Great BritainIrelandMustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Scrapie: A fatal disease of the nervous system in sheep and goats, characterized by pruritus, debility, and locomotor incoordination. It is caused by proteinaceous infectious particles called PRIONS.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Ceratopogonidae: A family of biting midges, in the order DIPTERA. It includes the genus Culicoides which transmits filarial parasites pathogenic to man and other primates.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Vinyl Chloride: A gas that has been used as an aerosol propellant and is the starting material for polyvinyl resins. Toxicity studies have shown various adverse effects, particularly the occurrence of liver neoplasms.Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding: Hemorrhage caused by vitamin K deficiency.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.EnglandWalesNorthern IrelandHemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of nuclear medicine services.ScotlandMouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Pharmacy Administration: The business and managerial aspects of pharmacy in its broadest sense.Refuse Disposal: The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Incineration: High temperature destruction of waste by burning with subsequent reduction to ashes or conversion to an inert mass.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.EuropeSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prions: Small proteinaceous infectious particles which resist inactivation by procedures that modify NUCLEIC ACIDS and contain an abnormal isoform of a cellular protein which is a major and necessary component. The abnormal (scrapie) isoform is PrPSc (PRPSC PROTEINS) and the cellular isoform PrPC (PRPC PROTEINS). The primary amino acid sequence of the two isoforms is identical. Human diseases caused by prions include CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME; GERSTMANN-STRAUSSLER SYNDROME; and INSOMNIA, FATAL FAMILIAL.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.World War I: Global conflict primarily fought on European continent, that occurred between 1914 and 1918.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.United States

*  Trial search results | Cancer Research UK
UK (1) Apply UK filter *Great Britain (1) Apply Great Britain filter *England (1) Apply England filter *Greater London (1) ... Cancer Research UK is a registered charity in England and Wales (1089464), Scotland (SC041666) and the Isle of Man (1103). A ...
  http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/find-a-clinical-trial/clinical-trials-search?populate=Skin%20cancer&f%5B0%5D=field_trial_status%3A4386&f%5B1%5D=field_cancer_type_tax%3A3391
*  Trial search results | Cancer Research UK
Remove UK filter UK. * Remove Great Britain filter Great Britain. * Remove Scotland filter Scotland. * Remove Lothian filter ... Cancer Research UK is a registered charity in England and Wales (1089464), Scotland (SC041666) and the Isle of Man (1103). A ...
  http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/find-a-clinical-trial/clinical-trials-search?populate=Children%27s%20cancers&f%5B0%5D=field_trial_status%3A4386&f%5B1%5D=field_region_tax%3A4491
*  Trial search results | Cancer Research UK
Remove UK filter UK. * Remove Great Britain filter Great Britain. * Remove England filter England. * Remove Midlands filter ... Cancer Research UK is a registered charity in England and Wales (1089464), Scotland (SC041666) and the Isle of Man (1103). A ... A study looking at stem cell transplants from half matched donors for people with blood cancers (UK Haplo). ...
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*  Social Roles and Women's Health in Mid-life
This study included people born in Great Britain in 1946 and followed them throughout their lives. ... Good health in mid-life seems to be influenced by the occupation of multiple roles and not the other way around. ... This Social Roles and Women's Health in Mid-life page on EmpowHER Women's Health works best with javascript enabled in your ... The findings showed that the more social roles women occupied, the better their health status in mid-life. Women who were ...
  http://www.empowher.com/media/reference/social-roles-and-womens-health-mid-life
*  Best universities in the UK 2018 | THE Rankings
The University of Oxford is top in a list of the best universities in the UK, which includes universities in England, Wales, ... Best universities in Europe. How to choose a UK university. Best universites in Scotland. Best universities in Ireland. Best UK ... This UK university league table reveals the 93 best UK universities and colleges, according to the trusted Times Higher ... Applying to a UK university. Guide to visas and funding to study in the UK. Apply to UK universities through Ucas as an ...
  https://www.timeshighereducation.com/student/best-universities/best-universities-uk
*  Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences
Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain. Leon Danon, Jonathan M. Read, Thomas A. House, Matthew C. Vernon, Matt ... Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain. Leon Danon, Jonathan M. Read, Thomas A. House, Matthew C. Vernon, Matt ... Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from Proceedings of ... 2011 Targeting vaccination against novel infections: risk, age and spatial structure for pandemic influenza in Great Britain. J ...
  http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1765/20131037.short
*  Great Britain - Wikipedia
In 1801, Great Britain united with the neighbouring Kingdom of Ireland, forming the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland ... "Is Great Britain really a 'small island'?" - via www.bbc.co.uk. "UK 2005: The Official Yearbook of the United Kingdom of Great ... "Great Britain" or the "Kingdom of Great Britain". Great Britain lies on the European continental shelf, part of the Eurasian ... "King of Great Brittaine, France and Ireland". Great Britain refers geographically to the island of Great Britain, politically ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain
*  Tattoo Club of Great Britain
PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER All other messages should be posted on the Forum at - http:www.tattoonews.co.uk/ http:// ... Tattoo Club of Great Britain is a Public Group with 2358 members.. *Tattoo Club of Great Britain ...
  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/tcgb/conversations/topics/213
*  Great Britain (disambiguation) - Wikipedia
Great Britain is an island in Europe. Great Britain may also refer to: Britain (place name) United Kingdom, a sovereign state ... United Kingdom Great Britain, a GWR 3031 Class locomotive, built in 1892 and retired in 1914 Great Britain (play), by Richard ... "Great Britain" All pages with a title containing Great Britain. ... a sovereign state from 1707 to 1800 SS Great Britain, a ... Bean National sports teams of the United Kingdom Terminology of the British Isles England Britannia British Isles Britain ( ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain_(disambiguation)
*  Miss Great Britain - Wikipedia
Miss Great Britain winner will go on to represent Great Britain as its Tourism Ambassador in Miss Tourism World. The 2006 title ... Morecambe went on to become the home of Miss Great Britain between 1956 and 1989. The first ever Miss Great Britain final was ... Miss Great Britain is a female beauty pageant. It is the oldest pageant in the UK, established in 1945. Following World War Two ... The Miss Great Pageant is owned by The Singhs. Miss Great Britain 2013 was organised by the new national director Kate Solomons ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miss_Great_Britain
*  Great Britain (play) - Wikipedia
"Great Britain to transfer to the Haymarket". trh.co.uk. Theatre Royal Haymarket. Retrieved 8 September 2014. "Great Britain at ... "Phone hacking play Great Britain gets West End transfer". bbc.co.uk/news. BBC News. 2 July 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2014. " ... "Back to the hacks: playwright Richard Bean on the reworked West End production of his play Great Britain". standard.co.uk. ... The author of phone hacking drama Great Britain tells Dominic Cavendish about his latest play". telegraph.co.uk. London: The ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain_(play)
*  SS Great Britain - Wikipedia
"ss Great Britain: teamwork as a platform for innovative conservation" (PDF). SS Great Britain. Archived (PDF) from the original ... "SS Great Britain Trust: Annual Review 2013" (PDF). SS Great Britain. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 June 2015. ... Ted Osborn (June 2010). "Great Britain Sinks!". Cruising. The Cruising Association: 24-26. "Recovery of the SS Great Britain". ... "Great Britain" SS. Melbourne: J. Reid. Corlett, Ewan C. B. (1990). The Iron Ship: Story of the S. S. "Great Britain" (2 ed.). ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Great_Britain
*  Militia (Great Britain) - Wikipedia
The Militia of Great Britain were the principal military reserve forces of the Kingdom of Great Britain during the 18th century ... For the period following the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801, see Militia (United Kingdom ... In fact, the acts, which applied in England and Wales only, restricted service to the territory of Great Britain. However some ... Following the merger of Scotland into the new Kingdom of Great Britain, the British Militia Act 1757 did not apply in Scotland ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Militia_(Great_Britain)
*  Great Britain Ltd - Wikipedia
Great Britain Ltd at SpectrumComputing.co.uk Sinclair User review Game information at GameFAQs. ... Great Britain Ltd (also known as GBLtd) is a British nation-simulation game originally released in 1982 for the BBC Micro and ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain_Ltd
*  Bridge Great Britain - Wikipedia
United Kingdom portal List of bridge competitions and awards English Bridge, August 1999, p. 3. Bridge Great Britain. Retrieved ... Bridge Great Britain is an organisation which was formed to continue the organisational functions of the British Bridge League ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_Great_Britain
*  Great Britain II - Wikipedia
Great Britain II (also United Friendly, Norsk Data GB, With Integrity, Whitbread Heritage) is a Maxi racing yacht launched by ... Great Britain II has taken part in all six Whitbread Round the World Races. Racing in the first five and "following" (not a ... Known throughout the world for her outstanding achievements, Great Britain II was the ultimate dream-come-true for Chay Blyth, ... Princess Anne on 21 May 1973 named after the SS Great Britain, built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel which was the world's first " ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain_II
*  Entity Voting: "Great Britain"
Great Britain (United Kingdom). 242. 0. 0. 0. 0 user votes. † This entity has been selected by the automated classifier as the ... Great Britain has, accordingly, entertained with that Government the closest and most intimate relations, while refusing on its ... Statistics for occurrence #1 of "Great Britain" in chapter 23 of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and ... or to title, the United States having asserted, and the British government has chosen to concede, that these sovereign States ...
  http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/entityvote?doc=Perseus:text:2001.05.0093:chapter=23&auth=tgn,7002445&n=17&type=place
*  Townhouse (Great Britain) - Wikipedia
English country house Great house Manor house Stately home List of house types Hôtel particulier For a description of an 18th- ... see Terraced houses in the United Kingdom. The aristocratic pedigree of terraced housing, for example as survives in St James's ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Townhouse_(Great_Britain)
*  Great Britain - TeacherVision
First Grade Math Resources Help your 1st graders easily and effectively learn important concepts like subtraction with new resources from TeacherVision partner Amdon and Pagewerkz! These colorful worksheets can be used as in-class or take-home activities ...
  https://www.teachervision.com/subjects/social-studies-history/great-britain
*  Louise of Great Britain - Wikipedia
At the time of the marriage, both France and Great Britain wished to make an alliance with Denmark, and Great Britain had the ... Louise of Great Britain (originally Louisa; 18 December 1724 - 19 December 1751) was Queen of Denmark and Norway from 1746 ... Her godparents were her elder sister and two cousins: Princess Amelia of Great Britain, Princess Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (for ... She was the youngest surviving daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach. Princess Louise was born as ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_of_Great_Britain
*  Wolves in Great Britain - Wikipedia
Wolves were once present in Great Britain. Early writing from Roman and later Saxon chronicles indicate that wolves appear to ... Richard Morley, of the Wolves and Humans Foundation (formerly The Wolf Society of Great Britain), forecast in 2007 that public ... This type of reintroduction could be beneficial for the economy and ecology of the UK, just as it has in the U.S. In 1995, ... "Wild wolves 'good for ecosystems'". BBC News. 31 January 2007. "Wolves debate turned into a play". BBC News. 18 October 2009. " ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolves_in_Great_Britain
*  1724 in Great Britain - Wikipedia
Events from the year 1724 in Great Britain. Monarch - George I Prime Minister - Robert Walpole (Whig) Parliament - 6th 20 ... Daniel Defoe's A tour thro' the whole island of Great Britain begins publication. Jonathan Swift's Drapier's Letters begin ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1724_in_Great_Britain
*  1720 in Great Britain - Wikipedia
Events from the year 1720 in Great Britain. Monarch - George I Parliament - 5th 17 February - Treaty of The Hague signed ... April - "South Sea Bubble": A scheme for the South Sea Company to take over most of Britain's unconsolidated government debt ... between Britain, France, Austria, the Dutch Republic and Spain ending the War of the Quadruple Alliance. ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1720_in_Great_Britain
*  1743 in Great Britain - Wikipedia
13 September - Treaty of Worms signed between Great Britain, the Holy Roman Emperor and the Kingdom of Sardinia. 25 October - ... Events from the year 1743 in Great Britain. Monarch - George II Prime Minister - Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington (Whig) ( ... second Prime Minister of Great Britain (born 1674) 1 August - Richard Savage, writer (born c. 1697) 5 August - John Hervey, 2nd ... King George II leads the troops of Britain and Brunswick to victory over the French - the last time a reigning British monarch ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1743_in_Great_Britain
*  1741 in Great Britain - Wikipedia
Events from the year 1741 in Great Britain. Monarch - George II Prime Minister - Robert Walpole (Whig) Parliament - 8th then ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1741_in_Great_Britain

National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Royal College of Surgeons in IrelandWolverine and the X-Men (toyline): The Wolverine and the X-Men toyline is a 3¾" action figure line manufactured by Hasbro. It is a tie-in to the Wolverine and the X-Men animated series and was released alongside the Marvel Universe toyline and X-Men Origins: Wolverine toyline as part of Hasbro's new 3¾" figure initiative for Marvel Comics characters, although this line has a much more animated style than the other two lines.Mycobacterium bovis: ATCC 19210ScrapieCollege of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand: The College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand was founded in 1964. It is a part of AAU, Anand, Gujarat, India.Geographical cluster: A geographical cluster is a localised anomaly, usually an excess of something given the distribution or variation of something else. Often it is considered as an incidence rate that is unusual in that there is more of some variable than might be expected.Jet aeratorsThe Flash ChroniclesCulicoides imicola: Culicoides imicola is a midge which transmits the bluetongue virus. Other suspected BTV vectors are Culicoides (Culicoides) pulicaris and species in the Culicoides (Avaritia) obsoletus complex.Corriedale: Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed, meaning they are used both in the production of wool and meat. The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New ZealandStock Types, The Land, North Richmond, c.Transmissible spongiform encephalopathyFoot-and-mouth disease: (ILDS B08.820)Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.The Vinyl Institute: The Vinyl Institute (VI) is a U.S.New Mexico Livestock Board: The New Mexico Livestock Board regulates livestock health and livestock identification in New Mexico, in the United States. It was created in 1967 by the merger of the New Mexico Cattle Sanitary Board and the New Mexico Sheep Sanitary Board.Red Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).North Wales Narrow Gauge RailwaysList of government departments, their agencies and their ministers in Northern Ireland: A list of Northern Ireland government departments, their agencies and their ministers and related organisations.HemangiosarcomaPKU 3rd People's Hospital: PKU 3rd People's Hospital (),full name: Peking University Third Hospital (alias: Sanyuan Hospital), abbreviation: PUTH. Peking University Third Hospital (PUTH) was founded in 1958 under the supervision of the Ministry of Health.Dundee Royal Infirmary: Dundee Royal Infirmary, often shortened to DRI, was a major teaching hospital in Dundee, Scotland. Until the opening of Ninewells Hospital in 1974, Dundee Royal Infirmary was Dundee’s main hospital.Mouthguard: A mouthguard is a protective device for the mouth that covers the teeth and gums to prevent and reduce injury to the teeth, arches, lips and gums. A mouthguard is most often used to prevent injury in contact sports, as a treatment for bruxism or TMD, or as part of certain dental procedures, such as tooth bleaching.Arthur Wilson (Royal Navy officer)Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==Seismic response of landfill: Solid waste landfills can be affected by seismic activity. The tension in a landfill liner rises significantly during an earthquake, and can lead to stretching or tearing of the material.Colt Crag Reservoir: Colt Crag Reservoir is a relatively shallow reservoir in Northumberland, England adjacent to the A68 road, and north of Corbridge. The A68 road at this point runs along the course of Dere Street, a Roman road.Beef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Sludge incineration: Sludge incineration (German: Klärschlammverbrennung, Chinese: 污泥焚烧发电) is a type of incineration process that generates thermal energy from sewage sludge produced in sewage treatment plants. The process is in operation in Germany where Klärschlammverbrennung GmbH in Hamburg incinerates 1.CASY cell counting technology: CASY technology is an electric field multi-channel cell counting system. It was first marketed by Schärfe System GmbH in 1987 under the name CASY1.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Donald Guthrie (physician)Pacific ElectricOccupational hygiene: Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.Health geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.Interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs: The interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs is an ongoing process affecting the population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia. The current population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia is now probably higher than in the past.Newington Green Unitarian ChurchNeighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Occupational fatality: An occupational fatality is a death that occurs while a person is at work or performing work related tasks. Occupational fatalities are also commonly called “occupational deaths” or “work-related deaths/fatalities” and can occur in any industry or occupation.Chilalo Agricultural Development Union: Chilalo Agricultural Development Union (CADU) is the first comprehensive package project established in Arsi Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia to modernize traditional subsistence agriculture. The major components of the package programmes include fertilizers, ameliorated seeds, farm credits, marketing facilities, better tools and implements, and improved storage facilities.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation: Alexandria, VirginiaMortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.GA²LENFour Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingAlbert CalmetteSelf-propagating high-temperature synthesis: Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a method for producing inorganic compounds by exothermic reactions, usually involving salts. A variant of this method is known as solid state metathesis (SSM).Australian referendum, 1913 (Trade and Commerce): The Constitution Alteration (Trade and Commerce) 1912 was an Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to extend Commonwealth legislative power in respect to trade and commerce.Enlightenment Intensive: An Enlightenment Intensive is a group retreat designed to enable a spiritual enlightenment experience within a relatively short time. Devised by Americans Charles (1929–2007) and Ava Berner in the 1960s,http://www.Childhood leukemia: Childhood leukemia is a type of leukemia, usually acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and a type of childhood cancer. The cure rate of childhood leukemia is generally higher than adult leukemia, approaching 90%, although some side effects of treatment last into adulthood.Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Waterladder pumpCanadian Thoroughbred Horse Society: The Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society (CTHS) is an organization headquartered in Toronto, Canada that was founded in 1906 to assist Thoroughbred horse breeders. Since 1982, there have been provincial divisions in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan.Inverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.Matrix model: == Mathematics and physics ==Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Mental disorderProportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Canadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.

(1/14168) Incidence of repeated legal abortion.

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(2/14168) Demographic, clinical and social factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted diseases in a cohort of women from the United Kingdom and Ireland. MRC Collaborative Study of women with HIV.

BACKGROUND: Clinical experience suggests many women with HIV infection have experienced no other sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of women with HIV infection in the United Kingdom and Ireland have experienced no other diagnosed STD and to describe the demographic, clinical and social factors associated with the occurrence of other STD in a cohort of HIV infected women. METHOD: Analysis of cross-sectional baseline data from a prospective study of 505 women with diagnosed HIV infection. The setting was 15 HIV treatment centres in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The main outcome measures were occurrence of other STD diagnosed for the first time before and after HIV diagnosis. Data were obtained from interview with women and clinic notes. We particularly focused on occurrence of gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis after HIV diagnosis, as these are the STD most likely to reflect recent unprotected sexual intercourse. RESULTS: The women were mainly infected via heterosexual sex (n = 304), and injection drug use (n = 174). 151 were black Africans. A total of 250 (49.5%) women reported never having been diagnosed with an STD apart from HIV, 255 (50.5%) women had ever experienced an STD besides HIV, including 109 (21.6%) who had their first other STD diagnosed after HIV. Twenty-five (5%) women reported having had chlamydia, gonorrhoea or trichomoniasis diagnosed for the first time after HIV diagnosis, possibly reflecting unprotected sexual intercourse since HIV diagnosis. In all 301 (60%) women reported having had sex with a man in the 6 months prior to entry to the study. Of these, 168 (58%) reported using condoms 'always', 66(23%) 'sometimes' and 56 (19%) 'never'. CONCLUSIONS: Half the women in this study reported having never experienced any other diagnosed STD besides HIV. However, after HIV diagnosis most women remain sexually active and at least 5% had an STD diagnosed which reflect unprotected sexual intercourse.  (+info)

(3/14168) A comparison of three methods of setting prescribing budgets, using data derived from defined daily dose analyses of historic patterns of use.

BACKGROUND: Prescribing matters (particularly budget setting and research into prescribing variation between doctors) have been handicapped by the absence of credible measures of the volume of drugs prescribed. AIM: To use the defined daily dose (DDD) method to study variation in the volume and cost of drugs prescribed across the seven main British National Formulary (BNF) chapters with a view to comparing different methods of setting prescribing budgets. METHOD: Study of one year of prescribing statistics from all 129 general practices in Lothian, covering 808,059 patients: analyses of prescribing statistics for 1995 to define volume and cost/volume of prescribing for one year for 10 groups of practices defined by the age and deprivation status of their patients, for seven BNF chapters; creation of prescribing budgets for 1996 for each individual practice based on the use of target volume and cost statistics; comparison of 1996 DDD-based budgets with those set using the conventional historical approach; and comparison of DDD-based budgets with budgets set using a capitation-based formula derived from local cost/patient information. RESULTS: The volume of drugs prescribed was affected by the age structure of the practices in BNF Chapters 1 (gastrointestinal), 2 (cardiovascular), and 6 (endocrine), and by deprivation structure for BNF Chapters 3 (respiratory) and 4 (central nervous system). Costs per DDD in the major BNF chapters were largely independent of age, deprivation structure, or fundholding status. Capitation and DDD-based budgets were similar to each other, but both differed substantially from historic budgets. One practice in seven gained or lost more than 100,000 Pounds per annum using DDD or capitation budgets compared with historic budgets. The DDD-based budget, but not the capitation-based budget, can be used to set volume-specific prescribing targets. CONCLUSIONS: DDD-based and capitation-based prescribing budgets can be set using a simple explanatory model and generalizable methods. In this study, both differed substantially from historic budgets. DDD budgets could be created to accommodate new prescribing strategies and raised or lowered to reflect local intentions to alter overall prescribing volume or cost targets. We recommend that future work on setting budgets and researching prescribing variations should be based on DDD statistics.  (+info)

(4/14168) Why do dyspeptic patients over the age of 50 consult their general practitioner? A qualitative investigation of health beliefs relating to dyspepsia.

BACKGROUND: The prognosis of late-diagnosed gastric cancer is poor, yet less than half of dyspeptic patients consult their general practitioner (GP). AIM: To construct an explanatory model of the decision to consult with dyspepsia in older patients. METHOD: A total of 75 patients over the age of 50 years who had consulted with dyspepsia at one of two inner city general practices were invited to an in-depth interview. The interviews were taped, transcribed, and analysed using the computer software NUD.IST, according to the principles of grounded theory. RESULTS: Altogether, 31 interviews were conducted. The perceived threat of cancer and the need for reassurance were key influences on the decision to consult. Cues such as a change in symptoms were important in prompting a re-evaluation of the likely cause. Personal vulnerability to serious illness was often mentioned in the context of family or friends' experience, but tempered by an individual's life expectations. CONCLUSION: Most patients who had delayed consultation put their symptoms down to 'old age' or 'spicy food'. However, a significant minority were fatalistic, suspecting the worst but fearing medical interventions.  (+info)

(5/14168) A single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a simple acupuncture treatment in the cessation of smoking.

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable disease and premature death. Physicians should play an active role in the control of smoking by encouraging cessation and helping the smoker to choose the most suitable aid to cessation. AIM: To evaluate a simple, ear acupuncture treatment for the cessation of smoking. METHOD: Randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 78 currently smoking volunteers from the general public. Volunteers attended an acupuncture clinic in a general practice setting and were given a single treatment of electroacupuncture using two needles at either an active or a placebo site plus self-retained ear seeds for two weeks. The major outcome measure was biochemically validated total cessation of smoking at six months. RESULTS: A total of 12.5% of the active treatment group compared with 0% of the placebo group ceased smoking at six months (P = 0.055, 95% confidence interval -0.033 to 0.323). CONCLUSION: This simple ear electroacupuncture treatment was significantly more effective in helping volunteers to quit smoking than placebo treatment.  (+info)

(6/14168) Health at work in the general practice.

BACKGROUND: Poor mental health and high stress levels have been reported in staff working in general practice. Little is known about how practices are tackling these and other issues of health at work in the absence of an established occupational healthcare service. AIM: To establish the extent of knowledge and good practice of health at work policies for staff working in general practice. METHOD: Practice managers in 450 randomly selected general practices in England were interviewed by telephone, and the general practitioner (GP) with lead responsibility for workplace health in the same practice was surveyed by postal questionnaire. We surveyed the existence and implementation of practice policies, causes and effects of stress on practice staff, and agreement between practice managers and GPs on these issues. RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of GPs and 76% of practice managers responded, with at least one reply from 408 (91%) practices and responses from both the practice manager and GPs from 252 (56%) practices. Seventy-nine per cent of practices had a policy on monitoring risks and hazards. The proportion of practices with other workplace health policies ranged from 21% (policy to minimize stress) to 91% (policy on staff smoking). There was a tendency for practices to have policies but not to implement them. The three causes of stress for practice staff most commonly cites by both GP and practice manager responders were 'patient demands', 'too much work', and 'patient abuse/aggression'. Sixty-five per cent of GPs felt that stress had caused mistakes in their practices. Although there was general agreement between the two groups, there was a considerable lack of agreement between responders working in the same practices. CONCLUSIONS: The study revealed substantial neglect of workplace health issues with many practices falling foul of health and safety legislation. This report should help general practices identify issues to tackle to improve their workplace health, and the Health at Work in the NHS project to focus on areas where their targeted help will be most worthwhile.  (+info)

(7/14168) Screening for cervical cancer: a review of women's attitudes, knowledge, and behaviour.

The United Kingdom (UK) cervical screening programme has been successful in securing participation of a high proportion of targeted women, and has seen a fall in mortality rates of those suffering from cervical cancer. There remains, however, a significant proportion of unscreened women and, of women in whom an abnormality is detected, many will not attend for colposcopy. The present work reviews the psychological consequences of receiving an abnormal cervical smear result and of secondary screening and treatment, and examines reasons for women's non-participation in the screening programme. Psychological theories of screening behavior are used to elucidate women's reactions and to suggest methods of increasing participation, of improving the quality of the service, and of reducing women's anxiety. A literature search identified studies that examine factors influencing women's participation in the screening programme, their psychological reaction to the receipt of an abnormal cervical smear result, and experiences of colposcopy. Reasons for non-participation include administrative failures, unavailability of a female screener, inconvenient clinic times, lack of awareness of the test's indications and benefits, considering oneself not to be at risk of developing cervical cancer, and fear of embarrassment, pain, or the detection of cancer. The receipt of an abnormal result and referral for colposcopy cause high levels of distress owing to limited understanding of the meaning of the smear test; many women believe the test aims to detect existing cervical cancer. The quality of the cervical screening service can be enhanced by the provision of additional information, by improved quality of communication, and by consideration of women's health beliefs. This may result in increased participation in, and satisfaction with, the service.  (+info)

(8/14168) SWORD '97: surveillance of work-related and occupational respiratory disease in the UK.

SWORD is one of seven clinically based reporting schemes which together now provide almost comprehensive coverage of occupational diseases across the UK. Although SWORD is now in its tenth year, participation rates remain high. Of an estimated 3,903 new cases seen this year, 1,031 (26%) were of occupational asthma, 978 (25%) of mesothelioma, 794 (20%) of non-malignant pleural disease, 336 (9%) of pneumoconiosis and 233 (6%) of inhalation accidents. Incidence rates of occupational asthma were generally highest among workers in the manufacture of wood products, textiles and food (particularly grain products and crustaceans) and additionally, in the production of precious and non-ferrous metals, rubber goods, detergents and perfumes, and in mining. Health care workers were noted to have a surprisingly high incidence of inhalation accidents. Occupational asthma attributed to latex has increased dramatically; the highest rates are among laboratory technicians, shoe workers and health care workers.  (+info)



  • Isambard Kingdo
  • She was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel for the Great Western Steamship Company's transatlantic service between Bristol and New York. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great Britain II (also United Friendly, Norsk Data GB, With Integrity, Whitbread Heritage) is a Maxi racing yacht launched by Princess Anne on 21 May 1973 named after the SS Great Britain, built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel which was the world's first "iron clad" steam ship and whose salvage from the Falklands was underwritten by Sir Jack Hayward, who also funded the building of GB II. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brexit
  • The Japanese firm had received assurances from the British government that free trade between Britain and the EU would remain the standard trade arrangement post-Brexit, a commitment that helped the town of Burnaston in Derbyshire secure the company's new £240m plant in March. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker has lashed out at the UK's decision to leave the European Union as he addressed MEPs this morning, insisting Britain would "regret" Brexit. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • Billionaire George Soros was today told to 'butt out' of UK affairs after it was revealed he had pumped £400,000 into a campaign fighting to stop Brexit. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • The European Union's chief negotiator Michel Barnier gave Britain a two-week deadline yesterday to provide "vital" clarification on the financial commitments it is willing to honour as part of its Brexit divorce settlement. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • 2016
  • Tony Victor James Yoka of France and Joe Joyce of Great Britain compete during the Men's Super Heavy (+91kg) Final Bout on Day 16 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Riocentro - Pavilion 6 on August 21, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (olympic.org)
  • Team Great Britain walk during the 'Heroes of the Games' segment during the Closing Ceremony on Day 16 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Maracana Stadium on August 21, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (olympic.org)
  • Prime Minister
  • UK Prime Minister Theresa May has accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of "threatening the international order" through espionage and election meddling. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • Facing mounting pressure at home, UK Prime Minister Theresa May took aim at Russia, accusing it of the tried and trusted sins of endangering global security, election meddling, hacking attacks and spreading fake news, in what seems a desperate lunge for support. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • Wales
  • Three universities in Scotland appear in the top 25: the University of Edinburgh , University of Glasgow and the University of St Andrews , while the best university in Wales is Cardiff University ranked at number 25. (timeshighereducation.com)
  • The term "Great Britain" often extends to include surrounding islands that form part of England, Scotland, and Wales, and is also sometimes loosely applied to the UK as a whole. (wikipedia.org)
  • A single Kingdom of Great Britain resulted from the union of the Kingdom of England (which had already comprised the present-day countries of England and Wales) and the Kingdom of Scotland by the 1707 Acts of Union. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, the acts, which applied in England and Wales only, restricted service to the territory of Great Britain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Welsh
  • Priteni is the source of the Welsh language term Prydain, Britain, which has the same source as the Goidelic term Cruithne used to refer to the early Brythonic-speaking inhabitants of Ireland. (wikipedia.org)
  • British
  • The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge take the top two spots in this ranking of best British universities, while some of the best universities in London complete the top five. (timeshighereducation.com)
  • With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great Britain Ltd (also known as GBLtd) is a British nation-simulation game originally released in 1982 for the BBC Micro and ZX Spectrum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bridge Great Britain is an organisation which was formed to continue the organisational functions of the British Bridge League from 1 January 2000 when that body was dissolved at the end of 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • The report suggests that the UK police have amassed a collection of 19 million photos - equating to around 30 per cent of the British population. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • known
  • Of the 93 top universities in the UK, around 20 are in London, including well-known institutions such as Imperial College London and University College London, and more recently established universities such as the University of Westminster and the University of Greenwich . (timeshighereducation.com)
  • Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest known name for Great Britain is Albion (Greek: Ἀλβιών) or insula Albionum, from either the Latin albus meaning "white" (referring to the white cliffs of Dover, the first view of Britain from the continent) or the "island of the Albiones", first mentioned in the Massaliote Periplus in the 6th century BC, and by Pytheas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Known throughout the world for her outstanding achievements, Great Britain II was the ultimate dream-come-true for Chay Blyth, the adventurous pioneer who sailed east-to-west around the globe. (wikipedia.org)
  • she very much enjoys dance and dances well, she has a good temper and is known for her piety and excellent qualities. (wikipedia.org)
  • London
  • Margaret Thatcher: At Her Zenith: In London, Washington and Moscow is his second volume on the first - and so far only - female PM of Great Britain. (wamc.org)
  • Scottish
  • It has all the right ingredients for the type of scaremongering that gets clicks for UK news websites - Russia, alternative media and the man who led the charge for Scottish independence. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • island
  • The Greco-Egyptian scientist Ptolemy referred to the larger island as great Britain (μεγάλη Βρεττανία megale Brettania) and to Ireland as little Britain (μικρὰ Βρεττανία mikra Brettania) in his work Almagest (147-148 AD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae (c. 1136) refers to the island as Britannia major ("Greater Britain"), to distinguish it from Britannia minor ("Lesser Britain"), the continental region which approximates to modern Brittany, which had been settled in the fifth and sixth centuries by migrants from Britain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great Britain is an island in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daniel Defoe's A tour thro' the whole island of Great Britain begins publication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Official
  • Official website Great Britain on Twitter "Playwright Richard Bean does not shy away from controversy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The firm's 64GB iPhone X costs $999 in the US, which works out at £750 at the current exchange rate - almost £250 less than the official UK price of £999. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • threat
  • The species, which frequently desecrated burial sites and was a threat to livestock and human life, was exterminated from Britain through a combination of deforestation and active hunting through bounty systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scotland
  • Scotland Yard's war crimes unit is being petitioned to open a case into fresh allegations of abuse which was allegedly sanctioned by government officials in Qatar, in a case which could prove embarrassing for the UK government. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • built
  • While other ships had been built of iron or equipped with a screw propeller, Great Britain was the first to combine these features in a large ocean-going ship. (wikipedia.org)
  • political
  • The revelation sparked fury among Brexiteers who said 'serious questions' must be asked into why a foreign national can bankroll a UK political campaign. (whatreallyhappened.com)
  • National
  • Miss Great Britain 2013 was organised by the new national director Kate Solomons, director of Leicester-based model & event agency ModelZed Promotions Ltd. Kate became the national director in November 2012 & has worked within the model industry for 10 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • place
  • Then, in sight of the finish line, New Zealand's Dan Slater passed Croatian Ivan Kljakovic for third place which ensured gold for Britain. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Government
  • Great Britain has, accordingly, entertained with that Government the closest and most intimate relations, while refusing on its demand ordinary amicable intercourse with us, and has, under arrangements made with t. (tufts.edu)