Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Disorders affecting amino acid metabolism. The majority of these disorders are inherited and present in the neonatal period with metabolic disturbances (e.g., ACIDOSIS) and neurologic manifestations. They are present at birth, although they may not become symptomatic until later in life.Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in the metabolism of LIPIDS resulting from inborn genetic MUTATIONS that are heritable.Lipid A: Lipid A is the biologically active component of lipopolysaccharides. It shows strong endotoxic activity and exhibits immunogenic properties.Steroid Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in metabolic processing of STEROIDS resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Purine-Pyrimidine Metabolism, Inborn ErrorsLipid Metabolism Disorders: Pathological conditions resulting from abnormal anabolism or catabolism of lipids in the body.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn ErrorsEnergy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.TriglyceridesUrea Cycle Disorders, Inborn: Rare congenital metabolism disorders of the urea cycle. The disorders are due to mutations that result in complete (neonatal onset) or partial (childhood or adult onset) inactivity of an enzyme, involved in the urea cycle. Neonatal onset results in clinical features that include irritability, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, NEONATAL HYPOTONIA; RESPIRATORY ALKALOSIS; HYPERAMMONEMIA; coma, and death. Survivors of the neonatal onset and childhood/adult onset disorders share common risks for ENCEPHALOPATHIES, METABOLIC, INBORN; and RESPIRATORY ALKALOSIS due to HYPERAMMONEMIA.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn: Brain disorders resulting from inborn metabolic errors, primarily from enzymatic defects which lead to substrate accumulation, product reduction, or increase in toxic metabolites through alternate pathways. The majority of these conditions are familial, however spontaneous mutation may also occur in utero.Argininosuccinic Aciduria: Rare autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle which leads to the accumulation of argininosuccinic acid in body fluids and severe HYPERAMMONEMIA. Clinical features of the neonatal onset of the disorder include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, tachypnea, coma, and death. Later onset results in milder set of clinical features including vomiting, failure to thrive, irritability, behavioral problems, or psychomotor retardation. Mutations in the ARGININOSUCCINATE LYASE gene cause the disorder.Hyperammonemia: Elevated level of AMMONIA in the blood. It is a sign of defective CATABOLISM of AMINO ACIDS or ammonia to UREA.Lipid Peroxidation: Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.Phenylketonurias: A group of autosomal recessive disorders marked by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme PHENYLALANINE HYDROXYLASE or less frequently by reduced activity of DIHYDROPTERIDINE REDUCTASE (i.e., atypical phenylketonuria). Classical phenylketonuria is caused by a severe deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase and presents in infancy with developmental delay; SEIZURES; skin HYPOPIGMENTATION; ECZEMA; and demyelination in the central nervous system. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p952).Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome: An autosomal recessive disorder of CHOLESTEROL metabolism. It is caused by a deficiency of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, the enzyme that converts 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol, leading to an abnormally low plasma cholesterol. This syndrome is characterized by multiple CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES, growth deficiency, and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Carnitine: A constituent of STRIATED MUSCLE and LIVER. It is an amino acid derivative and an essential cofactor for fatty acid metabolism.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Homogentisate 1,2-Dioxygenase: A mononuclear Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase, this enzyme catalyzes the conversion of homogentisate to 4-maleylacetoacetate, the third step in the pathway for the catabolism of TYROSINE. Deficiency in the enzyme causes ALKAPTONURIA, an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by homogentisic aciduria, OCHRONOSIS and ARTHRITIS. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.5 and EC 1.99.2.5.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Lipid Peroxides: Peroxides produced in the presence of a free radical by the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell in the presence of molecular oxygen. The formation of lipid peroxides results in the destruction of the original lipid leading to the loss of integrity of the membranes. They therefore cause a variety of toxic effects in vivo and their formation is considered a pathological process in biological systems. Their formation can be inhibited by antioxidants, such as vitamin E, structural separation or low oxygen tension.Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Homocystinuria: Autosomal recessive inborn error of methionine metabolism usually caused by a deficiency of CYSTATHIONINE BETA-SYNTHASE and associated with elevations of homocysteine in plasma and urine. Clinical features include a tall slender habitus, SCOLIOSIS, arachnodactyly, MUSCLE WEAKNESS, genu varus, thin blond hair, malar flush, lens dislocations, an increased incidence of MENTAL RETARDATION, and a tendency to develop fibrosis of arteries, frequently complicated by CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS and MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p979)Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous: A clinical syndrome characterized by development, usually in infancy or childhood, of a chronic, often widespread candidiasis of skin, nails, and mucous membranes. It may be secondary to one of the immunodeficiency syndromes, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, or associated with defects in cell-mediated immunity, endocrine disorders, dental stomatitis, or malignancy.Pyruvate Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Hereditary disorders of pyruvate metabolism. They are difficult to diagnose and describe because pyruvate is a key intermediate in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Some inherited metabolic disorders may alter pyruvate metabolism indirectly. Disorders in pyruvate metabolism appear to lead to deficiencies in neurotransmitter synthesis and, consequently, to nervous system disorders.alpha-Galactosidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing alpha-D-galactose residues in alpha-galactosides including galactose oligosaccharides, galactomannans, and galactolipids.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Fabry Disease: An X-linked inherited metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of lysosomal ALPHA-GALACTOSIDASE A. It is characterized by intralysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and other GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS in blood vessels throughout the body leading to multi-system complications including renal, cardiac, cerebrovascular, and skin disorders.Fatty Acids, Nonesterified: FATTY ACIDS found in the plasma that are complexed with SERUM ALBUMIN for transport. These fatty acids are not in glycerol ester form.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Australian Capital Territory: A territory of Australia consisting of Canberra, the national capital and surrounding land. It lies geographically within NEW SOUTH WALES and was established by law in 1988.Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase Deficiency Disease: An inherited urea cycle disorder associated with deficiency of the enzyme ORNITHINE CARBAMOYLTRANSFERASE, transmitted as an X-linked trait and featuring elevations of amino acids and ammonia in the serum. Clinical features, which are more prominent in males, include seizures, behavioral alterations, episodic vomiting, lethargy, and coma. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp49-50)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Argininosuccinic Acid: This amino acid is formed during the urea cycle from citrulline, aspartate and ATP. This reaction is catalyzed by argininosuccinic acid synthetase.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase: A mitochondrial flavoprotein, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of 3-methylbutanoyl-CoA to 3-methylbut-2-enoyl-CoA using FAD as a cofactor. Defects in the enzyme, is associated with isovaleric acidemia (IVA).Hypophosphatasia: A genetic metabolic disorder resulting from serum and bone alkaline phosphatase deficiency leading to hypercalcemia, ethanolamine phosphatemia, and ethanolamine phosphaturia. Clinical manifestations include severe skeletal defects resembling vitamin D-resistant rickets, failure of the calvarium to calcify, dyspnea, cyanosis, vomiting, constipation, renal calcinosis, failure to thrive, disorders of movement, beading of the costochondral junction, and rachitic bone changes. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Methylmalonic Acid: A malonic acid derivative which is a vital intermediate in the metabolism of fat and protein. Abnormalities in methylmalonic acid metabolism lead to methylmalonic aciduria. This metabolic disease is attributed to a block in the enzymatic conversion of methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA.PPAR alpha: A nuclear transcription factor. Heterodimerization with RETINOID X RECEPTOR GAMMA is important to metabolism of LIPIDS. It is the target of FIBRATES to control HYPERLIPIDEMIAS.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Brain Diseases, Metabolic: Acquired or inborn metabolic diseases that produce brain dysfunction or damage. These include primary (i.e., disorders intrinsic to the brain) and secondary (i.e., extracranial) metabolic conditions that adversely affect cerebral function.Pentanoic AcidsMagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on carbon-carbon bonds. This enzyme group includes all the enzymes that introduce double bonds into substrates by direct dehydrogenation of carbon-carbon single bonds.Lipolysis: The metabolic process of breaking down LIPIDS to release FREE FATTY ACIDS, the major oxidative fuel for the body. Lipolysis may involve dietary lipids in the DIGESTIVE TRACT, circulating lipids in the BLOOD, and stored lipids in the ADIPOSE TISSUE or the LIVER. A number of enzymes are involved in such lipid hydrolysis, such as LIPASE and LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE from various tissues.Hydroxocobalamin: Injectable form of VITAMIN B 12 that has been used therapeutically to treat VITAMIN B 12 DEFICIENCY.Methylmalonyl-CoA Mutase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA by transfer of the carbonyl group. It requires a cobamide coenzyme. A block in this enzymatic conversion leads to the metabolic disease, methylmalonic aciduria. EC 5.4.99.2.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Metal Metabolism, Inborn ErrorsGene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: A sterol regulatory element binding protein that regulates expression of GENES involved in FATTY ACIDS metabolism and LIPOGENESIS. Two major isoforms of the protein exist due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Inherited abnormalities of fructose metabolism, which include three known autosomal recessive types: hepatic fructokinase deficiency (essential fructosuria), hereditary fructose intolerance, and hereditary fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency. Essential fructosuria is a benign asymptomatic metabolic disorder caused by deficiency in fructokinase, leading to decreased conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate and alimentary hyperfructosemia, but with no clinical dysfunction; may produce a false-positive diabetes test.Lipogenesis: De novo fat synthesis in the body. This includes the synthetic processes of FATTY ACIDS and subsequent TRIGLYCERIDES in the LIVER and the ADIPOSE TISSUE. Lipogenesis is regulated by numerous factors, including nutritional, hormonal, and genetic elements.GlutaratesPhenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Maple Syrup Urine Disease: An autosomal recessive inherited disorder with multiple forms of phenotypic expression, caused by a defect in the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain amino acids (AMINO ACIDS, BRANCHED-CHAIN). These metabolites accumulate in body fluids and render a "maple syrup" odor. The disease is divided into classic, intermediate, intermittent, and thiamine responsive subtypes. The classic form presents in the first week of life with ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, emesis, neonatal seizures, and hypertonia. The intermediate and intermittent forms present in childhood or later with acute episodes of ataxia and vomiting. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p936)Phosphatidylcholines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Mice, Inbred C57BLAmidinotransferases: Enzymes of a subclass of TRANSFERASES that catalyze the transfer of an amidino group from donor to acceptor. EC 2.1.4.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Porphyria, Erythropoietic: An autosomal recessive porphyria that is due to a deficiency of UROPORPHYRINOGEN III SYNTHASE in the BONE MARROW; also known as congenital erythropoietic porphyria. This disease is characterized by SPLENOMEGALY; ANEMIA; photosensitivity; cutaneous lesions; accumulation of hydroxymethylbilane; and increased excretion of UROPORPHYRINS and COPROPORPHYRINS.Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein enzyme that is responsible for the catabolism of LYSINE; HYDROXYLYSINE; and TRYPTOPHAN. It catalyzes the oxidation of GLUTARYL-CoA to crotonoyl-CoA using FAD as a cofactor. Glutaric aciduria type I is an inborn error of metabolism due to the deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase.Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear: Intracellular receptors that can be found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. They bind to extracellular signaling molecules that migrate through or are transported across the CELL MEMBRANE. Many members of this class of receptors occur in the cytoplasm and are transported to the CELL NUCLEUS upon ligand-binding where they signal via DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Also included in this category are receptors found on INTRACELLULAR MEMBRANES that act via mechanisms similar to CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Hyperargininemia: A rare autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle. It is caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme ARGINASE. Arginine is elevated in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and periodic HYPERAMMONEMIA may occur. Disease onset is usually in infancy or early childhood. Clinical manifestations include seizures, microcephaly, progressive mental impairment, hypotonia, ataxia, spastic diplegia, and quadriparesis. (From Hum Genet 1993 Mar;91(1):1-5; Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p51)Iron Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of iron in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing, & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Hyperlipidemias: Conditions with excess LIPIDS in the blood.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for medium-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Lipoprotein Lipase: An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. The enzyme hydrolyzes triacylglycerols in chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, and diacylglycerols. It occurs on capillary endothelial surfaces, especially in mammary, muscle, and adipose tissue. Genetic deficiency of the enzyme causes familial hyperlipoproteinemia Type I. (Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.34.Failure to Thrive: A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Orphan Nuclear Receptors: A broad category of receptor-like proteins that may play a role in transcriptional-regulation in the CELL NUCLEUS. Many of these proteins are similar in structure to known NUCLEAR RECEPTORS but appear to lack a functional ligand-binding domain, while in other cases the specific ligands have yet to be identified.Adipocytes: Cells in the body that store FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. WHITE ADIPOCYTES are the predominant type and found mostly in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue. BROWN ADIPOCYTES are thermogenic cells that can be found in newborns of some species and hibernating mammals.Long-Chain-3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase: An NAD-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase that has specificity for acyl chains containing 8 and 10 carbons.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Alkaptonuria: An inborn error of amino acid metabolism resulting from a defect in the enzyme HOMOGENTISATE 1,2-DIOXYGENASE, an enzyme involved in the breakdown of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. It is characterized by accumulation of HOMOGENTISIC ACID in the urine, OCHRONOSIS in various tissues, and ARTHRITIS.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Citrullinemia: A group of diseases related to a deficiency of the enzyme ARGININOSUCCINATE SYNTHASE which causes an elevation of serum levels of CITRULLINE. In neonates, clinical manifestations include lethargy, hypotonia, and SEIZURES. Milder forms also occur. Childhood and adult forms may present with recurrent episodes of intermittent weakness, lethargy, ATAXIA, behavioral changes, and DYSARTHRIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p49)Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Multiple Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency: An autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation, and branched chain amino acids (AMINO ACIDS, BRANCHED-CHAIN); LYSINE; and CHOLINE catabolism, that is due to defects in either subunit of ELECTRON TRANSFER FLAVOPROTEIN or its dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.5.5.1).Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Mucopolysaccharidoses: Group of lysosomal storage diseases each caused by an inherited deficiency of an enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The diseases are progressive and often display a wide spectrum of clinical severity within one enzyme deficiency.Hepatocytes: The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Lipase: An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. It is produced by glands on the tongue and by the pancreas and initiates the digestion of dietary fats. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.3.Cholesterol, HDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Membrane Microdomains: Detergent-insoluble CELL MEMBRANE components. They are enriched in SPHINGOLIPIDS and CHOLESTEROL and clustered with glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins.Tandem Mass Spectrometry: A mass spectrometry technique using two (MS/MS) or more mass analyzers. With two in tandem, the precursor ions are mass-selected by a first mass analyzer, and focused into a collision region where they are then fragmented into product ions which are then characterized by a second mass analyzer. A variety of techniques are used to separate the compounds, ionize them, and introduce them to the first mass analyzer. For example, for in GC-MS/MS, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY is involved in separating relatively small compounds by GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY prior to injecting them into an ionization chamber for the mass selection.Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Inborn errors of metabolism characterized by defects in specific lysosomal hydrolases and resulting in intracellular accumulation of unmetabolized substrates.Adenylosuccinate Lyase: An enzyme that, in the course of purine ribonucleotide biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of 5'-phosphoribosyl-4-(N-succinocarboxamide)-5-aminoimidazole to 5'-phosphoribosyl-4-carboxamide-5-aminoimidazole and the conversion of adenylosuccinic acid to AMP. EC 4.3.2.2.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Glycerol: A trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is an intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is used as a solvent, emollient, pharmaceutical agent, and sweetening agent.Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors: TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that are activated by ligands and heterodimerize with RETINOID X RECEPTORS and bind to peroxisome proliferator response elements in the promoter regions of target genes.Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency Disease: An inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficient enzyme activity in the PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX, resulting in deficiency of acetyl CoA and reduced synthesis of acetylcholine. Two clinical forms are recognized: neonatal and juvenile. The neonatal form is a relatively common cause of lactic acidosis in the first weeks of life and may also feature an erythematous rash. The juvenile form presents with lactic acidosis, alopecia, intermittent ATAXIA; SEIZURES; and an erythematous rash. (From J Inherit Metab Dis 1996;19(4):452-62) Autosomal recessive and X-linked forms are caused by mutations in the genes for the three different enzyme components of this multisubunit pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. One of the mutations at Xp22.2-p22.1 in the gene for the E1 alpha component of the complex leads to LEIGH DISEASE.Ornithine-Oxo-Acid Transaminase: A pyridoxal phosphate enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glutamate gamma-semialdehyde and an L-amino acid from L-ornithine and a 2-keto-acid. EC 2.6.1.13.Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins: Sterol regulatory element binding proteins are basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factors that bind the sterol regulatory element TCACNCCAC. They are synthesized as precursors that are threaded into the MEMBRANES of the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM.Microsomes, Liver: Closed vesicles of fragmented endoplasmic reticulum created when liver cells or tissue are disrupted by homogenization. They may be smooth or rough.Neuroaxonal Dystrophies: A nonspecific term referring both to the pathologic finding of swelling of distal portions of axons in the brain and to disorders which feature this finding. Neuroaxonal dystrophy is seen in various genetic diseases, vitamin deficiencies, and aging. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by arrested psychomotor development at 6 months to 2 years of age, ataxia, brain stem dysfunction, and quadriparesis. Juvenile and adult forms also occur. Pathologic findings include brain atrophy and widespread accumulation of axonal spheroids throughout the neuroaxis, peripheral nerves, and dental pulp. (From Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p927)Fatty Acids, Unsaturated: FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.Oleic Acid: An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Hyperoxaluria, Primary: A genetic disorder characterized by excretion of large amounts of OXALATES in urine; NEPHROLITHIASIS; NEPHROCALCINOSIS; early onset of RENAL FAILURE; and often a generalized deposit of CALCIUM OXALATE. There are subtypes classified by the enzyme defects in glyoxylate metabolism.Glycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Genetic Diseases, Inborn: Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero.Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System: A superfamily of hundreds of closely related HEMEPROTEINS found throughout the phylogenetic spectrum, from animals, plants, fungi, to bacteria. They include numerous complex monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES). In animals, these P-450 enzymes serve two major functions: (1) biosynthesis of steroids, fatty acids, and bile acids; (2) metabolism of endogenous and a wide variety of exogenous substrates, such as toxins and drugs (BIOTRANSFORMATION). They are classified, according to their sequence similarities rather than functions, into CYP gene families (>40% homology) and subfamilies (>59% homology). For example, enzymes from the CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 gene families are responsible for most drug metabolism.Cholesterol, LDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to low density lipoproteins (LDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Carbon Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Adipose Tissue, White: Fatty tissue composed of WHITE ADIPOCYTES and generally found directly under the skin (SUBCUTANEOUS FAT) and around the internal organs (ABDOMINAL FAT). It has less vascularization and less coloration than the BROWN FAT. White fat provides heat insulation, mechanical cushion, and source of energy.Hypolipidemic Agents: Substances that lower the levels of certain LIPIDS in the BLOOD. They are used to treat HYPERLIPIDEMIAS.Diet, Protein-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of protein. It is prescribed in some cases to slow the progression of renal failure. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Lipoproteins, VLDL: A class of lipoproteins of very light (0.93-1.006 g/ml) large size (30-80 nm) particles with a core composed mainly of TRIGLYCERIDES and a surface monolayer of PHOSPHOLIPIDS and CHOLESTEROL into which are imbedded the apolipoproteins B, E, and C. VLDL facilitates the transport of endogenously made triglycerides to extrahepatic tissues. As triglycerides and Apo C are removed, VLDL is converted to INTERMEDIATE-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, then to LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS from which cholesterol is delivered to the extrahepatic tissues.Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Apolipoproteins B: Major structural proteins of triacylglycerol-rich LIPOPROTEINS. There are two forms, apolipoprotein B-100 and apolipoprotein B-48, both derived from a single gene. ApoB-100 expressed in the liver is found in low-density lipoproteins (LIPOPROTEINS, LDL; LIPOPROTEINS, VLDL). ApoB-48 expressed in the intestine is found in CHYLOMICRONS. They are important in the biosynthesis, transport, and metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. Plasma Apo-B levels are high in atherosclerotic patients but non-detectable in ABETALIPOPROTEINEMIA.Biotransformation: The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors: Genetic defects in the selective or non-selective transport functions of the KIDNEY TUBULES.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Ornithine: An amino acid produced in the urea cycle by the splitting off of urea from arginine.Argininosuccinate Lyase: An enzyme of the urea cycle which splits argininosuccinate to fumarate plus arginine. Its absence leads to the metabolic disease ARGININOSUCCINIC ACIDURIA in man. EC 4.3.2.1.PPAR gamma: A nuclear transcription factor. Heterodimerization with RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA is important in regulation of GLUCOSE metabolism and CELL GROWTH PROCESSES. It is a target of THIAZOLIDINEDIONES for control of DIABETES MELLITUS.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Oleic Acids: A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Sterols: Steroids with a hydroxyl group at C-3 and most of the skeleton of cholestane. Additional carbon atoms may be present in the side chain. (IUPAC Steroid Nomenclature, 1987)Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Lipoproteins, LDL: A class of lipoproteins of small size (18-25 nm) and light (1.019-1.063 g/ml) particles with a core composed mainly of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and smaller amounts of TRIGLYCERIDES. The surface monolayer consists mostly of PHOSPHOLIPIDS, a single copy of APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100, and free cholesterol molecules. The main LDL function is to transport cholesterol and cholesterol esters to extrahepatic tissues.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Uroporphyrinogen III Synthetase: An enzyme that catalyzes the cyclization of hydroxymethylbilane to yield UROPORPHYRINOGEN III and water. It is the fourth enzyme in the 8-enzyme biosynthetic pathway of HEME, and is encoded by UROS gene. Mutations of UROS gene result in CONGENITAL ERYTHROPOIETIC PORPHYRIA.Oxidative Stress: A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Apolipoproteins: Protein components on the surface of LIPOPROTEINS. They form a layer surrounding the hydrophobic lipid core. There are several classes of apolipoproteins with each playing a different role in lipid transport and LIPID METABOLISM. These proteins are synthesized mainly in the LIVER and the INTESTINES.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Carnitine O-Palmitoyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA to palmitoylcarnitine in the inner mitochondrial membrane. EC 2.3.1.21.Sphingolipids: A class of membrane lipids that have a polar head and two nonpolar tails. They are composed of one molecule of the long-chain amino alcohol sphingosine (4-sphingenine) or one of its derivatives, one molecule of a long-chain acid, a polar head alcohol and sometimes phosphoric acid in diester linkage at the polar head group. (Lehninger et al, Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd ed)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Acyl-CoA Oxidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the first and rate-determining steps of peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids. It acts on COENZYME A derivatives of fatty acids with chain lengths from 8 to 18, using FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE as a cofactor.Critical Pathways: Schedules of medical and nursing procedures, including diagnostic tests, medications, and consultations designed to effect an efficient, coordinated program of treatment. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Acyl Coenzyme A: S-Acyl coenzyme A. Fatty acid coenzyme A derivatives that are involved in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids as well as in ceramide formation.Sterol Esterase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and some other sterol esters, to liberate cholesterol plus a fatty acid anion.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.DiglyceridesBlood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Apolipoprotein A-I: The most abundant protein component of HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS or HDL. This protein serves as an acceptor for CHOLESTEROL released from cells thus promoting efflux of cholesterol to HDL then to the LIVER for excretion from the body (reverse cholesterol transport). It also acts as a cofactor for LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE that forms CHOLESTEROL ESTERS on the HDL particles. Mutations of this gene APOA1 cause HDL deficiency, such as in FAMILIAL ALPHA LIPOPROTEIN DEFICIENCY DISEASE and in some patients with TANGIER DISEASE.Lipid Mobilization: LIPOLYSIS of stored LIPIDS in the ADIPOSE TISSUE to release FREE FATTY ACIDS. Mobilization of stored lipids is under the regulation of lipolytic signals (CATECHOLAMINES) or anti-lipolytic signals (INSULIN) via their actions on the hormone-sensitive LIPASE. This concept does not include lipid transport.Fatty Acid Synthases: Enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of FATTY ACIDS from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA derivatives.

*  Lipid metabolism - Inborn errorsLipid Metabolism - Inborn Errors R96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Lipid Metabolism - Inborn Errors R384 Predesigned 384-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Lipid metabolism, Inborn errors M96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Lipid metabolism, Inborn errors M384 Predesigned 384-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ...
bio-rad.com/en-us/prime-pcr-assays/pathway/nutritional-metabolic-diseases/lipid-metabolism-inborn-errors

*  Efficacy, Safety, Pharmacodynamic, and Pharmacokinetics Study of Olipudase Alfa in Patients With Acid Sphingomyelinase...

Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lipid Metabolism Disorders. Metabolic ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02004691?recr=Open&cond="Niemann-Pick Diseases"&rank=5

*  AAVRh.10 Administered to Children With Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipid Metabolism Disorders. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01414985?cond="congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis" OR "Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses"&rank=7

*  Lipoprotein Metabolism in Normal Volunteers and Patients With High Levels of Lipoproteins - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Dyslipidemias. Lipid Metabolism Disorders ... Human apolipoprotein A-I isoprotein metabolism: proapoA-I conversion to mature apoA-I. J Lipid Res. 1985 Feb;26(2):185-93. ... Apolipoprotein E metabolism in normolipoproteinemic human subjects. J Lipid Res. 1984 Nov;25(11):1167-76. ... Studies are designed to formulate metabolic pathways in patients with undefined genetic disorders of lipid metabolism as well ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00001154?term=Atherosclerosis OR arteriosclerosis OR hardening of the arteries&recr=Open&fund=01&rank=4

*  Miglustat in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Miglustat. 1-Deoxynojirimycin. Enzyme Inhibitors. ... Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lysosomal Storage Diseases. Metabolic Diseases. Lipid Metabolism Disorders. Sphingolipidoses. ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00517153?term=Niemann-Pick Disease&rank=6

*  Tolerability and Safety Study of Recombinant Human Acid Sphingomyelinase in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency Patients - Full...

Lipid Metabolism Disorders. Sphingolipidoses. Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell. Histiocytosis. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. ... The patient who is receiving lipid lowering therapy should be on a stable dose and regimen of lipid-lowering therapy(ies) for ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ... Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lysosomal Storage Diseases. Metabolic Diseases. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01722526?term=Niemann-Pick Disease&rank=5

*  Safety Study of a Gene Transfer Vector for Children With Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis - Full Text View -...

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipid Metabolism Disorders. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00151216?cond="late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis" OR "Jansky-Bielschowsky disease" OR "Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses"&rank=7

*  Mendelian Reverse Cholesterol Transport Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lecithin Acyltransferase Deficiency. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. ... Cholesterol, HDL Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors Tangier Disease LCAT Deficiency Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) ... Lipid Metabolism Disorders. Polyneuropathies. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System ... Use of lipid lowering drugs expected to affect RCT (e.g. fibrates) within the 6 weeks prior to dosing or during the study, as ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01782027?cond="Tangier disease"&rank=3

*  Resistance Exercise in Barth Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolic Diseases. ... Thus, as a secondary aim, we will examine the effect of RET on whole-body protein metabolism in BTHS. We aim to address these ... In addition, our preliminary data suggest there is impaired protein metabolism and skeletal muscle atrophy in BTHS. Typically, ... whole-body protein metabolism by stable-isotope tracer methodology and mass spectrometry, and quality of life will be measured ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01629459?term=child [AGE-GROUP] AND exercise [TREATMENT]&recr=Open&rank=17

*  A Safety and Efficacy Study of Fabrazyme® Replacement Therapy in Patients With Cardiac Fabry Disease - Full Text View -...

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lysosomal Storage Diseases. ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00140621?cond="Fabry disease"&rank=14

*  Open-Label Extension Study Evaluating Safety and Efficacy of HGT-1110 in Patients With Metachromatic Leukodystrophy - Full Text...

Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lysosomal Storage Diseases. ... Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited, autosomal recessive disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by deficient ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01887938?term=Metachromatic Leukodystrophy&rank=2

*  Physician Initiated Expanded Access Request for Migalastat in Individual Patients With Fabry Disease - Full Text View -...

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lipidoses. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Lysosomal Storage Diseases. ... Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain Diseases, Metabolic. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01476163

*  A Long-Term Study of Cholesterol Supplements for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Abnormalities, Multiple. Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. ... However, since these disorders are uncommon autosomal-recessively inherited inborn errors of metabolism, STAIR investigators ... Clinical and biochemical spectrum of patients with RSH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Am J Med ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01413425?term=autism, "eunice kennedy shriver national institute of child health and human development"&rank=11

*  Lipid Metabolism sub-cluster 62

Patients with inborn errors of long-chain fatty acid oxidation accumulate disease-specific acylcarnitines and triacylglycerols ... in regulating lipid droplet accumulation and protection to fatty acids in tissues with high lipid oxidative metabolism. Plin5 ... The rodent heart accumulates triglyceride and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either free ... Perilipin 5, a lipid droplet protein adapted to mitochondrial energy utilization. Kimmel Alan R AR aLaboratory of Cellular and ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/14/Lipid-Metabolism/sub-62.html

*  Carolina public health :: State Publications

Professor Rosalind Coleman, MD, stud-ies hepatic insulin resistance and inborn errors of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. ... Professor Rosalind Coleman, MD, stud-ies hepatic insulin resistance and inborn errors of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. ... "People who were heavier in the past - their blood pressure, lipids and glucose levels were slightly better or about the same as ... "People who were heavier in the past - their blood pressure, lipids and glucose levels were slightly better or about the same as ...
digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/p249901coll22/id/482911/rec/3

*  Perikabiven - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

In some patients this may indicate hepatic insufficiency or the presence of an inborn error of amino acid metabolism [see ... Impaired lipid metabolism with hypertriglyceridemia may occur in conditions such as inherited lipid disorders, obesity, ... Inborn error of amino acid metabolism. *Cardiopulmonary instability (including pulmonary edema, cardiac insufficiency, ... if blood is sampled before lipid has been cleared from the bloodstream. Lipids are normally cleared after a lipid-free interval ...
https://drugs.com/pro/perikabiven.html

*  Pediatric Endocrinology in Freiburg, Germany

Most pediatric endocrinologists have special skills in lipid metabolism, bone metabolism, inborn errors of metabolism or ... glucose metabolism, sex differentiation, the pituitary/hypothalamus, bone metabolism, mineral metabolism, the thyroid, the ...
https://health-tourism.com/pediatric-endocrinology/germany-c-freiburg/

*  Books by Subject - Lane Medical Library - Stanford University School of Medicine

... lessons from inborn errors of lipid metabolism -- HDL structure, function, and anti-inflammatory properties -- Human ... Effects of estrogen on HDL metabolism -- Effects of niacin on HDL metabolism -- Effects of statins on HDL metabolism -- ... Preβ1-HDL, a Native Lipid-poor HDL, and its Potential as a New Marker for HDL Metabolism / Takashi Miida, Satoshi Hirayama -- ... plasma lipids, and atherosclerosis -- Human cholesteryl ester transfer protein in human HDL metabolism -- The HDL receptor SR- ...
lane.stanford.edu/biomed-resources/ebsubjectbrowse.html?m=Cardiology&page=3&proxy-links=false

*  Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 2 Deficiency

Condition Summary: Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Long- ... CPT-II results from a mutation (error) in the CPT2 gene. People with CPT-II cannot use certain fats for energy. Normally, fats ... Neutral Lipid Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease ...
diseaseinfosearch.org/Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Deficiency Type 2/1110

*  Carnitine Deficiency

Condition Summary: Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Long- ... CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) II muscle deficiency is the most common form of muscle fatty acid metabolism disorders. In ... Neutral Lipid Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease ... it is clinically characterized by attacks of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis without persistent muscle weakness and lipid ...
diseaseinfosearch.org/Carnitine Deficiency/1108

*  Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism ppt BIOCHEMISTRY

Disorders of lipid metabolism ppt by Ahmed Al Sa'idi 10330 views * Inborn errors of lipid metabolism by Tapeshwar Yadav 3390 ... Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism ppt BIOCHEMISTRY * 1. DISORDERS OF LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM Dr Vijay Marakala ... 3. Hyperlipoproteinaemia CLASSIFICATION Primary Hyperlipoproteinaemia Genetic defect in metabolism and transport Secondary ... DISORDERS OF LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM Dr Vijay Marakala ... lipid storage diseases by dr. Mirza Muhamma... 11247 views * ...
https://slideshare.net/biochem/disorders-of-lipoprotein-metabolism-ppt-biochemistry

*  sphingolipidosis - meddic

LSD) Inborn error of lipid metabolism: lipid storage disorders (E75, 272.7-272.8) ... Sphingolipidoses are a class of lipid storage disorders relating to sphingolipid metabolism. The main members of this group are ... Journal of lipid research.J Lipid Res.2013 Mar 7. [Epub ahead of print] ... Lipid storage disorder. References. *^ a b c d If not otherwise specified, reference is: Marks, Dawn B.; Swanson, Todd; Sandra ...
meddic.jp/sphingolipidosis

*  Inborn errors of metabolism: Classification

The major classes of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) and the ... myopathies caused by disorders of lipid and purine metabolism. ... See 'Inborn errors of metabolism: Metabolic emergencies' and 'Inborn errors of metabolism: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and ... Inborn errors of metabolism: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features. *Inborn errors of metabolism: Identifying the ... See 'Inborn errors of metabolism: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features' and 'Inborn errors of metabolism: ...
uptodate.com/contents/inborn-errors-of-metabolism-classification

*  HHMI Scientists Search Results | Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Life-Threatening Infectious Diseases of Childhood: Single-Gene Inborn Errors of Immunity? The Rockefeller University New York, ... Disorders of Lipid Trafficking and Metabolism. The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX ... Life-Threatening Infectious Diseases of Childhood: Single-Gene Inborn Errors of Immunity? ...
hhmi.org/scientists/browse?kw=&sort_by=field_scientist_last_name&sort_order=ASC&field_scientific_disciplines%5B0%5D=20511&items_per_page=96&field_scientific_disciplines[0]=17695

*  Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Deficiency Publications and Abstracts | PubFacts.com

The lipid storage is usually due to an inborn error causing an enzyme absence /deficiency in the primary lipidoses and to a ... Lipid Metabolism Section, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch (L.A.F., S.J.D., S.M.G., B.L.V., R.D.S., A.T.R.), Systems Biology ... Tissue- and sex-specific effects of β-carotene 15,15' oxygenase (BCO1) on retinoid and lipid metabolism in adult and developing ... Lipidoses occur for an abnormal storage parenchymal deposition of lipids and products of their metabolism in large amounts or ...
https://pubfacts.com/search/Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Deficiency

*  Carnitine - What It Is, Uses, How It Works | Lifescript.com

In: Update 1993: inborn errors of metabolism in the patient with epilepsy. Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals; 1993. ... Zidovudine-induced mitochondrial myopathy is associated with muscle carnitine deficiency and lipid storage. Ann Neurol. 1994;35 ... Alterations in the carnitine metabolism in epileptic children treated with valproic acid. J Korean Med Sci. 1997;12:553-558. ... Levocarnitine administration in elderly subjects with rapid muscle fatigue: effect on body composition, lipid profile and ...
lifescript.com/health/centers/heart_attack/alternative_treatments/carnitine.aspx


Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease: The Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering inherited metabolic disorders. It was established in 1978 and is the official journal of the Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism.Lipotoxicity: Lipotoxicity is a metabolic syndrome that results from the accumulation of lipid intermediates in non-adipose tissue, leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The tissues normally affected include the kidneys, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.Lipid droplet: Lipid droplets, also referred to as lipid bodies, oil bodies or adiposomes, are lipid-rich cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids and are found largely in the adipose tissue.Mobilization and cellular uptake of stored fats and triacylglycerol (with Animation) They also serve as a reservoir for cholesterol and acyl-glycerols for membrane formation and maintenance.Lysinuric protein intoleranceNeutral lipid storage disease: Neutral lipid storage disease (also known as Chanarin–Dorfman syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by accumulation of triglycerides in the cytoplasm of leukocytes, muscle, liver, fibroblasts, and other tissues.Freedberg, et al.UDP-3-O-(3-hydroxymyristoyl)glucosamine N-acyltransferase: UDP-3-O-(3-hydroxymyristoyl)glucosamine N-acyltransferase (, UDP-3-O-acyl-glucosamine N-acyltransferase, UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-glucosamine N-acyltransferase, acyltransferase LpxD, acyl-ACP:UDP-3-O-(3-hydroxyacyl)-GlcN N-acyltransferase, firA (gene), lpxD (gene)) is an enzyme with system name (3R)-3-hydroxymyristoyl-(acyl-carrier protein):UDP-3-O-((3R)-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-alpha-D-glucosamine N-acetyltransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionHypolipoproteinemiaLiver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GIIndex of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.Heptadecanoic acidModel lipid bilayer: A model lipid bilayer is any bilayer assembled in vitro, as opposed to the bilayer of natural cell membranes or covering various sub-cellular structures like the nucleus. A model bilayer can be made with either synthetic or natural lipids.TriglycerideCholesterolHyperammonemiaLipid peroxidationHyperphenylalaninemia: (also includes non-classic PKU)Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndromeGlucose transporterPhospholipidSilent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Systemic primary carnitine deficiencyAutorefractor: An autorefractor or automated refractor is a computer-controlled machine used during an eye examination to provide an objective measurement of a person's refractive error and prescription for glasses or contact lenses. This is achieved by measuring how light is changed as it enters a person's eye.Adipose tissue macrophages: Adipose tissue macrophages (abbr. ATMs) comprise tissue resident macrophages present in adipose tissue.Low-sulfur diet: A low-sulfur diet is a diet with reduced sulfur content. Sulfur containing compounds may also be referred to as thiols or mercaptans.Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasisBeano (dietary supplement): Beano is an enzyme-based dietary supplement that is used to reduce gas in the digestive tract, thereby improving digestion and reducing bloating, discomfort, and flatulence caused by gas. It contains the enzyme alpha-galactosidase.Coles PhillipsFabry disease: (ILDS E75.25)Flux (metabolism): Flux, or metabolic flux is the rate of turnover of molecules through a metabolic pathway. Flux is regulated by the enzymes involved in a pathway.Giralang, Australian Capital TerritoryOrnithine transcarbamylase: Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) (also called ornithine carbamoyltransferase) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reaction between carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and ornithine (Orn) to form citrulline (Cit) and phosphate (Pi). In plants and microbes, OTC is involved in arginine (Arg) biosynthesis, whereas in mammals it is located in the mitochondria and is part of the urea cycle.Matrix model: == Mathematics and physics ==Argininosuccinic acidTable of standard reduction potentials for half-reactions important in biochemistry: The values below are standard reduction potentials for half-reactions measured at 25°C, 1 atmosphere and a pH of 7 in aqueous solution.Insulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.HypophosphatasiaBlood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.Animal fatMethylmalonic acidVery low-density lipoprotein: Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is a type of lipoprotein made by the liver. VLDL is one of the five major groups of lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL, low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein) that enable fats and cholesterol to move within the water-based solution of the bloodstream.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingPrescription cascade: Prescription cascade refers to the process whereby the side effects of drugs are misdiagnosed as symptoms of another problem resulting in further prescriptions and further side effects and unanticipated drug interactions. This may lead to further misdiagnoses and further symptoms.Isovaleric acidemiaSpin–lattice relaxation in the rotating frame: Spin–lattice relaxation in the rotating frame is the mechanism by which Mxy, the transverse component of the magnetization vector, exponentially decays towards its equilibrium value of zero, under the influence of a radio frequency (RF) field in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is characterized by the spin–lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame, T1ρ.Lipolysis: Lipolysis is the breakdown of lipids and involves hydrolysis of triglycerides into glycerol and free fatty acids. The following hormones induce lipolysis: epinephrine, norepinephrine, ghrelin, growth hormone, testosterone, and cortisol.HydroxocobalaminMethylmalonyl-CoAList of MeSH codes (D12.776.930): This is a sub-part (transcription factors only) of List of MeSH codes (D12.776), itself a part of the list of the "D" codes for MeSH.Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.SotolonEgg lecithinAtomic mass: right |thumb|200px|Stylized [[lithium-7 atom: 3 protons, 4 neutrons, & 3 electrons (total electrons are ~1/4300th of the mass of the nucleus). It has a mass of 7.Arginine:glycine amidinotransferaseGene signature: A gene signature is a group of genes in a cell whose combined expression patternItadani H, Mizuarai S, Kotani H. Can systems biology understand pathway activation?Erythropoietic porphyriaGlutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase: Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) is an enzyme encoded by the GCDH gene on chromosome 19. The protein belongs to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family (ACD).Orphan receptor: An orphan receptor is an apparent receptor that has a similar structure to other identified receptors but whose endogenous ligand has not yet been identified. If a ligand for an orphan receptor is later discovered, the receptor is referred to as an "adopted orphan".Mature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Argininemia: Argininemia, also called arginase deficiency, is an autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme arginase causes a buildup of arginine and ammonia in the blood.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiencyBile acid malabsorptionLipoprotein lipase: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) () is a member of the lipase gene family, which includes pancreatic lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase. It is a water-soluble enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides in lipoproteins, such as those found in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), into two free fatty acids and one monoacylglycerol molecule.Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.Fatty liverGas chromatography–mass spectrometry: right|300 px|Example of a GC-MS instrument|thumb

(1/298) Extremely low values of serum leptin in children with congenital generalized lipoatrophy.

Congenital generalized lipoatrophy (CGL) is a syndrome with multiple clinical manifestations and complete atrophy of adipose tissue. The exact mechanism of this disease remains unknown. One hypothesis presupposes an abnormal development of adipocytes. Leptin, the adipocyte-specific product of the ob gene, acts as a regulatory factor of body weight. In children, as in adults, leptin levels are correlated with body mass index (BMI) and body fat mass. Some authors have demonstrated that adults with congenital or acquired generalized lipoatrophy have decreased leptin concentrations. In order to study serum leptin profile during childhood in this disease, we measured serum leptin concentrations in six children aged 5.5-11 years suffering from CGL, and investigated the relationship between metabolic parameters and the variations in leptin levels. Serum leptin concentrations (1.19+/-0.32 ng/ml (+/- S.D.)) were extremely low compared with those observed in normal children. No significant correlation was found with BMI, which is known to be one of the major determinants of serum leptin. Serum leptin values were significantly correlated with fasting insulin levels (r=0.83, P=0.024). In conclusion, extremely low leptin values measured in children with CGL could be regarded as one among other diagnostic parameters. However, the detectable levels observed in all of these children support the evidence that a small amount of body fat is likely to be present in these patients, despite complete subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Our data suggest that this small amount of adipose tissue could be metabolically active and, at least in part, sensitive to insulin. Further investigations are required to uncover the pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome, known to be commonly associated with insulin resistance.  (+info)

(2/298) Outcome of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency after diagnosis.

BACKGROUND: Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most common inborn error of fatty acid metabolism. Undiagnosed, it has a mortality rate of 20-25%. Neonatal screening for the disorder is now possible but it is not known whether this would alter the prognosis. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the outcome of MCAD deficiency after the diagnosis has been established. METHOD: All patients with a proved diagnosis of MCAD deficiency attending one centre in a four year period were reviewed. RESULTS: Forty one patients were identified. Follow up was for a median of 6.7 years (range, 9 months to 14 years). Nearly half of the patients were admitted to hospital with symptoms characteristic of MCAD deficiency before the correct diagnosis was made. After diagnosis, two patients were admitted to hospital with severe encephalopathy but there were no additional deaths or appreciable morbidity. There was a high incidence (about one fifth) of previous sibling deaths among the cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Undiagnosed, MCAD deficiency results in considerable mortality and morbidity. However, current management improves outcome, supporting the view that the disorder should be included in newborn screening programmes.  (+info)

(3/298) Dietary management of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHADD). A case report and survey.

Current dietary management of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD; long-chain-(S)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA:NAD+ oxido-reductase, EC 1.1.1.211) deficiency (LCHADD) is based on avoiding fasting, and minimizing energy production from long-chain fatty acids. We report the effects of various dietary manipulations on plasma and urinary laboratory values in a child with LCHADD. In our patient, a diet restricted to 9% of total energy from long-chain fatty acids and administration of 1.5 g medium-chain triglyceride oil per kg body weight normalized plasma acylcarnitine and lactate levels, but dicarboxylic acid excretion remained approximately ten times normal. Plasma docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) was consistently low over a 2-year period; DHA deficiency may be related to the development of pigmentary retinopathy seen in this patient population. We also conducted a survey of metabolic physicians who treat children with LCHADD to determine current dietary interventions employed and the effects of these interventions on symptoms of this disease. Survey results indicate that a diet low in long-chain fatty acids, supplemented with medium-chain triclyceride oil, decreased the incidence of hypoketotic hypoglycaemia, and improved hypotonia, hepatomegaly, cardiomyopathy, and lactic acidosis. However, dietary treatment did not appear to effect peripheral neuropathy, pigmentary retinopathy or myoglobinuria.  (+info)

(4/298) A fetal fatty-acid oxidation disorder as a cause of liver disease in pregnant women.

BACKGROUND: Acute fatty liver of pregnancy and the HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver-enzyme levels, and a low platelet count) are serious hepatic disorders that may occur during pregnancy in women whose fetuses are later found to have a deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase. This enzyme resides in the mitochondrial trifunctional protein, which also contains the active site of long-chain 2,3-enoyl-CoA hydratase and long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. We undertook this study to determine the relation between mutations in the trifunctional protein in infants with defects in fatty-acid oxidation and acute liver disease during pregnancy in their mothers. METHODS: In 24 children with 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, we used DNA amplification and nucleotide-sequence analyses to identify mutations in the alpha subunit of the trifunctional protein. We then correlated the results with the presence of liver disease during pregnancy in the mothers. RESULTS: Nineteen children had a deficiency only of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and presented with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and fatty liver. In eight children, we identified a homozygous mutation in which glutamic acid at residue 474 was changed to glutamine. Eleven other children were compound heterozygotes, with this mutation in one allele of the alpha-subunit gene and a different mutation in the other allele. While carrying fetuses with the Glu474Gln mutation, 79 percent of the heterozygous mothers had fatty liver of pregnancy or the HELLP syndrome. Five other children, who presented with neonatal dilated cardiomyopathy or progressive neuromyopathy, had complete deficiency of the trifunctional protein (loss of activity of all three enzymes). None had the Glu474Gln mutation, and none of their mothers had liver disease during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Women with acute liver disease during pregnancy may have a Glu474Gln mutation in long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Their infants are at risk for hypoketotic hypoglycemia and fatty liver.  (+info)

(5/298) Mobilisation of triacylglycerol stores.

Triacylglycerol (TAG) is an energy dense substance which is stored by several body tissues, principally adipose tissue and the liver. Utilisation of stored TAG as an energy source requires its mobilisation from these depots and transfer into the blood plasma. The means by which TAG is mobilised differs in adipose tissue and liver although the regulation of lipid metabolism in each of these organs is interdependent and synchronised in an integrated manner. This review deals principally with the mechanism of hepatic TAG mobilisation since this is a rapidly expanding area of research and may have important implications for the regulation of plasma very-low-density lipoprotein metabolism. TAG mobilisation plays an important role in fuel selection in non-hepatic tissues such as cardiac muscle and pancreatic islets and these aspects are also reviewed briefly. Finally, studies of certain rare inherited disorders of neutral lipid storage and mobilisation may provide useful information about the normal enzymology of TAG mobilisation in healthy tissues.  (+info)

(6/298) Improved stable isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for serum or plasma free 3-hydroxy-fatty acids and its utility for the study of disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation.

BACKGROUND: Disorders of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are difficult to diagnose, primarily because in many of the FAO disorders measurable biochemical intermediates accumulate in body fluids only during acute illness. Increased concentrations of 3-hydroxy-fatty acids (3-OH-FAs) in the blood are indicative of FAO disorders of the long- and short-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, LCHAD and SCHAD. We describe a serum/plasma assay for the measurement of 3-OH-FAs with carbon chain lengths from C(6) to C(16). METHODS: We used stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Natural and isotope-labeled compounds were synthesized for the assay. RESULTS: The assay was linear from 0.2 to 50 micromol/L for all six 3-OH-FAs. CVs were 5-15% at concentrations near the upper limits seen in healthy subjects. In 43 subjects, the medians (and ranges) in micromol/L were as follows: 3-OH-C(6), 0.8 (0.3-2.2); 3-OH-C(8), 0.4 (0.2-1.0); 3-OH-C(10), 0.3 (0.2-0.6); 3-OH-C(12), 0.3 (0.2-0.6); 3-OH-C(14), 0.2 (0.0-0.4); and 3-OH-C(16), 0.2 (0.0-0.5). 3-OH-FAs were increased in infants receiving formula containing medium chain triglycerides. Two patients diagnosed with LCHAD deficiency showed marked increases in 3-OH-C(14) and 3-OH-C(16) concentrations. Two patients diagnosed with SCHAD deficiency showed increased shorter chain 3-OH-FAs but no increases in 3-OH-C(14) to 3-OH-C(16). CONCLUSION: Measuring blood concentrations of the 3-OH-FAs with this assay may be a valuable tool for helping to rapidly identify deficiencies in LCHAD and SCHAD and may also provide useful information about the status of the FAO pathway.  (+info)

(7/298) Twenty novel mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A gene causing Fabry disease.

BACKGROUND: Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from the deficient activity of the lysosomal exoglycohydrolase alpha-galactosidase A (EC 3.2.1.22; alpha-Gal A). The nature of the molecular lesions in the alpha-Gal A gene in 30 unrelated families was determined to provide precise heterozygote detection, prenatal diagnosis, and define genotype-phenotype correlations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected males and/or carrier females from 30 unrelated families with Fabry disease. The entire alpha-Gal A coding region and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed by PCR amplification and automated sequencing. RESULTS: Twenty new mutations were identified, each in a single family: C142R, G183D, S235C, W236L, D244H, P259L, M267I, I289F, Q321E, C378Y, C52X, W277X, IVS4(+4), IVS6(+2), IVS6(-1), 35del13, 256del1, 892ins1, 1176del4, and 1188del1. In the remaining 10 unrelated Fabry families, 9 previously reported mutations were detected: M42V, R112C, S148R, D165V, N215S (in 2 families), Q99X, C142X, R227X, and 1072del3. Haplotype analysis using markers closely flanking the alpha-Gal A gene indicated that the two patients with the N215S lesion were unrelated. The IVS4(+4) mutation was a rare intronic splice site mutation that causes Fabry disease. CONCLUSIONS: These studies further define the heterogeneity of mutations in the alpha-Gal A gene causing Fabry disease, permit precise heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis, and help delineate phenotype-genotype correlations in this disease. +info)

(8/298) Unique electroencephalographic change of acute encephalopathy in glutaric aciduria type 1.

We report the peculiar serial electroencephalographic (EEG) findings in a 7-year-old boy with glutaric aciduria type 1 during an episode of acute encephalopathy. The patient developed Reye-like syndrome triggered by cellulitis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse softening of cerebral hemisphere. The EEG on the day following onset of acute encephalopathy showed suppression burst pattern including continuous 14-15 Hz rhythmic waves at first. Then, periodic synchronous discharge appeared and lasted for about 40 minutes. Periodic synchronous discharge finally disappeared and nearly total electrocerebral silence continued. There have been no reports indicating such a change of EEG in a short period. The serial EEG changes probably reflect the process of electrical death of neurons in cerebral hemispheres.  (+info)



lipoproteins


  • We propose to investigate human in vivo lipoprotein metabolism using radiolabeled apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Paired kinetic studies using dual-labeled iodinated lipoproteins and apolipoproteins are performed in healthy volunteer controls with normal lipids and subjects with dyslipidemia under controlled metabolic conditions. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of radiolabeled particulate cholesterol administered intravenously in association with albumin, as a method to study reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in people carrying mutations in genes known to affect high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism by analyzing changes in the tracer activity in total plasma, lipoproteins fractions and feces. (clinicaltrials.gov)

healthy


  • Studies are designed to formulate metabolic pathways in patients with undefined genetic disorders of lipid metabolism as well as in healthy volunteers to provide original insights into normal and pathologic metabolic pathways. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Subjects carrying mutations in genes known to affect HDL metabolism and healthy controls will be enrolled in the study. (clinicaltrials.gov)

plasma


  • Preterm infants and low birth weight infants have poor clearance of intravenous lipid emulsion and increased free fatty acid plasma levels following lipid emulsion infusion. (drugs.com)

study


  • In this study, the antiradical activities and phenolic, phytosterol, lipid-soluble vitamin and fatty acid contents of firethorn fruits were investigated. (biomedsearch.com)

results


  • Mutations in some of the genes affecting HDL metabolism, may results in changes in RCT. (clinicaltrials.gov)

activity


  • Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited, autosomal recessive disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase A (ASA). (clinicaltrials.gov)

role


  • CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. (biomedsearch.com)

medical


  • Deaths in preterm infants after infusion of intravenous lipid emulsions have been reported in the medical literature. (drugs.com)