Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Central AmericaCuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.United StatesReligion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)TexasPuerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.North AmericaAmerican Samoa: A group of islands of SAMOA, in the southwest central Pacific. Its capital is Pago Pago. The islands were ruled by native chiefs until about 1869. An object of American interest beginning in 1839, Pago Pago and trading and extraterritorial rights were granted to the United States in 1878. The United States, Germany, and England administered the islands jointly 1889-99, but in 1899 they were granted to the United States by treaty. The Department of the Interior has administered American Samoa since 1951. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p44)American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.

*  Cultural and Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Cancer Screening, Early Detection and Care in the Latino Population - EthnoMed

2011). Cancer and Hispanic Americans. Retrieved from http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/content.aspx?ID=3323 ... Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans have twice the cervical cancer risk as Cuban Americans. The mortality rate among Latinas ... Washington, DC: Pew Hispanic Center.. Hiatt, R.A., Pasick, R.J., Stewart, S., Bloom, J., Davis, P., Gardiner, P., et al. (2001 ... Among Hispanic men who participated in focus groups, the shame of seeming sick or weak was described as a major deterrent to ...
ethnomed.org/clinical/cancer/cultural-and-socioeconomic-factors-affecting-cancer-screening-early-detection-and-care-in-the-latino-population

*  English Main Language for Hispanic Americans - ABC News

A new study by the Pew Hispanic Center reveals that more Latinos are learning and using English as their primary language, as ... Spanish-language media are seen as doing a better job covering news relevant to Hispanics, but only slimly-46 percent of ... In 2012, 82 percent of Hispanic adults consumed news in English, up from 78 percent in 2006. Meanwhile the number who consumed ... And as the share of foreign-born among Latinos falls, English will likely be used more by Hispanics." ...
abcnews.go.com/m/blogEntry?id=19746233&cid=77

*  Stereotypes of smokers held by Hispanic and white non-Hispanic smokers.

All respondents tended to think that smokers were Nervous, Friendly, and Sociable; although White non-Hispanics felt more ... A group of Hispanic and White non-Hispanic smokers were asked to report the stereotypes they hold of smokers in general. ... Hispanic Americans / psychology*. Humans. Male. San Francisco. Smoking* / psychology. Social Behavior. Stereotyping*. ... A group of Hispanic and White non-Hispanic smokers were asked to report the stereotypes they hold of smokers in general. All ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Stereotypes-smokers-held-by-Hispanic/2793279.html

*  Hispanic-Americans - The New York Times

Commentary and archival information about Hispanic-Americans from The New York Times. ... Commentary and archival information about Hispanic-Americans from The New York Times. ... News about Hispanic-Americans, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times. ... For Hispanic Heritage Month, 3 Books on Latinos in the U.S. From conquistadores to modern cultural enclaves, these books trace ...
https://nytimes.com/topic/subject/hispanicamericans?query=State Legislatures&field=des&match=exact

*  Hispanic-Americans - The New York Times

Commentary and archival information about Hispanic-Americans from The New York Times. ... Commentary and archival information about Hispanic-Americans from The New York Times. ... News about Hispanic-Americans, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times. ... Even With Affirmative Action, Blacks and Hispanics Are More Underrepresented at Top Colleges Than 35 Years Ago How 100 top U.S ...
https://nytimes.com/topic/subject/hispanicamericans?query=New York State&field=geo&match=exact

*  Wealthy Hispanic-Americans' Giving Targets Native Countries - The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Latin Americans who have achieved business success in the United States are stepping up their giving, often with a focus on ... Wealthy Hispanic-Americans' Giving Targets Native Countries. Latin Americans who have achieved business success in the United ... Hispanic business people such as Alberto Beeck-a native of Peru who chairs a Mexican education charity and financed a reality ... Colombian television that highlights the work of social entrepreneurs-reflect a changing attitude among wealthy Latin Americans ...
https://philanthropy.com/article/Wealthy-Hispanic-Americans/223559

*  Primary Source Sets - Hispanic Americans - Themed Resources | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

A compilation of Hispanic American related primary source sets from across the Library's Web site. ... The Library of Congress > Teachers > Classroom Materials > Themed Resources > Hispanic Americans > Primary Source Sets ... Hispanic Exploration in America. Songs, maps, drawings, paintings, written documents and presentations outline the role of ...
https://loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/themes/hispanic-americans/set.html

*  Social Media Plays Greater Role in Cause Engagement For African Americans and Hispanics

... ... 66% of African Americans and 69% of Hispanics). Hispanics are significantly more likely to believe that everybody "likes" ... African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely to believe that they can help get the word out about a social ... African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to engage with and learn about social issues and ...
prnewswire.com/news-releases/social-media-plays-greater-role-in-cause-engagement-for-african-americans-and-hispanics-122861499.html

*  Federal Register :: Federal Register Document Issue for 1996-08-21

President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans; Notice of a Public Forum. FR Document:. 96- ...
https://federalregister.gov/documents/1996/08/21

*  Nicholas Stix, Uncensored: Are Any Americans Left in L.A.? Hispanic Teen Convicted in Beating Death of USC Student from Red...

Are Any Americans Left in L.A.? Hispanic Teen Convicted in Beating Death of USC Student from Red China ... No Americans involved, either as perps or victims.. Any Americans left in L.A.?. ...
nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com/2016/10/are-any-americans-left-in-la-hispanic.html

*  Arizona Ethnic Groups Genealogy - FamilySearch Wiki

The Hispanic Americans *The Mexicans *The Central Americans *The Indians of North America ...
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/index.php?title=Arizona_Ethnic_Groups&oldid=206087

*  Race and Hispanic origin population density of the United States: 1990 | Library of Congress

Hispanic Americans--Maps - United States Genre Maps Notes - Includes insets of Alaska and Hawaii. - Available also through the ... Race and Hispanic origin population density of the United States: 1990. . [Washington: The Bureau: For sale by the U.S. G.P.O ... Race and Hispanic origin population density of the United States: 1990. . [Washington: The Bureau: For sale by the U.S. G.P.O ... Race and Hispanic origin population density of the United States: 1990. . [Washington: The Bureau: For sale by the U.S. G.P.O ...
https://loc.gov/item/97682420/

*  Motor Proficiency, Strength, Endurance, and Physical Activit... : Pediatric Physical Therapy

adolescent; body mass index; child; Hispanic Americans; ideal body weight; motor activity; motor skill; muscle strength; ... adolescent, body mass index, child, Hispanic Americans, ideal body weight, motor activity, motor skill, muscle strength, ... Of the remaining 8% of children who reported to be of non-Hispanic ethnicity/race, 5, 2, and 1 reported to be of White non- ... These results are consistent with another study investigating PA and obesity among children of Hispanic ethnicity.42 Current ...
journals.lww.com/pedpt/Fulltext/2013/25020/Motor_Proficiency,_Strength,_Endurance,_and.2.aspx?WT.mc_id=HPxADx20100319xMP

*  Attention Magazine - Articles on ADHD | CHADD

Hispanic Americans. Historical Studies. holiday gifts. Homeschooling. Homework. Hormones. Hyperactive Type. Hyperactivity ... African Americans. Aggression. Alcohol. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Amphetamine-based products. Anger. Anger / ...
chadd.org/Membership/Attention-Magazine/View-Articles/Bullies-in-the-Workplace.aspx

*  Companies Look at the Hispanic American Consumer Video - ABC News

They are marketing to hispanic americans. This is the secret to creating jobs selling to hispanic americans. These are hot. Two ... Hispanic americans back in the u.S. Who want their products. And when they first started selling to the u.S., How many plants ... Within two years, one of the 33 babies born in america, hispanic. Hispanic american families, a force. Soon spending 1.5 ... Companies Look at the Hispanic American Consumer. More. "Made in America" series looks at the products businesses are making ...
abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/companies-hispanic-american-consumer-19179961?tab=9482930§ion=1206853&playlist=19180181

*  Racial and ethnic differences in determinants of intrauterine growth retardation and other compromised birth outcomes.

The odds of compromised birth outcomes were much higher among African Americans than among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic ... Hispanic Americans*. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Logistic Models. Male. Odds Ratio. Population Surveillance. Pregnancy. Pregnancy ... African Americans* / statistics & numerical data. European Continental Ancestry Group* / statistics & numerical data. Female. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Racial-ethnic-differences-in-determinants/9431287.html

*  Lower bone mineral content in hypertensive compared with normotensive overweight Latino children and adolescents.

Hispanic Americans. Humans. Hypertension / complications, metabolism*. Male. Overweight*. Risk Factors. Grant Support. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Lower-bone-mineral-content-in/17261466.html

*  Very low food security predicts obesity predominantly in California Hispanic men and women.

Hispanic Americans. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Minority Groups*. Obesity / economics, ethnology*, etiology. Poverty*. Sex ... No significant associations were observed for non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, Asian men or multi-racial women. ... RESULTS: Among Hispanic men, very low food security was associated with a 1.0 kg/m2 higher BMI (95 % CI 0.3, 1.7 kg/m2) and a ... Among Hispanic women, very low food security was associated with a 1.1 kg/m2 higher BMI (95 % CI 0.4, 1.9 kg/m2) and a 22 % ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Very-low-food-security-predicts/22463949.html

*  Childhood obesity and asthma control in the GALA II and SAGE II studies.

Hispanic Americans. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Obesity / complications*, ethnology. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index ... African Americans. Age Factors. Asthma / complications*, ethnology. Body Mass Index. Child. Disease Progression. Female. ... with asthma were recruited from the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) Study and the Study of ... African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II). Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Childhood-Obesity-Asthma-Control-in/23392439.html

*  BPL - Social Sciences Department Bibiographic Key Sources Indexed in BGMI

The Biographical Dictionary of Hispanic Americans. Biographical Dictionary of Hispanic Literature in the United States.. ... Who's Who among Hispanic Americans.. Social Sciences E184.S75W36x. Who's Who in Hockey.. Research Library Stacks GV848.5.A1K37 ... Notable Hispanic American Women.. Social Sciences E184.S75N68 1993. Notable Latino Americans.. Research Library Stacks E184. ... Memorable Americans, 1750-1950.. Research Library Stacks CT214.D68 1983. The Men Behind Boys' Fiction.. Research Library Stacks ...
bpl.org/research/socsci/bgmi.htm

*  9780205172252 - Strangers to these Shores, Census | eCampus.com

Chapter 9: Middle Eastern and North African Americans. Chapter 10: Black Americans. Chapter 11: Hispanic Americans ... Caribbean, Central, and South Americans. Dominican Americans. Salvadoran Americans. Nicaraguan Americans. Colombian Americans. ... Afro-Caribbean Americans. The Haitians. The Jamaicans. African-born Americans. Cape Verdean Americans. Nigerian Americans. ... Polish Americans. Culture Shock. Community Organization. Polish Americans Today. Russian Americans. Life in the United States. ...
ecampus.com/strangers-shores-census-update-plus/bk/9780205172252

*  Central corneal thickness as a predictor of visual field loss in primary open angle glaucoma for a Hispanic population.

Hispanic Americans / ethnology. Humans. Intraocular Pressure. Male. Middle Aged. Ocular Hypertension / diagnosis, ethnology. ... of 308 charts of patients seen during a six-week period by a glaucoma specialist in his community practice in a large Hispanic ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Central-corneal-thickness-as-predictor/21275602.html

*  Polymorphism in the interleukin-1 gene complex and spontaneous preterm delivery.

Hispanic Americans / genetics. Homozygote. Humans. Interleukin-1 / genetics*. Obstetric Labor, Premature / ethnology, genetics* ... Fetuses of Hispanic descent that carried IL1RN allele 2 were found to be at an increased risk for preterm premature rupture of ... 3953*1 and IL1RN*2 alleles in African and Hispanic populations, respectively.. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Polymorphism-in-interleukin-1-gene/12114904.html

*  Ethnicity, criminality, and the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory.

Hispanic Americans / psychology. Hostility. Humans. Mexico / ethnology. Personality Inventory*. Violence*. From MEDLINE®/PubMed ... African Americans / psychology. Criminal Psychology*. Ethnic Groups / psychology*. European Continental Ancestry Group / ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Ethnicity-criminality-Buss-Durkee-Hostility/6620107.html

*  Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute at St. David's Medical Center First in Nation to Use EnSite

The most common arrhythmia is Atrial Fibrillation, or A Fib, which affects more than 3 million Americans-and millions more ...
https://prnewswire.com/news-releases/texas-cardiac-arrhythmia-institute-at-st-davids-medical-center-first-in-nation-to-use-ensite-precision-cardiac-mapping-system-to-treat-ventricular-tachycardia-supraventricular-tachycardia-and-premature-ventricular-contraction-300402817.html

African-American family structure: The family structure of African-Americans has long been a matter of national public policy interest.Moynihan's War on Poverty report A 1965 report by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, known as The Moynihan Report, examined the link between black poverty and family structure.Athletics at the 2002 Central American and Caribbean GamesSociety of the Army of Santiago de CubaList of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,WOW Worship: Orange: [ Allmusic review]University of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonSan Juan River (Vancouver Island): The San Juan River is a river on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, draining into the Pacific Ocean at Port San Juan, the harbour for Port Renfrew,BCGNIS entry "San Juan River" which is at the limit of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which lies south and southeast of the river. Its name is derived from that or Port San Juan, which is also the namesake of San Juan Ridge, which lies on the south side of the river's final W-E course.WGAViewer: WGAViewer is a bioinformatics software tool which is designed to visualize, annotate, and help interpret the results generated from a genome wide association study (GWAS). Alongside the P values of association, WGAViewer allows a researcher to visualize and consider other supporting evidence, such as the genomic context of the SNP, linkage disequilibrium (LD) with ungenotyped SNPs, gene expression database, and the evidence from other GWAS projects, when determining the potential importance of an individual SNP.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Excessive alcohol intake is associated with an elevated risk of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), heart failure, some cancers, and accidental injury, and is a leading cause of preventable death in industrialized countries. However, extensive research has shown that moderate alcohol intake is associated with health benefits, including less cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and lower all-cause mortality.Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California: The Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Eastern Pomo people in Lake County, California.California Indians and Their Reservations.American Medical Student AssociationList of Superfund sites in American Samoa: This is a list of Superfund sites in American Samoa designated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) environmental law:Aultman Hospital: Aultman Hospital is a non-profit hospital located in Canton, Ohio, United States. It is the largest hospital and the largest employer, with over 5000 employees, in Stark County.

(1/5055) Elevated asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican children: a review of possible risk and prognostic factors.

Latino children represent a significant proportion of all US children, and asthma is the most common chronic illness affecting them. Previous research has revealed surprising differences in health among Latino children with asthma of varying countries of family origin. For instance, Puerto Rican children have a higher prevalence of asthma than Mexican American or Cuban American children. In addition, there are important differences in family structure and socioeconomic status among these Latino populations: Cuban Americans have higher levels of education and family income than Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans; mainland Puerto Rican children have the highest proportion of households led by a single mother. Our review of past research documents differences in asthma outcomes among Latino children and identifies the possible genetic, environmental, and health care factors associated with these differences. Based on this review, we propose research studies designed to differentiate between mutable and immutable risk and prognostic factors. We also propose that the sociocultural milieus of Latino subgroups of different ethnic and geographic origin are associated with varying patterns of risk factors that in turn lead to different morbidity patterns. Our analysis provides a blue-print for future research, policy development, and the evaluation of multifactorial interventions involving the collaboration of multiple social sectors, such as health care, public health, education, and public and private agencies.  (+info)

(2/5055) Latino children's health and the family-community health promotion model.

A majority of Latino children in the US live in poverty. However, unlike other poor children, Latino children do not seem to have a consistent association between poverty and poor health. Instead, many poor Latino children have unexpectedly good health outcomes. This has been labeled an epidemiologic paradox. This paper proposes a new model of health, the family-community health promotion model, to account for this paradox. The family-community health promotion model emphasizes the family-community milieu of the child, in contrast to traditional models of health. In addition, the family-community model expands the outcome measures from physical health to functional health status, and underscores the contribution of cultural factors to functional health outcomes. In this paper, we applied the family-community health promotion model to four health outcomes: low birthweight, infant mortality, chronic and acute illness, and perceived health status. The implications of this model for research and policy are discussed.  (+info)

(3/5055) Calcium absorption and kinetics are similar in 7- and 8-year-old Mexican-American and Caucasian girls despite hormonal differences.

To assess the possibility of ethnic differences in mineral metabolism in prepubertal children, we compared measures of calcium metabolism in 7- and 8-y-old Mexican-American (MA) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (CAU) girls (n = 38) living in southeastern Texas. We found similar fractional calcium absorption, urinary calcium excretion, calcium kinetic values and total-body bone mineral content in the MA and CAU girls. In contrast, parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations were greater in MA girls (4.01 +/- 0.47 vs. 1. 96 +/- 0.50 pmol/L, P = 0.005) than in CAU girls. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were lower in MA girls (68.9 +/- 7.7 vs. 109.4 +/- 8.4 nmol/L, P = 0.001) than in CAU girls, but 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations did not differ between groups. Seasonal variability was seen for 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in girls of both ethnic groups, but values in all of the girls were >30 nmol/L (12 ng/mL). We conclude the following: 1) greater PTH levels in MA girls than CAU girls are present without evidence of vitamin D deficiency; and 2) differences in 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations between MA and CAU girls do not have a large effect on calcium absorption, excretion or bone calcium kinetics. These data do not provide evidence for adjusting dietary recommendations for mineral or vitamin D intake by MA girls.  (+info)

(4/5055) Influence of maternal ethnicity on infant mortality in Chicago, 1989-1996.

This study compared infant mortality rates between large ethnic groups in Chicago from 1989-1996. Infant mortality information about ethnic groups was compared using data from annual reports published by the Epidemiology Program, Department of Public Health, City of Chicago and vital statistics documents in Illinois, which include information on ethnicity. Chi-squared analysis was used to evaluate the differences between the proportions. A P value of < .05 was considered significant. During the study period, there were 461,974 births and 6407 infant deaths in Chicago. African Americans contributed 212,924 (46.1%) births and 4387 (68.5%) deaths; Hispanics 132,787 (28.7%) births and 1166 (18.2%) deaths; and whites 99,532 (21.6%) births and 780 (12.2%) infant deaths. Compared with the other groups. African Americans suffered a twofold increased mortality (P < .00001) for five of the six most common causes of infant mortality. Deaths from congenital malformations, although significant, were not excessively increased among African Americans (P = .014). Hispanics demonstrated a higher mortality rate than whites (P = .01), especially for postnatal mortality and respiratory distress syndrome. These data confirm excessive infant mortality among African Americans. Further studies are needed to evaluate the apparent low mortality among some Hispanics compared with the other groups studied.  (+info)

(5/5055) Linkage of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of age at onset to a genetic location on chromosome 10q in Mexican Americans.

Since little is known about chromosomal locations harboring type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes, we conducted a genomewide scan for such genes in a Mexican American population. We used data from 27 low-income extended Mexican American pedigrees consisting of 440 individuals for whom genotypic data are available for 379 markers. We used a variance-components technique to conduct multipoint linkage analyses for two phenotypes: type 2 diabetes (a discrete trait) and age at onset of diabetes (a truncated quantitative trait). For the multipoint analyses, a subset of 295 markers was selected on the basis of optimal spacing and informativeness. We found significant evidence that a susceptibility locus near the marker D10S587 on chromosome 10q influences age at onset of diabetes (LOD score 3.75) and is also linked with type 2 diabetes itself (LOD score 2.88). This susceptibility locus explains 63.8%+/-9.9% (P=. 000016) of the total phenotypic variation in age at onset of diabetes and 65.7%+/-10.9% (P=.000135) of the total variation in liability to type 2 diabetes. Weaker evidence was found for linkage of diabetes and of age at onset to regions on chromosomes 3p, 4q, and 9p. In conclusion, our strongest evidence for linkage to both age at onset of diabetes and type 2 diabetes itself in the Mexican American population was for a region on chromosome 10q.  (+info)

(6/5055) Marijuana use among minority youths living in public housing developments.

Youths residing in public housing developments appear to be at markedly heightened risk for drug use because of their constant exposure to violence, poverty, and drug-related activity. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a model of marijuana etiology with adolescents (N = 624) residing in public housing. African-American and Hispanic seventh graders completed questionnaires about their marijuana use, social influences to smoke marijuana, and sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics. Results indicated that social influences, such as friends' marijuana use and perceived ease of availability of marijuana, significantly predicted both occasional and future use of marijuana. Individual characteristics such as antimarijuana attitudes and drug refusal skills also predicted marijuana use. The findings imply that effective prevention approaches that target urban youths residing in public housing developments should provide them with an awareness of social influences to use marijuana, correct misperceptions about the prevalence of marijuana smoking, and train adolescents in relevant psychosocial skills.  (+info)

(7/5055) Racial and ethnic differences in glycemic control of adults with type 2 diabetes.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate glycemic control in a representative sample of U.S. adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey included national samples of non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans aged > or = 20 years. Information on medical history and treatment of diabetes was obtained to determine those who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by a physician before the survey (n = 1,480). Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c were measured, and the frequencies of sociodemographic and clinical variables related to glycemic control were determined. RESULTS: A higher proportion of non-Hispanic blacks were treated with insulin and a higher proportion of Mexican Americans were treated with oral agents compared with non-Hispanic whites, but the majority of adults in each racial or ethnic group (71-83%) used pharmacologic treatment for diabetes. Use of multiple daily insulin injections was more common in whites. Blood glucose self-monitoring was less common in Mexican Americans, but most patients had never self-monitored. HbA1c values in the nondiabetic range were found in 26% of non-Hispanic whites, 17% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 20% of Mexican Americans. Poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 8%) was more common in non-Hispanic black women (50%) and Mexican-American men (45%) compared with the other groups (35-38%), but HbA1c for both sexes and for all racial and ethnic groups was substantially higher than normal levels. Those with HbA1c > 8% included 52% of insulin-treated patients and 42% of those taking oral agents. There was no relationship of glycemic control to socioeconomic status or access to medical care in any racial or ethnic group. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that many patients with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. have poor glycemic control, placing them at high risk of diabetic complications. Non-Hispanic black women, Mexican-American men, and patients treated with insulin and oral agents were disproportionately represented among those in poor glycemic control. Clinical, public health, and research efforts should focus on more effective methods to control blood glucose in patients with diabetes.  (+info)

(8/5055) Differential mortality in New York City (1988-1992). Part Two: excess mortality in the south Bronx.

To display the extent of variations in mortality according to geographic regions in New York City, we have compared mortality in New York City as a whole with that of the South Bronx. Mortality records for 1988 to 1992 and 1990 US census data for New York City were linked. The 471,000 residents of the South Bronx were younger, less educated, and more likely to lack health insurance than other New Yorkers. Using age- and gender-stratified populations and mortality in New York City as standards, age-adjusted death rates and excess mortality in the South Bronx were determined. All-cause mortality in the South Bronx was 26% higher than the city as a whole. Mortality for AIDS, injury and poisoning, drug and alcohol abuse, and cardiovascular diseases were 50% to 100% higher in the South Bronx than in New York City; years of potential life lost before age 65 in the South Bronx were 41.6% and 44.2% higher for men and women, respectively, than in New York City; AIDS accounted for the largest single share of excess premature deaths (21.8%). In summary, inequalities in health status, reflected by higher mortality rates in the South Bronx, are consistent with, and perhaps caused by, lower socioeconomic status and deficient medical care among residents of this inner-city community.  (+info)



Whites


  • The odds of compromised birth outcomes were much higher among African Americans than among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. (biomedsearch.com)
  • No significant associations were observed for non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, Asian men or multi-racial women. (biomedsearch.com)
  • For example, though the age-adjusted incidence of breast cancer in Latinas is lower than in non-Hispanic Whites ( U.S. Cancer Statistics , 2009). (ethnomed.org)

populations


  • CONCLUSION: There are associations of spontaneous preterm delivery with the fetal carriage of IL1B+3953*1 and IL1RN*2 alleles in African and Hispanic populations, respectively. (biomedsearch.com)

ages 18


  • An online survey was conducted by TNS Global among a nationally representative sample of 2,000 Americans ages 18 and over. (prnewswire.com)
  • About 12.7 percent of African Americans ages 18 years or older have diabetes. (nih.gov)

respectively


  • African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely to believe that they can help get the word out about a social issue or cause through online social networks (58% and 51%, respectively, vs. 34% of Caucasians). (prnewswire.com)
  • While traditional media (print and television) and personal relationships remain the primary ways in which Americans learn about causes, both African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to look to social media as an additional source of information (31% and 27% vs. 21%, respectively). (prnewswire.com)
  • Between 2009 and 2010, 24.3% and 21.2% of children and adolescents of African American and Hispanic race/ethnicity, respectively, were OB compared with 14.0% of children and adolescents of white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity. (lww.com)

Hypertension


  • African Americans are more likely to get hypertension than people of other ethnic groups. (westfloridahospital.com)

rises


  • The risk for Hispanic Americans rises markedly after age 60. (healthcanal.com)

adults


  • In 2012, 82 percent of Hispanic adults consumed news in English, up from 78 percent in 2006. (go.com)
  • WASHINGTON , May 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly one in three African-American adults (30%) and four in ten Hispanics (39%) say they are more likely to support a cause or social issue online than offline today-both significantly higher percentages than Caucasians (24%), according to the new Dynamics of Cause Engagement study. (prnewswire.com)

Latinos


  • For Hispanic Heritage Month, 3 Books on Latinos in the U.S. (nytimes.com)
  • A new study by the Pew Hispanic Center reveals that more Latinos are learning and using English as their primary language, as the number of Latinos in the United States who consume their news in English continues to grow. (go.com)
  • As the nation's Latino population changes, what language Latinos use in their daily lives, including getting the news, might change," Mark Lopez, associate director for the Pew Hispanic Center, told ABC News. (go.com)
  • And as the share of foreign-born among Latinos falls, English will likely be used more by Hispanics. (go.com)

ethnicity


  • Methods: Eighty-six children, aged 10 to 15 years, of mostly Hispanic ethnicity, participated. (lww.com)

Obesity


  • Very low food security predicts obesity predominantly in California Hispanic men and women. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RESULTS: Among Hispanic men, very low food security was associated with a 1.0 kg/m2 higher BMI (95 % CI 0.3, 1.7 kg/m2) and a 36 % higher prevalence of obesity (95 % CI 17, 58 %) after multivariate adjustment. (biomedsearch.com)

adolescents


  • METHODS: Children and adolescents ages 8-19 years (n = 2,174) with asthma were recruited from the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) Study and the Study of African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II). (biomedsearch.com)

Asian


  • American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut persons -- Asian and Pacific Islander persons -- Hispanic origin persons -- Black persons. (loc.gov)
  • Prevalence of diabetes in Asian Americans varies among subpopulations. (nih.gov)
  • Asian and Hispanic americans' cancer fatalism and colon cancer screening. (biomedsearch.com)

News


  • News about Hispanic-Americans, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times. (nytimes.com)
  • Spanish-language media are seen as doing a better job covering news relevant to Hispanics, but only slimly-46 percent of Spanish-language stations do a "good job," compared with 42 percent of English language news media. (go.com)

York Times


  • Latin Americans who have achieved business success in the United States are stepping up their giving, often with a focus on fostering social change in Central and South American countries with little tradition of private philanthropy, writes The New York Times . (philanthropy.com)

likely


  • Similarly, social media are not among the top ways Americans most often support causes-donating money or personal items, talking to others and learning about the issues rank the highest-but again, African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to engage with causes through promotional social media activities (e.g., joining a cause group on Facebook, posting a logo to a social profile, contributing to blogs). (prnewswire.com)
  • For example, Caucasians are significantly more likely to feel that emails about causes sometimes feel like spam (76%, vs. 66% of African Americans and 69% of Hispanics). (prnewswire.com)
  • Hispanics are significantly more likely to believe that everybody "likes" causes on Facebook and it doesn't really mean anything. (prnewswire.com)
  • However, African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to believe that supporting causes makes them feel like a part of a community. (prnewswire.com)
  • They also are significantly more likely to feel that it is important that their family be involved in causes (55% of Hispanics and 54% of African Americans, vs. 46% of Caucasians), and to have been actively involved in supporting causes when growing up (40% of Hispanics and 45% of African Americans, vs. 32% of Caucasians). (prnewswire.com)
  • Latinas are 20% more likely to die of breast cancer than non-Hispanic White women diagnosed at a similar age and stage. (ethnomed.org)

among


  • Hispanic business people such as Alberto Beeck-a native of Peru who chairs a Mexican education charity and financed a reality show on Colombian television that highlights the work of social entrepreneurs-reflect a changing attitude among wealthy Latin Americans as social ills in the region outstrip strapped governments' resources to address them. (philanthropy.com)
  • Among Americans, higher risk groups include those of African or Hispanic heritage and others with a family history of the illness. (healthcanal.com)

White


  • Stereotypes of smokers held by Hispanic and white non-Hispanic smokers. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A group of Hispanic and White non-Hispanic smokers were asked to report the stereotypes they hold of smokers in general. (biomedsearch.com)
  • although White non-Hispanics felt more certain than Hispanics that smokers were Friendly, Aggressive, Sociable, Attractive, and Feminine. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The amount of cigarettes smoked had no effect on the stereotypes but the more highly acculturated Hispanics showed stereotypes that resembled those of the White non-Hispanics. (biomedsearch.com)

students


  • Black and Hispanic students are more underrepresented at top schools nationwide, despite affirmative action. (nytimes.com)

lower


  • The Hispanic population had lower death rates for SCD than the non-Hispanic population. (ahajournals.org)

risk


  • African Americans have an increased risk of inheriting sickle cell trait, the condition in which people have both hemoglobin A (HbA), the usual form of hemoglobin, and hemoglobin S (HbS), a variant. (nih.gov)
  • African Americans are also at risk for having hemoglobin C (HbC), another variant. (nih.gov)

certain


  • Americans are generally in agreement when it comes to potential cause-related social media overload, though they differ in the degree to which certain tools drive their "cause fatigue" the most. (prnewswire.com)

years


  • A conquistador's statue in New Mexico that was vandalized 20 years ago remains a divisive symbol, one of a number of monuments drawing protests from Native Americans. (nytimes.com)
  • Within two years, one of the 33 babies born in america, hispanic. (go.com)

Mexico


  • Tonight selling in mexico, selling to hispanic america too. (go.com)
  • Exports to Mexico are on the rise, which could means jobs for Americans. (go.com)

older


  • The disease affects more than 2.3 million Americans age 40 and older. (healthcanal.com)

primary


  • Central corneal thickness as a predictor of visual field loss in primary open angle glaucoma for a Hispanic population. (biomedsearch.com)

products


  • Hispanic americans back in the u.S. Who want their products. (go.com)