Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Markov Chains: A stochastic process such that the conditional probability distribution for a state at any future instant, given the present state, is unaffected by any additional knowledge of the past history of the system.Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Gross Domestic Product: Value of all final goods and services produced in a country in one year.Decision Support Techniques: Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.United StatesDisabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Set (Psychology): Readiness to think or respond in a predetermined way when confronted with a problem or stimulus situation.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Political Systems: The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Economics: The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Housing for the Elderly: Housing arrangements for the elderly or aged, intended to foster independent living. The housing may take the form of group homes or small apartments. It is available to the economically self-supporting but the concept includes housing for the elderly with some physical limitations. The concept should be differentiated from HOMES FOR THE AGED which is restricted to long-term geriatric facilities providing supervised medical and nursing services.Europe, EasternFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Asia, Central: The geographical area of Asia comprising KAZAKHSTAN; KYRGYZSTAN; TAJIKISTAN; TURKMENISTAN; and UZBEKISTAN. The desert region of Kara Kum (Qara Qum) is largely in Turkmenistan and the desert region of Kyzyl Kum (Kizil Kum or Qizil Qum), is in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p233, 590, 636)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Commonwealth of Independent StatesIncome: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.EuropeHealth Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Mortality, Premature: Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.JapanRisk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Germany, EastCardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Germany, WestModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Decision Trees: A graphic device used in decision analysis, series of decision options are represented as branches (hierarchical).Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Great BritainBirth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Respiratory Tract NeoplasmsLithuaniaChronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.

*  Life expectancy in Norway - NIPH

... life expectancy was approximately 84 years for women and 80 years for men. There are large county and municipality differences ... Life expectancy is higher for women than for men. In 2015, life expectancy in Norway was almost four years higher for women ... Life expectancy in Norway In 2015, life expectancy was approximately 84 years for women and 80 years for men. There are large ... Growth in life expectancy was highest between 1920 and 1950. We then had a period of 20-30 years in which male life expectancy ...
https://fhi.no/en/op/public-health-report-2014/befolkning-og-levealder/levealderen-i-norge/

*  Project MUSE - Forecasting China's Mortality

China's life expectancy at birth is currently being debated; the 2010 census data may exaggerate the figure and its rate of ... We find that the annual increase in life expectancy from 2000 to 2030 is predicted to be 0.18 years for males, and 0.23 years ... 1990 and 2000 censuses to forecast the mortality pattern and life expectancy for the 2000 to 2030 period. ...
muse.jhu.edu/article/524285

*  Pancreatic Cancer: Prognosis and Life Expectancy

The prognosis and life expectancy for people with pancreatic cancer depends a great deal on the stage. Understand the stages, ... Pancreatic Cancer: How Staging Works Treatment, prognosis, life expectancy. Often times, they all depend on a cancer's stage. ... Your doctor can help you make sure you're doing all you can to improve your outlook and live a healthy life. Not only will you ...
healthline.com/health/pancreatic-cancer/prognosis-life-expectancy

*  Life Expectancy and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Yet, with treatment, quality of life can improve. ... Life Expectancy. Life expectancy is shorter among patients with ... Rheumatoid arthritis can affect someone's life expectancy, especially with other medical conditions. ... Life Expectancy and Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Complications Can Affect Mortality By Carol Eustice ... It can be concluded that life expectancy is shortened for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Yet, it has also been proven that ...
https://verywell.com/life-expectancy-and-rheumatoid-arthritis-188238

*  Reptile and Amphibian Study - MeritBadgeDotOrg

caretaker, what this species eats and what are its native habitat and home range, preferred climate, average life expectancy, ... average life expectancy, and natural predators. Also identify any human caused threats to its population and any laws that ... understanding the life cycle of a reptile or amphibian and keeping one as a pet can be a good introduction to natural history; ... understanding the life cycle of a reptile or amphibian and keeping one as a pet can be a good introduction to natural history; ...
meritbadge.org/wiki/index.php?title=Reptile_and_Amphibian_Study&diff=44075&oldid=4577

*  Dioxin-Like Chemical Messenger Makes Brain Tumors More Aggressive - Redorbit

About 75 percent of such tumors are considered particularly aggressive with an average life expectancy of eight months to two ...
redorbit.com/news/health/1112396442/dioxin-like-chemical-messenger-makes-brain-tumors-more-aggressive/

*  Sedentary behaviour and life expectancy in the USA: a cause-deleted life table analysis | BMJ Open

The difference between the current life expectancy and the cause-deleted life expectancy represents the estimated gain in life ... Current life expectancy in the USA (2009) is 78.5 years.14 The effects of sedentary behaviour on life expectancy reported in ... The promise of prevention: the effects of four preventable risk factors on national life expectancy and life expectancy ... To cite: Katzmarzyk PT, Lee I-M. Sedentary behaviour and life expectancy in the USA: a cause-deleted life table analysis. BMJ ...
bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/4/e000828

*  Patau Syndrome - Pictures, Symptoms, Treatment, Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy, Diagnosis, Facts, Pictures. This is a condition that is less common compared to all trisomies. ... Life expectancy. As mentioned above, the condition's prognosis is poor, as this would generate for the affected to a high ... Tags: Causes, Diagnosis, Facts, Images, Life expectancy, Patau Syndrome, Photos, Pictures, Symptoms, Treatment. ... The expected life for the child with Patau syndrome is 2.5 days. This is such a small number and a tragic result from the ...
syndrome.org/patau-syndrome/

*  QuickStats: Life Expectancy at Birth, by Race and Sex --- United States, 2000--2009

Life Expectancy at Birth, by Race and Sex --- United States, 2000--2009*. * Based on preliminary data. Life expectancy for 2000 ... The figure above shows life expectancy at birth, by race and sex in the United States during 2000-2009. Life expectancy at ... During this period, life expectancy increased most for black males (2.7 years) and black females (2.3 years) but also for white ... During this period, life expectancy increased most for black males (2.7 years) and black females (2.3 years), but also for ...
https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6018a5.htm?s_cid=mm6018a5_w

*  Estimating standard errors for life expectancies based on complex survey data with mortality follow-up: A case study using the...

This paper presents a case study of approaches to variance estimation for life expectancies based on life tables, using the ... Life expectancy is an important measure for health research and policymaking. Linking individual survey records to mortality ... Aïda Solé-Auró, Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, Eileen M. Crimmins, Are Differences in Disability-Free Life Expectancy by Gender, Race, ... Estimating standard errors for life expectancies based on complex survey data with mortality follow-up: A case study using the ...
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*  Life Expectancy - Crohn's Disease - HealingWell.com Forum

What I read back then was life expectancy was about 2 years. My Dr. at the time said this to my parents. it would be a life ... Get off the life expectancy gig. That can be a mental self fulfilling exercise. yeah, Crohns is a pain, but getting your head ... Our life expectancy with Crohn's is no different than the normal population.. If you're thinking of the risk of colon cancer, ... I believe after looking our life expectancy is one year fewer than average.. Some mornings I wake up and just feel like a Greek ...
healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=17&m=2518944

*  U.S. Life Expectancy Lowered By Poor Health Care - Redorbit

The life expectancy for 45-year-old American males dropped from third in 1975 to 12th in 2005, but according to an October 7 ... U.S. Life Expectancy Lowered By Poor Health Care. by Sam Savage ... from Columbia University have found that the life expectancy of ... are likely playing a large role in this relatively poor performance on improvements in life expectancy," he added. ...
redorbit.com/news/health/1928520/us_life_expectancy_lowered_by_poor_health_care/

*  How long is the human life span? | Reference.com

... the average life expectancy for everyone in the world is 66.26 years. Life expectancy varies somewhat by sex, with most men ... According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average life expectancy for everyone in the world is 66.26 years. Life expectancy ... The country with the lowest expected life span is Swaziland, South Africa, where average life expectancy is just 39.6 years. ... What is the life span of vascular dementia?. A: According to the Alzheimer's Society, the average life span for a patient with ...
https://reference.com/science/long-human-life-span-14db496194e5a65a

*  Local Life Expectancies (Population) | Walkerte...

Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar ... life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999. This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within ... www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us- ... We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures ...
scoop.it/t/walkerteach-geo/p/3137716339/2012/10/30/local-life-expectancies-population

*  Period Life Expectancy

a The period life expectancy at a given age for a given year is the average number of years of life remaining if a group of ... were to experience the mortality rates for that year over the course of their remaining lives.. b Estimated.. ...
https://ssa.gov/OACT/tr/2012/lr5a3.html

*  CANCER

Not only do these "rational," target-directed approaches not increase life expectancy in most cancer patients, they cause ... The very toxic therapies that assault tumors and help save lives put patients at risk of new problems down the road, including ... Until recently, researchers and clinicians had one goal: saving more lives. With improved survival rates, however, cancer ... "The Architecture of Life." Scientific American, January, pp48-57, 1998, or Maniotis, A., Chen, C., Ingber, D. Demonstration of ...
https://andrewmaniotis.wordpress.com/cancer-2/

*  Growing Gap in Life Expectancies Of Blacks and Whites Is Emerging - NYTimes.com

... the gap in life expectancy between blacks and whites has grown for three years in a row, Federal health experts say, and most ... As medicine and public health practices improved, the life expectancy for both races had improved. Life expectancy sometimes ... Growing Gap in Life Expectancies Of Blacks and Whites Is Emerging. By PHILIP J. HILTS, Special to The New York Times Published ... Life expectancy statistics are a good measure of both overall health and death rates because they are taken from a complete ...
nytimes.com/1989/10/09/us/growing-gap-in-life-expectancies-of-blacks-and-whites-is-emerging.html?pagewanted=2&src=pm

*  Economic Growth And Life Expectancy: The Case Of Iran

The results on this study show that economic growth has a positively significant effect on life expectancy in Iran during the ... To achieve the research objectives, annually data collected from World Bank Database and I used the life expectancy at birth ... this paper studies the effect of economic growth on life expectancy in Iran during 1966-2013. ... "Life expectancy and endogenous growth," Working Papers 97-23, FEDEA. *de la Croix, David & Licandro, Omar, 1997. "Life ...
https://ideas.repec.org/a/blg/journl/v11y2016i1p80-87.html

*  Have CHF, diabetes, COPD and kidney problem. Had water removed due to elephantitis. Life expectancy? - Doctor's insight on...

Life expectancy?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Copd, Ask a Nephrologist ... What do you think is life expectancy is? Surgery is too risky due to his age and condition. ... Life expectancy with copd and congestive heart failure. *Life expectancy with copd and kidney dialysis ...
healthcaremagic.com/questions/Have-CHF-diabetes-COPD-and-kidney-problem-Had-water-removed-due-to-elephantitis-Life-expectancy/335565

*  Obesity and Life Expectancy

Their rates of obesity are so high that we could easily lose five to ten years of life expectancy if their rates of obesity are ... That may not sound like a lot, but it's comparable to the reduced life expectancy from accidents, suicide and homicide combined ... Allison and his colleagues calculated that obesity currently reduces life expectancy by three to nine months for Americans as a ... Later this century, the effects of obesity could actually reduce life expectancy, reversing the long-term trend. Co-author Doug ...
https://voanews.com/a/a-13-2005-03-27-voa35-67524422/387020.html

*  Life Expectancy - Business Insider

The US Has A Staggering Gap Between Black And White Life Expectancy. *Lauren F Friedman and Katie Jennings ... Here's How Much 14 Everyday Life Factors Affect How Long You Live. *Michael Blastland and David Spiegelhalter, Slate ... A quiz told me these 7 small changes could add 12 years to my life. *Guia Marie Del Prado ... These 7 small changes could add 12 years to my life. *Guia Marie Del Prado ...
businessinsider.com/category/life-expectancy?page=2

*  Healthy Life Expectancy

Overall male and female Healthy Life Expectancy has, like life expectancy, demonstrated an overall upward trend. Healthy Life ... Although life expectancy (LE) and healthy life expectancy (HLE) have been increasing in Scotland in recent years, both tend to ... For both males and females in the most deprived communities there is a shorter healthy life expectancy at birth and a longer ... For females Healthy Life Expectancy increased from 65.9 years in 1980 to 70.8 years in 2008. ...
https://ageuk.org.uk/scotland/about-us/policy-and-parliament-/healthy-life-expectancy/

*  Life Expectancy? - Hepatitis C - MedHelp

Life Expectancy?. My fiance was diagnosed with end stage liver due to Hep c in April of 2008 has had esophagel varices banded ... Life expectancy in End Stage Liver Disease can be estimated by two methods. Child- Pugh Cirrhosis Score Meld score These are ... Life expectancy in End Stage Liver Disease can be estimated by two methods. Child- Pugh Cirrhosis Score Meld score These are ... The MELD score is intended to rank patients in respect to life expectancy. If you know his MELD score you should get some idea ...
medhelp.org/posts/Hepatitis-C/Life-Expectancy/show/859732

*  life expectancy - Pediatric Heart - MedHelp

I want to know, and cant find any information on what I can expect as far as life expectancy of this child with this severe and ... The doctor said not to expect a long life for the child. ... believing this little girl will live a long and productive life ...
medhelp.org/posts/Pediatric-Heart/life-expectancy-/show/988848

*  Lopinavir/r or Fosamprenavir/r Switch to Atazanavir/r or Darunavir/r - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Life expectancy , 6 months in the opinion of the investigator. *Pregnancy or breast feeding ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00756730?order=381

List of U.S. states by life expectancy: This article presents a list of United States states sorted by their life expectancy at birth and by race/ethnicity in every state where the population of that racial or ethnic group is sufficiently large for robust estimates. The data is taken from the Measure of America's third national human development report, The Measure of America 2013–2014 width="25%" align="center" |Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Disease burden: Disease burden is the impact of a health problem as measured by financial cost, mortality, morbidity, or other indicators. It is often quantified in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) or disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), both of which quantify the number of years lost due to disease (YLDs).Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) is a statistic used in cost-effectiveness analysis to summarise the cost-effectiveness of a health care intervention. It is defined by the difference in cost between two possible interventions, divided by the difference in their effect.Vladimir Andreevich Markov: Vladimir Andreevich Markov (; May 8, 1871 – January 18, 1897) was a Russian mathematician, known for proving the Markov brothers' inequality with his older brother Andrey Markov. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 25.Maximum life span: Maximum life span is a measure of the maximum amount of time one or more members of a population has been observed to survive between birth and death. The term can also denote an estimate of the maximum amount of time that a member of a given species could survive between life and death, provided circumstances that are optimal to their longevity.Value of control: The value of control is a quantitative measure of the value of controlling the outcome of an uncertainty variable. Decision analysis provides a means for calculating the value of both perfect and imperfect control.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Multiple disabilitiesTask switching (psychology): Task switching, or set-shifting, is an executive function and a kind of cognitive flexibility that involves the ability to shift attention between one task and another. This ability allows a person to rapidly and efficiently adapt to different situations.Vernacular Press Act: The Vernacular Press Act was passed in 1878 under the Governor Generalship and Viceroyalty of Lord Lytton, for better control of Indian language newspapers. The purpose of the Act was to control the printing and circulation of seditious material, specifically that which could produce disaffection against the British Government in India in the minds of the masses.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Vital statistics (government records): Vital statistics are statistics on live births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces. The most common way of collecting information on these events is through civil registration, an administrative system used by governments to record vital events which occur in their populations (see Box 1).Howard Phillips (politician)QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.McCloskey critique: The McCloskey critique refers to a critique of post-1940s "official modernist" methodology in economics, inherited from logical positivism in philosophy. The critique maintains that the methodology neglects how economics can be done, is done, and should be done to advance the subject.Anna Reid: Anna Reid (born 1965) is a journalist and author whose work focuses primarily on the history of Eastern Europe.MECACAR: Operation MECACAR (currently known as MECACAR New Millennium) is a multi-national immunization program launched in 1995 by the World Health Organization to coordinate polio vaccination efforts (currently it is also used to coordinated measles and rubella vaccination efforts). The name of the operation was derived from the names of the regions participating in the operation: Eastern Mediterranean, Caucasus, Central Asian Republics and Russia.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Cancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Penalized present value: The Penalized Present Value (PPV) is a method of Capital Budgeting under risk developed by Fernando Gómez-Bezares in the 1980s.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingFrance and the Commonwealth of Nations: Relations between France and the Commonwealth of Nations have undergone successive periods of change since the Commonwealth's creation.Circular flow of income: The circular flow of income or circular flow is a model of the economy in which the major exchanges are represented as flows of money, goods and services, etc. between economic agents.GA²LENRelative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Excessive alcohol intake is associated with an elevated risk of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), heart failure, some cancers, and accidental injury, and is a leading cause of preventable death in industrialized countries. However, extensive research has shown that moderate alcohol intake is associated with health benefits, including less cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and lower all-cause mortality.Cancer screeningBristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.Netherlands national rollball team: Vishwaraj JadejaNiigata UniversityGlobal Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Intershop: Intershop was a chain of government-run retail stores in the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) in which only hard currencies (and later Forum Checks) could be used to purchase high-quality goods. The East German mark was not accepted as payment.HeartScore: HeartScore is a cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management tool developed by the European Society of Cardiology, aimed at supporting clinicians in optimising individual cardiovascular risk reduction.West Germany at the 1976 Winter Paralympics: The West Germany competed at the 1976 Winter Paralympics in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden from February 21 to 28, 1976. The team finished first out of the sixteen competing nations in the medal table and won twenty eight medals: ten gold, twelve silver and six bronze.Inverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.Recursive partitioning: Recursive partitioning is a statistical method for multivariable analysis. Recursive partitioning creates a decision tree that strives to correctly classify members of the population by splitting it into sub-populations based on several dichotomous independent variables. The process is termed recursive because each sub-population may in turn be split an indefinite number of times until the splitting process terminates after a particular stopping criterion is reached.Homicide: Homicide occurs when one human being causes the death of another human being. Homicides can be divided into many overlapping types, including murder, manslaughter, justifiable homicide, killing in war, euthanasia, and execution, depending on the circumstances of the death.Morbidity and mortality conference: Morbidity and mortality}}National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Rafat Hussain: Rafat Hussain اردو: ڈاکٹر رفعت حسین is an Associate Professor in Health Management and Deputy Head of the School of Rural Medicine at the University of New England in Armidale, New South Wales, Australia.Drainage basins of Lithuania: There are six major drainage basins in Lithuania: the rivers Neman (Lithuanian:Nemunas), Lielupe, Venta, Daugava, Pregolya, and a strip along the Baltic where rivers flow directly into the sea.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Lucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}The Final Decision: The Final Decision is an episode from season 1 of the animated TV series X-Men Animated Series.Management of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Canadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.

(1/1743) The expiry date of man: a synthesis of evolutionary biology and public health.

In industrialised countries, mortality and morbidity are dominated by age related chronic degenerative diseases. The health and health care needs of future populations will be heavily determined by these conditions of old age. Two opposite scenarios of future morbidity exist: morbidity might decrease ("compress"), because life span is limited, and the incidence of disease is postponed. Or morbidity might increase ("expand"), because death is delayed more than disease incidence. Optimality theory in evolutionary biology explains senescence as a by product of an optimised life history. The theory clarifies how senescence is timed by the competing needs for reproduction and survival, and why this leads to a generalised deterioration of many functions at many levels. As death and disease are not independent, future morbidity will depend on duration and severity of the process of senescence, partly determined by health care, palliating the disease severity but increasing the disease duration by postponing death. Even if morbidity might be compressed, health care needs will surely expand.  (+info)

(2/1743) Prediction of life expectancy in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension. A retrospective nationwide survey from 1980-1990.

Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a progressive disease of unknown etiology usually followed by death within 5 years after diagnosis. Although heart-lung or lung transplantation is now offered to patients with advanced PPH, adequate criteria assessing an accurate prediction of life expectancy in PPH has been difficult to establish. The aims of this study were to identify the characteristic features associated with a poor prognosis in patients with PPH, and to attempt to establish an individual prognostic index that predicts with great accuracy survival or death of PPH after one year, thereby helping to define criteria for patient selection for transplantation. In 1991, a retrospective nation-wide survey on PPH was conducted in Japan, and the clinical and cardiorespiratory variables of 223 PPH cases (female; 144, male; 79) in the period from 1980-1990 were obtained. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PPA) was 57.5+/-17.2 mm Hg (mean+/-SD), and the overall median survival time was 32.5 months since the first diagnostic catheterization. The characteristic features of 61 patients who died within one year of catheterization (Nonsurvivors group) were compared to 141 patients who survived one year or more from the time of catheterization (Survivors group). Among several clinical and cardiorespiratory variables, heart rate, PPA, right atrial pressure (PRA), stroke volume index (SI), pulmonary vascular resistance, and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) were significantly different between the two groups. As the independent factors, PPA, PRA, SI, and PaCO2 were selected for the multiple logistic analysis. Using a 0.7 probability cut-point to separate Nonsurvivors from Survivors, 84.6% of Nonsurvivors and Survivors could be correctly predicted from this logistic regression equation. Predictive equations like the present preliminary one can be used in the future to better assess life expectancy in patients with PPH in whom transplantation will be considered.  (+info)

(3/1743) Lack of inhibitory effects of the Ju-myo protein on development of glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci in the male F344 rat liver.

The effects of the 77 kDa Ju-myo protein, isolated from Drosophila melanogaster, on the development of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci in the male F344 rat liver were evaluated using a medium-term bioassay system. No modifying potential was evident in terms of the numbers or areas of GST-P positive foci. Ju-myo protein did not exert any influence on cell proliferation, as reflected by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) or spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SAT) activity and BrdU labeling. These results demonstrated that Ju-myo protein is unlikely to have inhibitory or promoting effects on rat liver carcinogenesis.  (+info)

(4/1743) Impact of market value on human mate choice decisions.

Mate choice strategies are a process of negotiation in which individuals make bids that are constrained by their status in the market place. Humans provide an unusual perspective on this because we can measure their explicitly expressed preferences before they are forced to make any choices. We use advertisements placed in newspaper personal columns to examine, first, the extent to which evolutionary considerations affect the level of competition (or market value) during the reproductively active period of people's lives and, second, the extent to which market value influences individual's willingness to make strong demands of prospective mates. We show that female market value is determined principally by women's fecundity (and, to a lesser extent, reproductive value), while male market value is determined by men's earning potential and the risk of future pairbond termination (the conjoint probability that the male will either die or divorce his partner during the next 20 years). We then show that these selection preferences strongly influence the levels of demands that men and women make of prospective partners (although older males tend to overestimate their market value).  (+info)

(5/1743) Light on population health status.

A new approach to illustrating and analysing health status is presented which allows comparisons of various aspects of health in a population at different times and in different populations during given periods. Both quantitative and qualitative elements can be represented, the impact of interventions can be monitored, and the extent to which objectives are achieved can be assessed. The practical application of the approach is demonstrated with reference to the health profiles to Tunisia in 1966 and 1994.  (+info)

(6/1743) Health expectancy indicators.

An outline is presented of progress in the development of health expectancy indicators, which are growing in importance as a means of assessing the health status of populations and determining public health priorities.  (+info)

(7/1743) Survival of healthy older people.

The purpose of this study was to discover any relationships which might exist between measurable variables recorded when a healthy group of men and women, aged 70 years and over, were examined and their subsequent survival time. It was found that height, body weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, haemoglobin, hand grip power, cardiothoracic ratio, and pulse rate are of no predictive value in the estimation of survival time. Survival is not influenced by marital status or occupational class. For both sexes the degree of kyphosis and age are useful predictive criteria in respect of survival time. However, much research work requires to be done to explain why many people die at the time they do.  (+info)

(8/1743) Does over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy improve smokers' life expectancy?

OBJECTIVE: To determine the public health benefits of making nicotine replacement therapy available without prescription, in terms of number of quitters and life expectancy. DESIGN: A decision-analytic model was developed to compare the policy of over-the-counter (OTC) availability of nicotine replacement therapy with that of prescription ([symbol: see text]) availability for the adult smoking population in the United States. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Long-term (six-month) quit rates, life expectancy, and smoking attributable mortality (SAM) rates. RESULTS: OTC availability of nicotine replacement therapy would result in 91,151 additional successful quitters over a six-month period, and a cumulative total of approximately 1.7 million additional quitters over 25 years. All-cause SAM would decrease by 348 deaths per year and 2940 deaths per year at six months and five years, respectively. Relative to [symbol: see text] nicotine replacement therapy availability, OTC availability would result in an average gain in life expectancy across the entire adult smoking population of 0.196 years per smoker. In sensitivity analyses, the benefits of OTC availability were evident across a wide range of changes in baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with [symbol: see text] availability of nicotine replacement therapy, OTC availability would result in more successful quitters, fewer smoking-attributable deaths, and increased life expectancy for current smokers.  (+info)



birth


  • Primary outcome measure Life expectancy at birth. (bmj.com)
  • Life expectancy at birth increased gradually for white and black males and females from 2000 through 2009. (cdc.gov)
  • The figure above shows life expectancy at birth, by race and sex in the United States during 2000-2009. (cdc.gov)
  • To achieve the research objectives, annually data collected from World Bank Database and I used the life expectancy at birth and annually GDP growth rate to measure the research variables. (repec.org)

period


  • During this period, life expectancy increased most for black males (2.7 years) and black females (2.3 years) but also for white males (1.5 years) and white females (1.0 years). (cdc.gov)
  • The results on this study show that economic growth has a positively significant effect on life expectancy in Iran during the observation period. (repec.org)

years


  • In 2009, white females had the longest life expectancy (80.9 years), followed by black females (77.4 years), white males (76.2 years), and black males (70.9 years). (cdc.gov)