Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Great BritainSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.SwedenWorkplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.EnglandPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Construction Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of building.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Paternal Exposure: Exposure of the male parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring.FinlandState Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.World War II: Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.BrazilHealth Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.IndiaFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Channel Islands: A group of four British islands and several islets in the English Channel off the coast of France. They are known to have been occupied prehistorically. They were a part of Normandy in 933 but were united to the British crown at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. Guernsey and Jersey originated noted breeds of cattle. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p242)Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.JapanWalesHealth Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).

*  Health Occupations > Health Occupations...

The Health Occupations Department at College of the Redwoods offers seven programs that vary in length from one semester to two ... Health Occupations Office. Janet Humble. Administrative Assistant. 707-476-4216. FAX: 707-476-4419. healthocc@redwoods.edu. ...
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*  RN Health Occupations Instructor - Belfast - Waldo - Republican Journal

This position delivers curriculum to adult students including Certified Residential Medication Admin (CRMA) and Personal Support Specialist (PSS). Qualifications include Registered Nurse licensure with experience in a long-term care facility; training available. Experience teaching adults or supervising nursing preferred. Request an application by contacting Sherry Moody (207) 594-2161 x201 or email: smoody@mcst8.org. ...
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*  Green Occupation: 29-9012.00 - Occupational Health and Safety Technicians

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*  Courses - Health Professions and Occupations Health Professions and Occupations

Selected Topics in Health Professions and Occupations. Units: .5-9. Class: 0-9 hours lecture, 0-27 hours laboratory (GR or P/NP ... Selected Topics in Health Professions and Occupations. Units: .5-9. Class: 0-9 hours lecture, 0-27 hours laboratory (GR or P/NP ... Selected Topics in Health Professions and Occupations. Units: .5-9. Class: 0-9 hours lecture, 0-27 hours laboratory (GR or P/NP ... Interpreting in Health Care I. Units: 3. Class: 3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Recommended preparation: Biol 23 or 25 or 20A or ...
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*  Prevalence of Gallstone disease in a Swedish population sample : Relations to occupation, childbirth, health status, life style...

Prevalence of Gallstone disease in a Swedish population sample : Relations to occupation, childbirth, health status, life style ... The study subjects were asked to answer a questionnaire about potential risk factors (occupation, childbirth, life style, and ... The odds ratio of previous cholecystectomy was increased in subjects with an occupation requiring no specific education and ...
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*  Cops and loggers among higher risk occupations for prostate cancer: study

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*  The Diseases of Occupation | Oxfam GB | Oxfam's Online Shop

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*  College of the Redwoods Home >...

Health Occupations. *Dental Assistant. *Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). *Licensed Vocational Nursing (LVN) ...
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*  Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) | Fort Hayes Metropolitan Education Center

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*  Health Archives - Page 4 of 18 - Daily Occupation

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https://dailyoccupation.com/category/health/page/4/

*  CDC - Global Tobacco Control - Spotlight - Smoking & Tobacco Use

Global Tobacco Surveillance System Data (GTSSData) is a Web-based application that houses and displays data from four tobacco-related surveys conducted around the world. This surveillance data system was designed to enhance countries' capacity to monitor tobacco use, guide national tobacco prevention and control programs, and facilitate comparison of tobacco-related data at the national, regional, and global levels.. On September 12, 2012, 145 country-specific Fact Sheets were added to the site. The Fact Sheets include summary-level data on tobacco use and tobacco control indicators from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS), the Global School Personnel Survey (GSPS) and the Global Health Professions Student Survey (GHPSS).. Included in this release are the following countries:. ...
https://cdc.gov/tobacco/global/spotlight/index.htm

*  Evidence-based health professions education conference to feature U.S. Preventive Services Chair | UGA Today

Dr. Virginia A. Moyer, chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and a leading national voice against prostate cancer over-screening, will be the keynote speaker at the fourth annual conference of the University of Georgia's Institute for Evidence-Based Health Professions Education April 5. The keynote is free and open to the public.
news.uga.edu/releases/article/evidence-based-health-professions-education-conference-virginia-moyer-/

*  Engaging Health Professions Students - University of Southern Indiana

SWI-AHEC has access to many health professionals throughout the region who may be willing to participate in job shadowing or serve as mentors to college students interested in specific health careers. These opportunities will be arranged on a case by case basis, depending upon the area of interest and the health professionals' availability.. Job shadowing is a career exploration activity that offers an opportunity to spend time with a professional currently working in a person's career field of interest. Job shadowing offers a chance to see what it's actually like working in a specific healthcare career. Not only do job shadowers get to observe the day-to-day activities of someone in the healthcare workforce, they also get a chance to have their questions answered.. Mentoring is the matching of an experienced health professional with one who has less or no experience. This may be for the purpose of career ...
usi.edu/southwest-indiana-area-health-education-center/engaging-health-professions-students/

*  Health Professions Education - Courses & Timetables | Educational & Counselling Psychology - McGill University

After having consulted the Department's and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies' Registration Information page, here you will find information on your specific courses of study throughout the program. All students are required to follow the course sequences as outlined in the provided time table. If you are a newly-admitted student, do not forget to accept your offer of admission on Minerva otherwise you will not be able to register for any courses!. In exceptional circumstances students with prior graduate-level coursework may follow a different course sequencing (or plan of study). In such cases, it is the student's responsibility to be in contact with their Supervisor and edpsych.education [at] mcgill.ca (Program Coordinator) to ensure they are enrolling in the correct courses and progressing through the program appropriately.. Additionally, all students must be in contact with their Program Coordinator to ensure the proper dual registration forms are submitted each year to ensure registration ...
mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions/courses

*  Interprofessional Education and Practice

AAHC has a deep history as a convener of health professions organizations interested in actively promoting interprofessional education and practice . AAHC also serves as a supporter and/or adviser to several multi-stakeholder organizations advancing this important health workforce goal.. ...
aahcdc.org/Initiatives/Health-Workforce/Interprofessional-Education-and-Practice

*  News | The Interprofessional Education Collaborative | University of New England in Maine, Tangier and Online

Jennifer Morton, D.N.P., M.S., M.P.H., R.N., associate professor and chair in the Department of Nursing, will present on nursing's role in interprofessional education (IPE) and practice at the Health Resources... ...
une.edu/wchp/ipec/news?page=5

*  Student Surveys - Disability Resource Center

With more than 140 degrees to choose from, UA Little Rock offers its students the opportunity to learn from top-ranked faculty and provides invaluable internship opportunities in several in-demand career fields.. ...
ualr.edu/disability/assessment-2/student-evaluations/

*  Applying - Health Professions Advising | Academic Services | Brandeis University

Most health professions schools require that students complete a computerized, primary application similar to the common application to college, which allows basic information to be collected centrally, and then transmitted to the schools to which you have applied. Each profession has a different primary (sometimes called "standardized") application ...
brandeis.edu/acserv/health/applying/primary.html

*  Delivering Baby, the Natural Way. ( Giving birth to a child is a uniquely e...)

Health,Giving birth to a child is a uniquely enjoyable process. Why spoil it ... Delivering their own babies at home often alone they dismiss wha... Birthing uses the same hormones as lovemaking - so why would y... Her comment is echoed by many in online discussion groups about... We were the only people there when she was conceived and it f...,Delivering,Baby,,the,Natural,Way.,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
bio-medicine.org/medicine-news/Delivering-Baby--the-Natural-Way--21431-1/

*  Info: Family Planning Personnel Training - Financial Info (HEALTH PROFESSIONS)

Grants) FY 04 $8,442,000; FY 05 est $8,442,000; and FY 06 est $8,442,000.. Note: The dollar amounts listed in this section represent obligations for the past fiscal year (PY), estimates for the current fiscal year (CY), and estimates for the budget fiscal year (BY) as reported by the Federal agencies. Obligations for non-financial assistance programs indicate the administrative expenses involved in the operation of a program. ...
family-planning-personnel-training.idilogic.aidpage.com/family-planning-personnel-training/index.b84.u2.htm

VCU School of Allied Health Professions: Carnegie Classifications | Institution ProfileYo KobayashiProfessional student: The term Professional student has two uses in the university setting:Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Global Health Delivery ProjectHealth policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)WHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Halfdan T. MahlerContraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Occupational hygiene: Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Pocket petRelative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Women's Health Initiative: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was initiated by the U.S.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.European Immunization Week: European Immunization Week (EIW) is an annual regional initiative, coordinated by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/Europe), to promote immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. EIW activities are carried out by participating WHO/Europe member states.Healthy community design: Healthy community design is planning and designing communities that make it easier for people to live healthy lives. Healthy community design offers important benefits:Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Sharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.Minati SenClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Occupational fatality: An occupational fatality is a death that occurs while a person is at work or performing work related tasks. Occupational fatalities are also commonly called “occupational deaths” or “work-related deaths/fatalities” and can occur in any industry or occupation.Resource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Northeast Community Health CentreAge adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Basic Occupational Health Services: The Basic Occupational Health Services are an application of the primary health care principles in the sector of occupational health. Primary health care definition can be found in the World Health Organization Alma Ata declaration from the year 1978 as the “essential health care based on practical scientifically sound and socially accepted methods, (…) it is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work (…)”.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Maternal Health Task ForceDenplanQRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Climate change in Sweden: The issue of climate change has received significant public and political attention in Sweden and the mitigation of its effects has been high on the agenda of the two latest Governments of Sweden, the previous Cabinet of Göran Persson (-2006) and the current Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt (2006-). Sweden aims for an energy supply system with zero net atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Stressor: A stressor is a chemical or biological agent, environmental condition, external stimulus or an event that causes stress to an organism.Mental disorderRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.

(1/195) Achieving 'best practice' in health promotion: improving the fit between research and practice.

This paper is based on the proposition that transfer of knowledge between researchers and practitioners concerning effective health promotion interventions is less than optimal. It considers how evidence concerning effectiveness in health promotion is established through research, and how such evidence is applied by practitioners and policy makers in deciding what to do and what to fund when addressing public health problems. From this examination it is concluded that there are too few rewards for researchers which encourage research with potential for widespread application and systematic development of promising interventions to a stage of field dissemination. Alternatively, practitioners often find themselves in the position of tackling a public health problem where evidence of efficacy is either lacking, or has to be considered alongside a desire to respond to expressed community needs, or the need to respond to political imperative. Several different approaches to improving the fit between research and practice are proposed, and they include improved education and training for practitioners, outcomes focussed program planning, and a more structured approach to rewarding research development and dissemination.  (+info)

(2/195) Fin-de-siecle Philadelphia and the founding of the Medical Library Association.

Philadelphia at the time of the founding of the Medical Library Association (MLA) is described. Several factors that promoted the birth of the association are discussed, including the rapid increase in the labor force and the rise of other health related professions, such as the American Hospital Association and the professionalization of nursing. The growth of the public hygiene movement in Philadelphia at the time of Sir William Osler's residency in the city is discussed. Finally, the rapid growth of the medical literature is considered a factor promoting the development of the association. This article continues the historical consideration of the MLA begun in the author's article on the three founders of the association. The background information is drawn from the items listed in the bibliography, and the conclusions are those of the author.  (+info)

(3/195) Cigarettes and suicide: a prospective study of 50,000 men.

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relation between smoking and suicide, controlling for various confounders. METHODS: More than 50,000 predominantly White, middle-aged and elderly male health professionals were followed up prospectively with biennial questionnaires from 1986 through 1994. The primary end point was suicide. Characteristics controlled for included age, marital status, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol intake, coffee consumption, and history of cancer. RESULTS: Eighty-two members of the cohort committed suicide during the 8-year follow-up period. In age-adjusted analyses with never smokers as the comparison group, the relative risk of suicide was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.8, 2.3) among former smokers, 2.6 (95% CI = 0.9, 7.5) for light smokers (< 15 cigarettes/day), and 4.5 (95% CI = 2.3, 8.8) among heavier smokers. After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risks were 1.4 (95% CI = 0.9, 2.4), 2.5 (95% CI = 0.9, 7.3), and 4.3 (95% CI = 2.2, 8.5), respectively. CONCLUSION: We found a positive, dose-related association between smoking and suicide among White men. Although inference about causality is not justified, our findings indicate that the smoking-suicide connection is not entirely due to the greater tendency among smokers to be unmarried, to be sedentary, to drink heavily, or to develop cancers.  (+info)

(4/195) Integrating Healthy Communities concepts into health professions training.

To meet the demands of the evolving health care system, health professionals need skills that will allow them to anticipate and respond to the broader social determinants of health. To ensure that these skills are learned during their professional education and training, health professions institutions must look beyond the medical model of caring for communities. Models in Seattle and Roanoke demonstrate the curricular changes necessary to ensure that students in the health professions are adequately prepared to contribute to building Healthy Communities in the 21st century. In addition to these models, a number of resources are available to help promote the needed institutional changes.  (+info)

(5/195) Planning health care delivery systems.

The increasing concern and interest in the health delivery system in the United States has placed the health system planners in a difficult position. They are inadequately prepared, in many cases, to deal with the management techniques that have been designed for use with system problems. This situation has been compounded by the failure, until recently, of educational programs to train new health professionals in these techniques. Computer simulation is a technique that allows the planners dynamic feedback on his proposed plans. This same technique provides the planning student with a better understanding of the systems planning process.  (+info)

(6/195) Housework, paid work and psychiatric symptoms.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hypothesis that work burden, the simultaneous engagement in paid work and unpaid family housework, is a potential risk factor for psychiatric symptoms among women. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 460 women randomly selected from a poor area of the city of Salvador, Brazil. Women between 18 to 70 years old, who reported having a paid occupation or were involved in unpaid domestic activities for their families, were eligible. Work burden-related variables were defined as: a) double work shift, i.e., simultaneous engagement in a paid job plus unpaid housework; and b) daily working time. Psychiatric symptoms were collected through a validated questionnaire, the QMPA. RESULTS: Positive, statistically significant associations between high (>7 symptoms) QMPA scores and either double work shift (prevalence ratio - PR=2.04, 95% confidence interval - CI: 1.16, 2.29) or more than 10 hours of daily work time (PR=2.29, 95% CI: 1.96, 3.43) were found after adjustment for age, marital status and number of pre-school children. CONCLUSIONS: Major correlates of high QMPA scores are work burden variables. Being married or having pre-school children are also associated with high QMPA scores only when associated with work burden.  (+info)

(7/195) National health services and family planning: Thailand, a case study.

 (+info)

(8/195) Educational outcomes and leadership to meet the needs of modern health care.

If professionals are to be equipped better to meet the needs of modern health care systems and the standards of practice required, significant educational change is still required. Educational change requires leadership, and lack of educational leadership may have impeded change in the past. In practical terms standards refer to outcomes, and thus an outcome based approach to clinical education is advocated as the one most likely to provide an appropriate framework for organisational and system change. The provision of explicit statements of learning intent, an educational process enabling acquisition and demonstration of these, and criteria for ensuring their achievement are the key features of such a framework. The derivation of an appropriate outcome set should emphasise what the learners will be able to do following the learning experience, how they will subsequently approach these tasks, and what, as a professional, they will bring to their practice. Once defined, the learning outcomes should determine, in turn, the nature of the learning experience enabling their achievement and the assessment processes to certify that they have been met. Provision of the necessary educational environment requires an understanding of the close interrelationship between learning style, learning theory, and methods whereby active and deep learning may be fostered. If desired change is to prevail, a conducive educational culture which values learning as well as evaluation, review, and enhancement must be engendered. It is the responsibility of all who teach to foster such an environment and culture, for all practitioners involved in health care have a leadership role in education.  (+info)



healthcare


  • Training for bilingual individuals to be an integral member of the healthcare team in bridging the language and cultural gap between clients and providers: Further enhancement of interpreting skills learned in Interpreting in Health Care I, covering specialized healthcare service areas such as genetics, mental health, and death and dying. (merritt.edu)

care


  • A goal of HOSA is to promote career opportunities in the health care industry through leadership development programs and student recognition activities. (fthayes.org)
  • Left unsaid is the fact that Palestinians come to Israel because health care in the West Bank is substandard. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Includes PSB Health Occupations Practice Test Questions*** If you're hoping to start studying for a health care career, don't underestimate the difficulty of the PSB Health Occupations Exam, which can make or break your dreams of a career in this field. (audrasdetails.com)
  • It's tougher than a lot of people think, and every year countless people are denied admission to health care degree programs because of their low scores on the test from the Psychological Services Bureau. (audrasdetails.com)
  • If the Supreme Court strikes down health care reform, should public health practitioners go to Hogwarts to learn magic, so they can solve public health problems with wands and spells and not actual resources, namely money? (rudyowensblog.com)
  • We are hearing next to nothing about the historic efforts that have prevented this nation from adopting a national health care system like other modern, capitalist democracies such as Canada, Taiwan, Japan, and France (see this comparison of how the United States system is different than and similar to other national systems, but still less efficient and more expensive). (rudyowensblog.com)
  • According to Reid, "Every developed country except the United States has designed a health care system that covers every resident. (rudyowensblog.com)
  • Covering everybody in a unified system creates a powerful political dynamic for managing the cost of health care … Universal coverage also enhances health care results by improving the overall health of a nation. (rudyowensblog.com)
  • Health care, argue many medical and religious leaders, is not purely a political issue, but a moral right . (rudyowensblog.com)

College


  • The Health Occupations Department at College of the Redwoods offers seven programs that vary in length from one semester to two years. (redwoods.edu)

students


  • A national career-technical student organization for students enrolled in health occupations programs. (fthayes.org)
  • The course is a graduate course that is intended primarily to familiarize students with the broad array of professional and technical literature in Environmental and Occupational Health, from Toxicological Sciences to Epidemiology to Safety and Occupational Health Journals. (csun.edu)

risk


  • The study subjects were asked to answer a questionnaire about potential risk factors (occupation, childbirth, life style, and so forth), symptoms, and quality of life. (ehesp.fr)

study


  • The study, which involved nearly 2,000 men in Montreal's French-speaking hospitals is one of the largest exploring possible links between occupation and the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Canadian men. (calgaryherald.com)
  • Our comprehensive PSB Health Occupations Secrets study guide is written by exam experts, who have done the hard research necessary to dissect every topic and concept that you need to know to ace your test. (audrasdetails.com)
  • PSB Health Occupations Exam Flashcard Study System has been writing in one form or another for most of life. (audrasdetails.com)
  • You can find so many inspiration from PSB Health Occupations Exam Flashcard Study System also informative, and entertaining. (audrasdetails.com)
  • Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full PSB Health Occupations Exam Flashcard Study System book for free. (audrasdetails.com)

covers


  • PSB Health Occupations Secrets covers all aspects of the exam: Academic Aptitude, Spelling, Reading Comprehension, Information in the Natural Sciences, Vocational Adjustment Index, plus, test taking secrets and much more. (audrasdetails.com)

change


  • Green occupations will likely change as a result of the green economy . (onetonline.org)
  • This is a Green Enhanced Skills occupation - green economy activities and technologies are likely to cause significant change to the work and worker requirements. (onetonline.org)

activities


  • Green economy activities and technologies are increasing the demand for occupations, shaping the work and worker requirements needed for occupational performance, or generating new and emerging occupations. (onetonline.org)

System


  • So in this vortex of news distortion without perspective, I would recommend that anyone who wants to get a grasp of the "bigger story" about the essential inequity and deficiencies in the U.S. health system read T.R. Reid's clearly written tome called The Healing of America , the book I read before I began my studies in public health in 2010. (rudyowensblog.com)
  • It is immoral because it still leaves out millions of Americans, which the very imperfect ACA, after intense lobbying to pre-empt a single payer system and scuttle any discussion of a national health plan, tried to address by using market mechanisms (the individual mandate). (rudyowensblog.com)

education


  • The odds ratio of previous cholecystectomy was increased in subjects with an occupation requiring no specific education and reduced in subjects using wine or spirits every week. (ehesp.fr)

Public Health


  • My new occupation, public health wizard, if the high court declares health reform unconstitutional? (rudyowensblog.com)

overall health


  • You might not be aware of the fact that oral health actually determines your overall health. (dailyoccupation.com)

year


  • Last year, the Palestinian Health Ministry sent 4,500 patients from the West Bank and Gaza to Israeli hospitals. (washingtonpost.com)

national


  • I will leave this post with a very clearly stated summary from the group called Physicians for a National Health Program , an 18,000-member organization dedicated to the creation of a national single-payer health program. (rudyowensblog.com)

human


  • Collect data related to ecological or human health risks at brownfield sites. (onetonline.org)
  • There are many ways to tally the human costs of the Israeli occupation, which began 50 years ago in June. (washingtonpost.com)

issue


  • However, other attempts have been "inconsistent or inconclusive," and few job-based studies have taken into account the aggressiveness of the cancer when it was diagnosed, the team reports in the most recent issue of Environmental Health. (calgaryherald.com)