Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Facility Administration: Management of the organization of HEALTH FACILITIES.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Ethiopia: An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Clinical Governance: A framework through which the United Kingdom's National Health Service organizations are accountable for continually improving the quality of their services and safeguarding high standards of care by creating an environment in which excellence in clinical care will flourish. (Scally and Donaldson, BMJ (4 July 1998): 61-65)Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Zambia: A republic in southern Africa, south of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and TANZANIA, and north of ZIMBABWE. Its capital is Lusaka. It was formerly called Northern Rhodesia.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Facility Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of health care facilities such as nursing homes.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Facility Planning: Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Artemisinins: A group of SESQUITERPENES and their analogs that contain a peroxide group (PEROXIDES) within an oxepin ring (OXEPINS).Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Fluorenes: A family of diphenylenemethane derivatives.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.NepalRwanda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA, east of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, west of TANZANIA. Its capital is Kigali. It was formerly part of the Belgian trust territory of Ruanda-Urund.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Burkina Faso: A republic in western Africa, south and east of MALI and west of NIGER. Its capital is Ouagadougou. It was formerly called Upper Volta until 1984.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)AfghanistanPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.IndiaPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Health Facility Moving: The relocation of health care institutions or units thereof. The concept includes equipment relocation.Community Health Workers: Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Parturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.LaosMedically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.BangladeshFamily Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Cameroon: A republic in central Africa lying east of CHAD and the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and west of NIGERIA. The capital is Yaounde.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Vaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Capacity Building: Organizational development including enhancement of management structures, processes and procedures, within organizations and among different organizations and sectors to meet present and future needs.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Public Facilities: An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.PakistanElectronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Namibia: A republic in southern Africa, south of ANGOLA and west of BOTSWANA. Its capital is Windhoek.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Diagnostic Tests, Routine: Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Eritrea: A country of eastern Africa, west of the Red Sea, bordered west and northwest by SUDAN, and south by ETHIOPIA. Its capital is Asmara.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Swaziland: A kingdom in southern Africa, west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Mbabane. The area was settled by the Swazi branch of the Zulu nation in the early 1880's, with its independence guaranteed by the British and Transvaal governments in 1881 and 1884. With limited self-government introduced in 1962, it became independent in 1968. Swazi is the Zulu name for the people who call themselves Swati, from Mswati, the name of a 16th century king, from a word meaning stick or rod. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1170 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p527)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Collective Bargaining: The process of negotiation between representatives of an employee organization, association or union, and representatives of the employer.Ethanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Postnatal Care: The care provided to women and their NEWBORNS for the first few months following CHILDBIRTH.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Mozambique: A republic in southern Africa, south of TANZANIA, east of ZAMBIA and ZIMBABWE, bordered on the west by the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Maputo. It was formerly called Portuguese East Africa.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Medical Waste Disposal: Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.Hospitals, Voluntary: Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Public-Private Sector Partnerships: An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Delayed Diagnosis: Non-optimal interval of time between onset of symptoms, identification, and initiation of treatment.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.

*  Health facility held ancillary to home | Planning Resource

Health facility held ancillary to home. 13 April 2007 , Be the First to Comment ... An enforcement notice requiring the cessation of a health farm at a house in Berkshire has been quashed after an inspector ...
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*  California Association of Health Facilities (CAHF)

... a resource for professional members and consumers seeking to research available nursing home facilities in California. ... of Health Facilities is a non-profit trade association representing skilled-nursing facilities and intermediate-care facilities ... California Association of Health Facilities. 2201 K Street. Sacramento, CA 95816-4922. member.services@cahf.org. Phone: 916.441 ... Copyright 2017 by California Association of Health Facilities (CAHF) , Privacy Statement , Terms Of Use ,Powered by ...
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*  Health facilities Bills - GovTrack.us

Health facilities-related bills in the U.S. Congress. ... Health facilities. Use this page to browse bills in the U.S. ... Congress related to the subject Health facilities, as determined by the Library of Congress. ...
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*  Organizations: : H: Health Facilities - healthfinder.gov

Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the ... Health Resources and Services Administration - HRSA. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The Health Resources and ... Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration HRSA's Primary Health Care Programs have their ... Chinese Community Health Resource Center The Chinese Community Health Resource Center (CCHRC) is a private, non-profit ...
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*  Health Facilities in New Canaan, CT » Topix

0 health facilities businesses in New Canaan, CT. Get directions, photos and reviews near 06842. ... Health Facilities in New Canaan. 0 health facilities businesses in New Canaan, CT. Get directions, photos and reviews near ...
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*  General Dynamics Wins $409M For Army Health Facilities - InformationWeek

General Dynamics Wins $409M For Army Health Facilities. IT division gets a four-year contract to help the military service ... The Corps of Engineers will manage those projects on behalf of the U.S. Army Medical Department Health Facilities Planning ... General Dynamics has a diverse record in health IT operations and maintenance, health systems and patient safety program ... the Department of Health and Human Services and its subordinate agencies; and commercial players, with 70 of the top 200 health ...
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*  Promoting Breast-feeding in Health Facilities - WHO - OMS

The remaining modules offer extensive practical advice on how to make a health facility baby-friendly. Topics discussed include ... for use in a short course intended to help administrators and policy-makers promote breast-feeding in health facilities. The ... and the development of written plans for introducing changes in individual health facilities.. ...
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*  mental health facilities « CBS St. Louis

Southern Illinois Mental Health Facility Could Lose Federal MoneyA mental health facility in far southern Illinois risks losing ...
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*  Visitors to Peninsula health facilities urged to wear masks - Orlando Sentinel

Hampton Roads health providers try to stem spread of flu ... Visitors to Peninsula health facilities urged to wear masks. ... Health facilities provide the masks and hand sanitizer at their entrances.. Patient First, a chain of urgent care medical ... The Health Department continues to urge residents to get a flu shot as the season could continue for a couple more months. ... Area health professionals continue to urge people to get vaccinated.. The rapid increase in cases of influenza-like illnesses ...
orlandosentinel.com/dp-nws-flu-mask-0110-20130109-story.html

*  Health Facilities Management magazine | Hospitals Design, Construction & Operations

Health Facilities Management provides the most comprehensive coverage of challenges facing health facility design, construction ... Health facility casework design Modular furnishings provide long-term savings by adjusting to changes and growth. Read the ... You can read HFM Daily stories on this page or subscribe to Health Facilities Management This Week for a Friday roundup of the ... Effective Dust Control in Health Care Facilities Currently, cleaning staffs are being asked to do more with less, while still ...
hfmmagazine.com

*  Open New York Health Facility General Information | ProgrammableWeb

The Open New York Health Facility General Information API is a service part of the State of New York's data.ny.gov open data ... The API is meant to assist developers in creating health or healthcare related applications. The API provides access to a ... Accessible information includes the location and contact information for facilities, filterable by city, state, county, zip ... searchable dataset that holds general information on New York healthcare facilities such as hospitals, nursing homes, treatment ...
https://programmableweb.com/api/open-new-york-health-facility-general-information/frameworks

*  Psychiatric Admission | Mental Health Facilities | Chicago Lakeshore Hospital

Read Aurora Behavioral Health's Mission and Vision for our mental health facilities in Chicago ... To be the provider of choice as the industry leader for behavioral health and addiction services in the greater Chicago market. ...
chicagolakeshorehospital.com/about/chicago-lakeshore-mission

*  Bill Text - SB-481 Long-term health facilities: informed consent.

An act to amend Section 1418.8 of the Health and Safety Code, relating to health facilities. ... Long-term health facilities: informed consent.. Existing law requires the attending physician of a resident in a skilled ... to inform the skilled nursing facility or intermediate care facility. Existing law requires the facility to conduct an ... a) If the attending physician of a resident in a skilled nursing facility or intermediate care facility prescribes or orders a ...
leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB481

*  Federal Register :: Availability of Funds for the Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program for Service in Certain...

1997 for awards under section 846 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act to repay up to 85 percent of the nursing education ... The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) announces that applications will be accepted for fiscal year (FY) ...
https://federalregister.gov/documents/1997/07/09/97-17895/availability-of-funds-for-the-nursing-education-loan-repayment-program-for-service-in-certain-health

*  Mount Miguel Covenant Village Health Facility - Nursing Home - Official Ratings - Reviews

See ratings on health care quality in nursing homes, why quality matters to you, and how you can help get the care you deserve ... The CalQualityCare.org website provides ratings of California nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities (SNF) for staffing, ... facility quality, and care quality and data on location, residents, deficiencies, citations, staffing, bed sores, dementia, ... p>Mount Miguel Covenant Village Health Facility in Spring Valley, California 91977 has an Overall Rating of Average and a ...
calqualitycare.org/provider/?id=090000006&n=Mount Miguel Covenant Village Health Facility

*  WHO | Introduction of pneumococcal vaccine - PCV 13 A handbook for district and health facility staff (2013) English and...

Introduction of pneumococcal vaccine - PCV 13 A handbook for district and health facility staff (2013) English and French ... This handbook is most useful for staff working at district and health facility levels. Some adaptations will need to be made at ... Introduction of pneumococcal vaccine, PCV13 - A handbook for district and health facility staff (2013) ...
who.int/immunization/diseases/pneumococcal/training_materials_intro_PCV13/en/

*  health care facilities

NAHDAP is an archive in ICPSR and supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), both within the National Institutes of Health.. ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/thesaurus/entry?topic=subject&entry=health care facilities

*  WHO | Health care facilities and waste

... services and safe health care waste management in health care facilities are fundamental for the provision of quality, people- ... Such services also reduce health care associated infections, chemical hazards and risks to the community. ... Further information about health care facilities and waste. * Essential environmental health standards in health care ... With huge gaps in current WASH services in health care facilities, WHO is working to improve WASH in health care facilities, ...
who.int/water_sanitation_health/facilities/en/

*  Access to and Quality of Menstrual Regulation and Postabortion Care in Bangladesh: Evidence from a Survey of Health Facilities,...

Health Facilities Survey. The HFS was conducted to obtain nationally representative facility-level data on the provision of MR ... Using the most recent Ministry of Health and Family Welfare lists of health facilities in Bangladesh, we identified 5,424 ... and private-sector facilities providing reproductive health services; the Health Professionals Survey (HPS), which collected ... These facilities are the primary health providers in rural areas, where the majority of the population lives. ...
https://guttmacher.org/report/menstrual-regulation-postabortion-care-bangladesh

*  Code of Laws - Title 44 - Chapter 13 - Admission, Detention And Removal Of Patients At State Mental Health Facilities

The Department of Mental Health shall investigate the case of each patient or trainee in a State mental health facility who is ... SECTION 44-13-10. Detention of individual pending removal to facility.. Pending his removal to a State mental health facility ... Return of patient to out-of-State mental health facility.. If a mentally ill patient from an out-of-State mental health ... if any person admitted to a State mental health facility is not a citizen of this State, the superintendent of the facility ...
scstatehouse.gov/code/t44c013.php

*  Health Care Facilities Licensing | doh

Monday to Friday, 8:15 am to 4:45 pm, except District ...
https://doh.dc.gov/service/health-care-facilities-licensing

*  Real Estate Firm Buying 20 Health Care Facilities - latimes

said Monday that it has acquired 11 long-term-care facilities and has entered into commitments to purchase nine others for a ... Health Care Property Investors Inc. said Monday that it has acquired 11 long-term-care facilities and has entered into ... The Costa Mesa real estate investment trust, which specializes in health care facilities, said the properties were acquired ... With these purchases, Health Care Property Investors will own 70 properties valued at more than $266 million. ...
articles.latimes.com/1986-08-12/business/fi-18763_1_care-facilities-health

*  Health care facilities - Bohemian Switzerland

This website offers the contact information related to the accommodation facilities in the region of Bohemian Switzerland, the ...
ceskesvycarsko.cz/en/health-care-facilities

*  Star Trek (2009) / Headscratchers - TV Tropes

And it's not like Nero had repair facilities for Federation ships. * ^Nero and Co. had 25 years to figure out the best way to ... Nero's torture has probably had very serious side-effects to his health. ...
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Headscratchers/StarTrek2009

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Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Global Health Delivery ProjectMaternal Health Task ForceHealth policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Timeless Secret: Timeless Secret is a line of anti-aging skin-care products sold by home delivery. They’re advertised on infomercials featuring former Entertainment Tonight host Julie Moran.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Federal institutions of Tanzania: This is a list of the federal institutions of Tanzania.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Halfdan T. MahlerKenya Pipeline CompanyBehavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Roll Back Malaria Partnership: The Roll Back Malaria Partnership (RBM Partnership) is the global framework for coordinated action against malaria. It forges consensus among key actors in malaria control, harmonises action and mobilises resources to fight malaria in endemic countries.Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Addis Ababa Fistula HospitalContraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.Health in Ghana: Health in Ghana includes the healthcare systems on prevention, care and treatment of diseases and other maladies.Hinduism in Zambia: Zambia is home to 25,000 Hindus.as reported by Hinduism Today, 2003 Hinduism is the third largest religion in Zambia.Makerere University School of MedicineSharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.COPE FoundationNortheast Community Health CentreSisterhood method: The Sisterhood Method is a household survey to estimate maternal deaths, which includes a series of four questions. The Sisterhood Method is one method recommended by the WHO.Nigerian Ports Authority: The Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) is a federal government agency that governs and operates the ports of Nigeria. The major ports controlled by the NPA include: the Lagos Port Complex and Tin Can Island Port in Lagos; Calabar Port, Delta Port, Rivers Port at Port Harcourt, and Onne Port.Private healthcareLucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.European Immunization Week: European Immunization Week (EIW) is an annual regional initiative, coordinated by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/Europe), to promote immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. EIW activities are carried out by participating WHO/Europe member states.Minati SenPsychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Women's Health Initiative: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was initiated by the U.S.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.WHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Karonga District: right|115px|Location of Karonga District in MalawiAssistance in Recovery: Assistance in Recovery (AiR) is an international provider of addiction recovery assistance that focuses on treating addiction as a chronic disease, and provides services to reflect this. AiR has behavioral health case management services for chronic disease care and specializes in the treatment of chemical dependency, mental health and eating disorders.PfATP6: PfATP6, also known as PfSERCA or PfATPase6, is a calcium ATPase gene encoded by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The protein is thought to be a P-type ATPase involved in calcium ion transport.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.Benzo(a)fluoreneResource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Manipal Teaching HospitalIndia–Rwanda relations: Indo-Rwandan relations are the foreign relations between the Republic of India and the Republic of Rwanda. India is represented in Rwanda through its Honorary Consulate in Kigali.Standard evaluation frameworkEden Prairie Library: The Eden Prairie Library is located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota and is one of 41 libraries of the Hennepin County Library system. The 40,000 square foot building houses a collection of 150,000 items, an automated materials handling system (AMH) for check in and rough sortation of materials, 82 public computers, two meeting rooms, a reading lounge with fireplace, a teen area, a children's area with a Family Reading Lounge, and several installations of artwork.

(1/595) Nurses and nursing in primary medical care in England.

In 1974 we sent questionnaires on attachment and employment of nurses to 9214 general practices in England. There were 7863 replies (85%), of which 551 were excluded from the study. A total of 2654 nurses were directly employed by 24% (1774) of the practices, and 68% (4972) had attached nurses. Practices in health centres were larger and had greater nursing resources than those in other premises. We suggest that practices may employ nurses to compensate for ineffective nursing attachments, and we conclude that general-practice-employed nurses are becoming "professionalised".  (+info)

(2/595) A management information system for nurse/midwives.

The experiences of nurse/midwives with a simple management information system in the private sector are reported from four facilities in Nigeria. When such a system is being introduced, special attention should be given to strengthening the ability of health workers to record and collate data satisfactorily.  (+info)

(3/595) Regional organisational audit of district departments of public health.

Organisational audit of public health in the United Kingdom is rare. To provide a framework for a structured organisational audit in district public health departments in one region organisational factors contributing to efficient, high quality work were identified and compared between districts, enabling each department to identify its organisational strengths and weaknesses. A draft list of organisational factors, based on the King's Fund organisational audit programme, were rated by 52 public health physicians and trainees in 12 district public health departments in South East Thames region for their importance on a scale of 0 (not relevant) to 5 (vital). Factors with average ratings of > 4, judged to be "vital" and proxies for standards, were then used to compare each district's actual performance, as reported by its director of public health in a self reported questionnaire. In all, 37 responses were received to the rating questionnaire (response rate 71%) and 12 responses to the directors' questionnaire. Of the 54 factors identified as vital factors, 20(37%) were achieved in all 12 districts and 16(30%) in all but one district; 18 were not being achieved by two (33%) districts or more. Overall, vital factors were not being achieved in 9% of cases. The authors concluded that most departments are achieving most vital organisational factors most of the time, but improvement is still possible. The results have been used as a basis for planning the organisation of public health departments in several of the newly formed commissioning agencies. This was the first regional audit of public health of its kind performed in the region and it provided valuable experience for planning future regional audit activity.  (+info)

(4/595) Health human resource development in rural China.

China has made significant progress in increasing the quantity of health workers in rural areas. Attention is shifting to improving the quality of health workers. This article documents several features of health workers in rural China. Many have not received formal training to a level implied by their rank and title, and there is no clear relationship between the skills of health workers and the functions they perform. Many better-qualified personnel have left lower level health facilities for more attractive employment in higher level and urban facilities. A system of professional licensing is currently being considered that will link educational requirements to employment and promotion. This article outlines some of the issues that should be taken into consideration in formulating this system. In particular, licensing may have unequal impacts on rich and poorer areas. This article argues that other regulatory measures will be necessary if licensing is to be an effective mechanism for controlling the quality of health workers, and contribute to the provision of affordable health services in both rich and poor areas.  (+info)

(5/595) The impact of a simulated immunization registry on perceived childhood immunization status.

We developed a simulated immunization registry to assess the impact on the perceived immunization status in a population-based sample of 2-year-olds living in Olmsted County, MN, in 1995. We compiled records of all immunizations by abstracting immunization data from all medical care facilities in the county. The data collected from each facility were analyzed separately to provide the immunization rate as perceived by each facility. This perceived rate was compared to the rate obtained by combining all recorded immunizations from all facilities (simulated registry). Information on children not receiving any carefrom facilities in Olmsted County was compiled from birth certificate data and community school lists. Data from the simulated registry indicated that 69.1% of all children in Olmsted County with medical records were up-to-date on their immunizations by 20 months of age. By 24 months, this increased to 74.2%. The immunization rate of 24-month-old children recorded at individual healthcare facilities in Olmsted County ranged from 24.3% to 79.5%. The addition of data from the simulated registry increased the immunization rate at each site: a 27.7% relative increase in the site with the lowest recorded immunization rate, a 14.0% increase in the site with the intermediate immunization rate, and a 6.9% increase in the site with the highest internally perceived immunization rate. The registry also identified excess immunizations in 5% of the county's 2-year-olds. Each healthcare facility in this community gained an immediate benefit from the development of a simulated immunization registry. This immediate improvement in one quality-of-care measure (up-to-date immunization rate) should be factored into the cost/benefit assessment of immunization registries.  (+info)

(6/595) Management of maple syrup urine disease in Canada. Committee for improvement of Hereditary Disease Management.

Nine patients with classic maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and four with variant forms are under care at five treatment centres in the network affiliated with the National Food Distribution Centre for the Treatment of Hereditary Metabolic Diseases (the "Food Bank"). Diagnosis was made by clinicians and not from mass screening programs. MSUD requires complex emergency treatment to prevent severe neurologic damage, but effective management is compatible with normal growth and development. Long-term treatment requires continuous monitoring of the response to diets restricted in branched-chain amino acids; semisynthetic diet products free of branched-chain amino acids, provided by the Food Bank, are essential. Centralized treatment programs reduce the cost of treatment and maximize the potential benefits. The leucine requirement for adequate somatic growth during infancy in MSUD was found to be 200 to 600 mg/d; this range is lower than that estimated for infants with an intact leucine catabolic outflow pathway. The requirements for isoleucine and valine in infancy were also found to be lower than published values for normal infants.  (+info)

(7/595) Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data.  (+info)

(8/595) Health-care facility choice and the phenomenon of bypassing.

Health policy-makers in developing countries are often disturbed and to a degree surprised by the phenomenon of the ill travelling past a free or subsidized local public clinic (or other public facility) to get to an alternative source of care at which they often pay a considerable amount for health care. That a person bypasses a facility is almost certainly indicative either of significant problems with the quality of care at the bypassed facility or of significantly better care at the alternative source of care chosen. When it is a poor person choosing to bypass a free public facility and pay for care further away, such action is especially bothersome to public policy-makers. This paper uses a unique data set, with a health facility survey in which all health facilities are identified, surveyed, and located geographically; and a household survey in which a sample of households from the same health district is also both surveyed and located geographically. The data are analyzed to examine patterns of health care choice related to the characteristics and locations of both the facilities and actual and potential clients. Rather than using the distance travelled or some other general choice of type of care variable as the dependent variable, we are able actually to analyze which specific facilities are bypassed and which chosen. The findings are instructive. That bypassing behaviour is not very different across income groups is certainly noteworthy, as is the fact that the more severely ill tend to bypass and to travel further for care than do the less severely ill. In multivariate analysis almost all characteristics of both providers and facilities are found to have the a priori expected relationships to facility choice. Prices tend to deter use, and improved quality of services to increase the likelihood of a facility being chosen. The answer to the bypassing dilemma seems to be for providers to provide as good quality care relative to the money charged (if any), as other, often further away, providers.  (+info)



Public Health


  • BMC public health, 15. (eprints.org)
  • said Randy Kuykendall, interim director of EMS for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. (brushnewstribune.com)

services


  • BMC health services research, 15 (1). (eprints.org)
  • A new round of crises and challenges in rural Colorado medicine has health experts and public officials on alert, scrambling to shore up services in far-flung areas. (brushnewstribune.com)

Treatment


  • If you're a member of a health plan, we can also assist you in understanding your coverage and find the right treatment center and rehab program for you. (recoveryrehabs.com)