Influenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Influenza in Birds: Infection of domestic and wild fowl and other BIRDS with INFLUENZA A VIRUS. Avian influenza usually does not sicken birds, but can be highly pathogenic and fatal in domestic POULTRY.Influenza B virus: Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 1. The H5N1 subtype, frequently referred to as the bird flu virus, is endemic in wild birds and very contagious among both domestic (POULTRY) and wild birds. It does not usually infect humans, but some cases have been reported.Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus: Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.Orthomyxoviridae: A family of RNA viruses causing INFLUENZA and other diseases. There are five recognized genera: INFLUENZAVIRUS A; INFLUENZAVIRUS B; INFLUENZAVIRUS C; ISAVIRUS; and THOGOTOVIRUS.Orthomyxoviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE.Influenza A Virus, H9N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 9 and neuraminidase 2. The H9N2 subtype usually infects domestic birds (POULTRY) but there have been some human infections reported.Pandemics: Epidemics of infectious disease that have spread to many countries, often more than one continent, and usually affecting a large number of people.Influenza A Virus, H3N8 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 8. The H3N8 subtype has frequently been found in horses.Influenza A Virus, H2N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 2 and neuraminidase 2. The H2N2 subtype was responsible for the Asian flu pandemic of 1957.Neuraminidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-2,3, alpha-2,6-, and alpha-2,8-glycosidic linkages (at a decreasing rate, respectively) of terminal sialic residues in oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycolipids, colominic acid, and synthetic substrate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Influenza A Virus, H7N7 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 7. The H7N7 subtype produced an epidemic in 2003 which was highly pathogenic among domestic birds (POULTRY). Some infections in humans were reported.Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests: Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Oseltamivir: An acetamido cyclohexene that is a structural homolog of SIALIC ACID and inhibits NEURAMINIDASE.Influenza A Virus, H5N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 2. The H5N2 subtype has been found to be highly pathogenic in chickens.Hemagglutinins, Viral: Specific hemagglutinin subtypes encoded by VIRUSES.Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 9. This avian origin virus was first identified in humans in 2013.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Reassortant Viruses: Viruses containing two or more pieces of nucleic acid (segmented genome) from different parents. Such viruses are produced in cells coinfected with different strains of a given virus.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Influenza A Virus, H1N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 2. It is endemic in both human and pig populations.Vaccines, Inactivated: Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Zanamivir: A guanido-neuraminic acid that is used to inhibit NEURAMINIDASE.Amantadine: An antiviral that is used in the prophylactic or symptomatic treatment of influenza A. It is also used as an antiparkinsonian agent, to treat extrapyramidal reactions, and for postherpetic neuralgia. The mechanisms of its effects in movement disorders are not well understood but probably reflect an increase in synthesis and release of dopamine, with perhaps some inhibition of dopamine uptake.Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells: An epithelial cell line derived from a kidney of a normal adult female dog.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.DucksInfluenzavirus C: A genus of the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE comprising viruses similar to types A and B but less common, more stable, more homogeneous, and lacking the neuraminidase protein. They have not been associated with epidemics but may cause mild influenza. Influenza C virus is the type species.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Viral Matrix Proteins: Proteins associated with the inner surface of the lipid bilayer of the viral envelope. These proteins have been implicated in control of viral transcription and may possibly serve as the "glue" that binds the nucleocapsid to the appropriate membrane site during viral budding from the host cell.Rimantadine: An RNA synthesis inhibitor that is used as an antiviral agent in the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.Influenza A Virus, H7N3 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 3. It was first detected in turkeys in Britain in 1963 and there have been several outbreaks on poultry farms since that time. A couple cases of human infections have been reported.Cross Protection: Protection conferred on a host by inoculation with one strain or component of a microorganism that prevents infection when later challenged with a similar strain. Most commonly the microorganism is a virus.Influenzavirus A: A genus in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE causing influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. It contains many strains as well as antigenic subtypes of the integral membrane proteins hemagglutinin (HEMAGGLUTININS) and NEURAMINIDASE. The type species is INFLUENZA A VIRUS.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Anseriformes: An order of BIRDS comprising the waterfowl, particularly DUCKS; GEESE; swans; and screamers.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Hemagglutinins: Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.Influenza A Virus, H7N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 1. This subtype has demonstrated the ability to mutate from a low pathogenic form to a highly pathogenic form in birds. It was responsible for a 1999 outbreak in turkeys in Italy.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Virus Shedding: The expelling of virus particles from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract. Virus shedding is an important means of vertical transmission (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Nucleoproteins: Proteins conjugated with nucleic acids.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Mice, Inbred BALB CMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.PyransChickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Influenza A Virus, H7N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 2. It has been involved in a number of outbreaks in the 21st century on poultry farms and has been isolated a few times in humans.Epidemics: Sudden outbreaks of a disease in a country or region not previously recognized in that area, or a rapid increase in the number of new cases of a previous existing endemic disease. Epidemics can also refer to outbreaks of disease in animal or plant populations.Virology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of viruses, and VIRUS DISEASES.RNA Replicase: An enzyme that catalyses RNA-template-directed extension of the 3'- end of an RNA strand by one nucleotide at a time, and can initiate a chain de novo. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p293)Polysorbates: Sorbitan mono-9-octadecanoate poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivatives; complex mixtures of polyoxyethylene ethers used as emulsifiers or dispersing agents in pharmaceuticals.Administration, Intranasal: Delivery of medications through the nasal mucosa.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Viral Core Proteins: Proteins found mainly in icosahedral DNA and RNA viruses. They consist of proteins directly associated with the nucleic acid inside the NUCLEOCAPSID.Mass Vaccination: Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Hemagglutination, Viral: Agglutination of ERYTHROCYTES by a virus.Drug Resistance, Viral: The ability of viruses to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents or antiviral agents. This resistance is acquired through gene mutation.United StatesImmunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Cloaca: A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Sialic Acids: A group of naturally occurring N-and O-acyl derivatives of the deoxyamino sugar neuraminic acid. They are ubiquitously distributed in many tissues.SqualeneRespiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Antibodies, Neutralizing: Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Influenzavirus B: A genus of the family ORTHOMYXOVIRUS causing HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. In contrast to INFLUENZAVIRUS A, no distinct antigenic subtypes of hemagglutinin (HEMAGGLUTININS) and NEURAMINIDASE are recognized.GeeseAntigenic Variation: Change in the surface ANTIGEN of a microorganism. There are two different types. One is a phenomenon, especially associated with INFLUENZA VIRUSES, where they undergo spontaneous variation both as slow antigenic drift and sudden emergence of new strains (antigenic shift). The second type is when certain PARASITES, especially trypanosomes, PLASMODIUM, and BORRELIA, survive the immune response of the host by changing the surface coat (antigen switching). (From Herbert et al., The Dictionary of Immunology, 4th ed)Respiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Quarantine: Restriction of freedom of movement of individuals who have been exposed to infectious or communicable disease in order to prevent its spread; a period of detention of vessels, vehicles, or travelers coming from infected or suspected places; and detention or isolation on account of suspected contagion. It includes government regulations on the detention of animals at frontiers or ports of entrance for the prevention of infectious disease, through a period of isolation before being allowed to enter a country. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).Reverse Genetics: The use of techniques that produce a functional MUTATION or an effect on GENE EXPRESSION of a specific gene of interest in order to identify the role or activity of the gene product of that gene.Vaccines, Virosome: Vaccines using VIROSOMES as the antigen delivery system that stimulates the desired immune response.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Adjuvants, Immunologic: Substances that augment, stimulate, activate, potentiate, or modulate the immune response at either the cellular or humoral level. The classical agents (Freund's adjuvant, BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, et al.) contain bacterial antigens. Some are endogenous (e.g., histamine, interferon, transfer factor, tuftsin, interleukin-1). Their mode of action is either non-specific, resulting in increased immune responsiveness to a wide variety of antigens, or antigen-specific, i.e., affecting a restricted type of immune response to a narrow group of antigens. The therapeutic efficacy of many biological response modifiers is related to their antigen-specific immunoadjuvanticity.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Guanidines: A family of iminourea derivatives. The parent compound has been isolated from mushrooms, corn germ, rice hulls, mussels, earthworms, and turnip juice. Derivatives may have antiviral and antifungal properties.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Myxovirus Resistance Proteins: Interferon-induced DYNAMIN-like GTP-binding proteins localized in the cytoplasm, nuclear pore complex and nucleus. They play a role in antiviral defense and immunity.N-Acetylneuraminic Acid: An N-acyl derivative of neuraminic acid. N-acetylneuraminic acid occurs in many polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids in animals and bacteria. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1518)Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Hemagglutination Tests: Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Virus Inactivation: Inactivation of viruses by non-immune related techniques. They include extremes of pH, HEAT treatment, ultraviolet radiation, IONIZING RADIATION; DESICCATION; ANTISEPTICS; DISINFECTANTS; organic solvents, and DETERGENTS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Nasal Mucosa: The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Viral Plaque Assay: Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.Immunity, Humoral: Antibody-mediated immune response. Humoral immunity is brought about by ANTIBODY FORMATION, resulting from TH2 CELLS activating B-LYMPHOCYTES, followed by COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Hemadsorption: A phenomenon manifested by an agent or substance adhering to or being adsorbed on the surface of a red blood cell, as tuberculin can be adsorbed on red blood cells under certain conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed)Acetamides: Derivatives of acetamide that are used as solvents, as mild irritants, and in organic synthesis.Mice, Inbred C57BLDisease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Adamantane: A tricyclo bridged hydrocarbon.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Charadriiformes: An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.Host Specificity: The properties of a pathogen that makes it capable of infecting one or more specific hosts. The pathogen can include PARASITES as well as VIRUSES; BACTERIA; FUNGI; or PLANTS.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Injections, Intradermal: The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.Viral Load: The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.Basic Reproduction Number: The expected number of new cases of an infection caused by an infected individual, in a population consisting of susceptible contacts only.Hemagglutination: The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Influenza A Virus, H10N7 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 10 and neuraminidase 7. It has been isolated from a variety of wild and domestic animals including ducks, emu, and mink. It was found for the first time in humans in 2004.JapanCoinfection: Simultaneous infection of a host organism by two or more pathogens. In virology, coinfection commonly refers to simultaneous infection of a single cell by two or more different viruses.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Virion: The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.Membrane Fusion: The adherence and merging of cell membranes, intracellular membranes, or artificial membranes to each other or to viruses, parasites, or interstitial particles through a variety of chemical and physical processes.Immunization, Secondary: Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: Methods used for detecting the amplified DNA products from the polymerase chain reaction as they accumulate instead of at the end of the reaction.Vaccines, Subunit: Vaccines consisting of one or more antigens that stimulate a strong immune response. They are purified from microorganisms or produced by recombinant DNA techniques, or they can be chemically synthesized peptides.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Nasal Lavage Fluid: Fluid obtained by THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION or washout of the nasal cavity and NASAL MUCOSA. The resulting fluid is used in cytologic and immunologic assays of the nasal mucosa such as with the NASAL PROVOCATION TEST in the diagnosis of nasal hypersensitivity.RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic: Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.Pneumonia, Pneumococcal: A febrile disease caused by STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.VietnamImmunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Immunologic Memory: The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.Virus Attachment: The binding of virus particles to receptors on the host cell surface. For enveloped viruses, the virion ligand is usually a surface glycoprotein as is the cellular receptor. For non-enveloped viruses, the virus CAPSID serves as the ligand.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.USSRHistory, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Ribonucleoproteins: Complexes of RNA-binding proteins with ribonucleic acids (RNA).Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.TracheitisFluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct: A form of fluorescent antibody technique utilizing a fluorochrome conjugated to an antibody, which is added directly to a tissue or cell suspension for the detection of a specific antigen. (Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.

*  WHO | Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus - update

... of China notified WHO of six additional laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. ... Further sporadic human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. ... Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus - update. Disease outbreak news ... Until the virus adapts itself for efficient human-to-human transmission, the risk of ongoing international spread of H7N9 virus ...
who.int/csr/don/2014_03_27/en/

*  Scientists solve co-crystal structure of human antibody that can neutralize influenza viruses

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and Sea Lane Biotechnologies have solved the co-crystal structure of a human ... antibody that can neutralize influenza viruses in a unique way. ... structure of a human antibody that can neutralize influenza ... Scientists solve co-crystal structure of human antibody that can neutralize influenza viruses. *Download PDF Copy ... UF scientists to use $2.7 million NIH grant for preventing influenza viruses in animals and humans ...
https://news-medical.net/news/20120917/Scientists-solve-co-crystal-structure-of-human-antibody-that-can-neutralize-influenza-viruses.aspx

*  Respiratory syncytial virus- and human metapneumovirus-associated emergency department and hospital burden in adults - Widmer -...

Rates of hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, and influenza virus in older adults. J Infect ... Estimating age-specific influenza-related hospitalization rates during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in Davidson Co, TN. Influenza ... Clinical features of influenza A virus infection in older hospitalized persons. J Am Geriatr Soc 2002; 50:1498-1503.. Direct ... A newly discovered human pneumovirus isolated from young children with respiratory tract disease. Nat Med 2001; 7:719-724.. * ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/irv.12234/references?globalMessage=0&systemMessage=Wiley Online Library will be unavailable on Saturday 7th Oct from 03.00 EDT / 08:00 BST / 12:30 IST / 15.00 SGT to 08.00 EDT / 13.00 BST / 17:30 IST / 20.00 SGT and Sunday 8th Oct from 03.00 EDT / 08:00 BST / 12:30 IST / 15.00 SGT to 06.00 EDT / 11.00 BST / 15:30 IST / 18.00 SGT for essential maintenance. Apologies for the inconvenience caused

*  JCI - Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy...

Cross-recognition of avian H5N1 influenza virus by human cytotoxic T lymphocyte populations directed to human influenza A virus ... mutate or reassort with a human influenza virus and hence acquire efficient human to human transmission and cause an influenza ... Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy ... The threat of avian influenza A (H5N1) infection in humans remains a global health concern. Current influenza vaccines ...
https://jci.org/articles/view/32460

*  China Details First Human Fatality Linked to Novel H10N8 Influenza - Physician's First Watch

Chinese health officials are reporting the first fatality associated with a novel reassortant avian H10N8 influenza virus. The ... China Details First Human Fatality Linked to Novel H10N8 Influenza - Physician's First Watch. ... No human contacts were infected. Researchers noted that the novel H10N8 virus contains mutations that could increase virulence ... Chinese health officials are reporting the first fatality associated with a novel reassortant avian H10N8 influenza virus. ...
jwatch.org/fw108438/2014/02/05/china-details-first-human-fatality-linked-novel-h10n8

*  Guangdong Province, 1 new confirmed case of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza - FluTrackers News and Information

Re: Guangdong Province, 1 new confirmed case of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza. The city's new case of human ... 3 months 23 days confirmed human infection of H7N9 avian influenza cases, the patient is currently in critical condition at the ... Guangdong Province, 1 new confirmed case of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza March 23rd, 2014, 11:59 PM. ... Guangdong Province, 1 new confirmed case of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza. ...
https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/china-h7n9-outbreak-tracking/china-h7n9-tracking-guangdong/162213-guangdong-province-1-new-confirmed-case-of-human-infection-with-h7n9-avian-influenza

*  Hunan Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 31 March 2014 - FluTrackers News and...

March 31, Hunan 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza, as the 18th province confirmed cases. Case ... Hunan Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 31 March 2014 March 31st, 2014, 03:07 AM. ... Hunan Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza Time :2014-03-31 Author:. ... Hunan Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 31 March 2014. ...
https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/china-h7n9-outbreak-tracking/china-h7n9-tracking-hunan/162504-hunan-province-1-new-confirmed-cases-of-human-infection-with-h7n9-avian-influenza-31-march-2014?t=220932

*  Guangdong Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 16 February 2014 - FluTrackers News...

Re: Guangdong Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 16 February 2014. Is just coincidence ... Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza. 2014-02-16 09:24:35 Ministry of Health and Family ... Guangdong Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 16 February 2014 February 15th, 2014, 09: ... Guangdong Province 1 new confirmed cases of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza 16 February 2014. ...
https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/china-h7n9-outbreak-tracking/china-h7n9-tracking-guangdong/160351-guangdong-province-1-new-confirmed-cases-of-human-infection-with-h7n9-avian-influenza-16-february-2014?t=218818

*  RePub, Erasmus University Repository: Serological reports of human infections of H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in...

Avian influenza, China, H7 subtype, H9 subtype, Influenza virus, Influenza virus A H5N1, Sero-prevalence, adolescent, adult, ... Serological reports of human infections of H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in northern China. Publication. Publication. ... human, influenza, major clinical study, male, poultry, preschool child, priority journal, school child, virus detection, virus ... Background: H7 and H9 subtype avian influenza viruses pose a similar threat to humans as H5 virus. Objectives: This study aims ...
https://repub.eur.nl/pub/15494/

*  H5N1: Hong Kong: CHP notified of five human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Mainland

CHP notified of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Mainland. Excerpt: The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the ... Influenza at human-animal interface - Monthly Risk Assessment Summary. WHO reports on new human H5N1 cases. ... Hong Kong: CHP notified of five human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Mainland. Via the Centre for Health Protection: CHP ... Via the Centre for Health Protection: CHP notified of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Mainland. Excerpt:. The Centre ...
crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/2017/06/hong-kong-chp-notified-of-five-human-cases-of-avian-influenza-ah7n9-in-mainland.html

*  WHO | Human influenza epidemic spreads to more countries in northern hemisphere - update 3

United States (29 November 2003). Influenza activity continued to increase during week 48. Overall ILI consultation rate was 5.1%, which is above the national baseline of 2.5%. Widespread influenza activity was reported in 13 states and regional activity was reported in 16 states during week 48; 39.1% of the specimens tested were positive for influenza with 1302 influenza A viruses and 7 B viruses identified. Since week 40, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta have antigenically characterized 157 influenza A(H3N2) viruses, of which 45 (29%) are A/Panama/2007/99-like and 112 (71%) are A/Fujian/411/2002-like.. Other reports. Low influenza activity was reported in Czech Republic, Germany, Hong Kong SAR, Italy, Thailand and Ukraine. No influenza activity was reported in Croatia, Iceland, Japan or Poland.. ...
who.int/csr/don/2003_12_10a/en/

*  WHO | Influenza virus activity in the world

During weeks 47 to 48 (20 November 2011 to 3 December 2011), the number of laboratory confirmed influenza virus detections in general remained sporadic in most parts of the world except in a few countries. The predominant virus subtype detected was influenza A(H3N2). In the northern hemisphere influenza activity remained low with the exception of a few countries. Regional outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses continued to persist in Cambodia. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B viruses were detected at low levels elsewhere in Asia, Europe and Northern America.. In Central America, influenza activity was low in general. In Costa Rica, increased detections of A(H3N2) viruses were reported with co-circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09.. In the southern hemisphere, an increase in the number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses was reported by Brazil. Elsewhere sporadic detections of influenza ...
who.int/influenza/gisrs_laboratory/updates/summaryreport_20111216/en/

*  Hospitalized Patients with Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection --- California, April--May, 2009

On May 18, this report was posted as an MMWR Early Release on the MMWR website (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr).. Since April 15 and 17, 2009, when the first two cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were identified from two southern California counties, novel influenza A (H1N1) cases have been documented throughout the world, with most cases occurring in the United States and Mexico (1--3). In the United States, early reports of illnesses associated with novel influenza A (H1N1) infection indicated the disease might be similar in severity to seasonal influenza, with the majority of patients not requiring hospitalization and only rare deaths reported, generally in persons with underlying medical conditions (2,3). As of May 17, 2009, 553 novel influenza A (H1N1) cases, including 333 confirmed and 220 probable cases, had been reported in 32 of 61 local health jurisdictions in California. Of the 553 patients, 30 have been ...
https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5819a6.htm

*  Pregnancy and influenza planning - Effect Measure

Bland reported on pregnant influenza patients in Philadelphia and elsewhere in the fall of 1918; of 337, 155 died [Bland PB. Influenza in its relation to pregnancy and labour. Am J Obstet Dis Women Child. 1919;79:184-97]. Harris obtained by questionnaire from obstetricians medical histories of 1,350 pregnant patients in Maryland and in 4 large US cities [Harris JW. Influenza occurring in pregnant women: a statistical study of thirteen hundred and fifty cases. JAMA. 1919;2:978-80]. Pneumonia developed in half (678) of these patients and 365 died. Death rates from pneumonia were >40% for every month of pregnancy; fetal loss was >40% in all months but the fifth (37%). According to a contemporaneous report from England, the influenza death rate for pregnant women was 25.4% [Bland PB. Influenza in its relation to pregnancy and labour. Am J Obstet Dis Women Child. 1919;79:184-97]. These inquiries into pregnancy must have been ...
scienceblogs.com/effectmeasure/2006/10/27/pregnancy-and-influenza-planni-1/

*  Clinical and laboratory features distinguishing pandemic H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia from interpandemic community-acquired...

To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the clinical differences between inter-pandemic CAP and H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia. Patients with H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia were significantly younger than patients with CAP, reflecting the epidemiology of H1N1 influenza infection globally.2 14 24 29 30 This may relate to previous exposure of older persons to pre-2009 H1N1 influenza viruses conferring some immunity.31-33 In future years, as the virus evolves, the epidemiology of H1N1 infection may alter to affect older persons to a greater extent. Such a shift would also impact on the age distribution of patients developing H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia with potentially important consequences on resultant morbidity and mortality. Studies of CAP conducted in inter-pandemic years demonstrate an association between extremes of age or frailty and influenza or viral infection.10 11. Lower ...
thorax.bmj.com/content/66/3/247

*  Vaccines for preventing seasonal influenza and its complications in people aged 65 or older | Cochrane

Influenza vaccination of elderly individuals is recommended worldwide as people aged 65 and older are at a higher risk of complications, hospitalisations and deaths from influenza. This review looked at evidence from experimental and non-experimental studies carried out over 40 years of influenza vaccination. We included 75 studies. These were grouped first according to study design and then the setting (community or long-term care facilities). The results are mostly based on non-experimental (observational) studies, which are at greater risk of bias, as not many good quality trials were available. Trivalent inactivated vaccines are the most commonly used influenza vaccines. Due to the poor quality of the available evidence, any conclusions regarding the effects of influenza vaccines for people aged 65 years or older cannot be drawn. The public health safety profile of the vaccines appears to be acceptable.. ...
cochrane.org/CD004876/ARI_vaccines-for-preventing-seasonal-influenza-and-its-complications-in-people-aged-65-or-older

*  Plus it

Advocacy for influenza vaccination begins with recognising the impact of the disease. Globally, seasonal influenza causes an estimated 300 000-500 000 deaths and 3-5 million cases of severe disease every year.1 Methods that distinguish between influenza and other viruses causing influenza-like illnesses estimate that influenza infections and complications cause an average 226 000 hospital admissions annually in the United States, including 3000-49 000 deaths, depending on seasonal severity.2 Influenza vaccines are estimated to prevent thousands of admissions and millions of illnesses annually with current usage.3 4 5. Complications and deaths from influenza are highest in elderly people, infants, and patients with compromised cardiopulmonary or immune systems.1 2 6 These vulnerable populations are most likely to enter healthcare settings and least likely to mount effective immune responses ...
bmj.com/content/347/bmj.f6705

*  Influenza-attributable deaths in south-eastern France (1999 to 2010): mortality predictions were undependable | BMC Public...

We assessed that respiratory mortality attributable to influenza was lower during the pandemic period than during the epidemic seasons. Since most of the influenza mortality is commonly observed in the elderly group (,65 year-old), the moderate elderly mortality during the 2009 pandemic period has impacted the total mortality, and has resulted in a reduced total mortality despite an increased mortality in the young age group.. Similarly, in Austria, Redlsperger-Fritz et al. reported an excess mortality in the young age groups (,34 year-old) and a reduced mortality in age groups , 55 year-old during the 2009 pandemic period, compared with the epidemic seasons [9]. In France, Lemaitre et al. showed that the mortality burden of the 2009 pandemic was particularly mild except in the age groups 5 to 44 years old [5].. The reasons for this low mortality among elderly may relate to the existence of prior immunity of individuals born before 1957 after infection with an A(H1N1)2009 ...
https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-015-1887-y

*  FLU NEWS SCAN: Flu-shot priority groups, 1918 pandemic flu transmission, recombinant swine flu virus, flu immune response |...

Those placed in priority groups to receive seasonal or the 2009 pandemic flu vaccine vary broadly among countries, with pregnant women, obese patients, and healthcare workers (HCWs) becoming increasingly targeted, according to researchers who studied policies in 72 countries over the past several years. Scientists from the University of Hong Kong analyzed target groups in 33 countries for whom policies were accessible for seasonal flu vaccine in 2009 (Southern Hemisphere) and 2009-10, 72 countries for monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine, and 34 countries for seasonal 2010 and 2010-11 vaccines. They found that for seasonal 2009-10 vaccines, which were produced before the pandemic, 97% of nations placed the elderly in the priority group, followed by those with chronic conditions (91%), HCWs (70%), and nursing home residents (52%). Pregnant women were included in only 46% of plans, and the obese in only 3%. For the 2009 H1N1 vaccine, pregnant women, HCWs, and those with chronic illnesses were targeted in ...
cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2011/08/flu-news-scan-flu-shot-priority-groups-1918-pandemic-flu-transmission

*  Influenza-Associated Mortality in Georgia (2009-2011)

Influenza Research and Treatment is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to all aspects of influenza.
https://hindawi.com/journals/irt/2012/480763/ref/

*  e- Ab Sensor - Based Real-time Diagnosis of Influenza Virus - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Since April 15 and 17, 2009, when the first two cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were identified in two southern California counties, as of 12 March 2010, the virus has spread to more than 213 countries and overseas territories or communities where it has caused the deaths of at least 16713 people. Therefore, a rapid diagnosis is clinically necessary and can provide clinicians the rapid answers and make early treatment possible to reduce the complications and case-fatality rate. In addition, early diagnosis of the patients will alert parents and public health workers to prevent the contacts earlier and to limit the influenza spread.. Electrosensing antibody probing system (e- Ab sensing), which was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of hapten, proteins or viral antigen in medical samples, will be used for analyzing the interaction kinetics between Q.anti-influenza-virus and its influenza virus antigen present in flu ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01388062

*  Avian Flu Diary: CDC: Updated RIDT Guidance - When `No' Doesn't Always Mean No

The above guidance documents are lengthy, technical, and of greatest interest to medical professionals, but an overview can give us a pretty good idea of their importance. RIDTs are popular in-office test kits that are designed to detect Influenza A and Influenza B infections in 15 minutes or so. They are quick, convenient and reasonably inexpensive - but their accuracy has come under scrutiny in the past (see MMWR: Evaluating RIDTs). In this 2012 study, 11 commercially available Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests that were were tested against 23 flu viruses (16 A & 6 B strains) that have circulated in the United States since 2006. Each virus was tested at five different dilution strengths, in order to gauge relative sensitivity of these tests ...
afludiary.blogspot.com/2015/10/cdc-updated-ridt-guidance-when-no.html

*  Virus Shedding and Environmental Deposition of a Novel Influenza Virus - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

An influenza pandemic has recently been declared, involving the novel A(H1N1) 'swine flu' virus. This has spread to almost 100 countries worldwide in less than two months, causing widespread disease so far in Mexico, USA and Canada. It is highly likely that over the next 12 months, many countries including the UK will be affected by widespread illness. In the UK this wave of intense flu activity is most likely to occur in late autumn 2009.. Very little is known about the new H1N1 pandemic virus. For example we do not know how long the virus is excreted by infected humans and how much virus is spread to surfaces and carried in the air. This is very important to know as soon as possible because it affects the advice that will be given to healthcare workers about controlling the spread of infection to themselves and other patients. Similarly we need this information so we can give good quality advice to families who will have to look after each other in their own homes.. The ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01046734

*  UW scientists report a new method to speed bird flu vaccine production ( In the event of an influenza pandemic ...)

In the event of an influenza pandemic the world's vaccine manufacture...Writing this week (Oct. 31 2005) in the online edition of the Proceed...In their report a team led by UW-Madison virologists Yoshihiro Kawaok...In nature viruses commandeer a cell's reproductive machinery to make ...,UW,scientists,report,a,new,method,to,speed,bird,flu,vaccine,production,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
bio-medicine.org/biology-news/UW-scientists-report-a-new-method-to-speed-bird-flu-vaccine-production-1584-1/

*  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

The evolution of influenza viruses results in (i) recurrent annual epidemics of disease that are caused by progressive antigenic drift of influenza A and B viruses due to the mutability of the RNA genome and (ii) infrequent but severe pandemics caused by the emergence of novel influenza A subtypes to which the population has little immunity. The latter characteristic is a consequence of the wide antigenic diversity and peculiar host range of influenza A viruses and the ability of their segmented RNA genomes to undergo frequent genetic reassortment (recombination) during mixed infections. Contrasting features of the evolution of recently circulating influenza AH1N1, AH3N2 and B viruses include the rapid drift of AH3N2 viruses as a single lineage, the slow replacement of successive antigenic variants of AH1N1 viruses and the co-circulation over some 25 years of antigenically and genetically distinct lineages of ...
rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/356/1416/1861.long

*  Antigen sparing strategy could boost bird flu vaccine production

The bird flu strain H5N1 is widely regarded as the probable cause of the next global influenza pandemic. This virus contains a H5 haemagglutinin antigen subtype, which generally produces a poor immunogenic response in humans and to which most of the world population is immunologically naïve. As a result, the one-dose schedule routinely used for seasonal "regular" influenza vaccines is unlikely to be sufficient to give immunity. The authors say: "Clearly, new formulations that require less antigen per dose are needed. The use of adjuvant to improve immunogenicity is a crucial antigen-sparing strategy.". The researchers did a study of eight groups of 50 volunteers aged 18-60 years, and studied four antigen doses (3.8µg, 7.5µg, 15µg, 30µg haemagglutinin) given with or without the oil-water adjuvant. Blood samples were then collected to analyse the immune response, and the results showed that the adjuvanted formulations were significantly more immunogenic than ...
innovations-report.com/html/reports/medicine-health/report-89029.html

*  Evaluation of the Japanese school health surveillance system for influenza.

In order to evaluate the Japanese nationwide school absenteeism surveillance system for pediatric influenza in comparison with the national sentinel surveillance for influenza, we used surveillance guidelines (Centers for Disease Control and Preventi
biomedsearch.com/nih/Evaluation-Japanese-school-health-surveillance/11326126.html

*  Influenza symptoms and treatment

Influenza (commonly called the flu) is a highly contagious illness that can occur in children or adults of any age. It occurs more often in the winter months because people spend more time in close contact with one another. The flu is spread easily f
uptodate.com/contents/influenza-symptoms-and-treatment-beyond-the-basics

*  Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

Influenza A is a devastating pathogen to humans, causing significant yearly morbidity and mortality, and periodic deadly pandemics. The recent 2009 influenza pandemic killed 1 in 8,300 Americans with direct and indirect costs estimated at $90 billion. This same pandemic stuck India in May of 2009, where over 45,000 laboratory-confirmed cases and over 3,000 deaths were reported. The actual number of cases and deaths are likely to have been far higher. Billions of dollars have been spent on preparedness including antiviral therapeutics and influenza vaccine development and manufacture. Unfortunately, these vaccines offer incomplete protection against infection and complications due to influenza (up to 50% to 70% failure rates in the very young, old, and immunocompromized individuals). Accurate markers or models that explain the development of protective immunity to influenza, or predict vaccine failure in ...
rgcb.res.in/m-radhakrishna-pillai.php

*  The domestic and international impacts of the 2009-H1N1 influenza A pandemic : global challenges, global solutions : workshop...

Get this from a library! The domestic and international impacts of the 2009-H1N1 influenza A pandemic : global challenges, global solutions : workshop summary. [Eileen R Choffnes; Alison Mack; David A Relman; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Forum on Microbial Threats.;] -- 'In March and early April 2009, a new, swine-origin 2009-H1N1 influenza A virus emerged in Mexico and the United States. During the first few weeks of surveillance, the virus spread by human-to-human ...
worldcat.org/title/domestic-and-international-impacts-of-the-2009-h1n1-influenza-a-pandemic-global-challenges-global-solutions-workshop-summary/oclc/495696002

*  Visterra medication proves effective against influenza strains | Vaccine News

Visterra Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company, recently published data that shows the effectiveness of its VIS410 in protecting people from both seasonal and potentially pandemic influenza strains.
vaccinenewsdaily.com/stories/510633889-law-courts-visterra-medication-proves-effective-against-influenza-strains

*  A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the immune response to an adjuvanted 2012 seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza...

This study will investigate the immunogenicity and tolerability of seasonal influenza virus vaccine alone and in combination with ADVAX [Vaxine], for the
adisinsight.springer.com/trials/700220290

*  Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

As Visiting Faculty at RGCB, I am a joint Principal Investigator on two research programs in Viral Disease Biology. The first one is studying the dynamics of immune responses to influenza vaccine. Influenza is the most recurring respiratory disease in humans. During the 20th century, Influenza A viruses have afflicted the human race with three pandemics in 1918, 1957 and 1968 and numerous seasonal epidemics. While most people recover from infection, some develop life-threatening complications such as pneumonia. This occurs predominantly in the elderly (>65 years of age), people with chronic medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease, pregnant women, and young children of 0.5-5 years of age. Although a single influenza infection provides lifelong immunity against the homotypic strain, new variants continue to emerge, rendering the public susceptible to infection with a novel flu variant. ...
rgcb.res.in/joshy-jacob.php

*  portland imc - 2009.04.25 - April 25-26, 2009 -- SPECIAL BULLETIN. New swine flu feared to be weaponized strain

Our Jakarta source said WHO officials are afraid that the presence of gene segments from dreaded H5N1 bird flu in the A-H1N1 swine flu strain could mean that the new swine flu strain was engineered to 'jump species.' WMR has been informed that the CDC and U.S. Army dug up the body of an Inuit woman who died in 1918 in Brevig Mission, Alaska from an outbreak of Spanish flu. The influenza pandemic that year killed up to 100 million people worldwide in an 18-month period. Brevig Mission saw 72 of its 80 residents die within five days, the worst case recorded anywhere in the world. WMR has been told the genetic material recovered by the U.S. government from the corpse of the Inuit woman provided the basis for the development of the H5N1, or bird (avian), flu strain at the U.S. Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) laboratory at Fort Detrick, Maryland, the point of origin for the Ames strain of anthrax used in the 2001 bio-war attacks against the U.S. Congress and the media ...
portland.indymedia.org/en/2009/04/390770.shtml

*  WHO offers standards to improve global flu surveillance | CIDRAP

(CIDRAP News) - Largely as a result of gaps in global influenza surveillance that were exposed during the 2009 pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released a set of standards designed to improve the collection and use of flu data around the world.
cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2012/07/who-offers-standards-improve-global-flu-surveillance

Influenza Research Database: The Influenza Research Database (IRD)IRD Influenza Research Database BRCSquires, R.B.Influenza A virus subtype H1N1: Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu.Flu season: Flu season is an annually recurring time period characterized by the prevalence of outbreaks of influenza (flu). The season occurs during the cold half of the year in each hemisphere.Influenza A virus subtype H5N1: Influenza A virus subtype H5N1, also known as A(H5N1) or simply H5N1, is a subtype of the influenza A virus which can cause illness in humans and many other animal species. A bird-adapted strain of H5N1, called HPAI A(H5N1) for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of type A of subtype H5N1, is the highly pathogenic causative agent of H5N1 flu, commonly known as avian influenza ("bird flu").Influvac: Influvac is a sub-unit vaccine produced and marketed by Abbott Laboratories. It contains inactivated purified surface fragments (sub-units) from the three different strains of the influenza virus (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and Influenza B Virus) that are selected and distributed by the World Health Organization, on the basis of their latest recommendations.Global spread of H5N1 in 2006: The global spread of (highly pathogenic) H5N1 in birds is considered a significant pandemic threat.Pandemic: A pandemic (from Greek πᾶν pan "all" and δῆμος demos "people") is an epidemic of infectious disease that has spread through human populations across a large region; for instance multiple continents, or even worldwide. A widespread endemic disease that is stable in terms of how many people are getting sick from it is not a pandemic.Newmarket, Suffolk: Newmarket is a market town in the English county of Suffolk, approximately 65 miles (105 kilometres) north of London. It is generally considered the birthplace and global centre of thoroughbred horse racing and a potential World Heritage Site.Neuraminidase inhibitor: Neuraminidase inhibitors are a class of drugs which block the neuraminidase enzyme. They are commonly used as antiviral drugs because they block the function of viral neuraminidases of the influenza virus, by preventing its reproduction by budding from the host cell.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==OseltamivirFour Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Bird trapping: Bird trapping techniques to capture wild birds include a wide range of techniques that have their origins in the hunting of birds for food. While hunting for food does not require birds to be caught alive, some trapping techniques capture birds without harming them and are of use in ornithology research.VaccinationAntiviral drug: Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections. Like antibiotics for bacteria, specific antivirals are used for specific viruses.ZanamivirAmantadineBritish Poultry Standard: [Poultry Standard.png|thumb|right|The front cover of the 6th Edition of the British Poultry Standards.Tadorninae: The Tadorninae is the shelduck-sheldgoose subfamily of the Anatidae, the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl such as the geese and swans.Kennel clubInfluenza virus matrix protein 2: Matrix protein 2 of Influenza virus is a single-spanning transmembrane protein. It is expressed on the infected cell surface and incorporated into virions where it is a minor component.RimantadineNational Data Repository: A National Data Repository (NDR) is a data bank that seeks to preserve and promote a country’s natural resources data, particularly data related to the petroleum exploration and production (E&P) sector.Viral pneumoniaU.S.-Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project: The U.S.Bokhara Trumpeter: The Bokhara Trumpeter is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. Bokhara Trumpeters, along with other varieties of domesticated pigeons, are all descendants from the rock pigeon (Columba livia).Global Vaccines: Global Vaccines, Inc is a mission-driven non-profit company applying state-of-the-art science and innovative business strategies to design and develop affordable vaccines for people in poor countries.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Influenza virus nucleoprotein: Influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a structural protein which encapsidates the negative strand viral RNA. NP is one of the main determinants of species specificity.Lung receptor: Lung receptors sense irritation or inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli.Coles PhillipsPyranChicken as biological research model: Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their eggs have been used extensively as research models throughout the history of biology. Today they continue to serve as an important model for normal human biology as well as pathological disease processes.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Clinical virology: Clinical or medical virology is a branch of medicine (more particularly of clinical pathology) which consists in isolating and/or in characterising one or several viruses responsible for some human pathologies by various direct or indirect techniques (cellular Cultures, serologies, biochemistry, molecular biology). It also consists in proving the absence of resistance of viruses in treatment antiviral by viral genome sequencing to adapt antiviral therapeutics at best.PSI-6130Polysorbate: Polysorbates are a class of emulsifiers used in some pharmaceuticals and food preparation. They are often used in cosmetics to solubilize essential oils into water-based products.Nasal administrationNS3 (HCV): Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), also known as p-70, is a viral nonstructural protein that is 70 kDa cleavage product of the hepatitis C virus polyprotein. It acts as a serine protease.Resistance mutation: A resistance mutation is a point mutations in virus genes that allow the virus to become resistant to treatment with a particular antiviral drug. The term was first used in the management of HIV, the first virus in which genome sequencing was routinely used to look for drug resistance.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Universal Immunization Programme: Universal Immunization Programme is a vaccination program launched by the Government of India in 1985. It became a part of Child Survival and Safe Motherhood Programme in 1992 and is currently one of the key areasSialic acid: Sialic acid is a generic term for the N- or O-substituted derivatives of neuraminic acid, a monosaccharide with a nine-carbon backbone.SqualaneLower respiratory tract infection: Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), while often used as a synonym for pneumonia, can also be applied to other types of infection including lung abscess and acute bronchitis. Symptoms include shortness of breath, weakness, fever, coughing and fatigue.List of hospitals in Hong Kong: This is a list of hospitals and other medical facilities in Hong Kong.Subtherapeutic antibiotic use in swine: Antibiotics are commonly used in commercial swine production in the United States and around the world. They are used for disease treatment, disease prevention and control, and growth promotion.Goose egg addling: Goose egg “addling” is a wildlife management method of population control for Canada geese and other bird species. The process of addling involves temporarily removing fertilized eggs from the nest, testing for embryo development, terminating embryo development, and placing the egg back in the nest.Antigenic shiftTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingProtein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Quarantine

(1/7176) Interrupting the transmission of respiratory tract infections: theory and practice.

Interruption of transmission has always been one of the most attractive approaches for infection control. The technologies available were severely limited before the development of appropriate vaccines. Mathematically, the proportion of those who need to be immune to interrupt transmission can be derived from the Ro, which represents the number of new cases infected by a single case when all contacts are susceptible. Purely respiratory infections have critical characteristics affecting transmission that are different from key childhood vaccine-preventable diseases spread by the respiratory route. They include frequent reinfections and antigenic changes of the agents. Pragmatic approaches to understanding their potential effect can be found in experimental and programmatic use of vaccines such as those for Haemophilus influenzae type b and influenza virus infections. Results of these experiences can in turn strengthen the development of transmission theory.  (+info)

(2/7176) Potential advantages of DNA immunization for influenza epidemic and pandemic planning.

Immunization with purified DNA is a powerful technique for inducing immune responses. The concept of DNA immunization involves insertion of the gene encoding the antigen of choice into a bacterial plasmid and injection of the plasmid into the host where the antigen is expressed and where it induces humoral and cellular immunity. The most effective routes and methods for DNA immunization are bombardment with particles coated with DNA ("gene gun" technique), followed by the intramuscular and intradermal routes. DNA immunization technology has the potential to induce immunity to all antigens that can be completely encoded in DNA, which therefore include all protein, but not carbohydrate, antigens. DNA immunization results in presentation of antigens to the host's immune system in a natural form, like that achieved with live-attenuated vaccines. The DNA immunization strategy has the potential to rapidly provide a new vaccine in the face of an emerging influenza pandemic.  (+info)

(3/7176) Evaluation of clinical case definitions of influenza: detailed investigation of patients during the 1995-1996 epidemic in France.

Using clinical predictors, we evaluated clinical case definitions of influenza during the 1995-1996 outbreak in France. Thirty-five general practitioners collected virological specimens and clinical data. Predictors of influenza virus infection were selected with logistic regression models. The results varied with the influenza virus subtype: temperature of >38.2 degrees C, stiffness or myalgia, rhinorrhea, and cough were predictive of influenza A/H3N2, whereas fatigue, lacrimation or conjunctival injection, and the absence of stiffness or myalgia were predictive of influenza A/H1N1. On the basis of this analysis and data from the literature, 12 clinical case definitions were evaluated for their abilities to diagnose influenza virus infection. They were associated with positive predictive values of 27% to 40% and negative predictive values of 80% to 91%. We conclude that focused studies evaluating clinical case definitions of influenza with use of subsets of patients should accompany population-based disease surveillance for optimal estimates of the disease burden associated with influenza epidemics.  (+info)

(4/7176) Biological heterogeneity, including systemic replication in mice, of H5N1 influenza A virus isolates from humans in Hong Kong.

An H5N1 avian influenza A virus was transmitted to humans in Hong Kong in 1997. Although the virus causes systemic infection and is highly lethal in chickens because of the susceptibility of the hemagglutinin to furin and PC6 proteases, it is not known whether it also causes systemic infection in humans. The clinical outcomes of infection in Hong Kong residents ranged widely, from mild respiratory disease to multiple organ failure leading to death. Therefore, to understand the pathogenesis of influenza due to these H5N1 isolates, we investigated their virulence in mice. The results identified two distinct groups of viruses: group 1, for which the dose lethal for 50% of mice (MLD50) was between 0.3 and 11 PFU, and group 2, for which the MLD50 was more than 10(3) PFU. One day after intranasal inoculation of mice with 100 PFU of group 1 viruses, the virus titer in lungs was 10(7) PFU/g or 3 log units higher than that for group 2 viruses. Both types of viruses had replicated to high titers (>10(6) PFU/g) in the lungs by day 3 and maintained these titers through day 6. More importantly, only the group 1 viruses caused systemic infection, replicating in nonrespiratory organs, including the brain. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the replication of a group 1 virus in brain neurons and glial cells and in cardiac myofibers. Phylogenetic analysis of all viral genes showed that both groups of Hong Kong H5N1 viruses had formed a lineage distinct from those of other viruses and that genetic reassortment between H5N1 and H1 or H3 human viruses had not occurred. Since mice and humans harbor both the furin and the PC6 proteases, we suggest that the virulence mechanism responsible for the lethality of influenza viruses in birds also operates in mammalian hosts. The failure of some H5N1 viruses to produce systemic infection in our model indicates that multiple, still-to-be-identified, factors contribute to the severity of H5N1 infection in mammals. In addition, the ability of these viruses to produce systemic infection in mice and the clear differences in pathogenicity among the isolates studied here indicate that this system provides a useful model for studying the pathogenesis of avian influenza virus infection in mammals.  (+info)

(5/7176) Detection of antibody to avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in human serum by using a combination of serologic assays.

From May to December 1997, 18 cases of mild to severe respiratory illness caused by avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses were identified in Hong Kong. The emergence of an avian virus in the human population prompted an epidemiological investigation to determine the extent of human-to-human transmission of the virus and risk factors associated with infection. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, the standard method for serologic detection of influenza virus infection in humans, has been shown to be less sensitive for the detection of antibodies induced by avian influenza viruses. Therefore, we developed a more sensitive microneutralization assay to detect antibodies to avian influenza in humans. Direct comparison of an HI assay and the microneutralization assay demonstrated that the latter was substantially more sensitive in detecting human antibodies to H5N1 virus in infected individuals. An H5-specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was also established to test children's sera. The sensitivity and specificity of the microneutralization assay were compared with those of an H5-specific indirect ELISA. When combined with a confirmatory H5-specific Western blot test, the specificities of both assays were improved. Maximum sensitivity (80%) and specificity (96%) for the detection of anti-H5 antibody in adults aged 18 to 59 years were achieved by using the microneutralization assay combined with Western blotting. Maximum sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) in detecting anti-H5 antibody in sera obtained from children less than 15 years of age were achieved by using ELISA combined with Western blotting. This new test algorithm is being used for the seroepidemiologic investigations of the avian H5N1 influenza outbreak.  (+info)

(6/7176) Influenza vaccination among the elderly in Italy.

This article surveys the attitudes and perceptions of a random sample of the elderly population in three regions of Italy on the use and efficacy of influenza vaccine. The data were collected by direct interviews using a standard questionnaire. The results show that vaccination coverage against influenza is inadequate (26-48.6%). The major reasons for nonvaccination were lack of faith in the vaccine and disbelief that influenza is a dangerous illness. These data emphasize the need for a systematic education programme targeted at the elderly and the provision of influenza vaccination, with the increased cooperation of general practitioners.  (+info)

(7/7176) Influenza A virus accelerates neutrophil apoptosis and markedly potentiates apoptotic effects of bacteria.

Neutrophils are recruited into the airway in the early phase of uncomplicated influenza A virus (IAV) infection and during the bacterial superinfections that are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in IAV-infected subjects. In this report, we show that IAV accelerates neutrophil apoptosis. Unopsonized Escherichia coli had similar effects, although apoptotic effects of opsonized E coli were greater. When neutrophils were treated with both IAV and unopsonized E coli, a marked enhancement of the rate and extent of neutrophil apoptosis occurred as compared with that caused by either pathogen alone. Treatment of neutrophils with IAV markedly increased phagocytosis of E coli. Simultaneous treatment of neutrophils with IAV and E coli also elicited greater hydrogen peroxide production than did either pathogen alone. IAV increased neutrophil expression of Fas antigen and Fas ligand, and it also increased release of Fas ligand into the cell supernatant. These findings may have relevance to the understanding of inflammatory responses to IAV in vivo and of bacterial superinfection of IAV-infected subjects.  (+info)

(8/7176) A mathematical approach to epidemic control.

A mathematical model of an influenza epidemic which occurred in 1961 is suggested. The mathematics imply conclusions on the practical control of similar outbreaks. This is a technique applicable to one general practice.  (+info)



viruses


  • Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and Sea Lane Biotechnologies have solved the co-crystal structure of a human antibody that can neutralize influenza viruses in a unique way. (news-medical.net)
  • Sea Lane Biotechnologies scientists, led by Bhatt, isolated the unusual new antibody, which they dubbed C05, by screening this enormous library for antibodies that could bind to proteins from a variety of influenza A viruses-the most dangerous family of flu viruses. (news-medical.net)
  • The RBS has such an important function that it does not change much from strain to strain-and thus C05 can neutralize a broad range of dangerous influenza A viruses, including H1, H2, H3, and H9 subtypes. (news-medical.net)
  • Background: H7 and H9 subtype avian influenza viruses pose a similar threat to humans as H5 virus. (eur.nl)
  • Our study provides further evidence that the air in LPMs can be contaminated by influenza viruses and their nucleic acids, and this should be considered when choosing and evaluating disinfection strategies in LPMs, such as regular air disinfection. (scoop.it)
  • Aerosolized viruses such as the H9N2 virus detected in this study can increase the risk of human infection when people are exposed in LPMs. (scoop.it)
  • Viruses play a constant game of cat-and-mouse with the human immune system. (theconversation.com)
  • Recently, it's become easier to track how viruses change within the human body. (theconversation.com)
  • The same advances that have made it cheap and easy to sequence human genomes are changing how we study viruses. (theconversation.com)
  • For the cost of sequencing a single human genome, we can sequence thousands of viruses from throughout an infection to track new mutations as they arise. (theconversation.com)

outbreaks


  • WHO advises that travellers to countries with known outbreaks of avian influenza should avoid poultry farms, or contact with animals in live bird markets, or entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered, or contact with any surfaces that appear to be contaminated with faeces from poultry or other animals. (who.int)
  • Objectives: This study aims to identify the potential existence of H7 and H9 avian influenza infections in farmers and in poultry workers in northern China regions with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks. (eur.nl)
  • Recently, avian influenza virus has caused repeated worldwide outbreaks in humans. (scoop.it)

H7N9


  • 27 March 2014 - Between 20 and 25 March 2014, the National Health and Family Planning Commission (NHFPC) of China notified WHO of six additional laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. (who.int)
  • The previous report of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus detection in live poultry exported from mainland China to Hong Kong SAR shows the potential for the virus to spread through movement of live poultry, at this time there is no indication that international spread of avian influenza A(H7N9) has occurred. (who.int)
  • Further sporadic human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. (who.int)
  • Until the virus adapts itself for efficient human-to-human transmission, the risk of ongoing international spread of H7N9 virus by travellers is low. (who.int)
  • 3 months 23 days confirmed human infection of H7N9 avian influenza cases, the patient is currently in critical condition at the city's hospitals admitted to hospital. (flutrackers.com)
  • Health and Family Planning Commission of Guangdong Province on February 16 Bulletin, Shenzhen new confirmed cases of H7N9 avian influenza case of human infection. (flutrackers.com)
  • Qinmou cases, male, 44 years old, workers, now living in Longgang District, February 15 confirmed cases of human infection of H7N9 avian influenza, the patient is currently in critical condition in hospital in Shenzhen designated hospital. (flutrackers.com)
  • The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health today (June 16) is monitoring a notification from the National Health and Family Planning Commission that five additional human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9), including one death, were recorded from June 9 to 15, and strongly urged the public to maintain strict personal, food and environmental hygiene both locally and during travel. (typepad.com)

respiratory


  • As always, a diagnosis of infection with an avian influenza virus should be considered in individuals who develop severe acute respiratory symptoms while travelling or soon after returning from an area where avian influenza is a concern. (who.int)
  • WHO encourages countries to continue strengthening influenza surveillance, including surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns, in order to ensure reporting of human infections under the IHR (2005), and continue national health preparedness actions. (who.int)
  • Need Help Finding Human Respiratory Strains? (atcc.org)
  • View a comprehensive listing of ATCC strains known to cause respiratory disease in humans. (atcc.org)

H1N1


  • Viral nucleic acids, including virus genomic RNA, in total RNA isolated from MDCK cells (ATCC CCL-34) infected with Influenza A virus - TC adapted, strain A/Swine/1976/31(H1N1) (ATCC VR-1682). (atcc.org)
  • Mouse monoclonal antibody prepared against the H1 hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1). (atcc.org)
  • Mouse monoclonal antibody prepared against the H1 hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus, A/South Carolina/1/1918 (H1N1) was purified from clone 58C4 hybridoma supernatant by protein G affinity chromatography. (atcc.org)
  • Mouse monoclonal antibody prepared against the H1 hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A/South Carolina/1/1918 (H1N1) was purified from clone 5D3 hybridoma supernatant by protein G affinity chromatography. (atcc.org)

infection


  • Should human cases from affected areas travel internationally, their infection may be detected in another country during or after arrival. (who.int)
  • Conclusions: Although H9 virus infection was limited in farmers from Xinjiang and Liaoning, a public health alert is needed as novel pandemic influenza strains may develop unnoticed given the presence of subclinical infections, and the possibility of re-assortment with prevailing H5N1 virus in these regions. (eur.nl)

infections


  • In mice, relatively low doses of C05 prevented infections despite influenza A exposures that would have been lethal. (news-medical.net)
  • March 23 confirmed human infections H N 7 9 avian flu cases, patient risk, and the Shenzhen city of hospital-admitted patient. (flutrackers.com)
  • The progressive increase in the number of multi-drug resistant bacteria and the complete ban on the use of antibiotics in livestock feed in the EU, as well as the partial ban in the US, have led to the growth of research on the use of bacteriophages to combat bacterial infections in humans and animals. (scoop.it)

H5N1


poultry


  • Live Poultry Markets (LPMs) play an important role in the circulation and reassortment of novel Avian Influenza Virus (AIVs). (scoop.it)
  • Aerosol transmission is one of the most important pathways for influenza virus to spread among poultry, from poultry to mammals, and among mammals. (scoop.it)

novel


  • Chinese health officials are reporting the first fatality associated with a novel reassortant avian H10N8 influenza virus. (jwatch.org)

virus


  • If this were to occur, community level spread is unlikely as the virus does not have the ability to transmit easily among humans. (who.int)
  • Almost uniquely among broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza A, it specifically recognizes and blocks the part of the flu virus that mediates viral attachment to host cells. (news-medical.net)
  • In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. (scoop.it)
  • These mutations can show us how the virus reacts to challenging environments within the human body. (theconversation.com)

potential


  • We found evidence of adaptation targeting muscle function and immune response, potential adaptive introgression of UV-light protection, and selection predating modern human diversification involving skeletal and neurological development. (scoop.it)

history


  • These new findings illustrate the importance of African genomic diversity in understanding human evolutionary history. (scoop.it)