Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Catastrophic Illness: An acute or prolonged illness usually considered to be life-threatening or with the threat of serious residual disability. Treatment may be radical and is frequently costly.Insurance, Major Medical: Insurance providing a broad range of medical services and supplies, when prescribed by a physician, whether or not the patient is hospitalized. It frequently is an extension of a basic policy and benefits will not begin until the basic policy is exhausted.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Gross Domestic Product: Value of all final goods and services produced in a country in one year.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Inflation, Economic: An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Healthcare Financing: Methods of generating, allocating, and using financial resources in healthcare systems.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Georgia (Republic)National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Calorimetry, Indirect: Calculation of the energy expenditure in the form of heat production of the whole body or individual organs based on respiratory gas exchange.Basal Metabolism: Heat production, or its measurement, of an organism at the lowest level of cell chemistry in an inactive, awake, fasting state. It may be determined directly by means of a calorimeter or indirectly by calculating the heat production from an analysis of the end products of oxidation within the organism or from the amount of oxygen utilized.United StatesMental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.IndiaChina: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Thermogenesis: The generation of heat in order to maintain body temperature. The uncoupled oxidation of fatty acids contained within brown adipose tissue and SHIVERING are examples of thermogenesis in MAMMALS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Rest: Freedom from activity.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Calorimetry: The measurement of the quantity of heat involved in various processes, such as chemical reactions, changes of state, and formations of solutions, or in the determination of the heat capacities of substances. The fundamental unit of measurement is the joule or the calorie (4.184 joules). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Oxygen Isotopes: Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.

*  Health expenditure - private (% of GDP) in Canada

Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and ... an economic calendar and news for Health expenditure - private (% of GDP) in Canada. ... Health expenditure; private (% of GDP) in Canada was last measured at 3.28 in 2013, according to the World Bank. ... Health expenditure, public (% of total health expenditure). 70.93 % Health expenditure, public (% of government expenditure). ...
https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/health-expenditure-private-percent-of-gdp-wb-data.html

*  Increased health care cost sharing hurts patients who need care the most and does little to lower total expenditures | Economic...

Cost sharing seeks to bring down overall health expenditures by making people more careful consumers of health care. However, ... finds that shifting more health care costs onto consumers is a flawed strategy for containing health expenditures. Cost sharing ... A new paper from EPI Director of Health Policy Research Elise Gould, Increased health care cost sharing works as intended: It ... Increased health care cost sharing hurts patients who need care the most and does little to lower total expenditures Press ...
epi.org/press/increased-health-care-cost-sharing-hurts/

*  Dentons - Health Care in the United States

Global expenditures on health care are approaching seven trillion US dollars a year, or roughly 10 percent of the world's gross ... Global expenditures on health care are approaching seven trillion US dollars a year, or roughly 10 percent of the world's gross ... Health Care in the United States. You are currently viewing Dentons' capabilities in Health Care in the United States. To view ... Home health and home infusion supplier: Representing a home infusion and home health company in its sale to a publicly traded ...
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*  Health expenditure - public (% of government expenditure) in Norway

... of government expenditure) in Norway was last measured at 18.33 in 2013, according to the World Bank. Public health expenditure ... an economic calendar and news for Health expenditure - public (% of government expenditure) in Norway. ... health insurance funds.This page has the latest values, historical data, forecasts, charts, statistics, ... Health expenditure, public (% of total health expenditure). 85.49 % Health expenditure, public (% of government expenditure). ...
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*  Sur model with spatial effects: an application to mental health expenditure - LSE Research Online

... an application to mental health expenditure. Health Economics, 16 (12). pp. 1403-1408. ISSN 1057-9230 ...
eprints.lse.ac.uk/3445/

*  Percentage of total government expenditure allocated to health | Zanran

Projected Government health expenditure as a proportion of GDP a 2003-04 and 2044-45, Educational expenditure not allocated by ... level as % of total educational expenditure - Georgia, Scope for allocating more to priority sectors such as health... ... statistics on Percentage of total government expenditure allocated to health: ... Non-health care Expenditures Health Care Expenditures Year. 2048 (projection) , U.S. Government Accountability Office (U.S. GAO ...
zanran.com/q/Percentage_of_total_government_expenditure_allocated_to_health

*  Colonoscopies Explain Why U.S. Leads the World in Health Expenditures - NYTimes.com

... a more significant factor in the nation's annual health care bill may be the high price tag of ordinary services. ... "The U.S. just pays providers of health care much more for everything," said Tom Sackville, chief executive of the health plans ... Many other countries deliver health care on a private fee-for-service basis, as does much of the American health care system, ... A list of drug, scan and procedure prices compiled by the International Federation of Health Plans, a global network of health ...
nytimes.com/2013/06/02/health/colonoscopies-explain-why-us-leads-the-world-in-health-expenditures.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1

*  Health expenditure - public (% of total health expenditure) in the United Kingdom

Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services ( ... an economic calendar and news for Health expenditure - public (% of total health expenditure) in the United Kingdom. ... Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external ... of total health expenditure) in the United Kingdom was last measured at 83.54 in 2013, according to the World Bank. ...
https://tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/health-expenditure-public-percent-of-total-health-expenditure-wb-data.html

*  Health expenditure per capita (US dollar) in Canada

Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the ... an economic calendar and news for Health expenditure per capita (US dollar) in Canada. ... and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. ... Health expenditure per capita (US dollar) in Canada was last measured at 5717.97 in 2013, according to the World Bank. ...
https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/health-expenditure-per-capita-us-dollar-wb-data.html

*  Percentage of National Health Expenditures Spent on Insurance Administration, 2005 - The Commonwealth Fund

Percentage of National Health Expenditures Spent on Insurance Administration, 2005. Items in My ChartCart: My ChartCart ... Harkness Fellowships in Health Care Policy and Practice * Association of Health Care Journalists Reporting Fellowships on ... FEATURED:How the Affordable Care Act Has Helped Women Gain Insurance and Improved Their Ability to Get Health Care ... The mission of The Commonwealth Fund is to promote a high-performing health care system that achieves better access, improved ...
commonwealthfund.org/interactives-and-data/chart-cart/report/why-not-the-best--results-from-the-national-scorecard-on-u-s--health-system-performance--2008/p/percentage-of-national-health-expenditures-spent-on-insurance-administration--2005

*  Limitations of methods for measuring out-of-pocket and catastrophic private health expenditures

... Bull World Health Organ [ ... that asked the same respondents about health expenditures in different ways. Data from the World Health Survey were used to ... on estimates of household out-of-pocket and catastrophic expenditure on health. METHODS: We used results from two surveys - the ... Bulletin of the World Health Organization. Print version ISSN 0042-9686. Abstract. LU, Chunling; CHIN, Brian; LI, Guohong and ...
scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S0042-96862009000300019&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en

*  CME: Seasonal Expenditures on Pork - The Pig Site

Maintaining Mental Health Key to Coping with PED. 22 September 2017. Access a world of solutions for veterinary professionals ... The chart of real per capita expenditures for pork appeared in last week's update on the status of various meat and poultry ... The result is larger expenditures and the conclusion that pork demand is strongest in Q4.Finally, the difference in the price ... Very few years have not seen dramatic peaks for consumer level expenditures in the fourth quarter with 2009 being the most ...
thepigsite.com/swinenews/37694/cme-seasonal-expenditures-on-pork/

*  Latvia Health expenditures - Demographics

Facts and statistics about the Health expenditures of Latvia. Updated as of 2017. ... Health expenditures: 5.9% of GDP (2014). Definition: This entry provides the total expenditure on health as a percentage of GDP ... Health expenditures are broadly defined as activities performed either by institutions or individuals through the application ... Health expenditures by year chart. *Health expenditures rank chart*Health expenditures - comparative map ...
indexmundi.com/latvia/health_expenditures.html

*  Global Health Expenditure Database

... Data ExplorerQuick ReportsDocumentation CentreHelpSearch * , ...
apps.who.int/nha/database/Key_Indicators/Index/en

*  Health expenditure in Mozambique | Open Library

Health expenditure in Mozambique by Allison Beattie; 1 edition; First published in 1999; Subjects: Cost of Medical care, ... openlibrary.org/books/OL3348010M/Health_expenditure_in_Mozambique ,title = Health expenditure in Mozambique ,publication-date ... Health expenditure in Mozambique 25 policy questions Allison Beattie and Daniel Kraushaar. Published 1999 by s.n. in [Maputo . ... You could add Health expenditure in Mozambique to a list if you log in. ...
https://openlibrary.org/works/OL5773346W/Health_expenditure_in_Mozambique

*  Health expenditure, total (% of GDP) | Data

Health expenditure, total (% of GDP) from The World Bank: Data ... Health expenditure, total (% of GDP). World Health Organization ... Global Health Expenditure database ( see apps.who.int/nha/database for the most recent updates ). ...
https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.XPD.TOTL.ZS?page=2&order=wbapi_data_value_2008 wbapi_data_value wbapi_data_value-last&sort=asc

*  Health expenditure per capita (current US$) | Data

Health expenditure per capita (current US$) from The World Bank: Data ... Health expenditure per capita (current US$). World Health Organization Global Health Expenditure database ( see apps.who.int/ ...
https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.XPD.PCAP?page=2&order=wbapi_data_value_2010 wbapi_data_value&sort=asc

*  Why Have Health Expenditures as a Share fo GDP Risen So Much?

... including the large increase in the health expenditure share, a rise in life expectancy, and an increase in the size of health- ... When this technological progress is combined with a Medicare- like transfer program to pay the health expenses of the elderly, ... Aggregate health expenditures as a share of GDP have risen in the United States from about 5 percent in 1960 to nearly 14 ... including the large increase in the health expenditure share, a rise in life expectancy, and an increase in the size of health- ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/9325.html

*  Health expenditures 2017 country comparisons, ranks, Alphabetical

Health expenditures provides the total expenditure on health as a percentage of GDP. Health expenditures are broadly defined as ... NOTE: The information regarding Health expenditures 2017 on this page is re-published from the CIA World Factbook 2017. No ... All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Health expenditures 2017 should be addressed to the CIA. ... claims are made regarding theaccuracy of Health expenditures 2017 information contained here. ...
https://photius.com/rankings/2017/population/health_expenditures_2017_1.html

*  Health expenditure - public (% of GDP) in Gabon

Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external ... an economic calendar and news for Health expenditure - public (% of GDP) in Gabon. ... health insurance funds.This page has the latest values, historical data, forecasts, charts, statistics, ... Health expenditure; public (% of GDP) in Gabon was last measured at 2.07 in 2013, according to the World Bank. ...
https://tradingeconomics.com/gabon/health-expenditure-public-percent-of-gdp-wb-data.html

*  Star Trek (2009) / Headscratchers - TV Tropes

... expenditure of resources. * Transwarp Beaming doesn't allow planet to planet beaming. Scotty discovered two things: Transwarp ... Nero's torture has probably had very serious side-effects to his health. ...
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Headscratchers/StarTrek2009

*  Impact of Immediate Versus South African Recommendations Guided ART Initiation on HIV Incidence - Full Text View -...

Health care use and health care expenditures [ Time Frame: Repeated measure every 6 months during follow-up ]. Percentage of ... IMPORTANT: Listing of a study on this site does not reflect endorsement by the National Institutes of Health. Talk with a ... This trial is evaluating a public health intervention strategy trial which aims to reduce the incidence of HIV at a population- ... Keywords provided by French National Institute for Health and Medical Research-French National Agency for Research on AIDS and ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01509508

*  The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Investigating Mumps Outbreak in Odisha, India: An Opportunity to Assess...

The exercise uncovered a number of weak links in the essential public health services within the health-care delivery system in ... The outbreak had led to a community expenditure of 538 USD. ... which had gone completely unnoticed by the existing health-care ... The exercise uncovered a number of weak links in the essential public health services within the health-care delivery system in ... An Opportunity to Assess the Health System by Utilizing the Essential Public Health Services Framework * Authors: Sourabh Paul1 ...
ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0593

*  Study Search Results

Health Interview Survey, 1977 (ICPSR 7839) United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control ... Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2001: Diary Survey (ICPSR 3675) United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics 23 ... National Center for Health Statistics 25 more results in National Health Interview Survey Series ... United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institute of Mental Health ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies?keyword=households&geography[0]=United States&paging.startRow=1

*  Online Debate: Novice Tournament R1: The United States should implement a system of Single Payer health care. | Debate.org

The United States should implement a system of Single Payer health care. ... He simply returns to his statistics about current expenditure per GDP and fails to address the current trends we see in ... Ironically, with the rise of Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), private health insurance plans actually regulate health ... The current health care system in America is very costly, with 17% of the GDP going to health care6; while this is cited as one ...
debate.org/debates/Novice-Tournament-R1-The-United-States-should-implement-a-system-of-Single-Payer-health-care./1/

Catastrophic illness: A catastrophic illness is a severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery. Examples would include coma, cancer, leukemia, heart attack or stroke.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Global Health Delivery ProjectHesquiaht First NationContraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: (first Board of Directors meeting)Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Health policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Index of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.Old Tbilisi: Old Tbilisi (, dzveli t'bilisi) is an administrative district (raioni) in Tbilisi, capital of Georgia. Although the term "Old Tbilisi" has long been used to denote a historical part of the city, it was only in 2007 that it became a distinct administrative entity to incorporate several historical neighborhoods formerly included in the districts of Mtatsminda-Krtsanisi, Isani-Samgori, and Didube-Chughureti.Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Circular flow of income: The circular flow of income or circular flow is a model of the economy in which the major exchanges are represented as flows of money, goods and services, etc. between economic agents.Criticisms of globalization: Criticism of globalization is skepticism of the claimed benefits of globalization. Many of these views are held by the anti-globalization movement.Private healthcareEuropean Immunization Week: European Immunization Week (EIW) is an annual regional initiative, coordinated by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/Europe), to promote immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. EIW activities are carried out by participating WHO/Europe member states.Lucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}List of U.S. states by life expectancy: This article presents a list of United States states sorted by their life expectancy at birth and by race/ethnicity in every state where the population of that racial or ethnic group is sufficiently large for robust estimates. The data is taken from the Measure of America's third national human development report, The Measure of America 2013–2014 width="25%" align="center" |Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Penalized present value: The Penalized Present Value (PPV) is a method of Capital Budgeting under risk developed by Fernando Gómez-Bezares in the 1980s.Halfdan T. MahlerBehavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityLayout of the Port of Tianjin: The Port of Tianjin is divided into nine areas: the three core (“Tianjin Xingang”) areas of Beijiang, Nanjiang, and Dongjiang around the Xingang fairway; the Haihe area along the river; the Beitang port area around the Beitangkou estuary; the Dagukou port area in the estuary of the Haihe River; and three areas under construction (Hanggu, Gaoshaling, Nangang).School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.WHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.List of countries by food energy intake: Food consumption refers to the amount of food available for human consumption as estimated by the FAO Food Balance Sheets. However the actual food consumption may be lower than the quantity shown as food availability depending on the magnitude of wastage and losses of food in the household, e.Women's Health Initiative: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was initiated by the U.S.Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.Resource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Sharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.Minati SenHealthy community design: Healthy community design is planning and designing communities that make it easier for people to live healthy lives. Healthy community design offers important benefits:Population healthDenplan

(1/1821) Risk-adjusted capitation based on the Diagnostic Cost Group Model: an empirical evaluation with health survey information.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the predictive accuracy of the Diagnostic Cost Group (DCG) model using health survey information. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Longitudinal data collected for a sample of members of a Dutch sickness fund. In the Netherlands the sickness funds provide compulsory health insurance coverage for the 60 percent of the population in the lowest income brackets. STUDY DESIGN: A demographic model and DCG capitation models are estimated by means of ordinary least squares, with an individual's annual healthcare expenditures in 1994 as the dependent variable. For subgroups based on health survey information, costs predicted by the models are compared with actual costs. Using stepwise regression procedures a subset of relevant survey variables that could improve the predictive accuracy of the three-year DCG model was identified. Capitation models were extended with these variables. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: For the empirical analysis, panel data of sickness fund members were used that contained demographic information, annual healthcare expenditures, and diagnostic information from hospitalizations for each member. In 1993, a mailed health survey was conducted among a random sample of 15,000 persons in the panel data set, with a 70 percent response rate. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The predictive accuracy of the demographic model improves when it is extended with diagnostic information from prior hospitalizations (DCGs). A subset of survey variables further improves the predictive accuracy of the DCG capitation models. The predictable profits and losses based on survey information for the DCG models are smaller than for the demographic model. Most persons with predictable losses based on health survey information were not hospitalized in the preceding year. CONCLUSIONS: The use of diagnostic information from prior hospitalizations is a promising option for improving the demographic capitation payment formula. This study suggests that diagnostic information from outpatient utilization is complementary to DCGs in predicting future costs.  (+info)

(2/1821) Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia: pattern of use and health care system costs.

BACKGROUND: The use of mammography for screening asymptomatic women has increased dramatically in the past decade. This report describes the changes that have occurred in the use of bilateral mammography in British Columbia since the provincial breast cancer screening program began in 1988. METHODS: Using province-wide databases from both the breast cancer screening program and the provincial health insurance plan in BC, the authors determined the number and costs of bilateral mammography services for women aged 40 years or older between Apr. 1, 1986, and Mar. 31, 1997. Unilateral mammography was excluded because it is used for investigating symptomatic disease and screening abnormalities, and for follow-up of women who have undergone mastectomy for cancer. RESULTS: As the provincial breast cancer screening program expanded from 1 site in 1988 to 23 in 1997, it provided an increasing proportion of the bilateral mammographic examinations carried out each year in BC. In fiscal year 1996/97, 65% of bilateral mammographic examinations were performed through the screening program. The cost per examination within the screening program dropped as volume increased. Thirty percent more bilateral mammography examinations were done in 1996/97 than in 1991/92, but health care system expenditures for these services increased by only 4% during the same period. In calendar year 1996, 21% of new breast cancers were diagnosed as a result of a screening program visit. INTERPRETATION: Substantial increases in health care expenditures have been avoided by shifting bilateral mammography services to the provincial screening program, which has a lower cost per screening visit.  (+info)

(3/1821) The economic burden of asthma: direct and indirect costs in Switzerland.

Asthma mortality increased in Switzerland between 1980 and 1994. This study aimed to assess the economic burden of asthma in this country. Chart reviews were conducted for the last five patients seen for asthma in physician practices in 1996 and 1997. Direct expenditures and indirect costs for asthma-related morbidity were determined. A total of 589 patient charts were completely analysed, including 117 children's charts, obtained from 120 office-based physicians. The annual direct medical costs were CHF 1,778 and the mean annual indirect costs were CHF 1,019 per patient for all patients. The total estimated cost of asthma in Switzerland in 1997 was nearly CHF 1,252 million. Direct medical expenditures approached CHF 762 million, or 61% of the total. In 1997, the indirect costs for asthma were estimated to have exceeded CHF 490 million. Of these costs CHF 123 million (25%) was associated with morbidity and nearly CHF 368 million (75%) was associated with looking after asthmatic patients who had to be cared for at home. This study provides evidence that asthma is a major healthcare cost factor in Switzerland, amounting to approximately CHF 1,200 million per year. The data suggest that cost savings can be achieved by improving primary care for asthma in an ambulatory setting.  (+info)

(4/1821) Health expenditure and finance: who gets what?

The methods used in South Africa's first comprehensive review of health finance and expenditure are outlined. Special measures were adopted to make the process acceptable to all concerned during a period of profound political transition. The estimation of indicators of access to public sector resources for districts sorted by per capita income allowed the health care problems of disadvantaged communities to be highlighted.  (+info)

(5/1821) Light on population health status.

A new approach to illustrating and analysing health status is presented which allows comparisons of various aspects of health in a population at different times and in different populations during given periods. Both quantitative and qualitative elements can be represented, the impact of interventions can be monitored, and the extent to which objectives are achieved can be assessed. The practical application of the approach is demonstrated with reference to the health profiles to Tunisia in 1966 and 1994.  (+info)

(6/1821) Explaining the decline in health insurance coverage, 1979-1995.

The decline in health insurance coverage among workers from 1979 to 1995 can be accounted for almost entirely by the fact that per capita health care spending rose much more rapidly than personal income during this time period. We simulate health insurance coverage levels for 1996-2005 under alternative assumptions concerning the rate of growth of spending. We conclude that reduction in spending growth creates measurable increases in health insurance coverage for low-income workers and that the rapid increase in health care spending over the past fifteen years has created a large pool of low-income workers for whom health insurance is unaffordable.  (+info)

(7/1821) Cost of tax-exempt health benefits in 1998.

The tax expenditure for health benefits is the amount of revenues that the federal government forgoes by exempting the following from the federal income and Social Security taxes: (1) employer health benefits contribution, (2) health spending under flexible spending plans, and (3) the tax deduction for health expenses. The health tax expenditure was $111.2 billion in 1998. This figure varied from $2,357 per family among those with annual incomes of $100,000 or more to $71 per family among those with annual incomes of less than $15,000. Families with incomes of $100,000 or more (10 percent of the population) accounted for 23.6 percent of all tax expenditures.  (+info)

(8/1821) Who bears the burden of Medicaid drug copayment policies?

This DataWatch examines the impact of Medicaid prescription drug copayment policies in thirty-eight states using survey data from the 1992 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Findings indicate that elderly and disabled Medicaid recipients who reside in states with copay provisions have significantly lower rates of drug use than their counterparts in states without copayments. After controlling for other factors, we find that the primary effect of copayments is to reduce the likelihood that Medicaid recipients fill any prescription during the year. This burden falls disproportionately on recipients in poor health.  (+info)



capita


  • We used 3 macrosocioeconomic status indicators that are consistently defined by international agencies: per capita gross domestic product adjusted for purchasing power parity, total health expenditures per capita at purchasing power parity, and unemployment rate. (ahajournals.org)
  • Age-adjusted incident risk of stroke using the standardized World Health Organization World population was associated to lower per capita gross domestic product adjusted for purchasing power parity (ρ=−0.661, P =0.027, R 2 =0.32) and total health expenditures per capita at purchasing power parity (ρ=−0.623, P =0.040, R 2 =0.26). (ahajournals.org)
  • Thirty-day case-fatality rates and proportion of hemorrhagic strokes were also related to lower per capita gross domestic product adjusted for purchasing power parity and total health expenditures per capita at purchasing power parity. (ahajournals.org)
  • Moreover, stroke occurred at a younger age in populations with low per capita gross domestic product adjusted for purchasing power parity and total health expenditures per capita at purchasing power parity. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusions- Lower per capita gross domestic product adjusted for purchasing power parity and total health expenditures per capita at purchasing power parity were associated with higher incident risk of stroke, higher case-fatality, a greater proportion of hemorrhagic strokes, and lower age at stroke onset. (ahajournals.org)

indicators


  • Health expenditure, private (% of GDP) in Canada was reported at 3.0377 % in 2014, according to the World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially recognized sources. (tradingeconomics.com)

percentage


  • This entry provides the total expenditure on health as a percentage of GDP. (indexmundi.com)

spatial


  • Strategic interaction and the determinants of public health expenditures in China: a spatial panel perspective ," The Annals of Regional Science , Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(1), pages 203-221, February. (repec.org)

Commonwealth Fund


  • The costs of hospital stays here are about triple those in other developed countries, even though they last no longer, according to a recent report by the Commonwealth Fund , a foundation that studies health policy. (nytimes.com)

Economics


  • The sustainability of health spending growth ," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-60, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S. (repec.org)
  • Health Economics, 16 (12). (lse.ac.uk)

total


  • Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. (tradingeconomics.com)

public health


  • Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds. (tradingeconomics.com)
  • Despite these and other limitations mentioned, the increasing prevalence of NAS and its associated health care expenditures are a considerable public health concern. (rwjf.org)

private


  • They are typically prescribed more expensive procedures and tests than people in other countries, no matter if those nations operate a private or national health system. (nytimes.com)
  • Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations. (tradingeconomics.com)
  • Thus, it is crucial to establish a method to generate valid, reliable and comparable information on private health spending. (scielosp.org)

Data


  • Data from the World Health Survey were used to compare estimates of average annual out-of-pocket spending on health care derived from a single-item and from an eight-item measure. (scielosp.org)

care


  • Although her insurer covered the procedure and she paid nothing, her health care costs still bite: Her premium payments jumped 10 percent last year, and rising co-payments and deductibles are straining the finances of her middle-class family, with its mission-style house in the suburbs and two S.U.V.'s parked outside. (nytimes.com)
  • While the United States medical system is famous for drugs costing hundreds of thousands of dollars and heroic care at the end of life, it turns out that a more significant factor in the nation's $2.7 trillion annual health care bill may not be the use of extraordinary services, but the high price tag of ordinary ones. (nytimes.com)
  • The U.S. just pays providers of health care much more for everything," said Tom Sackville, chief executive of the health plans federation and a former British health minister. (nytimes.com)
  • Medical Technology And The Production Of Health Care ," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 130, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University. (repec.org)
  • Sign up to receive e-alerts and newsletters on the health policy topics you care about most. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • Affordable, quality health care. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • to improve the health and health care of all Americans. (rwjf.org)

Surveys


  • We used results from two surveys - the World Health Survey and the Living Standards Measurement Study - that asked the same respondents about health expenditures in different ways. (scielosp.org)

household


  • To investigate the effect of survey design, specifically the number of items and recall period, on estimates of household out-of-pocket and catastrophic expenditure on health. (scielosp.org)

list


  • You could add Health expenditure in Mozambique to a list if you log in . (openlibrary.org)
  • Are you sure you want to remove Health expenditure in Mozambique from your list? (openlibrary.org)
  • A list of drug, scan and procedure prices compiled by the International Federation of Health Plans, a global network of health insurers, found that the United States came out the most costly in all 21 categories - and often by a huge margin. (nytimes.com)

analysis


  • Using a nationally representative sample of newborns, this article discusses the retrospective analysis performed for hospital expenditures and length of stay costs from 2000 through 2009 for newborns with NAS. (rwjf.org)

model


  • When this technological progress is combined with a Medicare- like transfer program to pay the health expenses of the elderly, the model is able to reproduce the basic facts of recent U.S. experience, including the large increase in the health expenditure share, a rise in life expectancy, and an increase in the size of health-related transfer payments as a share of GDP. (repec.org)

lower


  • In most countries, a lower level of disaggregation (i.e. fewer items) gave a lower estimate for average health spending, and a shorter recall period yielded a larger estimate. (scielosp.org)

share


  • Why Have Health Expenditures as a Share fo GDP Risen So Much? (repec.org)
  • Aggregate health expenditures as a share of GDP have risen in the United States from about 5 percent in 1960 to nearly 14 percent in recent years. (repec.org)

medical


  • Health expenditures are broadly defined as activities performed either by institutions or individuals through the application of medical, paramedical, and/or nursing knowledge and technology, the primary purpose of which is to promote, restore, or maintain health. (indexmundi.com)