Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)United StatesPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Great BritainSocial Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Status Epilepticus: A prolonged seizure or seizures repeated frequently enough to prevent recovery between episodes occurring over a period of 20-30 minutes. The most common subtype is generalized tonic-clonic status epilepticus, a potentially fatal condition associated with neuronal injury and respiratory and metabolic dysfunction. Nonconvulsive forms include petit mal status and complex partial status, which may manifest as behavioral disturbances. Simple partial status epilepticus consists of persistent motor, sensory, or autonomic seizures that do not impair cognition (see also EPILEPSIA PARTIALIS CONTINUA). Subclinical status epilepticus generally refers to seizures occurring in an unresponsive or comatose individual in the absence of overt signs of seizure activity. (From N Engl J Med 1998 Apr 2;338(14):970-6; Neurologia 1997 Dec;12 Suppl 6:25-30)State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Diagnostic Self Evaluation: A self-evaluation of health status.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Mouth, Edentulous: Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Tooth DiseasesHealth Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.EnglandLife Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.BrazilEmigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Periodontal Index: A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Transients and Migrants: People who frequently change their place of residence.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Gypsies: Ethnic group originating in India and entering Europe in the 14th or 15th century.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.IndiaRefugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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Got Transition aims to improve transition from pediatric to adult health care through the use of new and innovative strategies ... Family-to-Family Health Information Centers These state-based centers, which are funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau ... How to Advocate for Your Health and Health Care [PDF] An activity guide to assist youth in preparing for adult health care, ... National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability A public health resource center on health promotion for people with ...
gottransition.org/resources/

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... including a key vote on health care in the Senate Finance Committee, bank earning reports and conflicting data about the health ... The only exception is the state of Maine, which has two Republicans. ... Barack Obama Economy HEALTH CARE REFORM max baucus olympia snowe public option recession Senate finance committee Shields and ... Columnists Mark Shields and Michael Gerson sort through the top news of the past week, including a key vote on health care in ...
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*  Health Care | Definition of Health Care by Merriam-Webster

Define health care: efforts made to maintain or restore physical, mental, or emotional well-being especially by trained… - ... dotage, dotard a state or period of senile decay * otherwise "in other respects" ... Learn More about health care. * See words that rhyme with health care Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about health care ... medical Definition of health care. :the maintaining and restoration of health by the treatment and prevention of disease ...
https://merriam-webster.com/dictionary/health care

*  Pancreatic Health

Taking a natural supplement for pancreatic health may support the digestion of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Free shipping ... Pancreatic Health Products. The pancreas is a gland organ that is part of the digestive system. The pancreas plays an essential ... By taking an all natural supplement for pancreatic health it may support the digestion of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. An ... Advice on treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a trained health care ...
earthturns.com/shop-by-condition/digestion/pancreatic-health

*  Developing a single sign-on implementation plan for health care

Implementing single sign-in on health care requires detailed planning, consultation with practitioners, and consideration of ... For organizations that must analyze large amounts of data quickly and efficiently, nothing beats solid-state storage. ... but they all have their downsides in health care, too. Fingerprints don't work so well in a fast-paced health care environment ... SSO in health care can be thorny, with an overwhelming number of technology choices from simple Web single sign-on to full-boat ...
searchhealthit.techtarget.com/tip/Developing-a-single-sign-on-implementation-plan-for-health-care

*  ICD-10 Delay Worries Health IT Leaders - InformationWeek

... with many leaders in the health IT community saying the delay could disrupt their health IT plans and cause them to lose the ... Read more from the most important live event in health IT on our HIMSS Special Report page. ] "I have not talked to anyone who ... Also in this issue: Why personal health records have flopped. (Free registration required.) ... re: ICD-10 Delay Worries Health IT Leaders Organizations that are ready for ICD10 implementation should be allowed to go ahead ...
https://informationweek.com/regulations/icd-10-delay-worries-health-it-leaders/d/d-id/1102951

*  Health Care Organization & Finance (American Casebook Series) 9780314279910 | BarristerBooks.com: The Internet's Largest Law...

Furrow, Greaney, Johnson et al 7th ed., 2013 This Health Care Organization & Finance casebook begins with an introduction to ... The next chapter considers quality control in the health care setting. Th... ... You agree that any claim relating to BarristerBooks shall be governed by the laws of the State of Kansas without regard to its ... Access to Health Care: The Obligation to Provide Care;. Legal Oversight of Private Health Care Financing;. Public Health Care ...
https://barristerbooks.com/used-health-care-organization-finance-american-casebook-series-.9780314279910.htm

*  What information is on a employee physical examination form? | Reference.com

... health history and the results of important health screenings, according to Fit for Work. Cholesterol, blood... ... current health status, health history and the results of important health screenings, according to Fit for Work. Cholesterol, ... according to Edward-Elmhurst Health. For example, health care workers are required to a two-step tuberculosis screening test, a ... Employee health physical exams and screenings can reduce absentee rates due to sickness, improve productivity and increase ...
https://reference.com/business-finance/information-employee-physical-examination-form-54c7dfe45470c45d

*  FAIR Health Elects James Roosevelt, Jr. to Board of Directors

FAIR Health, Inc. announced today that it has elected James Roosevelt, Jr. to its Board of Directors. Currently Counsel at ... FAIR Health data serve as an official reference point in support of certain state balance billing laws that protect consumers ... About FAIR Health. FAIR Health is a national, independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to ... Roosevelt to the FAIR Health Board," said Stephen A. Warnke, Chairman of FAIR Health's Board of Directors. "At a time of ...
medindia.net/health-press-release/FAIR-Health-Elects-James-Roosevelt-Jr-to-Board-of-Directors-331633-1.htm

*  The impact of rural mutual health care on health status: evaluation of a social experiment in rural China

We measured health status using both a 5‐point Categorical Rating Scale and the EQ‐5D instruments. The estimation method used ... The results show that RMHC has a positive effect on the health status of participants. Among the five dimensions of EQ‐5D, RMHC ... This paper aims to fill this gap by evaluating the impact of Rural Mutual Health Care (RMHC), a community-based health ... Our study provides useful policy information on the development of health insurance in developing countries, and also ...
https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v18y2009is2ps65-s82.html

*  NMR Healthcheck - Farmers Weekly

20 September 1996 NMR HealthcheckMILK tests to check herd health status are now being offered by National Milk Records in ... MILK tests to check herd health status are now being offered by National Milk Records in conjunction with Compton Paddock Labs ...
fwi.co.uk/news/nmr-healthcheck.htm

*  Coco's Health Status?? | Adventure Rider

Coco's Health Status??. Discussion in 'West - California, the desert southwest and whatev' started by LeeU, Jan 27, 2013. ... I thought I'd heard something about him heading up to SF for some health care. Glad to hear all is well.. ... While he wasn't in the best of health, he didn't look overly too bad. I pray he's ok.. ...
advrider.com/index.php?threads/cocos-health-status.858923/

*  Black on Headley's health status | Padres

Bud Black discusses Chase Headley making progress in his recovery from injury and Huston Street starting to throw again
https://mlb.com/padres/video/black-on-headleys-health-status/c-31532813?tid=26668336

*  Health status impacts on individual earnings in Brazil

Secondly, the subjective criterion which is based on the health self-assessment. Each Brazilian individual loses from R$6.30 to ... A measure of the welfare reduction due to poor health conditions was created by aggregating individual losses. Individuals are ... We have identified three ways through which health conditions affect workers' earnings: labor force participation, hourly wages ... The aim of this paper is to estimate the impact of health conditions on the earnings of Brazilians. ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/cdp/texdis/td173.html

*  Does Money Protect Health Status? Evidence from South African Pensions

The channels by which better health leads to higher income, and those by which higher income protects health status, are of ... Does Money Protect Health Status? Evidence from South African Pensions. Anne Case. NBER Working Paper No. 8495. Issued in ... given the simultaneous determination of health and income. In this paper, we quantify the impact on health status of a large, ... Does Money Protect Health Status? Evidence from South African Pensions. Duflo and Hanna. w11880 Monitoring Works: Getting ...
nber.org/papers/w8495

*  Mushkin Callisto Deluxe 120GB health status problem @ @

Health . I have really no clue what's going on , could anyone explain... ... Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › SSD › Mushkin Callisto Deluxe 120GB health status problem @_@ ... Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › SSD › Mushkin Callisto Deluxe 120GB health status problem @_@ ... So , ive bought a Mushkin Callisto 120Gb Deluxe last month , and im already at 43% Health . I have really no clue what's going ...
overclock.net/t/1025490/mushkin-callisto-deluxe-120gb-health-status-problem

*  Special Olympics: The Health Status and Needs of Individuals with Mental Retardation

SOI) commissioned this report to examine the health needs of children and adults with MR. ... The health status and health service needs of individuals with MR, however, have received little attention over the past four ... The Health Status and Needs of Individuals with Mental Retardation. In recognition of the need to improve the quality of life ... The purpose of this report is three-fold: 1) to identify the current health status and needs of individuals with MR, 2) to ...
specialolympics.org/RegionsPages/content.aspx?id=23759&Region=SOAP&RegionName=Asia-Pacific&LangType=2052

*  Health Status and Labour Force Status of Older Working-Age Australian Men

Unobserved factors are likely to affect both health and labour force status, therefore we estimate a model that takes the ... correlation between the two error terms in the health and labour force status equations into account. The results show that ... Therefore, more efficient estimates of the direct health effects on labour force participation can be obtained than in a cross- ... Any restriction on the correlation between the two equations appears to lead to underestimation of the direct health effects. ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/iae/iaewps/wp2005n09.html

*  Individual Health Status and Minority Racial Concentration in U.S. States and Counties

In addition, the effects of income, sex, marital status, area and region of residence on health status vary in size between ... socioeconomic status, and other attributes. We conduct an individual-level analysis of health status using data from the ... Our findings suggest that minority racial concentration has no significant effect on health status once individual ... We conclude that there are significant differences in the observed effect of minority racial concentration on health across ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/har/wpaper/0201.html

*  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Status | ACT Health

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Status. ACT Status. ACT Chief Health Officers Report 2014. Section 8.2 Aboriginal ... Population Health, Health Directorate. This publication provides an overview of the health status of Aboriginal and Torres ... Survey results give some indication of health status. In 2004-05, long term health conditions were reported by 82.3% of ACT ... ACT Chief Health Officer's Report 2010. The Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the ACT 2006-2011, ...
health.act.gov.au/our-services/aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-health/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health-0

*  Be honest with your health status, bets told - The Manila Times Online

You are at:Home»News»Top Stories»Be honest with your health status, bets told ... Casiple added that the state of health of the candidates can be observed during the three-month campaign period when people can ... "Voters will not bet on a candidate who has a questionable health condition, and although candidates can hide their true state ... they should also be honest enough in letting voters know their true state of health, a political analyst said on Sunday. ...
manilatimes.net/be-honest-with-your-health-status-bets-told/244982/

*  JMIR-Tweetations for Users of Internet Health Information: Differences by Health Status

Tweetations for "Users of Internet Health Information: Differences by Health Status" in the last year ...
jmir.org/article/tweets/864?dur=12

*  PPT - What's your Health Status? PowerPoint Presentation - ID:5762181

Measurements of Health Status -What is health status??!!!. health status is an overall level of health, looking at and taking ... Current Health Status In Sudan -Current health status in sudan. health care providers. ministry of health (fmoh,smoh). health ... Israel's Health System and Health Status of the Population -Israel's health system and health status of the population. th ... Saskatoon Health Region Rural Health Status -Saskatoon health region rural health status. phare symposium october 21, 2008 josh ...
slideserve.com/cloris/what-s-your-health-status

*  Hardware Canucks - View Single Post - Neat little app for SSD health status

Post 443353 -
hardwarecanucks.com/forum/443353-post20.html

Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Global Health Delivery ProjectHealth policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Halfdan T. MahlerContraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.WHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Women's Health Initiative: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was initiated by the U.S.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.European Immunization Week: European Immunization Week (EIW) is an annual regional initiative, coordinated by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/Europe), to promote immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. EIW activities are carried out by participating WHO/Europe member states.Healthy community design: Healthy community design is planning and designing communities that make it easier for people to live healthy lives. Healthy community design offers important benefits:Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Resource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Minati SenNortheast Community Health CentreRegression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Sharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.Neighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingProportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.DenplanMental disorderMaternal Health Task Force

(1/10025) Health status of Persian Gulf War veterans: self-reported symptoms, environmental exposures and the effect of stress.

BACKGROUND: Most US troops returned home from the Persian Gulf War (PGW) by Spring 1991 and many began reporting increased health symptoms and medical problems soon after. This investigation examines the relationships between several Gulf-service environmental exposures and health symptom reporting, and the role of traumatic psychological stress on the exposure-health symptom relationships. METHODS: Stratified, random samples of two cohorts of PGW veterans, from the New England area (n = 220) and from the New Orleans area (n = 71), were selected from larger cohorts being followed longitudinally since arrival home from the Gulf. A group of PGW-era veterans deployed to Germany (n = 50) served as a comparison group. The study protocol included questionnaires, a neuropsychological test battery, an environmental interview, and psychological diagnostic interviews. This report focuses on self-reported health symptoms and exposures of participants who completed a 52-item health symptom checklist and a checklist of environmental exposures. RESULTS: The prevalence of reported symptoms was greater in both Persian Gulf-deployed cohorts compared to the Germany cohort. Analyses of the body-system symptom scores (BSS), weighted to account for sampling design, and adjusted by age, sex, and education, indicated that Persian Gulf-deployed veterans were more likely to report neurological, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cardiac, dermatological, musculoskeletal, psychological and neuropsychological system symptoms than Germany veterans. Using a priori hypotheses about the toxicant effects of exposure to specific toxicants, the relationships between self-reported exposures and body-system symptom groupings were examined through multiple regression analyses, controlling for war-zone exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Self-reported exposures to pesticides, debris from Scuds, chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents, and smoke from tent heaters each were significantly related to increased reporting of specific predicted BSS groupings. CONCLUSIONS: Veterans deployed to the Persian Gulf have higher self-reported prevalence of health symptoms compared to PGW veterans who were deployed only as far as Germany. Several Gulf-service environmental exposures are associated with increased health symptom reporting involving predicted body-systems, after adjusting for war-zone stressor exposures and PTSD.  (+info)

(2/10025) Socioeconomic inequalities in health in the working population: the contribution of working conditions.

BACKGROUND: The aim was to study the impact of different categories of working conditions on the association between occupational class and self-reported health in the working population. METHODS: Data were collected through a postal survey conducted in 1991 among inhabitants of 18 municipalities in the southeastern Netherlands. Data concerned 4521 working men and 2411 working women and included current occupational class (seven classes), working conditions (physical working conditions, job control, job demands, social support at work), perceived general health (very good or good versus less than good) and demographic confounders. Data were analysed with logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: For both men and women we observed a higher odds ratio for a less than good perceived general health in the lower occupational classes (adjusted for confounders). The odds of a less than good perceived general health was larger among people reporting more hazardous physical working conditions, lower job control, lower social support at work and among those in the highest category of job demands. Results were similar for men and women. Men and women in the lower occupational classes reported more hazardous physical working conditions and lower job control as compared to those in higher occupational classes. High job demands were more often reported in the higher occupational classes, while social support at work was not clearly related to occupational class. When physical working conditions and job control were added simultaneously to a model with occupational class and confounders, the odds ratios for occupational classes were reduced substantially. For men, the per cent change in the odds ratios for the occupational classes ranged between 35% and 83%, and for women between 35% and 46%. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial part of the association between occupational class and a less than good perceived general health in the working population could be attributed to a differential distribution of hazardous physical working conditions and a low job control across occupational classes. This suggests that interventions aimed at improving these working conditions might result in a reduction of socioeconomic inequalities in health in the working population.  (+info)

(3/10025) The meaning and use of the cumulative rate of potential life lost.

BACKGROUND: The 'years of potential life lost' (YPLL) is a public health measure in widespread use. However, the index does not apply to the comparisons between different populations or across different time periods. It also has the limit of being cross-sectional in nature, quantifying current burden but not future impact on society. METHODS: A new years-lost index is proposed-the 'cumulative rate of potential life lost' (CRPLL). It is a simple combination of the 'cumulative rate' (CR) and the YPLL. Vital statistics in Taiwan are used for demonstration and comparison of the new index with existing health-status measures. RESULTS: The CRPLL serves the purpose of between-group comparison. It can also be considered a projection of future impact, under the assumption that the age-specific mortality rates in the current year prevail. For a rare cause of death, it can be interpreted as the expected years (days) of potential life lost during a subject's lifetime. CONCLUSIONS: The CRPLL has several desirable properties, rendering it a promising alternative for quantifying health status.  (+info)

(4/10025) Thiamine deficiency is prevalent in a selected group of urban Indonesian elderly people.

This cross-sectional study involved 204 elderly individuals (93 males and 111 females). Subjects were randomly recruited using a list on which all 60-75 y-old-people living in seven sub-villages in Jakarta were included. The usual food intake was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Hemoglobin, plasma retinol, vitamin B-12, red blood cell folate and the percentage stimulation of erythrocyte transketolase (ETK), as an indicator of thiamine status, were analyzed. Median energy intake was below the assessed requirement. More than 75% of the subjects had iron and thiamine intakes of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake, and 20.2% of the study population had folate intake of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake. Intakes of vitamins A and B-12 were adequate. Biochemical assessments demonstrated that 36.6% of the subjects had low thiamine levels (ETK stimulation > 25%). The elderly men tended to have lower thiamine levels than the elderly women. The overall prevalence of anemia was 28.9%, and the elderly women were affected more than the elderly men. Low biochemical status of vitamins A, B-12 and RBC folate was found in 5.4%, 8.8 % and 2.9% of the subjects, respectively. Dietary intakes of thiamine and folate were associated with ETK stimulation and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (r = 0.176, P = 0.012 and r = 0.77, P = 0.001), respectively. Results of this study suggest that anemia, thiamine and possibly vitamin B-12 deficiency are prevalent in the elderly living in Indonesia. Clearly, micronutrient supplementation may be beneficial for the Indonesian elderly population living in underprivileged areas.  (+info)

(5/10025) Diabetic peripheral neuropathy and quality of life.

The quality of life (QOL) of 79 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and 37 non-diabetic controls was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). The NHP consists of six domains assessing energy, sleep, pain, physical mobility, emotional reactions and social isolation. Symptomatic diabetic neuropathy was present in 41 of the patients. The neuropathy patients had significantly higher scores (impaired QOL) in 5/6 NHP domains than either the other diabetic patients (p < 0.01) or the non-diabetic (p < 0.001) controls. These were: emotional reaction, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep. The diabetic patients without neuropathy also had significantly impaired QOL for 4/6 NHP domains compared with the non-diabetic control group (p < 0.05) (energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep). This quantification of the detrimental effect on QOL of diabetes, and in particular of chronic symptomatic peripheral diabetic neuropathy, emphasizes the need for further research into effective management of these patients.  (+info)

(6/10025) Why do short term workers have high mortality?

Increased mortality is often reported among workers in short term employment. This may indicate either a health-related selection process or the presence of different lifestyle or social conditions among short term workers. The authors studied these two aspects of short term employment among 16,404 Danish workers in the reinforced plastics industry who were hired between 1978 and 1985 and were followed to the end of 1988. Preemployment hospitalization histories for 1977-1984 were ascertained and were related to length of employment between 1978 and 1988. Workers who had been hospitalized prior to employment showed a 20% higher risk of early termination of employment than those never hospitalized (rate ratio (RR) = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.29), and the risk increased with number of hospitalizations. For workers with two or more preemployment hospitalizations related to alcohol abuse or violence, the rate ratios for short term employment were 2.30 (95% CI 1.74-3.06) and 1.86 (95% CI 1.35-2.56), respectively. An unhealthy lifestyle may also be a determinant of short term employment. While it is possible in principle to adjust for lifestyle factors if proper data are collected, the health-related selection of workers requires careful consideration when choosing a reference group for comparative studies of cumulative occupational exposure.  (+info)

(7/10025) Economic consequences of the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden.

OBJECTIVE: To develop a simulation model for analysis of the cost-effectiveness of treatments that affect the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The Markov model was developed on the basis of a Swedish cohort of 116 patients with early RA who were followed up for 5 years. The majority of patients had American College of Rheumatology (ACR) functional class II disease, and Markov states indicating disease severity were defined based on Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores. Costs were calculated from data on resource utilization and patients' work capacity. Utilities (preference weights for health states) were assessed using the EQ-5D (EuroQol) questionnaire. Hypothetical treatment interventions were simulated to illustrate the model. RESULTS: The cohort distribution among the 6 Markov states clearly showed the progression of the disease over 5 years of followup. Costs increased with increasing severity of the Markov states, and total costs over 5 years were higher for patients who were in more severe Markov states at diagnosis. Utilities correlated well with the Markov states, and the EQ-5D was able to discriminate between patients with different HAQ scores within ACR functional class II. CONCLUSION: The Markov model was able to assess disease progression and costs in RA. The model can therefore be a useful tool in calculating the cost-effectiveness of different interventions aimed at changing the progression of the disease.  (+info)

(8/10025) Risk factors for injuries and other health problems sustained in a marathon.

OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for injuries and other health problems occurring during or immediately after participation in a marathon. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was undertaken of participants in the 1993 Auckland Citibank marathon. Demographic data, information on running experience, training and injuries, and information on other lifestyle factors were obtained from participants before the race using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Information on injuries and other health problems sustained during or immediately after the marathon were obtained by a self administered questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were undertaken to identify significant risk factors for health problems. RESULTS: This study, one of only a few controlled epidemiological studies that have been undertaken of running injuries, has identified a number of risk factors for injuries and other health problems sustained in a marathon. Men were at increased risk of hamstring and calf problems, whereas women were at increased risk of hip problems. Participation in a marathon for the first time, participation in other sports, illness in the two weeks before the marathon, current use of medication, and drinking alcohol once a month or more, were associated with increased self reported risks of problems. While increased training seemed to increase the risk of front thigh and hamstring problems, it may decrease the risk of knee problems. There are significant but complex relations between age and risk of injury or health problem. CONCLUSIONS: This study has identified certain high risk subjects and risk factors for injuries and other health problems sustained in a marathon. In particular, subjects who have recently been unwell or are taking medication should weigh up carefully the pros and cons of participating.  (+info)



Centre


  • Please consult the Centre for Nursing and Health Studies website for the most recent information relating to clinical course registration and start dates. (athabascau.ca)

oral health


  • Study of the extent of the effects of oral health game education on dental and oral health status among students in Isfahan, Iran. (scirp.org)
  • ABSTRACT: Background and Objective:Dental and oral health education is an effective method in preventing dental caries. (scirp.org)
  • The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of drawing and picture-based dental and oral health education on awareness of five to six-year-old children in Ardabil province kindergartens.Methodology:Four hundred 5 to 6-year-old children were randomly selected from rural and urban kindergartens. (scirp.org)
  • Objective: To determine whether or not self-weighting at an item level contributes to the performance of an oral health-related quality-of-life measure. (hku.hk)
  • Design: Data were collected in two national surveys conducted a month apart, one using the 'weighted' measure and the other an 'unweighted' version of the UK oral health-related quality-of-life measure. (hku.hk)
  • In addition, sociodemographic and self-reported oral health status were recorded. (hku.hk)
  • Oral health is an important part of overall health. (saskatoonhealthregion.ca)
  • The goal of the Oral Health Program is to promote good oral health for people of all ages within the community. (saskatoonhealthregion.ca)
  • The Oral Health Program has two components - primary health services and the Public Health Dental Clinic. (saskatoonhealthregion.ca)
  • Dental health educator coordinators determine the oral health needs of communities, provide health promotion and dental health education, and deliver preventive programs. (saskatoonhealthregion.ca)

Behavior


  • These studies, generally known as Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC), are based on nationally independent surveys of school-aged children in as many as 30 participating countries. (umich.edu)
  • The study also examines a person's health and health behaviors such as eating habits, depression, injuries, anti-social behavior including questions concerning bullying, fighting, using weapons, and how one deals with anger. (umich.edu)

therapeutic


  • Opportunities to apply nursing assessment skills, such as mental status examination, and nursing intervention strategies such as therapeutic communication will be facilitated. (athabascau.ca)

Population


  • As part of the European project VINTAGE, a systematic review of scientific literature was undertaken to document the evidence base on the impact of alcohol on the health and well-being of older people, and on effective policies and preventive approaches to face the problem in this steadily increasing segment of the population. (scielosp.org)

infrastructure


  • Medical managers in 49 'designated' hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) were surveyed on infrastructure, staffing, administrative requirements and mental health care user case load pertaining to the Act for the month of July 2009. (scielo.org.za)

promotion


  • The first objective is to monitor health-risk behaviors and attitudes in youth over time to provide background and identify targets for health promotion initiatives. (umich.edu)
  • The 2018 NASPA Well-being and Health Promotion Leadership Conference will provide student affairs practitioners with the knowledge and skills to effectively address college student health and well-being through a variety of integrative approaches. (naspa.org)
  • Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over, and improve, their health. (naspa.org)
  • The NASPA Well-being and Health Promotion Leadership Conference will build attendees' knowledge and capacity around creating a culture of health and well-being, and inform future planning at institutions of higher education. (naspa.org)
  • Nursing 435: Professional Practice in Mental Health Promotion This 16-week paced online course provides opportunities to integrate theory and develop further skills related to mental health promotion with a focus on individuals, families and groups experiencing mental health alterations. (athabascau.ca)
  • Consideration will be given to mental health promotion with vulnerable aggregates and recognition of psychiatric mental health disorders that emerge across the lifespan. (athabascau.ca)
  • A major focus of the course is a mental health promotion project. (athabascau.ca)

objective


  • The second objective is to provide researchers with relevant information to understand and explain the development of health attitudes and behaviors through early adolescence. (umich.edu)

adults


  • First, much less is known about the health, social and economic impacts of alcohol use in older people compared to younger adults. (scielosp.org)
  • Research suggests that older people might be more sensitive to alcohol's negative health effects compared to younger adults, which could mean that more harm results from equivalent amounts of consumption by older people. (scielosp.org)

mental health care


  • The South African Mental Health Care Act (the Act) No. 17 of 2002 stipulated that regional and district hospitals be designated to admit, observe and treat mental health care users (MHCUs) for 72 hours before they are transferred to a psychiatric hospital. (scielo.org.za)
  • 3 To ensure adequate access and treatment for mental health care users (MHCUs), human, social and financial resources are necessary. (scielo.org.za)
  • The Mental Health Care Act No. 17 of 2002 (the Act) 8 introduced radical changes. (scielo.org.za)
  • Petersen expressed concern that de-institutionalisation and comprehensive integrated mental health care in South Africa were hampered by a lack of resources for mental health care as well as the inefficient use of existing mental health resources. (scielo.org.za)

care


  • 1996 Benchmarks of Fairness for Health Care Reform - Oxford University Press. (slideserve.com)
  • 1 Neuropsychiatric disorders contribute significantly to disability and health care cost in society, 2 and rank third in their contribution to burden of disease in SA. (scielo.org.za)

public


  • 1 Mental health was a low priority on South Africa's public health agenda, the lack of an action plan being one of the shortcomings. (scielo.org.za)
  • Prevalence, consequences and prevention of childhood nutritional iron deficiency: a child public health perspective. (biomedsearch.com)

Prevention


  • This conference is part of the NASPA Strategies Conferences, which include the 2018 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug, and Campus Violence Prevention Conference , the 2018 NASPA Mental Health Conference , and the 2018 NASPA Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Conference . (naspa.org)

provide


  • 50 (70.4%) of the district and regional hospitals have been designated to provide mental health services and admit involuntary and assisted MHCUs for 72-hour observations. (scielo.org.za)

dental


people


  • Since 1982, the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe has sponsored a cross-national, school-based study of health-related attitudes and behaviors of young people. (umich.edu)
  • As the 2009 council of the European Union conclusions on Alcohol and Health noted , there are a number of reasons to consider reviewing the impact of alcohol on older people in the European Union (EU) and what can be done about it [4, (scielosp.org)

services


  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. (umich.edu)
  • 6 Scarce resources, inequity of distribution and inefficiency of resource use characterise mental health services in low- and middle-income countries. (scielo.org.za)
  • Historically, mental health services in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) had been centred on a few large mental hospitals and stand-alone clinics. (scielo.org.za)

Department


  • 10 In KZN, 0.03% of the total health budget is spent on mental health, a figure that has not increased in the last decade (personal communication, KZN Department of Health). (scielo.org.za)

less


  • 4 Internationally, 32% of 191 countries surveyed did not have a specified budget for mental health, 5 and 36% of countries spent less than 1% of their total health budgets on mental health. (scielo.org.za)