Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.United StatesHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Great BritainClinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.CaliforniaQuality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.BrazilHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Herbals as Topic: Works about books, articles or other publications on herbs or plants describing their medicinal value.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).EnglandActivities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Bookplates as Topic: Labels pasted in books to mark their ownership and sometimes to indicate their location in a library. Private bookplates are often ornate or artistic: simpler and smaller ones bearing merely the owner's name are called "book labels." They are usually pasted on the front endpaper of books. (From Harrod, The Librarians' Glossary and Reference Book, 4th rev ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Broadsides as Topic: Published pieces of paper or other material, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded and usually intended to be posted, publicly distributed, or sold. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Communication Barriers: Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Anecdotes as Topic: Brief accounts or narratives of an incident or event.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.GermanyEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Webcasts as Topic: Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Nurse-Patient Relations: Interaction between the patient and nurse.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.

*  Hot Topic Interview Questions | Glassdoor

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*  Hot Topic Sales Associate Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Free interview details posted anonymously by Hot Topic interview candidates. ... 111 Hot Topic Sales Associate interview questions and 84 interview reviews. ... Sales Associate Interview candidates at Hot Topic rate the interview process an overall positive experience. Interview ... Interview. Applied online and in person. A couple days later I got a call for an interview. It was a group interview so it was ...
https://glassdoor.com/Interview/Hot-Topic-Sales-Associate-Interview-Questions-EI_IE5499.0,9_KO10,25.htm

*  iWindsurf Community :: View topic - WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in

WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in. Goto page Previous 1, 2, 3 ... 8, 9, 10 ... 23, 24, 25 Next. ... Every once in a while, I write a good topic and get positive feedback from people. Most of the time, it had humour in it and ... Iso, can you turn off your kill file thing for this interview ... a few of the people who are apparently on it are posting some ...
iwindsurf.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=221452

*  iWindsurf Community :: View topic - WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in

WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in. Goto page Previous 1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25. ... I will exit this thread and leave you to continue your 'interview' and your trolling. Good day and good luck. I look forward to ... As someone suggested, the interview has decayed into an intervention (aka taking a dump). From this point forward I ll ... determine which questions deserve an answer and/or are relevant to the interview, rather than accommodating whatever comes out ...
iwindsurf.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=222331

*  iWindsurf Community :: View topic - WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in

Isobars has agreed to a public interview right here on iWindsurf. The result of the interview will be published in the Closeout ... WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. Please join in. Goto page 1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25 Next. ... If it is doable in interview form, and you're question gets in, you will get full credit. Isobars, because the article is so ... If this gets packed with too much content, I'll probably write the article as a story rather than an interview. But it will be ...
iwindsurf.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=27241&start=0

*  View topic - Japanese interview - self introduction | TheJapanesePage.com

At a job interview for an employment agency in 1999 I was asked this very question and responded word-for-word with JSL CC 25A ... At a job interview for an employment agency in 1999 I was asked this very question and responded word-for-word with JSL CC 25A ... At a job interview, in particular, I imagine they felt the answer would tell them something about your stability as well as ... If you are in an interview at a Japanese company and someone asks you to give a self introduction, what kind of things do you ...
thejapanesepage.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=108326

*  electro-music.com :: View topic - Article + Interview

Article + Interview Moderators: HrastProgrammer Page 1 of 1 [1 Post]. View unread posts. View new posts in the last week. Mark ... Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:23 am Post subject: Article + Interview. ... A very nice article including an interview: http://synth-caresses.blogspot.com.es/search/label/HrastProgrammer Thanks Jose and ...
electro-music.com/forum/post-396285.html

*  TargetTalk • View topic - Hibernate Interview Question

id, ,a href='http://candidjava.com/hibernate-interview-question',,/a,. Last edited by candidjava on Mon Jan 02, 2012 8:34 am, ...
targettalk.org/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=32971&p=163802

*  Jim Carrey Online • View topic - Film interview: Jim Carrey

Film interview: Jim Carrey. Discuss this movie. Filmed April 29-June 30, 2008. Available on DVD and Blu-ray. ... Film interview: Jim Carrey. by jimliker » Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:38 pm ... Jim Carrey on I Love You Phillip Morris: The Big Interview http://www.metro.co.uk/metrolife/film/8 ... -interview. ...
jimcarreyonline.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=171732

*  Topic: stick-and-rudder-interviews articles on Engadget

Everything you need to know about the latest smartphones, tablets, smartwatches and more.
https://engadget.com/tag/stick-and-rudder-interviews/

*  iWindsurf Community :: View topic - Ross Williams interview

Posted: Wed Jun 16, 2010 9:08 am Post subject: Ross Williams interview. ...
iwindsurf.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=132315

*  Pit Bull Talk • View topic - Interview with Vick about Dog Fighting Legislation

Want to write my reps in support of the bill anyway, if I can read it through and see what it actually says ...
pitbulltalk.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=35721&view=unread

*  electro-music.com :: View topic - Teo Macero Interview

Mark the topic unread :: View previous topic :: View next topic. Forum index » Reviews, Editorials and Commentary » Commentary ... Teo Macero Interview Page 1 of 1 [11 Posts]. View unread posts. View new posts in the last week. Mark the topic unread :: View ... The same site where you found the Macero interview has a lot of other great interviews too. Check out the Holger Czukay ... The interview was great because this resistance from the interviewer really makes the guy talk about his own visions. Some ...
electro-music.com/forum/topic-1072.html

*  electro-music.com :: View topic - New Wowa Interview

New Wowa Interview Page 1 of 1 [1 Post]. View unread posts. View new posts in the last week. Mark the topic unread :: View ... Posted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 9:33 am Post subject: New Wowa Interview. ... http://www.velvetacidchrist.com/2008/04/28/interviews-wowa-cwejman-by-bryan-erickson/. ...
electro-music.com/forum/topic-25961-0.html&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=

*  MarkWahlberg.com :: View topic - Mark TV Interviews

No live interviews in sight, but sometime this week or next there is supposed to be an interview with Mark on a show called ... This has been out there for a couple days now, Extra TV's interview You need Real Player and may have to update it to view it. ... Posted: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:31 am Post subject: Mark TV Interviews. ...
markwahlberg.com/viewtopic.php?p=59015

*  CriticalDance Forum • View topic - Isabella Boylston interview

For CNN, Flora Zhang interviews ABT principal dancer Isabella Boylston about falling in love with ballet.. CNN ...
ballet-dance.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=40450&view=next

Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Essex School of discourse analysis: The Essex School constitutes a variety of discourse analysis, one that combines theoretical sophistication – mainly due to its reliance on the post-structuralist and psychoanalytic traditions and, in particular, on the work of Lacan, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, etc. – with analytical precision, since it focuses predominantly on an in-depth analysis of political discourses in late modernity.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.International Congress on Sleep ApneaBritish Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease: The British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers six times a year in the field of Cardiovascular medicine. The journal's editors are Clifford J Bailey (Aston University), Ian Campbell (Victoria Hospital) and Christoph Schindler (Dresden University of Technology).History of communication studies: Various aspects of communication have been the subject of study since ancient times, and the approach eventually developed into the academic discipline known today as communication studies.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Online patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.The Oxford Textbook of Medicine: The Oxford Textbook of Medicine Warrell DA, Cox TM, Firth JD. (2010).The Final Decision: The Final Decision is an episode from season 1 of the animated TV series X-Men Animated Series.Mental disorderBestbets: BestBETS (Best Evidence Topic Reports) is a system designed by emergency physicians at Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK. It was conceived as a way of allowing busy clinicians to solve real clinical problems using published evidence.Dell Hymes: Dell Hathaway Hymes (June 7, 1927, Portland, OregonNovember 13, 2009, Charlottesville, Virginia) was a linguist, sociolinguist, anthropologist, and folklorist who established disciplinary foundations for the comparative, ethnographic study of language use. His research focused upon the languages of the Pacific Northwest.Parent structure: In IUPAC nomenclature, a parent structure, parent compound, parent name or simply parent is the denotation for a compound consisting of an unbranched chain of skeletal atoms (not necessarily carbon), or consisting of an unsubstituted monocyclic or polycyclic ring system.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.International Committee on Aeronautical Fatigue and Structural IntegrityHalfdan T. MahlerStandard evaluation frameworkSelf-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.AIP Conference Proceedings: AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970. It publishes the proceedings from various conferences of physics societies.Avoidance coping: In psychology, avoidance coping, escape coping, or cope and avoid is a maladaptive coping mechanism characterized by the effort to avoid dealing with a stressor. Coping refers to behaviors that attempt to protect oneself from psychological damage.National Clinical Guideline CentreDavid Budescu: David Budescu is a psychologist and academic. He is the Anne Anastasi Professor of Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology at Fordham University.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Interpersonal reflex: Interpersonal reflex is a term created by Timothy Leary and explained in the book, Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality: A functional theory and methodology for personality evaluation (1957).Telephone numbers in Panama: Country Code: +507Bio Base EuropeSyllabus: A syllabus (pl. syllabi) is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Downtown Train – Selections from the Storyteller Anthology: [ AllMusic review]SchizophreniaAge adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.San Diego County, California Probation: The San Diego County Probation Department is the body in San Diego County, California responsible for supervising convicted offenders in the community, either who are on probation, such as at the conclusion of their sentences, or while on community supervision orders.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Immaculate perception: The expression immaculate perception has been used in various senses by various philosophers.Substance-related disorderPrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingStressor: A stressor is a chemical or biological agent, environmental condition, external stimulus or an event that causes stress to an organism.Mothers TalkRating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.Patient participation: Patient participation, also called shared decision-making, is a process in which both the patient and physician contribute to the medical decision-making process. Under this operating system, health care providers explain treatments and alternatives to patients in order to provide the necessary resources for patients to choose the treatment option that most closely aligns with their unique cultural and personal beliefs.Andrew Dickson WhiteNested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.University of CampinasCancer screeningManagement of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.

(1/8857) Oral contraceptive use: interview data versus pharmacy records.

BACKGROUND: If women tend to forget and underreport their past oral contraceptive (OC) use, but the recall among cases is enhanced by the presence of disease, recall bias may explain some reported health effects of OC use. METHODS: Two different sources of information on lifetime OC use were compared for 427 (84%) of a community-based sample of 511 women aged 20-34: (i) structured interviews, using a life event calendar and picture display as memory aids, and (ii) a register of all prescriptions dispensed by pharmacies in the county since 1970. RESULTS: Interview data and pharmacy records showed high levels of agreement for any OC use, current use, time since first and last use, total duration of use, and for duration of use in different 'time windows'. But there was a tendency to under-report specific kinds of OC used in the past. CONCLUSION: Underreporting of OC use among non-cases would usually introduce little or no bias (as compared to pharmacy records) for this kind of interview and women. However, it may be preferable to use interviews for current OC use, and pharmacy records for specific kinds of OC used in the past.  (+info)

(2/8857) Influenza vaccination among the elderly in Italy.

This article surveys the attitudes and perceptions of a random sample of the elderly population in three regions of Italy on the use and efficacy of influenza vaccine. The data were collected by direct interviews using a standard questionnaire. The results show that vaccination coverage against influenza is inadequate (26-48.6%). The major reasons for nonvaccination were lack of faith in the vaccine and disbelief that influenza is a dangerous illness. These data emphasize the need for a systematic education programme targeted at the elderly and the provision of influenza vaccination, with the increased cooperation of general practitioners.  (+info)

(3/8857) The Montefiore community children's project: a controlled study of cognitive and emotional problems of homeless mothers and children.

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the prevalence of emotional, academic, and cognitive impairment in children and mothers living in the community with those living in shelters for the homeless. METHOD: In New York City, 82 homeless mothers and their 102 children, aged 6 to 11, recruited from family shelters were compared to 115 nonhomeless mothers with 176 children recruited from classmates of the homeless children. Assessments included standardized tests and interviews. RESULTS: Mothers in shelters for the homeless showed higher rates of depression and anxiety than did nonhomeless mothers. Boys in homeless shelters showed higher rates of serious emotional and behavioral problems. Both boys and girls in homeless shelters showed more academic problems than did nonhomeless children. CONCLUSION: Study findings suggest a need among homeless children for special attention to academic problems that are not attributable to intellectual deficits in either children or their mothers. Although high rates of emotional and behavioral problems characterized poor children living in both settings, boys in shelters for the homeless may be particularly in need of professional attention.  (+info)

(4/8857) Mediators of ethnic-associated differences in infant birth weight.

PURPOSE: To examine whether ethnic differences in low birth weight babies of low-income women may be explained in part by group differences in prenatal health behaviors and psychosocial factors. METHODS: A prospective, survey of 1,071 low-income, primiparous African-American and Mexican-origin women was conducted in Los Angeles County, California. In face-to-face interviews, data were obtained on substance use, prenatal stress, social support, attitudes toward pregnancy, initiation of prenatal care, and medical risk. Medical chart data were abstracted regarding medical risk factors and labor, delivery, and neonatal data. Interview data were linked with birth outcome data retrieved from maternal medical records. Structural equation modeling was used to test a hypothesized model in which differences in birth weight were expected to be mediated by ethnic differences in substance use, psychosocial factors, and medical risk. RESULTS: As expected, African-American women delivered babies of earlier gestational age and lower birth weight than did women of Mexican origin. Direct predictors of low birth weight were use of drugs and cigarettes, prenatal stress, and positive attitudes toward pregnancy; together, these factors accounted for the observed ethnic differences in birth weight. CONCLUSION: These data contribute to our understanding of the factors that may account for ethnic-associated differences in low birth weight.  (+info)

(5/8857) The validation of interviews for estimating morbidity.

Health interview surveys have been widely used to measure morbidity in developing countries, particularly for infectious diseases. Structured questionnaires using algorithms which derive sign/symptom-based diagnoses seem to be the most reliable but there have been few studies to validate them. The purpose of validation is to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of brief algorithms (combinations of signs/symptoms) which can then be used for the rapid assessment of community health problems. Validation requires a comparison with an external standard such as physician or serological diagnoses. There are several potential pitfalls in assessing validity, such as selection bias, differences in populations and the pattern of diseases in study populations compared to the community. Validation studies conducted in the community may overcome bias caused by case selection. Health centre derived estimates can be adjusted and applied to the community with caution. Further study is needed to validate algorithms for important diseases in different cultural settings. Community-based studies need to be conducted, and the utility of derived algorithms for tracking disease frequency explored further.  (+info)

(6/8857) Safe working practices and HIV infection: knowledge, attitudes, perception of risk, and policy in hospital.

OBJECTIVES--To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of risk of occupational HIV transmission in hospital in relation to existing guidelines. DESIGN--Cross sectional anonymous questionnaire survey of all occupational groups. SETTING--One large inner city teaching hospital. SUBJECTS--All 1530 staff working in the hospital in October 1991 and 22 managers. MAIN MEASURES--Knowledge of safe working practices and hospital guidelines; attitudes towards patients with AIDS; perception of risk of occupational transmission of HIV; availability of guidelines. RESULTS--The response rate in the questionnaire survey was 63% (958/1530). Although staff across all occupational groups knew of the potential risk of infection from needlestick injury (98%, 904/922), significantly more non-clinical staff (ambulance, catering, and domestic staff) than clinical staff (doctors, nurses, and paramedics) thought HIV could be transmitted by giving blood (38%, 153/404 v 12%, 40/346; chi 2 = 66.1 p < 0.001); one in ten clinical staff believed this. Except for midwives, half of staff in most occupational groups and 19% (17/91) of doctors and 22% (28/125) of nurses thought gloves should be worn in all contacts with people with AIDS. Most staff (62%, 593/958), including 38% (36/94) of doctors and 52% (67/128) of nurses thought patients should be routinely tested on admission, 17% of doctors and 19% of nurses thought they should be isolated in hospital. One in three staff perceived themselves at risk of HIV. Midwives, nurses, and theatre technicians were most aware of guidelines for safe working compared with only half of doctors, ambulance, and paramedical staff and no incinerator staff. CONCLUSIONS--Policy guidelines for safe working practices for patients with HIV infection and AIDS need to be disseminated across all occupational groups to reduce negative staff attitudes, improve knowledge of occupational transmission, establish an appropriate perception of risk, and create a supportive and caring hospital environment for people with HIV. IMPLICATIONS--Managers need to disseminate policy guidelines and information to all staff on an ongoing basis.  (+info)

(7/8857) Developing role of medical audit advisory groups.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the approaches to audit of different medical audit advisory groups (MAAGs) and to consider the implications for evaluation of their activities and their developing role in the light of new priorities for clinical audit. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on semistructured interviews. SETTING: 15 family health services authority (FHSA) districts in two English health regions. SUBJECTS: MAAG chairpersons and support staff and FHSA general managers and medical advisors in each district, totalling 68 subjects. MAIN MEASURES: Structures and activities of MAAGs; perceptions of the MAAG's role and its achievements compared with the initial brief in a health circular in 1990. RESULTS: The approaches of different MAAGs varied considerably: some concentrated on promoting audit and others were involved in a wider range of development activities. MAAGs assessed their progress in various different ways. The importance of collaborative working was recognised, but few interface audit projects had been undertaken. MAAGs had little contact with other quality assurance activities in the FHSA, and FHSA involvement in the MAAG strategy was variable, although MAAGs were taking steps to improve communication with the FHSA. CONCLUSIONS: Major differences exist in the approaches taken by MAAGs and the roles they fulfil, which will make evaluation of their effectiveness a complex task. Already MAAGs are responding to changing expectations about audit and pressure for closer links with management.  (+info)

(8/8857) Diabetes care: who are the experts?

OBJECTIVES: To identify issues that patients and professionals consider important in diabetes care and differences in their priorities for care and to determine patients' and professionals' judgements of the relative importance of their chosen priorities. DESIGN: Structured group interviews using the nominal group technique. SETTING: Five district health authorities on Tyneside. SUBJECTS: Five nominal groups: expert (seven), non-expert (seven) health care professionals; insulin dependent (four), non-insulin dependent patients (eight); and carers of diabetic patients (eight). MAIN MEASURES: Items important in diabetes care to each nominal group (themes of care), ranked into a series of "top 10" items for each group, and allocated a score according to relative importance to individual members; scores were standardised by individual weighting and group weighting for comparison within and between groups. RESULTS: Patients and professionals agreed that information given to patients, interaction between professionals and patients, patient autonomy, and access were important for good diabetes care, but the importance assigned to each differed. Thus the professionals emphasised empathy and aspects of good communication and patients the desire to know enough to live a "normal" life. Differences were also found within the patient groups; these related to changes in patients' needs at specific points in the development of their illness and in their orientations to care. CONCLUSION: Patients differ from professionals in their orientation to diabetes care, and they can, and should, be involved in setting priorities for care. Since these priorities are dynamic further work is needed to explore the nature of patient satisfaction with diabetes care.  (+info)



2017


  • I interviewed at Hot Topic (City of Industry, CA) in July 2017. (glassdoor.com)

WINDSPORT interviews Isobars


  • WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. (iwindsurf.com)
  • Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:42 am Post subject: WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. (iwindsurf.com)
  • Posted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 11:21 am Post subject: Re: WINDSPORT interviews Isobars. (iwindsurf.com)

iWindsurf


  • Isobars has agreed to a public interview right here on iWindsurf. (iwindsurf.com)

subject


  • I generally prefer to write and will often decline interviews (both where I'm the subject and where I'm the interviewer) because I tend to sound "funny" to my own ear. (cookingforengineers.com)

Question


  • Hot Topic Interview Question: 'What's new in pop culture? (glassdoor.com)
  • If it is doable in interview form, and you're question gets in, you will get full credit. (iwindsurf.com)
  • At a job interview for an employment agency in 1999 I was asked this very question and responded word-for-word with JSL CC 25A #2, (N)a. (thejapanesepage.com)

Questions


  • Glassdoor has millions of jobs plus salary information, company reviews, and interview questions from people on the inside making it easy to find a job that's right for you. (glassdoor.com)
  • It also appears that there was a slight delay of less than a second, but that threw things off a little as it was hard to detect pauses to interject comments or direct the interview to other questions. (cookingforengineers.com)
  • Before the interview, I was informed that I'd have eight to ten minutes of time with Chef Puck, he would speak about his NovoPro Oven, and I could ask him any questions I wanted. (cookingforengineers.com)
  • Anyway, I had a lot of fun doing the interview and I hope I asked some interesting questions. (cookingforengineers.com)
  • From this point forward I ll determine which questions deserve an answer and/or are relevant to the interview, rather than accommodating whatever comes out of your (mouths). (iwindsurf.com)

good


  • Good interview, it's nice that SPCR now has an EU correspondent, you have a substantial following here so it makes sense to expand beyond the traditional NA base. (silentpcreview.com)
  • Good interview Christoph, great to see you've joined the SPCR team! (silentpcreview.com)
  • Every once in a while, I write a good topic and get positive feedback from people. (iwindsurf.com)

times


  • This happened a couple times during the interview, but, hopefully, I recovered quickly enough that it's not apparent. (cookingforengineers.com)

nice


  • It was the girl's first time doing an interview and she was very nice. (glassdoor.com)

write


  • If this gets packed with too much content, I'll probably write the article as a story rather than an interview. (iwindsurf.com)

music


  • With over 650 stores in the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico, Hot Topic is one of the leading retailers in music and pop culture licensed. (glassdoor.com)

people


  • Just because you're a busy manager doesn't mean you treat the people that are taking their time as well to interview for positions like they're nothing. (glassdoor.com)

Free


  • Why are you so driven to negate others' experiences in order to justify your positions (feel free to edit for the actual interview? (iwindsurf.com)

work


experiences


  • One of the worst job interview experiences I've had in a long time. (glassdoor.com)

generally


weeks


  • I then had to wait almost two weeks to get a phone call to set up an interview. (glassdoor.com)

feel


  • The group interview however did not feel so confident sine you have to find a way to better the others. (glassdoor.com)

phone


  • The interview was conducted by phone and I had a hard time hearing (the volume was fairly low). (cookingforengineers.com)

couple


  • A couple days later I got a call for an interview. (glassdoor.com)

customer


  • She was mainly focused (more like annoyed) that I didn't have sales experience but I told her not only when I walked in but during the interview that I've had many years of customer service experience, but I wanted to start developing some sales experience. (glassdoor.com)