Correspondence as Topic: Communication between persons or between institutions or organizations by an exchange of letters. Its use in indexing and cataloging will generally figure in historical and biographical material.ReadingLetterPattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Vision Tests: A series of tests used to assess various functions of the eyes.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Reminder Systems: Systems used to prompt or aid the memory. The systems can be computerized reminders, color coding, telephone calls, or devices such as letters and postcards.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Field Dependence-Independence: The ability to respond to segments of the perceptual experience rather than to the whole.Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Copying Processes: Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.Amblyopia: A nonspecific term referring to impaired vision. Major subcategories include stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia and toxic amblyopia. Stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia is a developmental disorder of the visual cortex. A discrepancy between visual information received by the visual cortex from each eye results in abnormal cortical development. STRABISMUS and REFRACTIVE ERRORS may cause this condition. Toxic amblyopia is a disorder of the OPTIC NERVE which is associated with ALCOHOLISM, tobacco SMOKING, and other toxins and as an adverse effect of the use of some medications.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Alexia, Pure: Loss of the power to comprehend written materials despite preservation of the ability to write (i.e., alexia without agraphia). This condition is generally attributed to lesions that "disconnect" the visual cortex of the non-dominant hemisphere from language centers in the dominant hemisphere. This may occur when a dominant visual cortex injury is combined with underlying white matter lesions that involve crossing fibers from the occipital lobe of the opposite hemisphere. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p483)Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Dyslexia, Acquired: A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.Intravitreal Injections: The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.Sensory Aids: Devices that help people with impaired sensory responses.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Macular Edema: Fluid accumulation in the outer layer of the MACULA LUTEA that results from intraocular or systemic insults. It may develop in a diffuse pattern where the macula appears thickened or it may acquire the characteristic petaloid appearance referred to as cystoid macular edema. Although macular edema may be associated with various underlying conditions, it is most commonly seen following intraocular surgery, venous occlusive disease, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, and posterior segment inflammatory disease. (From Survey of Ophthalmology 2004; 49(5) 470-90)Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Size Perception: The sensory interpretation of the dimensions of objects.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Secondary Care: Specialized healthcare delivered as a follow-up or referral from a PRIMARY CARE provider.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Scotoma: A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Wet Macular Degeneration: A form of RETINAL DEGENERATION in which abnormal CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION occurs under the RETINA and MACULA LUTEA, causing bleeding and leaking of fluid. This leads to bulging and or lifting of the macula and the distortion or destruction of central vision.Famous PersonsVision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Dental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Visual Prosthesis: Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Poetry as Topic: Literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).EnglandPractice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Macular Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Sterilization, Reproductive: Procedures to block or remove all or part of the genital tract for the purpose of rendering individuals sterile, incapable of reproduction. Surgical sterilization procedures are the most commonly used. There are also sterilization procedures involving chemical or physical means.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Word Processing: Text editing and storage functions using computer software.Vision, Low: Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Laser Coagulation: The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Refractory Period, Psychological: A delayed response interval occurring when two stimuli are presented in close succession.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Choroideremia: An X chromosome-linked abnormality characterized by atrophy of the choroid and degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium causing night blindness.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.BerlinAstrologyDiabetic Retinopathy: Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Agnosia: Loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. Tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone, despite unimpaired sensation to light touch, position, and other primary sensory modalities.Association: A functional relationship between psychological phenomena of such nature that the presence of one tends to evoke the other; also, the process by which such a relationship is established.Triamcinolone Acetonide: An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.Corneal Wavefront Aberration: Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Optometry: The professional practice of primary eye and vision care that includes the measurement of visual refractive power and the correction of visual defects with lenses or glasses.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Injections, Intraocular: The administration of substances into the eye with a hypodermic syringe.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Refusal to Participate: Refusal to take part in activities or procedures that are requested or expected of an individual. This may include refusal by HEALTH PERSONNEL to participate in specific medical procedures or refusal by PATIENTS or members of the public to take part in clinical trials or health promotion programs.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Choroidal Neovascularization: A pathological process consisting of the formation of new blood vessels in the CHOROID.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.Crowding: An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.Names: Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Retreatment: The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Parental Notification: Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).Great BritainDocumentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Drug Utilization Review: Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Retinal Vein Occlusion: Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Word Association Tests: Lists of words to which individuals are asked to respond ascertaining the conceptual meaning held by the individual.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Anisometropia: A condition of an inequality of refractive power of the two eyes.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.ComputersTape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: The segment of GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the ESOPHAGUS; the STOMACH; and the DUODENUM.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)PaintingsEthics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Oxazepam: A benzodiazepine used in the treatment of anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, and insomnia.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Accommodation, Ocular: The dioptric adjustment of the EYE (to attain maximal sharpness of retinal imagery for an object of regard) referring to the ability, to the mechanism, or to the process. Ocular accommodation is the effecting of refractive changes by changes in the shape of the CRYSTALLINE LENS. Loosely, it refers to ocular adjustments for VISION, OCULAR at various distances. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Persuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Eyeglasses: A pair of ophthalmic lenses in a frame or mounting which is supported by the nose and ears. The purpose is to aid or improve vision. It does not include goggles or nonprescription sun glasses for which EYE PROTECTIVE DEVICES is available.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.ExplosionsDiathermy: The induction of local hyperthermia by either short radio waves or high-frequency sound waves.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Optical Processes: Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Esthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Genetic Counseling: An educational process that provides information and advice to individuals or families about a genetic condition that may affect them. The purpose is to help individuals make informed decisions about marriage, reproduction, and other health management issues based on information about the genetic disease, the available diagnostic tests, and management programs. Psychosocial support is usually offered.Vision Screening: Application of tests and examinations to identify visual defects or vision disorders occurring in specific populations, as in school children, the elderly, etc. It is differentiated from VISION TESTS, which are given to evaluate/measure individual visual performance not related to a specific population.Facial DermatosesTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.

*  Letter

In a Letter to the Editor in the November 2000 issue of APS News, Professor Stuart Samuel informed the community that, ... not mentioned in the Letter by C. H. Thomson (APS News, October, 2000)). It is also true that Einstein derived the formula on ...
aps.org/publications/apsnews/200101/letter.cfm

*  Social Security Letter

The social security letter request is for students who have secured a job according to Hamline procedures. Students then ... request this letter that will be needed when applying for a social security number at the Social Security Administration office ...
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc7VaavQYjJfNaB2ZHUw73bF_8CqSMvIHvFviILWt3xmDrzFQ/viewform?hl=en&formkey=dHRVd2VGUkcyWldMdkhFdXFfM2FNa2c6MQ

*  ARES E-Letter

... * ARES E-Letter. Subscribe today! The ARES E-Letter is an informative e-mail newsletter about Amateur Radio ... ARES E-Letter Audio Version. To listen to a voice version of the ARRL ARES E-letter click here ... Missed an issue of the ARES E-Letter? Check out the ARES E-Letter Archive ... The ARES E-Letter e-mail is formatted with both HTML (rich text) and plain-text versions. Most e-mail reading programs provide ...
arrl.org/ares-e-letter

*  Motivation letter

I just wrote a motivation letter and i need ur help, So please tell me if i should change or add or correct something Thank you ... Letter of Motivation --, letter straight to hell? help my please :). By ichhassemandarinen in forum Letter Writing ... Motivation letter, please, look through my letter and check it)). By Irnes in forum CVs, Resumes and Applications ... Cover Letter] Motivation letter for UK. By classique in forum CVs, Resumes and Applications ...
https://usingenglish.com/forum/threads/199007-Motivation-letter

*  ANAPHYLAXIS LETTER - Google Docs

The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss. ...
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vARWsvyH8mXQm8Al4kvDFdtYjuqDgQqc9Z9AKVTy_4Y/edit?usp=sharing

*  ARES E-Letter Issues

The ARES E-Letter is published on the third Wednesday of each month. ARRL members may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by ... Free of charge to ARRL members: Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter(monthly public service and emergency communications news), the ... editing their Member Data Page as described at http://www.arrl.org/ares-e-letter.. Copyright © 2015 American Radio Relay League ...
arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2015-01-21

*  ARES E-Letter Issues

Saw your rack mount in the ARES E-Letter and thought I would forward a photo of mine. I built this about a year or so ago from ... The ARES E-Letter is published on the third Wednesday of each month. ARRL members may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by ... I liked your item in the last ARES E-Letter on racking up your gear. I've been an adherent of using standardized equipment ... Happy Holidays to readers, from all of us here on the corporate mega-campus of the ARES E-Letter Editorial Staff and Board! 73 ...
arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2009-11-18

*  ARES E-Letter Issues

The ARES E-Letter is published on the third Wednesday of each month. ARRL members may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by ... Here are three ideas for future editions of the ARES® E-Letter. First, with more than 35 years in AREC and ARES® communications ... And thirdly, last month's ARES® E-Letter mentions the subject of "self-deployment" by amateurs, most of who are untrained in ... Missouri SEC Ken Baremore, W0KRB, sent the following open letter to volunteers involved in the Joplin, Missouri tornado ...
arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2011-06-15

*  ARES E-Letter Issues

The ARES E-Letter is published on the third Wednesday of each month. ARRL members may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by ... editing their Member Data Page as described at http://www.arrl.org/ares-e-letter.. Copyright © 2011 American Radio Relay League ...
arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2011-07-20

*  Job Hunting (Application Letter)

... * 1. An Effective Application Letter Should tell why the applicant wants to join the ... 2. Purpose of an Application Letter To obtain an interview Function a sales letter ... 3. Your letter must… A - attract attention - arouse interest I - develop desire to see D personally A - move him into action ... 4. Appearance of an Application Letter  Create favorable first impression  Use plain-good quality paper  Show neatness, ...
https://slideshare.net/jessecamontemor9/the-application-letter

*  Letter From Belgium - LFB002

... zip
mediafire.com/file/jzm3dzozuuz/Letter From Belgium - LFB002.zip

*  Letter From Belgium - LFB003

... zip
mediafire.com/file/eh9pskr65vkcqb3/Letter From Belgium - LFB003.zip

*  General] Motivation letter

I would appreciate if you could check my letter and correct the mistakes. Thanks in advance Dear Sir or Madam, My name is ... I have to write a motivational letter to apply for a bachelor program in one of the European universities. ... Letter of Motivation --, letter straight to hell? help my please :). By ichhassemandarinen in forum Letter Writing ... Motivation letter, please, look through my letter and check it)). By Irnes in forum CVs, Resumes and Applications ...
https://usingenglish.com/forum/threads/190560-Motivation-letter

*  Letter Grading Government Efficiency

... Alberto Chong, Rafael La Porta, Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes, Andrei Shleifer. NBER Working ... "Letter Grading Government Efficiency," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(2 ...
nber.org/papers/w18268

*  Writing Letter Dictionary | eBay

Find great deals on eBay for Writing Letter Dictionary. Shop with confidence. ...
https://ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=Writing Letter Dictionary&tbp=eb_hol

*  Letter From Cambodia | The Nation

Letter From Cambodia. Letter From Cambodia. Still recovering from the Khmer Rouge.. By Noy Thrupkaew. June 10, 2004 ... CLARIFICATION: In Noy Thrupkaew's "Letter From Cambodia," Hun Sen has played a key part in the government since at least 1985, ...
https://thenation.com/article/letter-cambodia/?page=0,1&quicktabs_most_block=0

*  Letter From Poland | The Nation

Letter From Poland. Letter From Poland. Bush has managed to puncture Poles' image of America as essentially good.. By David Ost ...
https://thenation.com/article/letter-poland-0/?page=full

*  Letter: Unhealthy diet | Deseret News

Our economy looks down on drugs and drinking, which affect the brain, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and every other organ in your body. Did you ever realize that food does the exact same thing, acting as a drug if you don't eat healthy?
https://deseretnews.com/article/865592343/Letter-Unhealthy-diet.html

*  Letter: Hong Kong's push | New Scientist

Letter: Hong Kong's push. From G MCCLELLAND Readers who are unfamiliar with Hong Kong may be misled by the figures. for entry ...
https://newscientist.com/letter/mg12517057-400-letter-hong-kongs-push/

*  CHURCH FATHERS: Letter 69 (Theodoret)

Letter 69. To Eugraphia. . Had I not been unavoidably. prevented, I should no sooner have heard that your great and glorious ... I deemed it ill-advised to send you a letter at the very moment, when your grief was at its height; when it was impossible for ... To help fight spam, this address might change occasionally.) Regrettably, I can't reply to every letter, but I greatly ... Home > Fathers of the Church > Letters (Theodoret) > Letter 69. ...
newadvent.org/fathers/2707069.htm

*  Good Grief! - Letter - NYTimes.com

To the Editor: |p| It is depressing to watch a writer of Daniel Mendelsohn's intelligence selectively quote and thus greatly distort Jonathan Franzen's response to his novel's selection for Oprah's Book Club. It is appalling, but not very surprising, to then watch Mendelsohn cherry-pick supposedly ghastly sentences from ''The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History'' (Oct. 15) that show its author to be a twee, self-absorbed and humorless prig, especially when the retromingent tenor of his review makes it clear that Mendelsohn's failure to find the comedy in Franzen is very obviously Mendelsohn's problem rather than Franzen's failure. What is truly amazing, however, is Mendelsohn's claim that Snoopy represents ''the smugness, the avidity, the pomposity, the rank egotism'' that most of us ''try to keep decently hidden away.'' Mendelsohn fails his own Snoopy test. He claims to prefer the company of Charlie Brown. Lucy Van Pelt would probably say the same -- right before yanking the football away. |br| |br
query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C0CE3DC163FF93AA15753C1A9609C8B63

*  Buchstabe F - Letter F

anderen Buchstaben wählen - choose another letter --> Inhaltsverzeichnis - Table of contents; Homepage (Deutsch - English) ...
uni-mainz.de/FB/Medizin/Anatomie/workshop/Vokabular/F.html

*  CHURCH FATHERS: Letter 234 (St. Basil)

Letter 234. ST. BASIL OF CAESAREA To the same, in answer to another question. ... To help fight spam, this address might change occasionally.) Regrettably, I can't reply to every letter, but I greatly ...
newadvent.org/fathers/3202234.htm

*  CHURCH FATHERS: Letter 165 (St. Basil)

Letter 165. ST. BASIL OF CAESAREA To Ascholius. , bishop of Thessalonica. . God has fulfilled my old prayer in deigning to ... To help fight spam, this address might change occasionally.) Regrettably, I can't reply to every letter, but I greatly ... allow me to receive the letter of your veritable holiness. What I most of all desire is to see you and to be seen by you, and ...
newadvent.org/fathers/3202165.htm

*  CHURCH FATHERS: Letter 71 (St. Basil)

Letter 71. ST. BASIL OF CAESAREA Basil to Gregory. . 1. I have received the letter of your holiness, by the most reverend ... who are not convinced by long experience are not likely to be convinced by a short letter. If the former is enough let the ... To help fight spam, this address might change occasionally.) Regrettably, I can't reply to every letter, but I greatly ...
newadvent.org/fathers/3202071.htm

The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics: The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics (commonly referred to as The Medical Letter) is a peer-reviewed biweekly medical journal providing evaluations of pharmaceutical drugs. It is published in English, French, and Italian.Spalding MethodLandolt CLogMAR chart: A LogMAR chart comprises rows of letters and is used by ophthalmologists and vision scientists to estimate visual acuity. This chart was developed at the National Vision Research Institute of Australia in 1976, and is designed to enable a more accurate estimate of acuity as compared to other charts (e.USPS Post Office Box Lobby Recycling programAgraphia: Agraphia is an acquired neurological disorder causing a loss in the ability to communicate through writing, either due to some form of motor dysfunction or an inability to spell. The loss of writing ability may present with other language or neurological disorders; disorders appearing commonly with agraphia are alexia, aphasia, dysarthria, agnosia, and apraxia.Percolation threshold: Percolation threshold is a mathematical concept related to percolation theory, which is the formation of long-range connectivity in random systems. Below the threshold a giant connected component does not exist; while above it, there exists a giant component of the order of system size.Life writing: Life writing is the recording of selves, memories, and experiences, whether one's own or another's. This applies to many genres and practices, under which can be found autobiography, biography, memoir, diaries, letters, testimonies, personal essays and, more recently, digital forms such as blogs and email.Referral (medicine): In medicine, referral is the transfer of care for a patient from one clinician to another.García Olmos L, Gervas Camacho J, Otero A, Pérez Fernández M.Korte's law: In psychophysics, Korte's law, also known more completely as Korte's third law of apparent motion, is an observation relating the phenomenon of apparent motion to the distance and duration between two successively presented stimuli. It was originally proposed in 1915 by Adolf Korte.Macula of retina: The macula or macula lutea (from Latin macula, "spot" + lutea, "yellow") is an oval-shaped pigmented area near the center of the retina of the human eye. It has a diameter of around .Dyslexia: (developmental),Daniel Kane (linguist): Daniel Kane is an Australian linguist, one of the world's foremost authorities on the extinct Jurchen and Khitan languages and their scripts.Photocopier: A photocopier (also known as a copier or copy machine) is a machine that makes paper copies (AKA PhotoCopy) of documents and other visual images quickly and cheaply. Most current photocopiers use a technology called xerography, a dry process that uses electrostatic charges on a light sensitive photoreceptor to first attract and then transfer toner particles (a powder) onto paper in the form of an image.AmblyopiaMeridian (perimetry, visual field): Meridian (plural: "meridians") is used in perimetry and in specifying visual fields. According to IPS Perimetry Standards 1978 (2002): "Perimetry is the measurement of [an observer's] visual functions ...Pure alexia: Pure alexia, also known as agnosic alexia or alexia without agraphia or pure word blindness, is one form of alexia which makes up "the peripheral dyslexia" group. Individuals who have pure alexia suffer from severe reading problems while other language-related skills such as naming, oral repetition, auditory comprehension or writing are typically intact.Gary H. Posner: Gary H. Posner (born c.Braille technology: Braille technology is assistive technology which allows blind or visually impaired people to do common tasks such as writing, browsing the Internet, typing in Braille and printing in text, engaging in chat, downloading files, music, using electronic mail, burning music, and reading documents. It also allows blind or visually impaired students to complete all assignments in school as the rest of sighted classmates and allows them take courses online.Macular edemaMass nounHenry Whitelock Torrens: Henry Whitelock Torrens (1806–1852), son of Major Henry Torrens, was born on May 20, 1806. He received his B.Subatomic scale: The subatomic scale is the domain of physical size that encompasses objects smaller than an atom. It is the scale at which the atomic constituents, such as the nucleus containing protons and neutrons, and the electrons, which orbit in spherical or elliptical paths around the nucleus, become apparent.Loader (computing): In computing, a loader is the part of an operating system that is responsible for loading programs and libraries. It is one of the essential stages in the process of starting a program, as it places programs into memory and prepares them for execution.JAPE (linguistics): In computational linguistics, JAPE is the Java Annotation Patterns Engine, a component of the open-source General Architecture for Text Engineering (GATE) platform. JAPE is a finite state transducer that operates over annotations based on regular expressions.Vocabulary mismatch: Vocabulary mismatch is a common phenomenon in the usage of natural languages, occurring when different people name the same thing or concept differently.McKenzie method: The McKenzie method (also MDT = Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy) is a comprehensive method of care primarily used in physical therapy.History of communication studies: Various aspects of communication have been the subject of study since ancient times, and the approach eventually developed into the academic discipline known today as communication studies.ScotomaNon-native pronunciations of English: Non-native pronunciations of English result from the common linguistic phenomenon in which non-native users of any language tend to carry the intonation, phonological processes and pronunciation rules from their mother tongue into their English speech. They may also create innovative pronunciations for English sounds not found in the speaker's first language.Nicholas II of WerleCork University Hospital: Cork University Hospital (Irish: Ospidéal Ollscoil Chorcaí), abbreviated as CUH, is the largest university teaching hospital in Ireland and is the only Level 1 trauma center in the country due to the presence of over 40 different medical and surgical specialties on the campus. It is operated by the Health Service Executive.Discoverer 23Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis is a technology for restoring sight to blind patients suffering from degenerative retinal diseases. In retinal degenerative diseases such as Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age-Related Macular Degeneration, patients loss ‘image capturing’ photo-receptors, but, neurons in the ‘image-processing’ inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved.Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is a neuropsychological assessment initially introduced in 1998. It consists of ten subtests which give five scores, one for each of the five domains tested (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory).Plastic headlight restorationConcurrency semantics: In computer science, concurrency semantics is a way to give meaning to concurrent systems in a mathematically rigorous way. Concurrency semantics is often based on mathematical theories of concurrency such as various process calculi, the actor model, or Petri nets.Wedding anniversary: A wedding anniversary is the anniversary of the date a wedding took place. Traditional names exist for some of them: for instance, 50 years of marriage is called a "golden wedding anniversary" or simply a "golden anniversary" or "golden.Individual World Poetry Slam: The Individual World Poetry Slam (iWPS) is a yearly Poetry Slam tournament put on by Poetry Slam, Inc. that pits individual slam poets from around the world against one another.David S. Cafiso: David S. Cafiso (born 18 March 1952) is an American biochemist and a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Virginia.Operation Eyesight Universal: Operation Eyesight Universal is a Canada-based international development organisation, founded in 1963. It works to prevent avoidable blindness and to cure blindness that is treatable.Red Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Tower of Babel (M. C. Escher): Tower of Babel is a 1928 woodcut by M. C.Cancer screeningClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.An Act to amend the Copyright Act (39th Canadian Parliament, 2nd Session)Coherence theory: In physics, coherence theory is the study of optical effects arising from partially coherent light and radio sources. Partially coherent sources are sources where the coherence time or coherence length are limited by bandwidth, by thermal noise, or by other effect.Age-Related Eye Disease Study: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) was a clinical trial sponsored by the National Eye Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health in the United States.A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial of High-Dose Supplementation With Vitamins C and E, Beta Carotene, and Zinc for Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Vision Loss.Cue stick: A cue stick (or simply cue, more specifically pool cue, snooker cue, or billiards cue), is an item of sporting equipment essential to the games of pool, snooker and carom billiards. It is used to strike a ball, usually the .HyperintensitySt. Mary's Orthopaedic Hospital: St. Mary's Orthopaedic Hospital is a publichttp://www.Rande Lazar: Rande Lazar is an otolaryngologist with a primary focus in pediatric ear, nose, and throat disorders. He has special expertise in adult and pediatric sleep and snoring disorders and surgery, as well as adult and pediatric sinus disorders.Cerebral hemisphere: The vertebrate cerebrum (brain) is formed by two cerebral hemispheres that are separated by a groove, the medial longitudinal fissure. The brain can thus be described as being divided into left and right cerebral hemispheres.Hemispatial neglectOnline patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.Word Juggler: Word Juggler was a word processor application by Quark, Inc. for the Apple IIe, IIc, and III computers.Low vision assessment: Low vision is both a subspeciality and a condition. Optometrists and Ophthalmologists after their training may undergo further training in Low vision assessment and management.Laser coagulation: Laser coagulation or laser photocoagulation surgery is used to treat a number of eye diseases and has become widely used in recent decades. During the procedure, a laser is used to finely cauterize ocular blood vessels to attempt to bring about various therapeutic benefits.Psychological refractory period: The term psychological refractory period (PRP) refers to the period of time during which the response to a second stimulus is significantly slowed because a first stimulus is still being processed. This delay in response time when one is required to divide attention can exhibit a negative effect that is evident in many fields of study.Brodmann area 38: Brodmann area 38, also BA38 or temporopolar area 38 (H), is part of the temporal cortex in the human brain. BA 38 is at the anterior end of the temporal lobe, known as the temporal pole.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studying