Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Health Care Facilities, Manpower, and Services: The services provided in the delivery of health care, associated facilities in health care, and attendant manpower required or available.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Nursing, Practical: The practice of nursing by licensed, non-registered persons qualified to provide routine care to the sick.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Nurse Anesthetists: Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics and who function under the responsibility of the operating surgeon.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Traumatology: The medical specialty which deals with WOUNDS and INJURIES as well as resulting disability and disorders from physical traumas.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.United StatesAttitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Great BritainMedical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Population: The total number of individuals inhabiting a particular region or area.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.IndiaEnglandWorkload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.KentuckyOccupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Facility Administration: Management of the organization of HEALTH FACILITIES.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Diagnostic Services: Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Health Facility Planning: Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Nursing Services: A general concept referring to the organization and administration of nursing activities.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Public Facilities: An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Genetic Services: Organized services to provide diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of genetic disorders.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.LondonSocial Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)

*  New Descriptors by Tree Subcategory - 2015

N2 (Health Care Facilities, Manpower, and Services). Health Services for Persons with Disabilities. Licensed Practical Nurses. ... N4 (Health Services Administration). Culturally Competent Care. Lysholm Knee Score. Practice Management, Veterinary. Response ... N5 (Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation). Controlled Before-After Studies. Culturally Competent Care. Datasets as Topic ... National Institutes of Health, Health & Human Services Freedom of Information Act, NLM Customer Support ...
https://nlm.nih.gov/mesh/newbysub.html

*  The Telegraph - Calcutta

... effective utilisation of infrastructure facilities including manpower, and to meet the patient s requirement by offering expert ... The guiding force behind our institute is not just to provide patient care of the highest order, but also to ensure that this ... Like in Chennai, the hospital aims to provide free healthcare to those who are unable to bear the expenses. Our objectives are ... to maintain the quality of ophthalmic services in accordance with international standards, ...
https://telegraphindia.com/1030311/asp/calcutta/story_1750497.asp

*  Executive Order 11001 -- ASSIGNING EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FUNCTIONS TO THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

... civilian health manpower, health resources, welfare services, and educational programs as defined below. These plans and ... housing or lodging in private and congregate facilities; registration; locating and reuniting families; care of unaccompanied ... Manpower management. Executive Order 11001 --. Health and welfare services, and educational programs. Executive Order 11002 -- ... a) "Emergency health services" means medical and dental care for the civilian population in all of their specialties and ...
disastercenter.com/laworder/11001.htm

*  Ethiopia - Health and Welfare

... health facilities in outlying areas. Starting in 1981, a hierarchy of community health services, health stations, health ... At the bottom of the health-care pyramid was the community health service, designed to give every 1,000 people access to a ... malnutrition and exacerbated by the shortage of trained manpower and health facilities. Mortality and morbidity data were based ... Each health station was ultimately to be staffed by three health assistants. Ten health stations were supervised by one health ...
countrystudies.us/ethiopia/75.htm

*  In From the Cold: July 2010

The same procedure for an armed forces beneficiary in a civilian facility was $6,000. So, runaway military health care costs ... They failed to request that the president and Congress activate the Selective Service System to deal with the manpower- ... One thing is clear; DoD is facing huge budget cuts, and health care will almost certainly be slashed. If Obama's health care ... So, President Bush inherited a system that was short of money, facilities and health care professionals. Facing those realities ...
formerspook.blogspot.com.au/2010/07/

*  HEALTH

Gross disparity in health status and availability of health care services exist all over the country. ... other country still faces the problem of improper health care facilities. Though considerable achievements have been made, the ... With the growing influence of specializations in clinical subjects, manpower development for preventive medicine was hampered. ... HEALTH, Health care, HIV, India, Infectious disease, National Health Policy-2002, People, Public Health , 2 Comments 03.05.11 ...
https://nitikablog.wordpress.com/tag/health/

*  Medical Errors (medical concept explorer)

Health Care. Health Care Facilities, Manpower, and Services. Health Services. Adolescent Health Services ...
reference.md/files/N02/tN02.421.450.html

*  Commissioning & Training<...

Health Care Facilities, Municipal and Government entities and more. ... As a full service security management systems integrator, we have the knowhow, technology, and unrivalled expertise to plan and ... we also conduct Collaborative Site Surveys that usually require a higher amount of manpower and a longer timeframe to implement ... Financial institutions and Healthcare facilities, all with varying needs but with the same result; keeping you safe. For more ...
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*  Nurturing the Healthcare Industry

Nurturing Manpower. Naturally, more manpower will be required to operate these facilities. An additional $1 billion will be ... Major changes are also in store for existing facilities. A new Pathology Building will boost laboratory services at the ... There are about 1,500 registered pharmacists here, less than half of which are involved in direct patient care such as ... as Singapore has over 2,000 healthcare establishments providing a wide spectrum of medical services. Most patients seek primary ...
worksingapore.com/articles/industry_4.php

*  Candor Recruitment Group: 2013

One example of these is the health care recruitment agency. There are staffing agencies that hire nurses and hospital workers. ... It provides all kinds of manpower services to its clients saving their time and resources responsibilities.. ... They ensure to provide best facility to their clients as well as employers. ... There are normally two types of manpower stuffing. IT Manpower Staffing and non IT Manpower Staffing Although in the recent ...
candorservices.blogspot.com/2013/

*  Success story of the day: Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment - DG Environment | IUCN

Story featured in the Made in Countdown 2010 publication: The Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment - DG Environment has or...
https://iucn.org/content/success-story-day-federal-public-service-health-food-chain-safety-and-environment-–-dg

*  Health and Community Services - Health and Community Services - CSU, Chico

The Department of Health and Community Services provides students an opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science in Health Science. Students choose from one of two options for their major: health education or health services administration. Both options prepare students for entry-level positions in the health industry. The department also offers minors in health promotions and health services administration. These minors enhance students' career potential by expanding their expertise into the health field.. ...
csuchico.edu/hcsv/

*  Services - Health & Medicine, Pharmaceuticals Classified Ads in United States

Services| Health & Medicine, Pharmaceuticals classified ads in United States. Adsglobe is your one stop Advertising Gateway for online classifieds in jobs, real estate, rentals, autos, services, items for sale, travel, events, pets, business, community.
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*  Billing Services - Health Priority Systems

MITS Setup & Testing (Ohio Only). We estimate a 20 hour timeframe to deliver a basic billing program and software implementation. This estimate is contingent upon the complexity of the organization and program structure, as well as the number of activities required, payers considered, and if this is a new or existing service. Our MITS Setup and Testing process includes: ...
healthprioritysystems.com/our-services/billing-services/

*  Newswire & Press Release / Jerry Tasset, MD, Tackles Director of Education Role At Premier Health Care Services - Health...

Jerry Tasset, MD, plans to continue to add strategic improvements in the coming years to Premier's already-successful Education Division
newswiretoday.com/news/85822/Jerry-Tasset-MD-Tackles-Director-of-Education-Role-At-Premier-Health-Care-Services/

Minati SenSt John of God Health Choices: St John of God Health Choices is a division of St John of God Health Care, one of the largest providers of health care services in Australia.LiveinVictoria.Global Health Delivery ProjectSelf-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Ron WaksmanHealth policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Nurse anesthetist: A nurse anesthetist is a nurse who specializes in the administration of anesthesia. In the United States, a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) who has acquired graduate-level education and board certification in anesthesia.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedic Rehabilitation: The National Institute of Traumatology & Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR) is an orthopedic hospital and undergraduate & post-graduate institute in Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. It was established in 1972 by the Bangladeshi government as the Shaheed Suhrawardy Hospital.Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Halfdan T. MahlerMiddlesex County Hospital: Middlesex County Hospital was a hospital operated by Middlesex County which was operational from the 1930s until 2001 in Waltham and Lexington, Massachusetts. Originally opened as a tuberculosis hospital, the hospital eventually became the county hospital for Middlesex until its closure in 2001.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Q Services Corps (South Africa): The establishment of the 'Q' Services Corps as part of the South African Permanent Force was promulgated in the Government Gazette dated 10 November 1939.Typed copy of Proclamation 276 of 1939Samuel Bard (physician): Samuel Bard (April 1, 1742 – May 24, 1821) was an American physician. He founded the first medical school in New York.Maternal Health Task ForceCharles George DrakeBlitzkrieg Booking and Promotions: Blitzkrieg Booking and Promotions was founded in 2000 as a musical management company. The company held a staff of over 200 members and had contractual management with over a dozen bands.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.COPE FoundationClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation: The Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) was established for the development, administration, and evaluation of a program for certification in oncology nursing. Incorporated in 1984 and governed by a board of directors, ONCC is the certifying body for oncology nursing and meets standards established by the Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.Community mental health service: Community mental health services (CMHS), also known as Community Mental Health Teams (CMHT) in the United Kingdom, support or treat people with mental disorders (mental illness or mental health difficulties) in a domiciliary setting, instead of a psychiatric hospital (asylum). The array of community mental health services vary depending on the country in which the services are provided.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).University of Kentucky College of DentistryWHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Sharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.Women's Health Initiative: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was initiated by the U.S.Northeast Community Health CentreResource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Nigerian Ports Authority: The Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) is a federal government agency that governs and operates the ports of Nigeria. The major ports controlled by the NPA include: the Lagos Port Complex and Tin Can Island Port in Lagos; Calabar Port, Delta Port, Rivers Port at Port Harcourt, and Onne Port.Paramedic: A paramedic is a healthcare professional, predominantly in the pre-hospital and out-of-hospital environment, and working mainly as part of emergency medical services (EMS), such as on an ambulance.Basic Occupational Health Services: The Basic Occupational Health Services are an application of the primary health care principles in the sector of occupational health. Primary health care definition can be found in the World Health Organization Alma Ata declaration from the year 1978 as the “essential health care based on practical scientifically sound and socially accepted methods, (…) it is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work (…)”.