Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Infant, Premature, DiseasesInfant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Infant Formula: Liquid formulations for the nutrition of infants that can substitute for BREAST MILK.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.Milk, HumanChild Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Infant, Small for Gestational Age: An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.Bottle Feeding: Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.Infant, Extremely Premature: A human infant born before 28 weeks of GESTATION.Crying: To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.Intensive Care, Neonatal: Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Infant Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in infants ages 1 month to 24 months.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Term Birth: CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.Nurseries, Hospital: Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.Incubators, Infant: Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Enterocolitis, Necrotizing: ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Retinopathy of Prematurity: A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Infant Equipment: Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Diarrhea, Infantile: DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Leukomalacia, Periventricular: Degeneration of white matter adjacent to the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES following cerebral hypoxia or BRAIN ISCHEMIA in neonates. The condition primarily affects white matter in the perfusion zone between superficial and deep branches of the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY. Clinical manifestations include VISION DISORDERS; CEREBRAL PALSY; PARAPLEGIA; SEIZURES; and cognitive disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1021; Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch4, pp30-1)Hearing Tests: Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Hyaline Membrane Disease: A respiratory distress syndrome in newborn infants, usually premature infants with insufficient PULMONARY SURFACTANTS. The disease is characterized by the formation of a HYALINE-like membrane lining the terminal respiratory airspaces (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and subsequent collapse of the lung (PULMONARY ATELECTASIS).Postnatal Care: The care provided to women and their NEWBORNS for the first few months following CHILDBIRTH.Immunity, Maternally-Acquired: Resistance to a disease-causing agent induced by the introduction of maternal immunity into the fetus by transplacental transfer or into the neonate through colostrum and milk.Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Neonatal Nursing: The nursing specialty that deals with the care of newborn infants during the first four weeks after birth.Meconium: The thick green-to-black mucilaginous material found in the intestines of a full-term fetus. It consists of secretions of the INTESTINAL GLANDS; BILE PIGMENTS; FATTY ACIDS; AMNIOTIC FLUID; and intrauterine debris. It constitutes the first stools passed by a newborn.Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Ductus Arteriosus, Patent: A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.Hyperbilirubinemia, Neonatal: Accumulation of BILIRUBIN, a breakdown product of HEME PROTEINS, in the BLOOD during the first weeks of life. This may lead to NEONATAL JAUNDICE. The excess bilirubin may exist in the unconjugated (indirect) or the conjugated (direct) form. The condition may be self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) or pathological with toxic levels of bilirubin.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding: Hemorrhage caused by vitamin K deficiency.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Beds: Equipment on which one may lie and sleep, especially as used to care for the hospital patient.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Bilirubin: A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.Colostrum: The thin, yellow, serous fluid secreted by the mammary glands during pregnancy and immediately postpartum before lactation begins. It consists of immunologically active substances, white blood cells, water, protein, fat, and carbohydrates.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Congenital Hypothyroidism: A condition in infancy or early childhood due to an in-utero deficiency of THYROID HORMONES that can be caused by genetic or environmental factors, such as thyroid dysgenesis or HYPOTHYROIDISM in infants of mothers treated with THIOURACIL during pregnancy. Endemic cretinism is the result of iodine deficiency. Clinical symptoms include severe MENTAL RETARDATION, impaired skeletal development, short stature, and MYXEDEMA.Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.United StatesErythroblastosis, Fetal: A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Postpartum Period: In females, the period that is shortly after giving birth (PARTURITION).Umbilical Cord: The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Hyperbilirubinemia: A condition characterized by an abnormal increase of BILIRUBIN in the blood, which may result in JAUNDICE. Bilirubin, a breakdown product of HEME, is normally excreted in the BILE or further catabolized before excretion in the urine.Failure to Thrive: A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Bronchiolitis, Viral: An acute inflammatory disease of the lower RESPIRATORY TRACT, caused by paramyxoviruses, occurring primarily in infants and young children; the viruses most commonly implicated are PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS TYPE 3; RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN; and METAPNEUMOVIRUS.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Kangaroo-Mother Care Method: A method of continuously holding a partially wrapped baby to the chest, involving skin-to-skin contact. Originally it was a method of caring for LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANT in developing countries and is now more widespread in developed nations. Aside from encouraging breast feeding, the extra sleep that the infant gets assists in regulating body temperature, helps the baby conserve energy, and redirects calorie expenditures toward growth and weight gain.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Infanticide: The killing of infants at birth or soon after.Kernicterus: A term used pathologically to describe BILIRUBIN staining of the BASAL GANGLIA; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM and clinically to describe a syndrome associated with HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Clinical features include athetosis, MUSCLE SPASTICITY or hypotonia, impaired vertical gaze, and DEAFNESS. Nonconjugated bilirubin enters the brain and acts as a neurotoxin, often in association with conditions that impair the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER (e.g., SEPSIS). This condition occurs primarily in neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN), but may rarely occur in adults. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p613)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: Pneumovirus infections caused by the RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have been reported.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn: Abnormal increase in RESPIRATORY RATE in the newborn. It is self-limiting and attributed to the delayed fetal lung fluid clearance often in CAESAREAN SECTION delivery.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Syphilis, Congenital: Syphilis acquired in utero and manifested by any of several characteristic tooth (Hutchinson's teeth) or bone malformations and by active mucocutaneous syphilis at birth or shortly thereafter. Ocular and neurologic changes may also occur.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Pregnancy Trimester, Third: The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.Hyperoxia: An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Stillbirth: The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.Echoencephalography: Use of reflected ultrasound in the diagnosis of intracranial pathologic processes.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Pacifiers: Devices that babies can suck on when they are not feeding. The extra sucking can be comforting to the babies and pacify them. Pacifiers usually are used as a substitute for the thumb in babies who suck on their thumb or fingers almost constantly.Perinatology: The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Hospitals, Maternity: Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Pregnancy in Diabetics: The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Exchange Transfusion, Whole Blood: Repetitive withdrawal of small amounts of blood and replacement with donor blood until a large proportion of the blood volume has been exchanged. Used in treatment of fetal erythroblastosis, hepatic coma, sickle cell anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, septicemia, burns, thrombotic thrombopenic purpura, and fulminant malaria.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain: A disorder characterized by a reduction of oxygen in the blood combined with reduced blood flow (ISCHEMIA) to the brain from a localized obstruction of a cerebral artery or from systemic hypoperfusion. Prolonged hypoxia-ischemia is associated with ISCHEMIC ATTACK, TRANSIENT; BRAIN INFARCTION; BRAIN EDEMA; COMA; and other conditions.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Abnormalities, MultipleLung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Oximetry: The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.BrazilSensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Ductus Arteriosus: A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.Cerebral Ventricles: Four CSF-filled (see CEREBROSPINAL FLUID) cavities within the cerebral hemispheres (LATERAL VENTRICLES), in the midline (THIRD VENTRICLE) and within the PONS and MEDULLA OBLONGATA (FOURTH VENTRICLE).Toxoplasmosis, Congenital: Prenatal protozoal infection with TOXOPLASMA gondii which is associated with injury to the developing fetal nervous system. The severity of this condition is related to the stage of pregnancy during which the infection occurs; first trimester infections are associated with a greater degree of neurologic dysfunction. Clinical features include HYDROCEPHALUS; MICROCEPHALY; deafness; cerebral calcifications; SEIZURES; and psychomotor retardation. Signs of a systemic infection may also be present at birth, including fever, rash, and hepatosplenomegaly. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p735)Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.Fetal Macrosomia: A condition of fetal overgrowth leading to a large-for-gestational-age FETUS. It is defined as BIRTH WEIGHT greater than 4,000 grams or above the 90th percentile for population and sex-specific growth curves. It is commonly seen in GESTATIONAL DIABETES; PROLONGED PREGNANCY; and pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes mellitus.Infant, Postmature: An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine: A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.BangladeshAnoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Streptococcus agalactiae: A bacterium which causes mastitis in cattle and occasionally in man.Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).Hepatitis B Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated hepatitis B or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent hepatitis B. Some vaccines may be recombinantly produced.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 75

Early curettage of giant congenital naevi in new-born infants, if performed during the first few weeks after birth, can have a ... We report a case of a newborn infant whose mother had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosed before pregnancy. The child ... OBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of long-bone radiographs to the diagnosis and management of newborn infants at risk ... METHODS: Case infants with presumptive and confirmed congenital syphilis were compared with control infants born to women with ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-75-p13.html

*  Kangaroo Mother Versus Traditional Care for Newborn Infants ≤2000 Grams: A Randomized, Controlled Trial | Articles | Pediatrics

Of them, 3350 (24.7%) corresponded to LBW infants (birth weight ≤2500 g). A total of 1084 (8%) live newborn infants weighing ≤ ... Comparison of Characteristics of Newborn Infants From Birth to Eligibility Between Kangaroo and Control Infants ... of the newborn infants ,2000 g would be eligible. Therefore, we planned to evaluate at least 940 infants ≤2000 g to identify a ... and newborn infant characteristics). Regarding the 131 referred infants, the distribution of all their baseline variables was ...
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/100/4/682?ijkey=3936829a91742f7d09596feb70ca396736224a4e&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 27

The diagnosis of an infant, especially a newborn, with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is difficult due to the fact that not ... To develop a laboratory marker to identify newborns exposed to alcohol. Meconium was collected from 30 infants from Jordan who ... milk than do breast-fed infants not exposed to alcohol. The present study tested the hypothesis that infants would compensate ... Over a 4-month period, all infants admitted to the well-baby nursery were enrolled in a prospective study designed to compare ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-27-p4.html

*  Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Raltegravir in HIV-1-Exposed Newborn Infants at Risk of Acquiring HIV-1 Infection - Full Text...

Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Raltegravir in HIV-1-Exposed Newborn Infants at Risk of Acquiring HIV-1 Infection. This study is ... This study will evaluate the safety and PKs of RAL given to HIV-1-exposed newborn infants at risk of acquiring HIV-1 infection ... This study will evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PKs) of raltegravir (RAL) given to HIV-1-exposed newborn infants at ... Infant Inclusion Criteria:. *For Cohort 1 and Cohort 2 (RAL-naive): Full-term infants exposed to HIV aged 48 hours or less. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01780831?term=niaid hiv/aids&recr=open&rank=9

*  Miracle baby: Surgery saves 3-day-old infant from rare defect - News

In November 2003, a newborn male infant was operated upon by a team of doctors in Advocate Children's hospital in Illinois, USA ... The infant, yet to be named, was diagnosed with a rare genetic disease known as jejunal atresia, which is marked by a partial ... The infant's stomach took nearly two months to heal and start functioning normally. Doctors shared that he was on IV fluids for ... This infant was diagnosed with a congenital defect when his mother was six- months pregnant. A three-hour-long surgery three ...
mid-day.com/articles/miracle-baby-surgery-saves-3-day-old-infant-from-rare-defect/15482189

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 34

OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk that newborn infants of East Asian and South Asian ancestry may be misclassified as small for ... higher risk infants have lower mortality rates than do lower risk infants. However, among higher birth weight infants, the ... In a cohort of N(max) 2094 infants born during a randomized study of combined interventions to improve maternal and infant ... BACKGROUND: Most studies on clinical outcome of preterm born infants focus on high-risk infants, whereas little is known about ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-34-p5.html

*  Non-urgent caesarean delivery increases the need for ventilation at birth in term newborn infants.

... by bag and mask and by bag and endotracheal tube in newly born term infants with vertex presentation delivered by non-urgent ... Infant, Low Birth Weight. Infant, Newborn. Intubation, Intratracheal / utilization. Perinatal Care / methods. Positive-Pressure ... RESULTS: 2087 infants were born by non-urgent caesarean and 4842 by non-instrumental vaginal delivery. Non-urgent caesarean ... PATIENTS: 6929 inborn infants without congenital anomalies, with gestational ages from 37(0/7) to 41(6/7) weeks with vertex ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Non-urgent-caesarean-delivery-increases/20584803.html

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 21

The charts of all infants (N = 46) 22-25 weeks gestation admitted to the Newborn Intensive Care Unit at Providence Alaska ... Effect of surfactant on morbidity, mortality, and resource use in newborn infants ... ... This study examined the effect on infant morbidity and mortality of sustained nursing contact with mothers of healthy infants ... 108 infants were matched with respect to gestational age, date of birth, and gender. The HELLP group infants had more grade ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-21-p9.html

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 18

The sources and the impact of maternal bacteria on the initial inoculum of the intestinal microflora of newborn infants remain ... We compared 21 SGA infants prescribed 200 mL/kg milk on day 2, with 21 infants, prescribed 170 mL/kg on day 9. The infants fed ... infant feeds in place of powdered infant feeds (PIFs) as a standard formula for infants under the age of 1 year who are unable ... METHODS: Forty-five mother-infant pairs from western Shanghai were studied. All infants, born at term with normal weight and ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-18-p10.html

*  EMTALA: Its Application to Newborn Infants by Thaddeus Mason Pope :: SSRN

... to extremely premature newborn infants has long been a source of concern to pediatrici ... The application of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) to extremely premature newborn infants has long been ... In Preston, the Wisconsin Court of Appeals effectively narrowed the application of EMTALA to newborn infants, holding that ... Pope, Thaddeus Mason, EMTALA: Its Application to Newborn Infants (April 16, 2008). ABA Health eSource, Vol. 4, No. 7, 2008. ...
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1121373

*  Birth interventions and breastfeeding

Moore, E. R., Anderson, G. C. and Bergman, N. (2007) Early skin to skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants. ... "CONCLUSION: The results show that the skin temperature in newborns rises when newborns are put skin-to-skin to breastfeed two ... Furthermore, research has also shown that several newborn stressors had a more profound negative effect when newborns were also ... Newborn babies are born with more fluids in their tissues than they need, which is one of the reasons that most babies lose ...
aimsireland.ie/birth-interventions-and-breastfeeding/

*  Complement levels and leucocyte phagocytosis in newborn babies.

Newborn babies face higher risk of infection than adults, but the immunological basis of this observation is yet to be fully ... Infant, Low Birth Weight. Infant, Newborn / immunology*. Lymphocyte Count. Neutrophils / immunology. Phagocytosis*. T- ... Newborn babies face higher risk of infection than adults, but the immunological basis of this observation is yet to be fully ... 7221896 - Tracheostomy in neonates and small infants: problems and pitfalls.. 19735006 - Genetic association of sp-c with ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Complement-levels-leucocyte-phagocytosis-in/15259926.html

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 89

This study aimed to examine the effects of hypothyroxinemia of the newborn preterm infants born at 28-36 weeks of gestational ... Clinicians, especially neonatologists, should be aware that a cephalohematoma in the newborn infant with a history of vacuum- ... We review the infant's presentation, diagnostic, and therapeutic interventions, as well as the rare diagnosis of infant acute ... STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed case infants with CHD (n = 2361) and control infants without CHD (n = 3435) from the Baltimore- ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-89-p4.html

*  Incidence of hypo- and hyper-capnia in a cross-sectional European cohort of ventilated newborn infants.

... and hyper-capnia in a European cohort of ventilated newborn infants. DESIGN AND SETTING: Two-point cross-sectional prospective ... OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of hypo- and hyper-capnia in a European cohort of ventilated newborn infants. DESIGN AND ... and blood gas analyses were collected for endotracheally ventilated newborn infants on two separate dates. RESULTS: A total of ... was significantly higher in preterm infants (49 mm Hg or 6.5 kPa) than term infants (43 mm Hg or 5.7 kPa) and significantly ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Incidence-hypo-hyper-capnia-in/23241364.html

*  Neonatal care, premature birth, and other infant studies sub-cluster 47

δ(15)N and δ(13)C in hair from newborn infants and their mothers: a ... ... Singleton births of infants with birth weight ,500 g born at 28-43 weeks' gestation. Sudden infant death ... ... In this review, we describe the manner in which reciprocal communication between the mother and infant leads to mother-infant ... To compare changes in inequalities in sudden infant death syndrome with other causes of infant mortality and stillbirth in ...
biomedsearch.com/cluster/4/Neonatal-care-premature-birth-and-other-infant-studies/sub-47-p9.html

*  Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal...

In the interventional arm of this study, 945 newborn infants were identified as being at high risk of developing atopic disease ... Five hundred four infants were breastfed for 4 weeks or more, and 533 infants were formula fed from the time of birth or ... Infants at high risk of developing allergy: Infants with at least 1 first-degree relative (parent or sibling) with documented ... Although the majority of infants were breastfed initially, formula was introduced in the first 4 weeks to most infants. The ...
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/121/1/183

*  Non-nutritive sucking for increasing physiologic stability and nutrition in preterm infants

CINAHL: (infant, newborn OR newborn OR neonate OR neonatal OR premature OR low birth weight OR VLBW OR LBW or Newborn or infan ... PubMed: ((infant, newborn[MeSH] OR newborn OR neonate OR neonatal OR premature OR low birth weight OR VLBW OR LBW or infan* or ... Embase: (infant, newborn or newborn or neonate or neonatal or premature or very low birth weight or low birth weight or VLBW or ... Feeding the low birthweight infant. In: Sinclair JC, Bracken MB, editor(s). Effective Care of the Newborn Infant. Oxford: ...
https://nichd.nih.gov/cochrane_data/pinellij_01/pinellij_01.html

*  Cup introduction, drink type and vitamin supplementation in preterm babies at 11-25 months.

Infant Formula / administration & dosage. Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*. Infant, Newborn. Infant, Premature*. ... Infant gender did not differ. Fifty-seven percent had been introduced to a cup before 12 months, distribution was: 58% (n = 53 ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Cup-introduction-drink-type-vitamin/22320861.html

*  Efficacy of Newborn Vitamin A Supplementation Versus Placebo in Improving Child Survival (NeoVitA Trial) - Full Text View -...

... male and female infants, immunized and unimmunized infants, infants of families in the poorest and richest quintiles and by ... written consent is obtained from the parents of the infant. The infant is given the dose of vitamin A/placebo and a form ... Efficacy of Newborn Vitamin A Supplementation Versus Placebo in Improving Child Survival (NeoVitA Trial). This study has been ... After enrollment, each infant is visited by the enrollment team at hospital or home 1 day and 3 days after supplementation to ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01138449

*  Baby, infant, newborn icon | Icon search engine

... newborn icon in .PNG or .ICO format. Icon designed by Vincent Le Moign found in the icon set Children ...
https://iconfinder.com/icons/822800/baby_infant_newborn_icon

*  Seibertron.com Energon Pub Forums • Dead newborn infant found...

Dead newborn infant found.... Welcome to the General Discussion area where just about anything goes! This area is designed to ... Dead newborn infant found.... by Roadbuster » Sun Mar 11, 2007 9:21 pm ... Not sure this is how I'd want to get my fifteen minutes of fame... being interviewed over the death of a newborn. ...
https://seibertron.com/energonpub/dead-newborn-infant-found-t2410s4600.php

*  Avatar, baby, child, human, infant, newborn icon | Icon search engine

... newborn icon in .PNG or .ICO format. Icon designed by Stanislav Khodzhaev found in the icon set Unigrid Flat Human vol.1 ... Avatar, baby, child, human, infant, newborn icon. * Basic license · Categories: Avatars & smileys Styles: Filled outline 2 ...
https://iconfinder.com/icons/510982/avatar_baby_child_human_infant_newborn_icon

*  Advances in optical imaging of the newborn infant brain.

... and metabolism of the newborn infant brain are being developed, based on illumination of the head with near-infrared light. ... Infant, Newborn / physiology*. Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of ... New methods of imaging the oxygenation, hemodynamics, and metabolism of the newborn infant brain are being developed, based on ... and the likely impact of optical imaging methods on the care of newborn infants is assessed.. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Advances-in-optical-imaging-newborn/14570158.html

*  Local U.S. City Resources for Newborn Infant Hearing Screening on MedicineNet.com

Find local Newborn Infant Hearing Screening resources for the top U.S. cities - includes physician directory, list of local ... home , healthy kids center , healthy kids a-z list , newborn infant hearing screening index , newborn infant hearing screening ... Newborn Infant Hearing Screening Center - North Las Vegas, NV. *WebMD Physician Directory of North Las Vegas Doctors ... Suggested Reading on Newborn Infant Hearing Screening by Our Doctors. * Related Diseases & Conditions. 7 articles ...
https://medicinenet.com/newborn_infant_hearing_screening/city.htm

*  Amazon.com Nursery - ShopStyle

Binmer(TM) Baby Infant Kids Girl Soft Sole Crib Toddler Newborn Shoes (6~12 M, White) Feature: Soft material makes baby feel ... Safety Baby Infant Kid Toilet Seat Cover Pad Portable Potty Trainers Urinal D+ Size:38*31.2D+ Suitable temperature:-20 to 80D+ ... Silli Me Organic Cotton Creamy White Baby Infant Receiving - Crib/Toddler Bed Blanket (Twin Tan Trim) This Silli Me Organic ... The GiftsForYouNow Baby Boy Afghan offers a terrific classic look as a gift for new parents of an infant boy, as it features ...
https://shopstyle.com/browse/nursery-kids-and-baby/Amazon.com-US?sort=Recency

International Baby Food Action Network: The International Baby Food Action Network, IBFAN, consists of public interest groups working around the world to reduce infant and young child morbidity and mortality. IBFAN aims to improve the health and well-being of babies and young children, their mothers and their families through the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding and optimal infant feeding practices.Formula: π r3}}. On the right is the compound isobutane, which has chemical formula (CH3)3CH.Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale: The Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS),also known as the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale (BNAS),Kaplan, R. M.Sudden unexpected death syndromeLow birth-weight paradox: The low birth-weight paradox is an apparently paradoxical observation relating to the birth weights and mortality rate of children born to tobacco smoking mothers. Low birth-weight children born to smoking mothers have a lower infant mortality rate than the low birth weight children of non-smokers.Wilson–Mikity syndromePrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Breastfeeding promotionGestational age: Gestational age (or menstrual age) is a measure of the age of a pregnancy where the origin is the woman's last normal menstrual period (LMP), or the corresponding age as estimated by other methods. Such methods include adding 14 days to a known duration since fertilization (as is possible in in vitro fertilization), or by obstetric ultrasonography.CholineDavid Rees Griffiths: David Rees Griffiths (November 6, 1882 – December 17, 1953), also known by his bardic name of Amanwy, was a Welsh poet, and an older brother of politician Jim Griffiths.Birth weight: Birth weight is the body weight of a baby at its birth.Definitions from Georgia Department of Public Health.Bottle recycling: Bottles are able to be recycled and this is generally a positive option. Bottles are collected via kerbside collection or returned using a bottle deposit system.Antihypotensive agent: An antihypotensive agent, also known as a vasopressor agent, is any medication that tends to raise reduced blood pressure. Some antihypotensive drugs act as vasoconstrictors to increase total peripheral resistance, others sensitize adrenoreceptors to catecholamines - glucocorticoids, and the third class increase cardiac output - dopamine, dobutamine.Oxo BiodegradableMothers TalkPerinatal asphyxiaJoan Hodgman: Dr. Joan Hodgman (7 September 1923 – 10 August 2008) (first name pronounced jo-ANN) was a pioneer of neonatology.Developmental Disability (California): In California, Developmental Disabilitymeans a disability that is attributable to mental retardation], [[cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, or disabling conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for individuals with mental retardation.Transplacental carcinogenesis: Transplacental carcinogenesis is a series of genotypic and/or phenotypic changes in the cells of a fetus due to in utero exposure to carcinogens. Specifically, these changes are identified as malignant by virtue of their metastatic potential.Ray Avery (scientist): Sir Raymond John "Ray" Avery (born 1947"Ray Avery". Radio New Zealand.Expiratory apnea: Expiratory apnea is a voluntary condition performed by a patient during a doctor's examination. By breathing out and then holding one's breath, it gets easier for the doctor to perform an auscultation of the heart with a stethoscope.FulminateBaby walkerTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingSteatocritAge adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.National Birth Defects Prevention Network: The National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) was founded in 1997. It is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit volunteer organization whose members are involved in birth defects surveillance, prevention and research.PorencephalyPassive immunity: Passive immunity is the transfer of active humoral immunity in the form of ready-made antibodies, from one individual to another. Passive immunity can occur naturally, when maternal antibodies are transferred to the fetus through the placenta, and can also be induced artificially, when high levels of human (or horse) antibodies specific for a pathogen or toxin are transferred to non-immune through blood products that contain antibodies like immune globulin.Lying (position)Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease: The Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering inherited metabolic disorders. It was established in 1978 and is the official journal of the Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism.Peak inspiratory pressure: Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) is the highest level of pressure applied to the lungs during inhalation. In mechanical ventilation the number reflects a positive pressure in centimeters of water pressure (cmH2O).Ductus arteriosus: In the developing fetus, the ductus arteriosus, also called the ductus Botalli, is a blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery to the proximal descending aorta. It allows most of the blood from the right ventricle to bypass the fetus's fluid-filled non-functioning lungs.Powdered milk: Powdered milk or dried milk is a manufactured dairy product made by evaporating milk to dryness. One purpose of drying milk is to preserve it; milk powder has a far longer shelf life than liquid milk and does not need to be refrigerated, due to its low moisture content.Lighting for the elderly: Designing lighting for the elderly requires special consideration and care from architects and lighting designers. As people age, they experience neurodegeneration in the retina and in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN).Congenital heart defectMattress protector: A mattress protector is an item of removable bedding that sits on top of or encases a mattress to provide protection to the mattress. Some mattress protectors also provide protection to the individual sleeping on the mattress from allergens and irritants such as dust mites, bed bugs, mold, and dead skin (like dandruff).BilirubinColostrum: Colostrum (also known colloquially as beestings,Gottstein, Michael. Colostrum is vital ingredient to keep newborn lambs alive.Vacutainer: A Vacutainer blood collection tube is a sterile glass or plastic tube with a closure that is evacuated to create a vacuum inside the tube facilitating the draw of a predetermined volume of liquid. Most commonly used to collect blood samples in venipuncture, they are also used as urine collection tubes and as serum separator tubes.

(1/48457) Increased insensible water loss in newborn infants nursed under radiant heaters.

Urine osmolality was studied in 38 babies nursed in conventional incubators or cots and 18 nursed under an overhead radiant heat shield. Among 50 babies receiving a similar fluid intake in the first 48 hours of life mean urinary osmolality was significantly higher in the radiant heater group. In babies weighing less than 1500 g a trend towards higher urinary osmolalities was recorded in those nursed under radiant heaters even though they had received amost double the fluid intake of the incubator group. Severe hypernatraemia occurred in four of the five babies weighing less than 1000 g who were nursed under radiant heaters but in none of the seven babies of similar birth weight nursed in incubators. These findings are consistent with previous observations of an increase in insensible water loss in babies nursed under radiant heaters and emphasise the importance of providing enough extra water for these infants and the need for close monitoring of their fluid balance. The latter may be done at the bedside by measuring urinary specific gravity with a hand refractometer.  (+info)

(2/48457) New perspectives on biliary atresia.

An investigation into the aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of biliary atresia was carried out because the prognosis remains so poor.In an electron microscopical study no viral particles or viral inclusion bodies were seen, nor were any specific ultrastructural features observed. An animal experiment suggested that obstruction within the biliary tract of newborn rabbits could be produced by maternal intravenous injection of the bile acid lithocholic acid.A simple and atraumatic method of diagnosis was developed using(99) (m)Tc-labelled compounds which are excreted into bile. Two compounds, (99m)Tc-pyridoxylidene glutamate ((99m)Tc-PG) and (99m)Tc-dihydrothioctic acid ((99m)Tc-DHT) were first assessed in normal piglets and piglets with complete biliary obstruction. Intestinal imaging correlated with biliary tract patency, and the same correlation was found in jaundiced human adults, in whom the (99m)Tc-PG scan correctly determined biliary patency in 21 out of 24 cases. The (99m)Tc-PG scan compared well with liver biopsy and (131)I-Rose Bengal in the diagnosis of 11 infants with prolonged jaundice.A model of extrahepatic biliary atresia was developed in the newborn piglet so that different methods of bile drainage could be assessed. Priorities in biliary atresia lie in a better understanding of the aetiology and early diagnosis rather than in devising new bile drainage procedures.  (+info)

(3/48457) Perinatal nephropathies.

The purpose of this paper is to review the development of the mammalian kidney and to assess the influence that various perinatal manipulations may have on the developmental process either morphologically or functionally. Immature kidneys in general have less functional capacity than adult kidneys and a low rate of glomerular filtration, perhaps related to renal blood flow, which appears to limit the disposition of a fluid or solute load. Tubular reabsorption is also limited leading to the urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, bicarbonate and phosphate. Although the relatively low function of the immature kidney is a normal part of development, its capacity to respond under conditions of stress may be less adequate than in adults. An additional concern is that a variety of perinatal manipulations, such as the incidental or accidental ingestion of a chemical, may lead to varying degrees of altered morphogenesis or functional development of the kidney. Chemical induced renal anomalies may be of several types, but in typical teratology experiments hydronephrosis may be the most frequent observation. The functional consequences of these renal malformations may be lethal or inconsequential or while an animal may be able to survive and develop normally in the presence of a renal malformation, it is possible that a stressful situation would unmask a functional malformation which could compromise survival. Thus, some renal abnormalities may be subtle enough to go unnoticed without experimental tests. Without such tests it is impossible to evaluate the effect of functional alterations on successful adaptation.  (+info)

(4/48457) Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency.

BACKGROUND: Since 1968 it has been known that bone marrow transplantation can ameliorate severe combined immunodeficiency, but data on the long-term efficacy of this treatment are limited. We prospectively studied immunologic function in 89 consecutive infants with severe combined immunodeficiency who received hematopoietic stem-cell transplants at Duke University Medical Center between May 1982 and September 1998. METHODS: Serum immunoglobulin levels and lymphocyte phenotypes and function were assessed and genetic analyses performed according to standard methods. Bone marrow was depleted of T cells by agglutination with soybean lectin and by sheep-erythrocyte rosetting before transplantation. RESULTS: Seventy-seven of the infants received T-cell-depleted, HLA-haploidentical parental marrow, and 12 received HLA-identical marrow from a related donor; 3 of the recipients of haploidentical marrow also received placental-blood transplants from unrelated donors. Except for two patients who received placental blood, none of the recipients received chemotherapy before transplantation or prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease. Of the 89 infants, 72 (81 percent) were still alive 3 months to 16.5 years after transplantation, including all of the 12 who received HLA-identical marrow, 60 of the 77 (78 percent) who were given haploidentical marrow, and 2 of the 3 (67 percent) who received both haploidentical marrow and placental blood. T-cell function became normal within two weeks after transplantation in the patients who received unfractionated HLA-identical marrow but usually not until three to four months after transplantation in those who received T-cell-depleted marrow. At the time of the most recent evaluation, all but 4 of the 72 survivors had normal T-cell function, and all the T cells in their blood were of donor origin. B-cell function remained abnormal in many of the recipients of haploidentical marrow. In 26 children (5 recipients of HLA-identical marrow and 21 recipients of haploidentical marrow) between 2 percent and 100 percent of B cells were of donor origin. Forty-five of the 72 children were receiving intravenous immune globulin. CONCLUSIONS: Transplantation of marrow from a related donor is a life-saving and life-sustaining treatment for patients with any type of severe combined immunodeficiency, even when there is no HLA-identical donor.  (+info)

(5/48457) Cocaine metabolite kinetics in the newborn.

The study goal was to determine the half-life elimination of cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BZE) in the newborn. Three 0.3-mL blood samples were collected during the first day of life. Urine was collected once daily. Cocaine and BZE concentrations were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. An extraction method was developed for measuring low concentrations of cocaine and BZE in small (0.1 mL) blood samples. Cocaine had a half-life of 11.6 h in one subject. The half-life of BZE during the first day of life, based on blood data in 13 subjects, was 16 h (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.8 to 21.4 h). The half-life of BZE during the first week of life, based on urine data in 16 subjects, was 11.2 h (95% CI, 10.1 to 11.8 h). The novel extraction method for small blood sample volumes should be applicable to other basic drugs.  (+info)

(6/48457) Activation of alveolar macrophages in lung injury associated with experimental acute pancreatitis is mediated by the liver.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate (1) whether alveolar macrophages are activated as a consequence of acute pancreatitis (AP), (2) the implication of inflammatory factors released by these macrophages in the process of neutrophil migration into the lungs observed in lung injury induced by AP, and (3) the role of the liver in the activation of alveolar macrophages. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Acute lung injury is the extrapancreatic complication most frequently associated with death and complications in severe AP. Neutrophil infiltration into the lungs seems to be related to the release of systemic and local mediators. The liver and alveolar macrophages are sources of mediators that have been suggested to participate in the lung damage associated with AP. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in rats by intraductal administration of 5% sodium taurocholate. The inflammatory process in the lung and the activation of alveolar macrophages were investigated in animals with and without portocaval shunting 3 hours after AP induction. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The generation of nitric oxide, leukotriene B4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and MIP-2 by alveolar macrophages and the chemotactic activity of supernatants of cultured macrophages were evaluated. RESULTS: Pancreatitis was associated with increased infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs 3 hours after induction. This effect was prevented by the portocaval shunt. Alveolar macrophages obtained after induction of pancreatitis generated increased levels of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and MIP-2, but not leukotriene B4. In addition, supernatants of these macrophages exhibited a chemotactic activity for neutrophils when instilled into the lungs of unmanipulated animals. All these effects were abolished when portocaval shunting was carried out before induction of pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Lung damage induced by experimental AP is associated with alveolar macrophage activation. The liver mediates the alveolar macrophage activation in this experimental model.  (+info)

(7/48457) Exposure to nitrogen dioxide and the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years.

BACKGROUND: The objective of the investigation was to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has a causal influence on the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age. METHODS: A nested case-control study with 153 one-to-one matched pairs was conducted within a cohort of 3754 children born in Oslo in 1992/93. Cases were children who developed > or = 2 episodes of bronchial obstruction or one episode lasting >4 weeks. Controls were matched for date of birth. Exposure measurements were performed in the same 14-day period within matched pairs. The NO2 exposure was measured with personal samplers carried close to each child and by stationary samplers outdoors and indoors. RESULTS: Few children (4.6%) were exposed to levels of NO2 > or = 30 microg/m3 (average concentration during a 14-day period). In the 153 matched pairs, the mean level of NO2 was 15.65 microg/m3 (+/-0.60, SE) among cases and 15.37 (+/-0.54) among controls (paired t = 0.38, P = 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that NO2 exposure at levels observed in this study has no detectable effect on the risk of developing bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age.  (+info)

(8/48457) A method for calculating age-weighted death proportions for comparison purposes.

OBJECTIVE: To introduce a method for calculating age-weighted death proportions (wDP) for comparison purposes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A methodological study using secondary data from the municipality of Sao Paulo, Brazil (1980-1994) was carried out. First, deaths are weighted in terms of years of potential life lost before the age of 100 years. Then, in order to eliminate distortion of comparisons among proportions of years of potential life lost before the age of 100 years (pYPLL-100), the denominator is set to that of a standard age distribution of deaths for all causes. Conventional death proportions (DP), pYPLL-100, and wDP were calculated. RESULTS: Populations in which deaths from a particular cause occur at older ages exhibit lower wDP than those in which deaths occur at younger ages. The sum of all cause-specific wDP equals one only when the test population has exactly the same age distribution of deaths for all causes as that of the standard population. CONCLUSION: Age-weighted death proportions improve the information given by conventional DP, and are strongly recommended for comparison purposes.  (+info)



SIDS


  • BACKGROUND: In June 1992, the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Infant Positioning and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) made its first recommendation concerning placing infants in a supine position. (biomedsearch.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine if significant changes in SIDS rates have occurred in age at death (0-27 days vs 1-6 months vs 7-11 months), season of death, and weekday of death since the implementation of the recommendations for supine positioning of infants for sleep. (biomedsearch.com)
  • While the neurophysiological and neurostructural voluntary-involuntary nerve conduit upon which this system depends is a prerequisite for human language, or more specifically, for speech breathing, it makes human infants more vulnerable to any number of breathing control errors, one of which may be SIDS. (birthpsychology.com)
  • Hence, this perspective attempts to explain why SIDS is so circumscribed by age since speech breathing begins to occur as the infant begins to assert increasingly voluntary control over its crying behavior at two to four months when SIDS rates peak. (birthpsychology.com)
  • Respiratory pauses in aborted SIDS infants during sleep. (birthpsychology.com)

sudden


  • Age at death, season, and day of death as indicators of the effect of the back to sleep program on sudden infant death syndrome in the United States, 1992-1999. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The brain stem in sudden infant death syndrome. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Adult hemoglobin levels at birth and risk of sudden infant death syndrome. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This paper extends the evolutionary-based arguments proposed in a previous paper (see McKenna 1987, Part I) but concentrates on why the sudden infant death syndrome is not found among other animal species, and cannot be experimentally replicated, and thus why it appears to be a species-specific, unique human infant malady. (birthpsychology.com)
  • Waking and ventilatory responses during sleep in infants with near miss for sudden infant death syndrome. (birthpsychology.com)
  • Sudden infant death syndrome, (pp. 15-28). (birthpsychology.com)
  • Reversal of cardiopulmonary failure during active sleep in hypoxic kittens: Implications for sudden infant death. (birthpsychology.com)
  • Phrenic thiamin and neuropathy in sudden infant death. (birthpsychology.com)

birth


  • United States linked infant birth and death certificate files were used for the years 1995 through 1999. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A longitudinal study of nighttime sleep-wake patterns in infants from birth to one year. (birthpsychology.com)

months


  • By seven months, well before the infant utters its first words, it has mastered the voluntary pulmonic manipulations required for speech. (birthpsychology.com)

life


  • Night-waking in infants during the first year of life. (birthpsychology.com)
  • We report the case of an apparently healthy newborn who suddenly died at the third day of life, in which the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency was possible through peri-mortem blood-spot acylcarnitine analysis that showed very high concentrations of octanoylcarnitine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here we report the case of a newborn affected by MCAD deficiency and homozygous for a severe genetic mutation who suddenly died at the third day of life. (biomedcentral.com)