Glucose Tolerance Test: A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Glucose Intolerance: A pathological state in which BLOOD GLUCOSE level is less than approximately 140 mg/100 ml of PLASMA at fasting, and above approximately 200 mg/100 ml plasma at 30-, 60-, or 90-minute during a GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST. This condition is seen frequently in DIABETES MELLITUS, but also occurs with other diseases and MALNUTRITION.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Prediabetic State: The time period before the development of symptomatic diabetes. For example, certain risk factors can be observed in subjects who subsequently develop INSULIN RESISTANCE as in type 2 diabetes (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 2).Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Diabetes, Gestational: Diabetes mellitus induced by PREGNANCY but resolved at the end of pregnancy. It does not include previously diagnosed diabetics who become pregnant (PREGNANCY IN DIABETICS). Gestational diabetes usually develops in late pregnancy when insulin antagonistic hormones peaks leading to INSULIN RESISTANCE; GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; and HYPERGLYCEMIA.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.C-Peptide: The middle segment of proinsulin that is between the N-terminal B-chain and the C-terminal A-chain. It is a pancreatic peptide of about 31 residues, depending on the species. Upon proteolytic cleavage of proinsulin, equimolar INSULIN and C-peptide are released. C-peptide immunoassay has been used to assess pancreatic beta cell function in diabetic patients with circulating insulin antibodies or exogenous insulin. Half-life of C-peptide is 30 min, almost 8 times that of insulin.Insulin-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 50-80% of the islet cells. Beta cells secrete INSULIN.Drug Tolerance: Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Hyperglycemia: Abnormally high BLOOD GLUCOSE level.Hypoglycemic Agents: Substances which lower blood glucose levels.Glucose Metabolism Disorders: Pathological conditions in which the BLOOD GLUCOSE cannot be maintained within the normal range, such as in HYPOGLYCEMIA and HYPERGLYCEMIA. Etiology of these disorders varies. Plasma glucose concentration is critical to survival for it is the predominant fuel for the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Glucose Clamp Technique: Maintenance of a constant blood glucose level by perfusion or infusion with glucose or insulin. It is used for the study of metabolic rates (e.g., in glucose, lipid, amino acid metabolism) at constant glucose concentration.Hyperinsulinism: A syndrome with excessively high INSULIN levels in the BLOOD. It may cause HYPOGLYCEMIA. Etiology of hyperinsulinism varies, including hypersecretion of a beta cell tumor (INSULINOMA); autoantibodies against insulin (INSULIN ANTIBODIES); defective insulin receptor (INSULIN RESISTANCE); or overuse of exogenous insulin or HYPOGLYCEMIC AGENTS.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Glucagon-Like Peptide 1: A peptide of 36 or 37 amino acids that is derived from PROGLUCAGON and mainly produced by the INTESTINAL L CELLS. GLP-1(1-37 or 1-36) is further N-terminally truncated resulting in GLP-1(7-37) or GLP-1-(7-36) which can be amidated. These GLP-1 peptides are known to enhance glucose-dependent INSULIN release, suppress GLUCAGON release and gastric emptying, lower BLOOD GLUCOSE, and reduce food intake.Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated: Minor hemoglobin components of human erythrocytes designated A1a, A1b, and A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is most important since its sugar moiety is glucose covalently bound to the terminal amino acid of the beta chain. Since normal glycohemoglobin concentrations exclude marked blood glucose fluctuations over the preceding three to four weeks, the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin A is a more reliable index of the blood sugar average over a long period of time.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Glucagon: A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Fatty Acids, Nonesterified: FATTY ACIDS found in the plasma that are complexed with SERUM ALBUMIN for transport. These fatty acids are not in glycerol ester form.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Lactose Tolerance Test: A measure of a patient's ability to break down lactose.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.TriglyceridesPolycystic Ovary Syndrome: A complex disorder characterized by infertility, HIRSUTISM; OBESITY; and various menstrual disturbances such as OLIGOMENORRHEA; AMENORRHEA; ANOVULATION. Polycystic ovary syndrome is usually associated with bilateral enlarged ovaries studded with atretic follicles, not with cysts. The term, polycystic ovary, is misleading.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Glucose Transporter Type 4: A glucose transport protein found in mature MUSCLE CELLS and ADIPOCYTES. It promotes transport of glucose from the BLOOD into target TISSUES. The inactive form of the protein is localized in CYTOPLASMIC VESICLES. In response to INSULIN, it is translocated to the PLASMA MEMBRANE where it facilitates glucose uptake.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Acromegaly: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excessive HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE in adults. It is characterized by bony enlargement of the FACE; lower jaw (PROGNATHISM); hands; FEET; HEAD; and THORAX. The most common etiology is a GROWTH HORMONE-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch36, pp79-80)Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Proinsulin: A pancreatic polypeptide of about 110 amino acids, depending on the species, that is the precursor of insulin. Proinsulin, produced by the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS, is comprised sequentially of the N-terminal B-chain, the proteolytically removable connecting C-peptide, and the C-terminal A-chain. It also contains three disulfide bonds, two between A-chain and B-chain. After cleavage at two locations, insulin and C-peptide are the secreted products. Intact proinsulin with low bioactivity also is secreted in small amounts.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide: A gastrointestinal peptide hormone of about 43-amino acids. It is found to be a potent stimulator of INSULIN secretion and a relatively poor inhibitor of GASTRIC ACID secretion.Glycosuria: The appearance of an abnormally large amount of GLUCOSE in the urine, such as more than 500 mg/day in adults. It can be due to HYPERGLYCEMIA or genetic defects in renal reabsorption (RENAL GLYCOSURIA).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Rats, Zucker: Two populations of Zucker rats have been cited in research--the "fatty" or obese and the lean. The "fatty" rat (Rattus norvegicus) appeared as a spontaneous mutant. The obese condition appears to be due to a single recessive gene.Incretins: Peptides which stimulate INSULIN release from the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS following oral nutrient ingestion, or postprandially.Adiponectin: A 30-kDa COMPLEMENT C1Q-related protein, the most abundant gene product secreted by FAT CELLS of the white ADIPOSE TISSUE. Adiponectin modulates several physiological processes, such as metabolism of GLUCOSE and FATTY ACIDS, and immune responses. Decreased plasma adiponectin levels are associated with INSULIN RESISTANCE; TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS; OBESITY; and ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Glucose Transporter Type 2: A glucose transport facilitator that is expressed primarily in PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; LIVER; and KIDNEYS. It may function as a GLUCOSE sensor to regulate INSULIN release and glucose HOMEOSTASIS.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.Diagnostic Techniques, Endocrine: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the endocrine glands or demonstration of their physiological processes.Mice, Inbred C57BLHuman Growth Hormone: A 191-amino acid polypeptide hormone secreted by the human adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR), also known as GH or somatotropin. Synthetic growth hormone, termed somatropin, has replaced the natural form in therapeutic usage such as treatment of dwarfism in children with growth hormone deficiency.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Postpartum Period: In females, the period that is shortly after giving birth (PARTURITION).Hypoglycemia: A syndrome of abnormally low BLOOD GLUCOSE level. Clinical hypoglycemia has diverse etiologies. Severe hypoglycemia eventually lead to glucose deprivation of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM resulting in HUNGER; SWEATING; PARESTHESIA; impaired mental function; SEIZURES; COMA; and even DEATH.Metformin: A biguanide hypoglycemic agent used in the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus not responding to dietary modification. Metformin improves glycemic control by improving insulin sensitivity and decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p289)Leptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Monosaccharide Transport Proteins: A large group of membrane transport proteins that shuttle MONOSACCHARIDES across CELL MEMBRANES.Body Constitution: The physical characteristics of the body, including the mode of performance of functions, the activity of metabolic processes, the manner and degree of reactions to stimuli, and power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.Fructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Glucose Oxidase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the conversion of beta-D-glucose and oxygen to D-glucono-1,5-lactone and peroxide. It is a flavoprotein, highly specific for beta-D-glucose. The enzyme is produced by Penicillium notatum and other fungi and has antibacterial activity in the presence of glucose and oxygen. It is used to estimate glucose concentration in blood or urine samples through the formation of colored dyes by the hydrogen peroxide produced in the reaction. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.1.3.4.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Glucose Transporter Type 1: A ubiquitously expressed glucose transporter that is important for constitutive, basal GLUCOSE transport. It is predominately expressed in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS and ERYTHROCYTES at the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER and is responsible for GLUCOSE entry into the BRAIN.GlycogenDeoxyglucose: 2-Deoxy-D-arabino-hexose. An antimetabolite of glucose with antiviral activity.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Intra-Abdominal Fat: Fatty tissue inside the ABDOMINAL CAVITY, including visceral fat and retroperitoneal fat. It is the most metabolically active fat in the body and easily accessible for LIPOLYSIS. Increased visceral fat is associated with metabolic complications of OBESITY.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Mice, Obese: Mutant mice exhibiting a marked obesity coupled with overeating, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, marked insulin resistance, and infertility when in a homozygous state. They may be inbred or hybrid.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mauritius: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Port Louis. It was discovered by the Portuguese in 1505, occupied by the Dutch 1598-1710, held by the French 1715-1810 when the British captured it, formally ceded to the British in 1814, and became independent in 1968. It was named by the Dutch in honor of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange (1567-1625). (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p742 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p341)Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Thiazolidinediones: THIAZOLES with two keto oxygens. Members are insulin-sensitizing agents which overcome INSULIN RESISTANCE by activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma).Voluntary Health Agencies: Non-profit organizations concerned with various aspects of health, e.g., education, promotion, treatment, services, etc.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Receptors, Glucagon: Cell surface receptors that bind glucagon with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Activation of glucagon receptors causes a variety of effects; the best understood is the initiation of a complex enzymatic cascade in the liver which ultimately increases the availability of glucose to body organs.Glucokinase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and D-glucose to ADP and D-glucose 6-phosphate. They are found in invertebrates and microorganisms, and are highly specific for glucose. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.2.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Streptozocin: An antibiotic that is produced by Stretomyces achromogenes. It is used as an antineoplastic agent and to induce diabetes in experimental animals.Growth Hormone: A polypeptide that is secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin, stimulates mitosis, cell differentiation and cell growth. Species-specific growth hormones have been synthesized.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Pregnancy in Diabetics: The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Tolbutamide: A sulphonylurea hypoglycemic agent with actions and uses similar to those of CHLORPROPAMIDE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p290)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Fructosamine: An amino sugar formed when glucose non-enzymatically reacts with the N-terminal amino group of proteins. The fructose moiety is derived from glucose by the "classical" Amadori rearrangement.Gluconeogenesis: Biosynthesis of GLUCOSE from nonhexose or non-carbohydrate precursors, such as LACTATE; PYRUVATE; ALANINE; and GLYCEROL.Hyperandrogenism: A condition caused by the excessive secretion of ANDROGENS from the ADRENAL CORTEX; the OVARIES; or the TESTES. The clinical significance in males is negligible. In women, the common manifestations are HIRSUTISM and VIRILISM as seen in patients with POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME and ADRENOCORTICAL HYPERFUNCTION.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Ghrelin: A 28-amino acid, acylated, orexigenic peptide that is a ligand for GROWTH HORMONE SECRETAGOGUE RECEPTORS. Ghrelin is widely expressed but primarily in the stomach in the adults. Ghrelin acts centrally to stimulate growth hormone secretion and food intake, and peripherally to regulate energy homeostasis. Its large precursor protein, known as appetite-regulating hormone or motilin-related peptide, contains ghrelin and obestatin.Viscera: Any of the large interior organs in any one of the three great cavities of the body, especially in the abdomen.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.JapanPredictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Hormones: Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.Cholesterol, HDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Weight Loss: Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Abdominal Fat: Fatty tissue in the region of the ABDOMEN. It includes the ABDOMINAL SUBCUTANEOUS FAT and the INTRA-ABDOMINAL FAT.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins: A structurally-related group of signaling proteins that are phosphorylated by the INSULIN RECEPTOR PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE. The proteins share in common an N-terminal PHOSPHOLIPID-binding domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding domain that interacts with the phosphorylated INSULIN RECEPTOR, and a C-terminal TYROSINE-rich domain. Upon tyrosine phosphorylation insulin receptor substrate proteins interact with specific SH2 DOMAIN-containing proteins that are involved in insulin receptor signaling.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.ArizonaDehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate: The circulating form of a major C19 steroid produced primarily by the ADRENAL CORTEX. DHEA sulfate serves as a precursor for TESTOSTERONE; ANDROSTENEDIONE; ESTRADIOL; and ESTRONE.Lactose Intolerance: The condition resulting from the absence or deficiency of LACTASE in the MUCOSA cells of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, and the inability to break down LACTOSE in milk for ABSORPTION. Bacterial fermentation of the unabsorbed lactose leads to symptoms that range from a mild indigestion (DYSPEPSIA) to severe DIARRHEA. Lactose intolerance may be an inborn error or acquired.Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors: Compounds that suppress the degradation of INCRETINS by blocking the action of DIPEPTIDYL-PEPTIDASE IV. This helps to correct the defective INSULIN and GLUCAGON secretion characteristic of TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS by stimulating insulin secretion and suppressing glucagon release.Acanthosis Nigricans: A circumscribed melanosis consisting of a brown-pigmented, velvety verrucosity or fine papillomatosis appearing in the axillae and other body folds. It occurs in association with endocrine disorders, underlying malignancy, administration of certain drugs, or as in inherited disorder.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Adipocytes: Cells in the body that store FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. WHITE ADIPOCYTES are the predominant type and found mostly in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue. BROWN ADIPOCYTES are thermogenic cells that can be found in newborns of some species and hibernating mammals.Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Waist Circumference: The measurement around the body at the level of the ABDOMEN and just above the hip bone. The measurement is usually taken immediately after exhalation.Gastric Bypass: Surgical procedure in which the STOMACH is transected high on the body. The resulting small proximal gastric pouch is joined to any parts of the SMALL INTESTINE by an end-to-side SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS, depending on the amounts of intestinal surface being bypasses. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of MORBID OBESITY by limiting the size of functional STOMACH, food intake, and food absorption.Glycemic Index: A numerical system of measuring the rate of BLOOD GLUCOSE generation from a particular food item as compared to a reference item, such as glucose = 100. Foods with higher glycemic index numbers create greater blood sugar swings.Receptor, Insulin: A cell surface receptor for INSULIN. It comprises a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits which are derived from cleavage of a single precursor protein. The receptor contains an intrinsic TYROSINE KINASE domain that is located within the beta subunit. Activation of the receptor by INSULIN results in numerous metabolic changes including increased uptake of GLUCOSE into the liver, muscle, and ADIPOSE TISSUE.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Glucose 1-Dehydrogenase: A glucose dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to form D-glucono-1,5-lactone, using NAD as well as NADP as a coenzyme.Amylose: An unbranched glucan in starch.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Octreotide: A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Adipokines: Polypeptides produced by the ADIPOCYTES. They include LEPTIN; ADIPONECTIN; RESISTIN; and many cytokines of the immune system, such as TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA; INTERLEUKIN-6; and COMPLEMENT FACTOR D (also known as ADIPSIN). They have potent autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Fetal Macrosomia: A condition of fetal overgrowth leading to a large-for-gestational-age FETUS. It is defined as BIRTH WEIGHT greater than 4,000 grams or above the 90th percentile for population and sex-specific growth curves. It is commonly seen in GESTATIONAL DIABETES; PROLONGED PREGNANCY; and pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes mellitus.Insulin Antibodies: Antibodies specific to INSULIN.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Insulin-Like Growth Factor I: A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Proglucagon: The common precursor polypeptide of pancreatic GLUCAGON and intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Proglucagon is the 158-amino acid segment of preproglucagon without the N-terminal signal sequence. Proglucagon is expressed in the PANCREAS; INTESTINES; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Posttranslational processing of proglucagon is tissue-specific yielding numerous bioactive peptides.Acarbose: An inhibitor of ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASES that retards the digestion and absorption of DIETARY CARBOHYDRATES in the SMALL INTESTINE.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Glucagon-Like Peptides: Peptides derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of pancreatic GLUCAGON. Despite expression of proglucagon in multiple tissues, the major production site of glucagon-like peptides (GLPs) is the INTESTINAL L CELLS. GLPs include glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon-like peptide 2, and the various truncated forms.Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4: A serine protease that catalyses the release of an N-terminal dipeptide. Several biologically-active peptides have been identified as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 substrates including INCRETINS; NEUROPEPTIDES; and CHEMOKINES. The protein is also found bound to ADENOSINE DEAMINASE on the T-CELL surface and is believed to play a role in T-cell activation.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Adamantane: A tricyclo bridged hydrocarbon.Picolinic AcidsBiological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Hyperlipidemias: Conditions with excess LIPIDS in the blood.Retinol-Binding Proteins, Plasma: Retinol binding proteins that circulate in the PLASMA. They are members of the lipocalin family of proteins and play a role in the transport of RETINOL from the LIVER to the peripheral tissues. The proteins are usually found in association with TRANSTHYRETIN.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amylopectin: A highly branched glucan in starch.Diabetic Diet: A diet prescribed in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, usually limited in the amount of sugar or readily available carbohydrate. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dietary Sucrose: Sucrose present in the diet. It is added to food and drinks as a sweetener.FinlandGlycerol: A trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is an intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is used as a solvent, emollient, pharmaceutical agent, and sweetening agent.Hypertriglyceridemia: A condition of elevated levels of TRIGLYCERIDES in the blood.Hormones, Ectopic: Hormones released from neoplasms or from other cells that are not the usual sources of hormones.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone: A metabolite of PROGESTERONE with a hydroxyl group at the 17-alpha position. It serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of HYDROCORTISONE and GONADAL STEROID HORMONES.Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Protein: A transcription factor that takes part in WNT signaling pathway. The activity of the protein is regulated via its interaction with BETA CATENIN. Transcription factor 7-like 2 protein plays an important role in the embryogenesis of the PANCREAS and ISLET CELLS.Somatostatin: A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal.Glucagon-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 5-20% of the islet cells. Alpha cells secrete GLUCAGON.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Subcutaneous Fat: Fatty tissue under the SKIN through out the body.Thinness: A state of insufficient flesh on the body usually defined as having a body weight less than skeletal and physical standards. Depending on age, sex, and genetic background, a BODY MASS INDEX of less than 18.5 is considered as underweight.Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Diabetic Angiopathies: VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.

*  Short-Term Administrations of a Combination of Anti-LFA-1 and Anti-CD154 Monoclonal Antibodies Induce Tolerance to Neonatal...

Oral glucose tolerance test.. At 150 days post-transplantation, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in randomly ... This would test whether our strategy could also result in tolerance to NPI xenografts in the presence of preexisting anti-Gal ... Blood glucose levels of these mice were measured using a Precision glucose meter (OneTouch Ultra; LifeScan, Milpitas, CA). All ... Blood glucose levels (BGLs) of B6 mouse recipients of NPI (■) responding to oral glucose challenge at 150 days post- ...
diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/59/4/958

*  Oral Sodium Tolbutamide And Glucose Tolerance Tests | JAMA Internal Medicine | The JAMA Network

AN ORAL MODIFICATION of the intravenous tolbutamide test originally devised by Unger and Madison 1 has been described by ... Individual agreement of this test with the oral glucose tolerance test was generally good regarding diagnostic classification, ... Oral Sodium Tolbutamide And Glucose Tolerance Tests. Arch Intern Med. 1965;115(2):161-166. doi:10.1001/archinte. ... This test, in which 2.0 gm of sodium tolbutamide are administered orally in rapidly dissolving tablets along with sodium ...
jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/571109

*  Predicting Weight Gain and Weight Loss Associated With Overeating or Fasting - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Yearly visits (2-night inpatient stay) for all participants for repeat meal test, DXA, oral glucose tolerance test, behavioral ... Impaired glucose tolerance (according to the World Health Organization diagnostic criteria) for those participating in the ... Participants undergo the following tests and procedures during the hospital admission:. *Medical history, physical examination ... Determine if hormones, responses to behavioral testing, adipocyte size, body composition, core temperature, spontaneous ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00687115?recr=Open&cond="Nutrition"&rank=14

*  Integrating Insulin Delivery and Glucose Sensing in Subcutaneous Tissue for the Treatment of Type-1 Diabetic Patients - Full...

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT):. Oral glucose tolerance test combined with subcutaneous insulin delivery and glucose ... insulin delivery and glucose sampling at the same adipose tissue site during euglycemic clamps and oral glucose tolerance tests ... The aim of this study is to ascertain whether a stable ratio between the blood glucose concentration and the glucose levels at ... This treatment could be simplified if there were a stable ratio between blood glucose concentration and tissue glucose level at ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00812591

*  Hypoglycemia and carbohydrate metabolism (practice) | Khan Academy

Glucose Tolerance Test Results. A meal was given at Time = 0. 0. 00. and blood glucose levels were monitored. The boy's test ... Normal blood glucose levels are 6. 0. 60. 6060. -. 1. 5. 0. 150. 150150. mg/dL. The results are shown in Figure 1. ... Gierke agreed to the test. After eating a meal, the boy's blood glucose levels were monitored for several hours after a meal. ... Test prep. ·. MCAT. ·. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems Passages. ·. Biological sciences practice ...
https://khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/biological-sciences-practice/biological-sciences-practice-tut/e/carbohydrate-metabolism---passage-1

*  Insulin Resistance Before and During Pregnancy in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

... impaired glucose tolerance will not be an exclusion criterion because of the high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance in ... blood sample for oral glucose tolerance test. *urine for estrogen metabolites. Enrollment:. 2. ... Glucose Metabolism Disorders. Metabolic Diseases. Ovarian Cysts. Cysts. Neoplasms. Ovarian Diseases. Adnexal Diseases. Genital ... Change from Gestation Week 12-14 in Areas-under-the-response-curve of Glucose at Gestation Week 32-34 [ Time Frame: Gestation ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01475565?term=pregnancy&rank=20

*  Glycemia in acute coronary syndromes.

Recent studies have addressed the impact of abnormal glucose metabolism at the acute phase in patients without known diabetes. ... Fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test performed during the hospital stay discloses valuable diagnostic information ... Blood Glucose / metabolism*. Coronary Disease / blood*. Diabetes Mellitus / blood. Diabetic Angiopathies / blood*. Glucose ... whatever the method used to evaluate blood glucose metabolism. High blood glucose at admission, whether fasting or not, are ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Glycemia-in-acute-coronary-syndromes/17375407.html

*  Relationship Between Endothelial Function and Fibrinolysis in Early Hypertension | Hypertension

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test. The oral glucose test was performed in the morning after a 12-hour overnight fast. Blood samples ... Measurements of fibrinolytic and hemostatic variables and lipids were performed on the day of the oral glucose tolerance test ... Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test, and endothelial function was assessed by evaluating changes in ... oral glucose tolerance testing, and routine examinations of serum and urine obtained in the fasting state, except for the oral ...
hyper.ahajournals.org/content/31/1/321

*  'lameness animal' Protocols and Video...

Characterization of Metabolic Status in Nonhuman Primates with the Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test', 'Surgical Placement of ... Morris Water Maze Test: Optimization for Mouse Strain and Testing Environment', 'In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial ... Barnes Maze Testing Strategies with Small and Large Rodent Models', 'Behavioral and Locomotor Measurements Using an Open Field ... A Simple Behavioral Assay for Testing Visual Function in Xenopus laevis', 'Electrophysiological Recording in the Brain of ...
https://jove.com/keyword/lameness animal

*  Metformin Causes Reduction of Food Intake and Body Weight Gain and Improvement of Glucose Intolerance in Combination with...

In an oral glucose tolerance test on day 1, the coadministration caused a greater improvement of glucose tolerance and a ... Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed on days 1 and 15 in the repeated administration study. The animals were ... in oral glucose tolerance test in male obese fa/fa Zucker rats treated with met (300 mg/kg) and/or val-pyr (30 mg/kg), a DPPIV ... To examine the effect of the combination treatment with metformin and val-pyr on oral glucose tolerance in Zucker fa/fa rats, ...
jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/310/2/614

*  Oral Glucose Tolerance Test | OGTT | Oral Glucose Test

What is the oral glucose tolerance test? OGTT or oral glucose test measures body's ability to metabolize and clearing glucose in the blood stream.
healthy-ojas.com/diabetes/ogtt.html

*  Glucose dysregulation and hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents: Is there a link? - Cali - 2009 - Hepatology - Wiley Online...

Fatty liver is increasingly common in obese adolescents. We determined its association with glucose dysregulation in 118 (37M/81F) obese adolescents of similar age and percent total fat. Fast-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and simple MRI were used to quantify hepatic fat content and abdominal fat distribution. All subjects had a standard oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by the Matsuda Index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Baseline total and high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were measured. The cohort was stratified according to tertiles of hepatic fat content. Whereas age and %fat were comparable across tertiles, ethnicity differed in that fewer Blacks and more Whites and Hispanics were in the moderate and high category of hepatic fat fraction (HFF). Visceral and the visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio increased and insulin sensitivity decreased across ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.22858/abstract

*  Plus it

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective cohort of 485 women, we measured subcutaneous (SAT), visceral (VAT) and total (TAT) adipose tissue depth, using ultrasound at 11-14 weeks' gestation. Logistic regression analysis assessed the relation between quartiles of SAT, VAT or TAT depth and the composite outcome of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or GDM, based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks. ...
care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2015/10/29/dc15-2027

*  Glucose tolerance test in pregnancy normal range - Pregnancy Blog

Though exercising is suggested by most people but it surely would possibly create problem for a selected underlying medical situation. Males going for IVF remedy glucose tolerance test in pregnancy normal range their companions have been given vitamin E, and fertilisation rates low platelet count during pregnancy, because of this, increased from 19 to 29 p. Back. So Christmas is when Sperm and egg meet and my interval was implanting. A nose could possibly be seen on an ultrasound. I am 5 days previous ovulation (I've been utilizing ovulation check kits, so I do know), and I've been toleraance for three days now. As your body changes, you might must make adjustments to your each day routine, resembling going to bed earlier or consuming frequent, small meals. Except you expertise it for your self. Sure. Folks with RBD may shout, kick, or grind their teeth. There are a number of large, well-designed, printed trials displaying contrary to this. But this month i ...
guyuntereiner.com/pregnancy-test/glucose-tolerance-test-in-pregnancy-normal-range.html

*  Diabetes

In the DPP, subjects with elevated fasting glucose (5.3-6.9 mmol/l or ,6.9 mmol/l for American Indians), impaired glucose tolerance (glucose 7.8-11.0 mmol/l 2 h after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test), and overweight or obesity (BMI ≥24 kg/m2, except Asian Americans where the cut point used was ≥22 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to one of three treatments: Intensive lifestyle intervention, treatment with metformin, or treatment with placebo (21-23). A fourth intervention arm, in which subjects were randomized to receive e troglitazone, was prematurely terminated (24). The maximal measurable effectiveness of the DPP interventions, and the greatest compliance with assigned treatments, was seen at the end of the first year of intervention (23). Changes over this first-year interval have since proven to relate strongly to progression to diabetes (25-28).. Stored plasma samples ...
diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/57/4/980.full

*  Stealing Skinny: glucose tolerance test

I've been walking for an hour a day (or more!) after I get off work every day. I found a hike/bike trail super close to my boys' daycare, so I go walk and then pick them up. It's a lovely walk---I should take pics for you guys. It follows a creek for about a mile, is paved, and has tons of ducks and birds that are so domesticated they will sit their plump-sized-overfed-selves on the concrete and not even move when I walk by. I love it! Temps are in the 90's right now at that time of day, so I'm not sure how much longer I'll be able to keep up with it, but it feels great to be active. I've been wearing a pedometer and averaging about 15,000 steps a day---about 5,000 at work. If you look closely at my legs, you can see a tan line under my knee from my capri walking pants! I never noticed it til I took this picture. Then I looked down at my legs, hoping it was just the light of the bathroom. Nope! Farmer tan. I must get a full length mirror so I don't get these kinds of surprises. Awesome, right ...
stealingskinny.blogspot.com/2012/06/glucose-tolerance-test.html

*  Plus it

In this report, we demonstrate that standard antepartum screening for GDM identifies four metabolically distinct glucose tolerance groups in pregnancy whose differences in insulin sensitivity, β-cell function, and glucose handling persist at 3 months postpartum. Indeed, the prevalence of postpartum glucose intolerance progressively increases across these four groups. Most importantly, any degree of abnormal glucose homeostasis in pregnancy (i.e., not just GDM) independently predicts glucose intolerance at 3 months postpartum. Thus, antepartum GDM screening provides an opportunity to obtain insight into a women's future risk of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.. Women with GDM, who have chronic insulin resistance and a chronic defect in their insulin secretion-sensitivity relationship, are identified on the basis of hyperglycemia on glucose ...
care.diabetesjournals.org/content/31/10/2026

*  Glucose Tests: At a Glance

Overview of Glucose blood test (Blood sugar, GTT, Fasting glucose, glucose tolerance tests) which diagnoses and manages diabetes by determining blood levels of glucose.
labtestsonline.org.uk/understanding/analytes/glucose/tab/glance

*  Supplement to Metabolite Profiles During Oral Glucose Challenge | Diabetes

Jennifer E. Ho, Martin G. Larson, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Anahita Ghorbani, Susan Cheng, Eugene P. Rhee, Jose C. Florez, Clary B. Clish, Robert E. Gerszten, Thomas J. Wang ...
diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/suppl/2013/07/18/db12-0754.DC1

*  The liver-selective NO donor, V-PYRRO/NO, protects against liver steatosis and improves postprandial glucose tolerance in mice...

Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Edyta Maslak, Piotr Zabielski, Kamila Kochan, Kamil Kus, Agnieszka Jasztal, Barbara Sitek, Bartosz Proniewski, Tomasz Wojcik, Katarzyna Gula, Agnieszka Kij, Maria Walczak, Małgorzata Baranska, Adrian Chabowski, Ryan J Holland, Joseph E Saavedra, Larry K Keefer, Stefan Chlopicki].
sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/25534988

Blood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.Glucose transporterInsulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.Outline of diabetes: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to diabetes:International Association of Plastics DistributorsPermanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Alcohol tolerance: Alcohol tolerance refers to the bodily responses to the functional effects of ethanol in alcoholic beverages. This includes direct tolerance, speed of recovery from insobriety and resistance to the development of alcoholism.Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.HyperglycemiaAnti-diabetic medication: Drugs used in diabetes treat diabetes mellitus by lowering glucose levels in the blood. With the exceptions of insulin, exenatide, liraglutide and pramlintide, all are administered orally and are thus also called oral hypoglycemic agents or oral antihyperglycemic agents.Pine Islet LightGlucose clamp technique: Glucose clamp technique is a method for quantifying insulin secretion and resistance. It is used to measure either how well an individual metabolizes glucose or how sensitive an individual is to insulin.Glucagon-like peptide-2: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a 33 amino acid peptide with the sequence HADGSFSDEMNTILDNLAARDFINWLIQTKITD (see Proteinogenic amino acid) in humans. GLP-2 is created by specific post-translational proteolytic cleavage of proglucagon in a process that also liberates the related glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1).Glucagon rescueAdipose tissue macrophages: Adipose tissue macrophages (abbr. ATMs) comprise tissue resident macrophages present in adipose tissue.TriglycerideInfertility in polycystic ovary syndrome: Polycystic ovary disease (PCOS) is a hormonal imbalance in women that is thought to be one of the leading causes of female infertility.Palacio JR et,al.Lipid droplet: Lipid droplets, also referred to as lipid bodies, oil bodies or adiposomes, are lipid-rich cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids and are found largely in the adipose tissue.Mobilization and cellular uptake of stored fats and triacylglycerol (with Animation) They also serve as a reservoir for cholesterol and acyl-glycerols for membrane formation and maintenance.Rondo HattonHyperproinsulinemia: Hyperproinsulinemia is a disease where insulin is not sufficiently processed before secretion and immature forms of insulin make up the majority of circulating insulin immunoreactivity in both fasting and glucose-stimulated conditions (insulin immunoreactivity refers to all molecules detectable by an insulin antibody, i.e.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Gastric inhibitory polypeptide: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide is a member of the secretin family of hormones.Renal threshold: In physiology, the renal threshold is the concentration of a substance dissolved in the blood above which the kidneys begin to remove it into the urine. When the renal threshold of a substance is exceeded, reabsorption of the substance by the proximal convoluted tubule is incomplete; consequently, part of the substance remains in the urine.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingMyokine: A myokine is one of several hundred cytokines or other small proteins (~5–20 kDa) and proteoglycan peptides that are produced and released by muscle cells (myocytes) in response to muscular contractions.Bente Klarlund Pedersen , Thorbjörn C.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Liver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GIAnimal fatAdiponectin: Adiponectin (also referred to as GBP-28, apM1, AdipoQ and Acrp30) is a protein which in humans is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene. It is involved in regulating glucose levels as well as fatty acid breakdown.National Cholesterol Education Program: The National Cholesterol Education Program is a program managed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health. Its goal is to reduce increased cardiovascular disease rates due to hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol levels) in the United States of America.SLC2A11: Solute carrier family 2, facilitated glucose transporter member 11 (SLC2A11) also known as glucose transporter type 10/11 (GLUT-10/11) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC2A11 gene.PRX-07034: PRX-07034 is a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist. It has cognition and memory-enhancing properties and potently decreases food intake and body weight in rodents.Growth hormone treatment: Growth hormone treatment refers to the use of growth hormone (GH) as a prescription medication—it is one form of hormone therapy. Growth hormone is a peptide hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that stimulates growth and cell reproduction.Carbohydrate loading: Carbohydrate loading, commonly referred to as carb-loading or carbo-loading, is a strategy used by endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, to maximize the storage of glycogen (or energy) in the muscles and liver.http://www.Spontaneous hypoglycemia: The term "spontaneous hypoglycemia" was coined by the physician Seale Harris. (Who stated their source to be Alabama Hall of Fame, 1968)Pioglitazone/metforminLeptinPancreatic bud: The ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds (or pancreatic diverticula) are outgrowths of the duodenum during human embryogenesis. They join together to form the adult pancreas.Fructose malabsorptionLipotoxicity: Lipotoxicity is a metabolic syndrome that results from the accumulation of lipid intermediates in non-adipose tissue, leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The tissues normally affected include the kidneys, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.Glucose oxidase: ; }}Index of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.Chromium: Chromium is a chemical element with symbol Cr and atomic number 24. It is the first element in Group 6.Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes: The Network for Pancreatic Organ donors with Diabetes (nPOD), is a collaborative type 1 diabetes research project funded by JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). nPOD supports scientific investigators by providing, without cost, rare and difficult to obtain tissues beneficial to their research.Glycogen synthase: ; ; rendered using PyMOL.Osmotic controlled-release oral delivery system: OROS (Osmotic [Controlled] Release Oral [Delivery] System) is a controlled release oral drug delivery system in the form of a tablet. The tablet has a rigid water-permeable jacket with one or more laser drilled small holes.Drugs in Mauritius: Common illegal drugs in Mauritius include marijuana and opiates. According to the 2011 United Nations Drug Report, the small population of Mauritius has a prevalence of opiate consumption of 0.Aortic pressure: Central aortic blood pressure (CAP or CASP) is the blood pressure at the root of aorta. Studies have shown the importance of central aortic pressure and its implications in assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment with respect to cardiovascular risk factors.Overweight PoochThiazolidinedione: The thiazolidinediones , also known as glitazones, are a class of medications used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. They were introduced in the late 1990s.American Lung Association: The American Lung Association is a voluntary health organization whose mission is to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease through education, advocacy and research..Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Alloimmunity: Alloimmunity is an immune response to foreign antigens (alloantigens) from members of the same species. The body attacks mainly transplanted tissue and even the fetus in some cases.Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.TaspoglutideGlucokinase regulatory protein: The glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) also known as glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator (GCKR) is a protein produced in hepatocytes (liver cells). GKRP binds and moves glucokinase (GK), thereby controlling both activity and intracellular location of this key enzyme of glucose metabolism.Fatty liverSomatotropic cell

(1/4435) Neurosurgery restores late GH rise after glucose-induced suppression in cured acromegalics.

OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: A decrease of GH levels below 2 microg/l after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is still currently accepted as the gold standard for assessing cure in surgically treated acromegaly. Whether glucose-induced suppression of GH is accompanied by a restoration of normal GH late rebound has not yet been evaluated in this disease. In order to assess the restoration of normal GH regulation after removal of a pituitary adenoma, we have evaluated GH changes after an OGTT in a series of selected acromegalic patients (transsphenoidal surgery and lack of pituitary failure). METHODS: Twenty-nine patients (13 male, 16 female, age range 27-70 years) entered the study. Their neuroradiological imaging before neurosurgery showed microadenoma in 7, intrasellar macroadenoma in 8 and macroadenoma with extrasellar extension in 14. Plasma GH levels were assayed up to 300 min after glucose administration (75 g p.o.) and IGF-I on basal samples. RESULTS: Basal GH levels were below 5 microg/l in 20 patients and below 2 microg/l in 5 of these. Normal age-adjusted IGF-I levels were observed in 12 patients. GH values were suppressed below 2 microg/l during an OGTT in 13 patients, and below 1 microg/l in 7 of these. In 9 patients out of these 13, a marked rise in GH levels occurred after nadir. Baseline and nadir GH values of these 9 patients were not different from the corresponding values of the other 4 patients without OGTT-induced late GH peaks. CONCLUSIONS: GH rebound after GH nadir occurs in acromegalic patients considered as cured on the basis of OGTT-induced GH suppression and/or IGF-I normalization. The restoration of this physiological response could be regarded as a marker of recovered/preserved integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Even though the reason for this GH rebound has not yet been elucidated (GHRH discharge?/end of somatostatin inhibition?), the lack of late GH peak in the patients regarded as cured by the usual criteria could be due to injury to the pituitary stalk caused by the adenoma or by surgical manipulation.  (+info)

(2/4435) No association between the -308 polymorphism in the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) promoter region and polycystic ovaries.

The tumour necrosis factor (TNF)2 allele appears to be linked with increased insulin resistance and obesity, conditions often found in overweight patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The significance of TNFalpha polymorphism in relation to the clinical and biochemical parameters associated with PCOS was investigated in 122 well-characterized patients with polycystic ovaries (PCO). Of these, 84 had an abnormal menstrual cycle and were classified as having PCOS, while the remaining 38 had a normal menstrual cycle and were classified as having PCO. There were a further 28 individuals without PCO (non-PCO) and 108 individuals whose PCO status was undetermined (reference population). The promoter region of the TNFalpha gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the presence or absence of the polymorphism at -308 was determined by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The less common TNF allele (TNF2) was found as TNF1/2 or TNF2/2 in 11/38 (29%) of PCO subjects, 25/84 (30%) of PCOS subjects, 7/28 (25%) of non-PCO subjects, and 45/108 (42%) of the reference population. There was no significant difference in the incidence of the TNF2 allele between the groups. The relationship of TNF genotype to clinical and biochemical parameters was examined. In both the PCO group and the PCOS group, the presence of the TNF2 allele was significantly associated with lower glucose values obtained from the glucose tolerance testing (P<0.05). The TNF genotype was not significantly associated with any clinical or biochemical parameter measured in the PCO, PCOS or non-PCOS groups. Thus, the TNFalpha -308 polymorphism does not appear to strongly influence genetic susceptibility to polycystic ovaries.  (+info)

(3/4435) Type 2 diabetes: evidence for linkage on chromosome 20 in 716 Finnish affected sib pairs.

We are conducting a genome scan at an average resolution of 10 centimorgans (cM) for type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes in 716 affected sib pairs from 477 Finnish families. To date, our best evidence for linkage is on chromosome 20 with potentially separable peaks located on both the long and short arms. The unweighted multipoint maximum logarithm of odds score (MLS) was 3.08 on 20p (location, chi = 19.5 cM) under an additive model, whereas the weighted MLS was 2.06 on 20q (chi = 57 cM, recurrence risk,lambda(s) = 1. 25, P = 0.009). Weighted logarithm of odds scores of 2.00 (chi = 69.5 cM, P = 0.010) and 1.92 (chi = 18.5 cM, P = 0.013) were also observed. Ordered subset analyses based on sibships with extreme mean values of diabetes-related quantitative traits yielded sets of families who contributed disproportionately to the peaks. Two-hour glucose levels in offspring of diabetic individuals gave a MLS of 2. 12 (P = 0.0018) at 9.5 cM. Evidence from this and other studies suggests at least two diabetes-susceptibility genes on chromosome 20. We have also screened the gene for maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1, hepatic nuclear factor 4-a (HNF-4alpha) in 64 affected sibships with evidence for high chromosomal sharing at its location on chromosome 20q. We found no evidence that sequence changes in this gene accounted for the linkage results we observed.  (+info)

(4/4435) Training in swimming reduces blood pressure and increases muscle glucose transport activity as well as GLUT4 contents in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Exercise improves muscle insulin sensitivity and GLUT4 contents. We investigated the beneficial effects of swimming training on insulin sensitivity and genetic hypertension using stroke-prone hypertensive rats (SHRSP). We studied the relationship between genetic hypertension and insulin resistance in SHRSP and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) as a control. The systolic blood pressure of SHRSP was significantly reduced by 4-week swimming training (208.4 +/- 6.8 mmHg vs. 187.2 +/- 4.1 mmHg, p < 0.05). The swimming training also resulted in an approximately 20% increase in the insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity (p < 0.05) of soleus muscle strips and an approximately 3-fold increase in the plasma membrane GLUT4 protein expression (p < 0.01) in SHRSP. However, basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity and GLUT4 contents were not significantly different between WKY and SHRSP. There was no difference in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle of SHRSP as compared with WKY. Our results indicated swimming training exercise improved not only hypertension but also muscle insulin sensitivity and GLUT4 protein expression in SHRSP.  (+info)

(5/4435) Increased insulin sensitivity and obesity resistance in mice lacking the protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene.

Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) has been implicated in the negative regulation of insulin signaling. Disruption of the mouse homolog of the gene encoding PTP-1B yielded healthy mice that, in the fed state, had blood glucose concentrations that were slightly lower and concentrations of circulating insulin that were one-half those of their PTP-1B+/+ littermates. The enhanced insulin sensitivity of the PTP-1B-/- mice was also evident in glucose and insulin tolerance tests. The PTP-1B-/- mice showed increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in liver and muscle tissue after insulin injection in comparison to PTP-1B+/+ mice. On a high-fat diet, the PTP-1B-/- and PTP-1B+/- mice were resistant to weight gain and remained insulin sensitive, whereas the PTP-1B+/+ mice rapidly gained weight and became insulin resistant. These results demonstrate that PTP-1B has a major role in modulating both insulin sensitivity and fuel metabolism, thereby establishing it as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity.  (+info)

(6/4435) Resistance training affects GLUT-4 content in skeletal muscle of humans after 19 days of head-down bed rest.

This study assessed the effects of inactivity on GLUT-4 content of human skeletal muscle and evaluated resistance training as a countermeasure to inactivity-related changes in GLUT-4 content in skeletal muscle. Nine young men participated in the study. For 19 days, four control subjects remained in a -6 degrees head-down tilt at all times throughout bed rest, except for showering every other day. Five training group subjects also remained at bed rest, except during resistance training once in the morning. The resistance training consisted of 30 isometric maximal voluntary contractions for 3 s each; leg-press exercise was used to recruit the extensor muscles of the ankle, knee, and hip. Pauses (3 s) were allowed between bouts of maximal contraction. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the lateral aspect of vastus lateralis (VL) muscle before and after the bed rest. GLUT-4 content in VL muscle of the control group was significantly decreased after bed rest (473 +/- 48 vs. 398 +/- 66 counts. min-1. microgram membrane protein-1, before and after bed rest, respectively), whereas GLUT-4 significantly increased in the training group with bed rest (510 +/- 158 vs. 663 +/- 189 counts. min-1. microgram membrane protein-1, before and after bed rest, respectively). The present study demonstrated that GLUT-4 in VL muscle decreased by approximately 16% after 19 days of bed rest, and isometric resistance training during bed rest induced a 30% increase above the value of GLUT-4 before bed rest.  (+info)

(7/4435) Analysis of the relationship between fasting serum leptin levels and estimates of beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in a population sample of 380 healthy young Caucasians.

OBJECTIVE: Circulating leptin levels correlate positively with the degree of obesity and prolonged hyperinsulinaemia increases serum leptin levels. Moreover, insulin secreting beta-cells express functional leptin receptors indicating a functional relationship between leptin and insulin. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between fasting serum leptin levels and measures of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in a population-based sample of 380 young healthy Caucasians. DESIGN AND METHODS: Multiple regression analysis was employed to analyse the relationship between fasting serum leptin levels and levels of fasting serum insulin, insulin sensitivity index and acute insulin response (AIR) in a population-based study of 380 young healthy Caucasians who underwent a combined intravenous glucose and tolbutamide tolerance test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Serum leptin levels were positively correlated to measures of adiposity and were 3.2 times higher in women than in men (P<0.00001). In multiple regression analyses adjusting for age, percentage body fat, waist circumference and maximal aerobic capacity, a significant positive correlation was observed between the fasting serum leptin concentrations and both fasting serum insulin levels (P<0.0001) and AIR (P = 0.014) for women. No significant interrelation of these variables was found in men. However, for both genders a significant negative correlation was observed between fasting serum leptin levels and measures of insulin sensitivity index (P = 0.007).  (+info)

(8/4435) Relative contribution of insulin and its precursors to fibrinogen and PAI-1 in a large population with different states of glucose tolerance. The Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS).

Hyperinsulinemia is associated with the development of coronary heart disease. However, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Hypercoagulability and impaired fibrinolysis are possible candidates linking hyperinsulinism with atherosclerotic disease, and it has been suggested that proinsulin rather than insulin is the crucial pathophysiological agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of insulin and its precursors to markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis in a large triethnic population. A strong and independent relationship between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen and insulin and its precursors (proinsulin, 32-33 split proinsulin) was found consistently across varying states of glucose tolerance (PAI-1 versus fasting insulin [proinsulin], r=0.38 [r=0.34] in normal glucose tolerance; r=0.42 [r=0.43] in impaired glucose tolerance; and r=0.38 [r=0.26] in type 2 diabetes; all P<0.001). The relationship remained highly significant even after accounting for insulin sensitivity as measured by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. In a stepwise multiple regression model after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and clinic, both insulin and its precursors were significantly associated with PAI-1 levels. The relationship between fibrinogen and insulin and its precursors was significant in the overall population (r=0.20 for insulin and proinsulin; each P<0.001) but showed a more inconsistent pattern in subgroup analysis and after adjustments for demographic and metabolic variables. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that proinsulin (split products) but not fasting insulin significantly contributed to fibrinogen levels after adjustment for age, sex, clinic, and ethnicity. Decreased insulin sensitivity was independently associated with higher PAI-1 and fibrinogen levels. In summary, we were able to demonstrate an independent relationship of 2 crucial factors of hemostasis, fibrinogen and PAI-1, to insulin and its precursors. These findings may have important clinical implications in the risk assessment and prevention of macrovascular disease, not only in patients with overt diabetes but also in nondiabetic subjects who are hyperinsulinemic.  (+info)



insulin


  • The study seeks to use microdialysis and microperfusion techniques to assess the feasibility of combining insulin delivery and glucose sensing at a single subcutaneous tissue site. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Oral glucose tolerance test combined with subcutaneous insulin delivery and glucose sampling using a single microdialysis or microperfusion probe. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with simultaneous subcutaneous insulin delivery and glucose sampling using microdialysis and microperfusion probe. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Current treatment of in type 1 diabetes comprises the measurement of glucose in capillary blood obtained by fingersticking and administration of exogenous insulin in the form of a subcutaneous bolus injection or subcutaneous infusion. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This treatment could be simplified if there were a stable ratio between blood glucose concentration and tissue glucose level at the site of insulin delivery so that tissue glucose levels could be used to estimate blood glucose levels, thereby circumventing the need for fingerstick blood glucose monitoring. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The aim of this study is to ascertain whether a stable ratio between the blood glucose concentration and the glucose levels at the tissue site of insulin infusion exists when this tissue site is exposed to variable insulin infusion rates. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To achieve this, microdialysis and microperfusion probes are applied in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects to perform insulin delivery and glucose sampling at the same adipose tissue site during euglycemic clamps and oral glucose tolerance tests. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test, and endothelial function was assessed by evaluating changes in diameter of the brachial artery during reactive hyperemia as observed by ultrasonography. (ahajournals.org)
  • An incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), has been shown to lower plasma glucose via glucose-dependent insulin secretion and to reduce appetite. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In an oral glucose tolerance test on day 1, the coadministration caused a greater improvement of glucose tolerance and a prominent increase of plasma active GLP-1 without marked insulin secretion. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The 14-day combination treatment produced a potent reduction of fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels. (aspetjournals.org)
  • As the sensitivity towards insulin decreases, body produces excess insulin for better absorption of glucose. (medgadget.com)
  • Insulin resistance diagnosis is difficult and involves combination of tests. (medgadget.com)
  • Usually hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test is used to measures the amount of glucose which is necessary to compensate for increased insulin level without causing hypoglycemia. (medgadget.com)
  • Other tests include glucose tolerance test and fasting insulin level. (medgadget.com)

metabolism


  • She ordered that a specimen of the boy's liver be analyzed for possible enzyme deficiencies in the metabolism of glucose. (khanacademy.org)
  • Recent studies have addressed the impact of abnormal glucose metabolism at the acute phase in patients without known diabetes. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It has been found that abnormal glycemia regulation is more common than normal regulation in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, whatever the method used to evaluate blood glucose metabolism. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Abnormalities in fibrinolysis, endothelial function, and glucose and lipid metabolism have been reported in hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • This study was conducted to examine the interrelationships between fibrinolytic factors, glucose and lipid metabolism, and endothelial function in hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • These results indicate that abnormalities in fibrinolysis are associated with endothelial dysfunction as well as disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism in patients with borderline and mild hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • In hypertension, a close relationship has been demonstrated between disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism and disturbances of fibrinolysis. (ahajournals.org)
  • 4,7,8 ⇓ ⇓ Because hypertension and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism are accompanied by endothelial dysfunction, 9 the relationship between endothelial function and fibrinolytic balance needs to be examined in detail and more precisely. (ahajournals.org)
  • 10,11 ⇓ Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are reported to have such effects on fibrinolysis, 11 as well as on glucose metabolism 12,13 ⇓ and endothelial function. (ahajournals.org)
  • 14,15 ⇓ However, the interactions between the changes in fibrinolysis, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function following treatment with an ACE inhibitor have not been studied. (ahajournals.org)
  • 16,17 ⇓ The present study examined the interrelationships between endothelial function as determined by ultrasonography, fibrinolysis, and glucose and lipid metabolism in patients with borderline or mild hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • In reality, however, diabetes is a type of derangement of the glucose metabolism system that goes far beyond just the level of glucose in the blood or in the urine. (drlwilson.com)
  • Glucose is a sugar that plays a vital role in the metabolism of most living organisms. (britannica.com)

Intolerance


  • The purposes of this study are therefore to evaluate the increase of plasma active GLP-1 in response to the combined treatment with metformin and DPPIV inhibitor and to investigate the effect of subchronic coadministration on glycemic control, food intake, and body weight gain in obese Zucker fa/fa rats, which display abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes, including mild hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and impaired insulin secretion. (aspetjournals.org)
  • A number of metabolic abnormalities may contribute to adverse health outcomes in CKD, including glucose intolerance, altered immune cell function, and oxidative stress. (clinicaltrials.gov)

Hyperglycemia


  • Stress hyperglycemia may be a marker of extensive cardiac damage, reflecting a surge of stress hormones such as catecholamines and cortisol that participate to insulinresistance and affect fatty acid and glucose homeostasis. (biomedsearch.com)

glycogen


  • When your glucose levels are low, such as when you haven't eaten in a while, the liver breaks down stored glycogen into glucose to keep your glucose level within a normal range. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Also composed of glucose is glycogen , the reserve carbohydrate in most vertebrate and invertebrate animal cells, as well as those of numerous fungi and protozoans. (britannica.com)

Diabetes


  • AN ORAL MODIFICATION of the intravenous tolbutamide test originally devised by Unger and Madison 1 has been described by Boshell, 2 and tentative criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes established in presumed normal and known diabetic subjects. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose level is higher than the normal level, but not enough for proper diagnosis of diabetes. (medgadget.com)
  • Your doctor can perform tests to help determine if you have diabetes or pre-diabetes. (blackdoctor.org)
  • The fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test is the standard test for diabetes. (blackdoctor.org)
  • Some experts recommend it as a follow-up after FPG if the test results are normal but the patient has symptoms or risk factors of diabetes. (blackdoctor.org)
  • Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). (mayoclinic.org)
  • If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. (mayoclinic.org)
  • To understand diabetes, first you must understand how glucose is normally processed in the body. (mayoclinic.org)
  • When this happens, too little glucose gets into your cells and too much stays in your blood, resulting in gestational diabetes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • There are several different blood glucose tests, used to both diagnose diabetes as well as help individuals track and manage their blood sugars. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • It traditionally requires two fasting blood glucose tests before making a diagnosis of diabetes. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • If your results fall between 100 and 125 mg/dL, your doctor may diagnose you with pre-diabetes and send you for a hemoglobin A1c test to confirm a diagnosis. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • In general, a random blood glucose test result over 200 mg/dL may indicate diabetes. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • While this test formerly was used to diagnose diabetes in the general population, it's now used mainly to screen pregnant women for a condition called gestational diabetes. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • If you exhibit any symptoms of diabetes, such as excessive thirst or urination, or if you're in a high-risk category (obese, sedentary or of African-American, Hispanic/Latino or American Indian descent), you should ask your doctor about getting a glucose test at your annual physical. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • Brain diabetes - this is an inability of the brain to properly metabolize glucose. (drlwilson.com)
  • However, diabetes mellitus is defined by the medical profession as elevated sugar in the blood - usually a fasting blood glucose level above 126 mg/dl. (drlwilson.com)

oral


  • Individual agreement of this test with the oral glucose tolerance test was generally good regarding diagnostic classification, though with some conflicts. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test performed during the hospital stay discloses valuable diagnostic information and provide useful tools for secondary prevention. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This study will test whether oral paricalcitol, an active form of vitamin D, will improve glucose tolerance, immune cell function, and reduce oxidative stress in people with stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is more complex than the FPG. (blackdoctor.org)

Fasting


  • High blood glucose at admission, whether fasting or not, are associated with worse outcome after an acute coronary syndrome, ie. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It is a simple blood test taken after 8 hours of fasting. (blackdoctor.org)
  • Fasting Blood Glucose (formerly called 'Fasting Blood Sugar' or FBS). (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • This test is performed via blood draw at the lab when you're not fasting. (diabetesmonitor.com)

specimen


  • 2,3 The upper limit of normal for the 30-minute blood glucose specimen was found to be 78% of the pretest value. (jamanetwork.com)

Humans


  • Glucose is the main source of chemical energy for cell functions in organisms from bacteria and plants to humans. (britannica.com)

sugars


  • Glucose , also called dextrose , one of a group of carbohydrates known as simple sugars (monosaccharides). (britannica.com)

tissues


  • Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Glucose - a sugar - is a source of energy for the cells that make up muscles and other tissues. (mayoclinic.org)

Obesity


  • In this study, we assessed the effects of subchronic treatment with metformin and a DPPIV inhibitor, valine-pyrrolidide (val-pyr), on glycemic control, food intake, and weight gain using Zucker fa/fa rats, a model of obesity and impaired glucose tolerance. (aspetjournals.org)

islet


  • OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine whether tolerance to neonatal porcine islet (NPI) xenografts could be achieved by short-term administrations of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD154 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Our results show that short-term administrations of this combined mAbs resulted in a robust form of porcine islet xenograft tolerance mediated by T regulatory cells in B6 mice. (diabetesjournals.org)

meal


  • After taking a full history of the boy's past medical history and symptoms, Dr. Von recommended Mrs. Gierke have her son undergo a carefully monitored fast at the hospital to detect if blood glucose levels are dropping too much after a meal. (khanacademy.org)
  • After eating a meal, the boy's blood glucose levels were monitored for several hours after a meal. (khanacademy.org)
  • Upon seeing the results, Dr. Von suspected that the boy was suffering from a metabolic disorder that did not allow him to appropriately maintain blood glucose levels after a meal. (khanacademy.org)

plasma


  • We hypothesize that obese AA with DKA will prove particularly susceptible to b-cells dysfunction due to sustained elevations of plasma glucose (glucose toxicity) and/or free fatty acid levels (lipotoxicity). (clinicaltrials.gov)

levels


level


  • A blood glucose level less than 140 mg/dL two hours after drinking the liquid is considered normal. (blackdoctor.org)
  • This test provides an overview of your blood sugar (glucose) level over a three-month timespan. (diabetesmonitor.com)
  • If your A1c level is higher than 5.7, you can expect to have the test performed every three months. (diabetesmonitor.com)

diagnostic


  • Together, you can decide which of these diagnostic tests is right for you. (diabetesmonitor.com)

type


normal


  • The boy's test results are shown alongside a normal (expected) curve. (khanacademy.org)
  • The blood glucose can even be normal, in some cases. (drlwilson.com)

markers


  • A higher percentage of CD4 + T-cell population from these mice expressed regulatory markers, suggesting that tolerance to NPI xenografts may be mediated by T regulatory cells. (diabetesjournals.org)

Chemical


  • chemical process by which molecules such as glucose are broken down anaerobically. (britannica.com)

cells


  • This occurs because the cells are not receiving enough glucose, so one begins to crave it. (drlwilson.com)
  • formation in living cells of glucose and other carbohydrates from other classes of compounds. (britannica.com)

body


  • Determine if hormones, responses to behavioral testing, adipocyte size, body composition, core temperature, spontaneous activity, and food absorption/excretion are related to changes in EE with over/under-feeding and variation in weight change. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Many diabetics are tired because their bodies cannot utilize glucose properly for fueling the body. (drlwilson.com)

health


  • Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. (mayoclinic.org)

include


  • Alternate names for glucose include grape sugar, corn sugar, and dextrose. (britannica.com)

comes


  • Glucose comes from two major sources: food and your liver. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The word glucose comes from the Greek word glykys, meaning "sweet. (britannica.com)

results


  • CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that tolerance to NPI xenografts can be achieved by transient administrations of combined anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD154 mAb therapy. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This test, in which 2.0 gm of sodium tolbutamide are administered orally in rapidly dissolving tablets along with sodium bicarbonate, gave results comparable to the intravenous test with a lag of about ten minutes. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Unfortunately, when the lab results came back, Dr. Von's computer tablet suddenly froze and only a portion of the test results were visible, shown in Figure 2. (khanacademy.org)

study


  • The aim of this study was to determine whether interference with adhesion and co-stimulatory pathways by transient administrations of a combination of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD154 mAbs could induce tolerance to phylogenetically disparate NPI xenografts in mice. (diabetesjournals.org)

doctor


  • The test tells your doctor how quickly glucose is metabolized from the bloodstream. (blackdoctor.org)
  • Be sure to discuss the possibility of a false positive result with your doctor if you're of African, Mediterranean or Southeast Asian descent because you could have a hemoglobin variant that interferes with the accuracy of the A1c test . (diabetesmonitor.com)

sweet


  • For the OGTT, your blood will be drawn then you will be asked to drink a sweet liquid containing glucose. (blackdoctor.org)

makes


Years


  • or waiting until age 60 and repeating the test every three years. (blackdoctor.org)

increase


  • It is recommended to take the FPG test more than once to increase reliability. (blackdoctor.org)