Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.DenmarkDisease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.FinlandRisk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Lost to Follow-Up: Study subjects in COHORT STUDIES whose outcomes are unknown e.g., because they could not or did not wish to attend follow-up visits.(from Dictionary of Epidemiology, 5th ed.)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.United StatesJapanProsthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.SwedenNetherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Time: The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)NorwayComorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.TaiwanNeoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.ItalyDepression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Psychosurgery: Treatment of chronic, severe and intractable psychiatric disorders by surgical removal or interruption of certain areas or pathways in the brain, especially in the prefrontal lobes.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Patient Dropouts: Discontinuance of care received by patient(s) due to reasons other than full recovery from the disease.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Pensions: Fixed sums paid regularly to individuals.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.GermanyNutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Joint DiseasesFemur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Yugoslavia: Created as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes in 1918. Yugoslavia became the official name in 1929. BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA; CROATIA; and SLOVENIA formed independent countries 7 April 1992. Macedonia became independent 8 February 1994 as the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MACEDONIA REPUBLIC).Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Actuarial Analysis: The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Diskectomy: Excision, in part or whole, of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC. The most common indication is disk displacement or herniation. In addition to standard surgical removal, it can be performed by percutaneous diskectomy (DISKECTOMY, PERCUTANEOUS) or by laparoscopic diskectomy, the former being the more common.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Confounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.

*  ClicheStorm 2 (PG-13)
She came in, followed by her new friend. This is Nate; did you hear about him? He got into an accidental teleport and ended up ... I've still got to do some research and preparation, so this winter's devoted to study. For once, Violet said.. Ah come on, my ... I'm supposed to help her, and I was given some strange clues to follow in places to find. And this is one of them. Was Hilda ... Taking a deep breath and trying not to look giddy, Rosa went to the door of the study room. It was just him and a Liepard, so ...
*  Investigation of V520 in an HIV Vaccine Proof-of-Concept Study (V520-023) - Study Results -
Subjects not completing entire study were eligible for observational long term follow up in V520-030. ... The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study ... Study Type: Interventional. Study Design: Allocation: Randomized; Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment; Masking: Double ( ... Investigation of V520 in an HIV Vaccine Proof-of-Concept Study (V520-023). This study has been terminated. ...
*  Enzymatic lipid oxidation by eosinophils propagates coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombotic disease | JEM
... in the Bruneck Study (follow-up 2000 to 2010). All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and prior CVD. Analyses focusing on ... Follow-up for clinical endpoints was 100% complete (n = 682, mean and median follow up time 8.6 and 10 yr), whereas follow up ... J.J. Lee and V.B. O'Donnell helped to design the study and wrote the manuscript. G. Krönke designed the study and wrote the ... Bruneck Study population. The Bruneck Study is a prospective population-based survey on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ...
*  Follow-up on the HIGH: Low Study - the Longterm Effects of Growth Hormone - Full Text View -
Follow-up on the HIGH: Low Study - the Longterm Effects of Growth Hormone. The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The ... A follow-up study on the randomized, controlled, double-blind HIGH: low study. We will examine the participants from the HIGH: ... The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study ... Follow-up on the HIGH: Low Study - the Longterm Effect of Growth Hormone. ...
*  Slow-growing melanoma: a dermoscopy follow-up study. - PubMed - NCBI
Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ... Slow-growing melanoma: a dermoscopy follow-up study.. ... In a multicentre, retrospective study of histopathologically confirmed melanomas excised after follow-up, we analysed ... After a median follow-up of 20 months, most lesions were still in situ or early invasive (median Breslow thickness of 0.48 mm ... This study provides evidence for the existence of a subgroup of slow-growing melanomas, which may explain the increase in the ...
*  A Follow-up Study of 238 Leucotomized Patients | The BMJ
A Follow-up Study of 238 Leucotomized Patients Br Med J 1952; 1 :527 ... A Follow-up Study of 238 Leucotomized Patients. Br Med J 1952; 1 doi: (Published 08 ... A Follow-up Study of.... *A Follow-up Study of 238 Leucotomized Patients ...
*  American Citizen Participation Study Follow-Up: Singles and Couples Data, Fall 1993-Winter 1994
Study Description. Citation Burns, Nancy , Kay Lehman Schlozman , and Sidney Verba. American Citizen Participation Study Follow ... American Citizen Participation Study Follow-Up: Singles and Couples Data, Fall 1993-Winter 1994 (ICPSR 23561) Principal ... This study is the third wave of the American Citizen Participation Study and was designed to examine gender differences in ... This study is the third wave of the American Citizen Participation Study and was designed to examine gender differences in ...
*  American Citizen Participation Study Follow-Up: Singles and Couples Data, Fall 1993-Winter 1994
Study Description. Citation Burns, Nancy, Kay Lehman Schlozman, and Sidney Verba. American Citizen Participation Study Follow- ... Try the beta version of our new study homepage!. American Citizen Participation Study Follow-Up: Singles and Couples Data, Fall ... This study is the third wave of the American Citizen Participation Study and was designed to examine gender differences in ... This study is the third wave of the American Citizen Participation Study and was designed to examine gender differences in ...
*  Follow on Study From RE-ALIGN - Study Results -
Follow on Study From RE-ALIGN. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and ... Study Type: Interventional. Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized; Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment; Masking: None ( ... Percentage of Patients With Serious AEs [ Time Frame: From first intake of study drug until last intake of study drug plus 6 ... Percentage of Patients With Any Adverse Event (AE) [ Time Frame: From first intake of study drug until last intake of study ...
*  Cat-PAD Follow on Study - Full Text View -
Study Design:. Observational Model: Cohort. Time Perspective: Prospective. Official Title:. An Optional 1 Year Follow up Study ... The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study ... The purpose of this optional observational follow-on study is to further evaluate rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms on exposure to ... Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your ...
*  Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus: A Follow-up Study | Diabetes Care
Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus: A Follow-up Study Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ... in group A had an abnormal acceleration index in the follow-up study. We conclude that in both groups SAN developed rapidly and ... who showed a low mean E/I ratio and brake index in both studies. In group A, but not in group B, patients with SAN showed a ... duration of diabetes and without symptoms of autonomic neuropathy were re-investigated 6 yr after the initial studies. ...
*  Follow-up studies in a case of unusual congenital myopathy, suggestive of nemaline type | SpringerLink
Wallgren-Pettersson C (1989) Congenital nemaline myopathy: a clinical follow-up study of twelve patients. J Neurol Sci 89:1-14 ... A follow-up study. J Neurol Sci 83:243-257Google Scholar ... Follow-up studies in a case of unusual congenital myopathy, ... In: Kakulas BA (ed) Clinical studies of myology, part 2; Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on Muscle Diseases. ... A histopathologic and histochemical study. Am J Clin Pathol 48:1-13Google Scholar ...
*  Study Faults Follow-Up for Cancer Patients - The New York Times
Study Faults Follow-Up for Cancer Patients. By ROBERT PEAR. NOV. 8, 2005. ... One reason for the lack of appropriate follow-up care, it said, is that in many cases, insurance companies and health plans do ... "Millions of patients are living with cancer as a chronic condition and need good long-term follow-up care," said Dr. Ganz, a ... Sheldon Greenfield, chairman of a panel of 17 experts who conducted the study, said: "There are now 10 million Americans who ...
*  Dysport® Adult Lower Limb Spasticity Follow-on Study - Full Text View -
Dysport® Adult Lower Limb Spasticity Follow-on Study. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of ... or if it was present prior to study treatment in Study 140 but the intensity increased during the treatment phase of this study ... Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More ... Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More ...
*  British Library EThOS: Psychophysiology of fearful temperament : a follow up study
Skin conductance responses (SCRs) during an Orienting Habituation Paradigm (OHP) were also studied. We successfully induced ...
*  Link between migraines and reduced breast cancer risk confirmed in follow-up study | WebWire
... between migraine headaches in women and a significant reduction in breast cancer risk has been confirmed in a follow-on study ... Li and his colleagues are conducting a follow-up investigation among the women in the first study to determine the types, ... Link between migraines and reduced breast cancer risk confirmed in follow-up study. ... But in this study we looked at women who never drank, never smoked and who also didn t use hormones and found the same ...
This post-DPP follow-up study is intended to enable DPP investigators to continue a long-term follow-up of the DPP cohort. The ... NOTICE OF LIMITED COMPETITION - POST-DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM (DPP) FOLLOW-UP STUDIES Release Date: April 23, 2001 NOTICE: ... remain following study end. NIDDK staff will contact the current grantees directly regarding application procedures and format ... studied. The DPP Clinical Centers and the DPP Coordinating Center possess the infrastructure, organization, leadership, ...
*  Loss of tolerance and overdose mortality after inpatient opiate detoxification: follow up study | The BMJ
Death and survival in a cohort of heroin addicts from London clinics: a 22-year follow-up study. Addiction 1994; 89: 1299-1308 ... Contributors: JS conceived the analysis of data from the follow up study designed by DB, JB, MG, and JS. TB and SR collected ... Loss of tolerance and overdose mortality after inpatient opiate detoxification: follow up study BMJ 2003; 326 :959 ... Loss of tolerance and overdose mortality after inpatient opiate detoxification: follow up study ...
*  Grading Carotid Intrastent Restenosis. A 6-Year Follow-Up Study | Stroke
A 6-Year Follow-Up Study. Carlo Setacci, Emiliano Chisci, Francesco Setacci, Francesca Iacoponi, Gianmarco de Donato ...
*  ERIC - Ancillary Findings of a Follow-Up Study., 1984-Apr-25
A followup study of recent graduates from the undergraduate teacher education program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) ... derived from the approximately 400 practicing teachers and their principals who were initially involved in the study. Scores ... A followup study of recent graduates from the undergraduate teacher education program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) ... derived from the approximately 400 practicing teachers and their principals who were initially involved in the study. Scores ...
*  Link between migraines and reduced breast cancer risk confirmed in follow-up study | EurekAlert! Science News
The new study found a 26 percent reduced risk of breast cancer among both premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a ... between migraine headaches in women and a significant reduction in breast cancer risk has been confirmed in a follow-on study ... Li and his colleagues are conducting a follow-up investigation among the women in the first study to determine the types, ... Link between migraines and reduced breast cancer risk confirmed in follow-up study. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ...
*  Does moderate alcohol consumption affect fertility? Follow up study among couples planning first pregnancy | The BMJ
... was slightly lower in this study than in some of the previously published follow up studies.1426 Study designs and methods ... Enrolment and follow up. The couples were enrolled into the study when they discontinued birth control and were followed for ... We conducted a follow up study among couples who were trying to conceive for the first time, with repeated measurementsof ... Design : A follow up study over six menstrual cycles or until a clinically recognised pregnancy occurred after discontinuation ...
*  The VA Diabetes Trial Follow-up Study (VADT-FS) - No Study Results Posted -
The VA Diabetes Trial Follow-up Study (VADT-FS) (VADT-F). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... and the Extent of Atherosclerosis During the VA Diabetes Trial and Follow-up Study. Diabetes Care. 2017 Apr;40(4):591-598. doi ... Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ... Follow-up of glycemic control and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med. 2015 Jun 4;372(23):2197-206. doi: ...
*  Results and Implications of the INCAP follow-up study( , )
14, number 3, 1992) concentrated on the study which preceded the follow-up, namely the INCAP longitudinal study (1969-77). ... The follow-up study was conducted when the subjects were 11-27 y old. Among the long term effects found were greater stature ... The INCAP Longitudinal Study (1969-77). The villages. The studies took place in four small villages of eastern Guatemala. When ... To provide readers with the context necessary to interpret the findings of the follow-up study, the first three papers of this ...
*  A follow-up study of very low-birthweight infants receiving ventilatory support by face mask.
Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Infant Mortality. Infant, Low Birth Weight*. Infant, Newborn. Intermittent Positive-Pressure ...

Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingQRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences (Aarhus University): The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences is a faculty of Aarhus University. The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences became a reality after Aarhus University was divided into four new main academic areas which came into effect on 1 January 2011.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.Australia–Finland relations: Australia–Finland relations are foreign relations between the Australia and Finland. Diplomatic relations were established on 31 May 1949.Cancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Niigata UniversityMetallosis: Metallosis is the putative medical condition involving deposition and build-up of metal debris in the soft tissues of the body.Climate change in Sweden: The issue of climate change has received significant public and political attention in Sweden and the mitigation of its effects has been high on the agenda of the two latest Governments of Sweden, the previous Cabinet of Göran Persson (-2006) and the current Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt (2006-). Sweden aims for an energy supply system with zero net atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.Netherlands national rollball team: Vishwaraj JadejaDense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Hospital of Southern Norway: [[Sørlandet Hospital Arendal, seen from the north.|thumb|200px]]Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.HyperintensityHeartScore: HeartScore is a cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management tool developed by the European Society of Cardiology, aimed at supporting clinicians in optimising individual cardiovascular risk reduction.Abscopal effect: The abscopal effect is a phenomenon in the treatment of metastatic cancer where localized treatment of a tumor causes not only a shrinking of the treated tumor but also a shrinking of tumors in different compartments from the treated tumor. Initially associated with single-tumor, localized radiation therapy, the term has also come to encompass other types of localized treatments such as electroporation and intra-tumoral injection of therapeutics.List of kanji by stroke count: This Kanji index method groups together the kanji that are written with the same number of strokes. Currently, there are 2,186 individual kanji listed.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.National Taiwan University Hospital: The National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH; ) started operations under Japanese rule in Daitōtei (today's Dadaocheng) on June 18, 1895, and moved to its present location in 1898. The Hospital was later annexed to the Medical School of Taihoku Imperial University and renamed Taihoku Imperial University Medical School Affiliated Hospital in 1937.David Rees Griffiths: David Rees Griffiths (November 6, 1882 – December 17, 1953), also known by his bardic name of Amanwy, was a Welsh poet, and an older brother of politician Jim Griffiths.Multi-link suspension: __NOTOC__Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.Clinical endpoint: In a clinical research trial, a clinical endpoint generally refers to occurrence of a disease, symptom, sign or laboratory abnormality that constitutes one of the target outcomes of the trial, but may also refer to any such disease or sign that strongly motivates the withdrawal of that individual or entity from the trial, then often termed humane (clinical) endpoint.Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Hip resurfacing: 155px|right|thumb|The BHRElectrocardiography in myocardial infarctionBreast cancer classification: Breast cancer classification divides breast cancer into categories according to different schemes, each based on different criteria and serving a different purpose. The major categories are the histopathological type, the grade of the tumor, the stage of the tumor, and the expression of proteins and genes.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.Spontaneous remission: Spontaneous remission, also called spontaneous healing or spontaneous regression, is an unexpected improvement or cure from a disease that appears to be progressing in its severity. These terms are commonly used for unexpected transient or final improvements in cancer.Minimally invasive hip resurfacing: Minimally invasive hip resurfacing (MIS) is "total or partial hip surgery that can be carried out through an incision of less than 10 cm (3.94 inches) without imparting great forces on the anatomy or compromising component positioning"Comis Orthopaedics websiteGeneralizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.International Disability and Development Consortium: The International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) is a global consortium of disability and development related organisations. The aim of IDDC is to promote inclusive development internationally, with a special focus on promoting human rights for all disabled people living in economically poor communities in lower and middle-income countries.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Outline of diabetes: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to diabetes:Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.ABCD rating: ABCD rating, also called the Jewett staging system or the Whitmore-Jewett staging system, is a staging system for prostate cancer that uses the letters A, B, C, and D.HypertensionPain scale: A pain scale measures a patient's pain intensity or other features. Pain scales are based on self-report, observational (behavioral), or physiological data.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Negative probability: The probability of the outcome of an experiment is never negative, but quasiprobability distributions can be defined that allow a negative probability for some events. These distributions may apply to unobservable events or conditional probabilities.Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.OsteotomyAutomated ECG interpretation: Automated ECG interpretation is the use of artificial intelligence and pattern recognition software and knowledge bases to carry out automatically the interpretation, test reporting, and computer-aided diagnosis of electrocardiogram tracings obtained usually from a patient.Triangle of death (Italy): The triangle of death (Italian: Triangolo della morte) is an area in the Italian province of Campania comprising the municipalities of Acerra, Nola and Marigliano. The region has recently experienced increasing deaths caused by cancer and other diseases that exceeds the Italian national average.Rating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.

(1/63688) Follow-up of American Cancer Society Special Postdoctoral Research Fellowship recipients.

A follow-up study of the 44 recipients of American Cancer Society, Inc., Special Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from 1962 to 1973 revealed that 11 of 21 M.D. candidates obtained their second (Ph.D.) degree at the end of training. By contrast, all but one among the 23 Ph.D. candidates were awarded the second (M.D.) degree. A great majority of either group remain in active research, regardless of whether or not they obtained the second degree. A very high percentage of their research is cancer related.  (+info)

(2/63688) Superimposed histologic and genetic mapping of chromosome 9 in progression of human urinary bladder neoplasia: implications for a genetic model of multistep urothelial carcinogenesis and early detection of urinary bladder cancer.

The evolution of alterations on chromosome 9, including the putative tumor suppressor genes mapped to the 9p21-22 region (the MTS genes), was studied in relation to the progression of human urinary bladder neoplasia by using whole organ superimposed histologic and genetic mapping in cystectomy specimens and was verified in urinary bladder tumors of various pathogenetic subsets with longterm follow-up. The applicability of chromosome 9 allelic losses as non-invasive markers of urothelial neoplasia was tested on voided urine and/or bladder washings of patients with urinary bladder cancer. Although sequential multiple hits in the MTS locus were documented in the development of intraurothelial precursor lesions, the MTS genes do not seem to represent a major target for p21-23 deletions in bladder cancer. Two additional tumor suppressor genes involved in bladder neoplasia located distally and proximally to the MTS locus within p22-23 and p11-13 regions respectively were identified. Several distinct putative tumor suppressor gene loci within the q12-13, q21-22, and q34 regions were identified on the q arm. In particular, the pericentromeric q12-13 area may contain the critical tumor suppressor gene or genes for the development of early urothelial neoplasia. Allelic losses of chromosome 9 were associated with expansion of the abnormal urothelial clone which frequently involved large areas of urinary bladder mucosa. These losses could be found in a high proportion of urothelial tumors and in voided urine or bladder washing samples of nearly all patients with urinary bladder carcinoma.  (+info)

(3/63688) Persistent damage to Enterocytozoon bieneusi, with persistent symptomatic relief, after combined furazolidone and albendazole in AIDS patients.

AIM: To investigate morphological changes in Enterocytozoon bieneusi and the duration of symptomatic relief after combination treatment with furazolidone and albendazole in AIDS patients. METHODS: Four severely immunocompromised AIDS patients with symptomatic E bieneusi infection of the gut received an 18 day course of combined furazolidone and albendazole (500 + 800 mg daily). All patients were monitored for parasite shedding in stool by light microscopy at the end of treatment and monthly during follow up. At the end of treatment, duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from three patients were studied by transmission electron microscopy by two pathologists blind to the patients' treatment or clinical outcome. Duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from one of the patients two months after completion of treatment were also studied electronmicroscopically. RESULTS: All patients had long lasting symptomatic relief, with a major decrease--or transient absence--of spore shedding in stools from completion of treatment. After treatment, changes in faecal spores were persistently found by light microscopy in all cases, and there was evidence of both a substantial decrease in the parasite load and ultrastructural damage in the parasite in all biopsy specimens. The treatment was well tolerated, and no patient had clinical or parasitological relapse during follow up (up to 15 months). CONCLUSIONS: The long lasting symptomatic relief observed in all four treated patients correlated with the persistent decrease in parasite load both in tissue and in stool, and with the morphological changes observed in the life cycle of the protozoan. These data suggest that combined treatment with furazolidone and albendazole is active against E bieneusi and may result in lasting remission even in severely immunocompromised patients.  (+info)

(4/63688) Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in cervical squamous cell carcinoma--a clinicopathological study.

AIM: To evaluate the intracellular and peritumoral expression of matrix proteins in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix using immunohistochemistry. METHODS: 71 squamous cell carcinomas and 10 controls were stained for laminin, fibronectin, and collagen IV. Cytoplasmic staining in tumour cells and peritumoral deposition of matrix proteins were evaluated. The association between staining results and patient age, tumour stage, histological grade, and survival was studied. RESULTS: Positive cytoplasmic staining for laminin, fibronectin, and collagen IV was observed in 17 (23.9%), 27 (38%), and 10 (14.1%) cases, respectively. Staining for laminin was most pronounced in the invasive front of tumour islands, while for fibronectin and collagen IV it appeared to be diffuse. Peritumoral staining for laminin and collagen IV was detected in 12 cases (16.9%). Early stage (Ia1-Ia2) tumours were uniformly negative for all three proteins. Cytoplasmic staining for laminin correlated with positive staining for fibronectin and collagen IV, and with the presence of a peritumoral deposition of collagen IV and laminin. There was no correlation with any of the three markers between staining results and patient age, stage, grade, or survival. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in some cervical squamous cell carcinomas might reflect the enhanced ability of these tumours to modify the peritumoral stroma. This ability seems to be absent in early stage tumours. The correlation between intracytoplasmic and peritumoral expression of matrix proteins supports the evidence of their synthesis by tumour cells. However, this property did not correlate with disease outcome in this study.  (+info)

(5/63688) Reproductive factors and fatal hip fractures. A Norwegian prospective study of 63,000 women.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of reproductive variables (age at menarche, menopause, first and last birth as well as parity, lactation, and abortions) on hip fracture mortality. DESIGN AND SETTING: A prospective study in Norway with more than 60,000 women followed up for 29 years. A total of 465 deaths as a result of hip fracture were recorded. MAIN RESULTS: Statistically significant linear relations (p < or = 0.02) were found between both age at menarche and length of reproductive period (defined as age at menopause to age at menarche) and the mortality of hip fractures in women aged less than 80. The death rate for women with a late menarche (> or = 17 years) was twice that of the women with relatively early menarche (< or = 13 years). Compared with women with less than 30 years between menopause and menarche, the mortality rate ratio in women with more than 38 reproductive years was 0.5. We also found an inverse relation with age at first birth. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports by hypothesis that an early menarche and a long reproductive period protect against hip fracture mortality. High age at first birth may also be protective.  (+info)

(6/63688) Reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileoanal pouches.

OBJECTIVE: A retrospective review was performed to determine the results after surgical reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileal pouch-anal procedures for ulcerative colitis and familial colonic polyposis at a university medical center. METHODS: During the 20-year period from 1978 to 1998, 601 patients underwent colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis, familial colonic polyposis, or Hirschsprung's disease. A J pouch was used for 351 patients, a lateral pouch for 221, an S pouch for 6, and a straight pull-through for 23. Acute complications after pouch construction have been detailed in previous publications and are not included in this study. Chronic pouch stasis with diarrhea, frequency, urgency, and soiling gradually became more severe in 164 patients (27.3%), associated with pouch enlargement, an elongated efferent limb, and obstruction to pouch outflow, largely related to the pouch configuration used during the authors' early clinical experience. These patients were sufficiently symptomatic to be considered for reconstruction (mean 68 months after IPAA). Transanal resection of an elongated IPAA spout was performed on 58 patients; abdominoperineal mobilization of the pouch with resection and tapering of the lower end (AP reconstruction) and ileoanal anastomosis on 83; pouch removal and new pouch construction on 7; and conversion of a straight pull-through to a pouch on 16. RESULTS: Good long-term results (mean 7.7 years) with improvement in symptoms occurred in 98% of transanal resections, 91.5% of AP reconstructions, 86% of new pouch constructions, and 100% of conversions of a straight pull-through to a pouch. The average number of bowel movements per 24 hours at 6 months was 4.8. Complications occurred in 11.6% of reconstructed patients. Five of the 164 patients (3.1%) required eventual pouch removal and permanent ileostomy. The high rate of pouch revision in this series of patients undergoing IPAA is due to a policy of aggressive correction when patients do not experience an optimal functional result, or have a progressive worsening of their status. CONCLUSIONS: Although occasionally a major undertaking, reconstruction of ileoanal pouches with progressive dysfunction due to large size or a long efferent limb has resulted in marked improvement in intestinal function in >93% of patients and has reduced the need for late pouch removal.  (+info)

(7/63688) Intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma: long-term results of treatment and prognostic factors.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the long-term results of treatment and prognostic factors in patients with intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of re-resection, transarterial oily chemoembolization (TOCE), or percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) in selected patients with intrahepatic recurrent HCC. The overall results of a treatment strategy combining these modalities have not been fully evaluated, and the prognostic factors determining survival in these patients remain to be clarified. METHODS: Two hundred and forty-four patients who underwent curative resection for HCC were followed for intrahepatic recurrence, which was treated aggressively with a strategy including different modalities. Survival results after recurrence and from initial hepatectomy were analyzed, and prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using 27 clinicopathologic variables. RESULTS: One hundred and five patients (43%) with intrahepatic recurrence were treated with re-resection (11), TOCE (71), PEIT (6), systemic chemotherapy (8) or conservatively (9). The overall 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates from the time of recurrence were 65.5%, 34.9%, and 19.7%, respectively, and from the time of initial hepatectomy were 78.4%, 47.2%, and 30.9%, respectively. The re-resection group had the best survival, followed by the TOCE group. Multivariate analysis revealed Child's B or C grading, serum albumin < or = 40 g/l, multiple recurrent tumors, recurrence < or = 1 year after hepatectomy, and concurrent extrahepatic recurrence to be independent adverse prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: Aggressive treatment with a multimodality strategy could result in prolonged survival in patients with intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection for HCC. Prognosis was determined by the liver function status, interval to recurrence, number of recurrent tumors, any concurrent extrahepatic recurrence, and type of treatment.  (+info)

(8/63688) Serum triglyceride: a possible risk factor for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the relationship between ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and serum concentrations of lipids and apolipoproteins. METHODS: A cohort of 21 520 men, aged 35-64 years, was recruited from men attending the British United Provident Association (BUPA) clinic in London for a routine medical examination in 1975-1982. Smoking habits, weight, height and blood pressure were recorded at entry. Lipids and apolipoproteins were measured in stored serum samples from the 30 men who subsequently died of ruptured AAA and 150 matched controls. RESULTS: Triglyceride was strongly related to risk of ruptured AAA. In univariate analyses the risk in men on the 90th centile of the distribution relative to the risk in men on the 10th (RO10-90) was 12 (95% confidence interval [CI] : 3.8-37) for triglyceride, 5.5 (95% CI: 1.8-17) for apolipoprotein B (apoB) (the protein component of low density lipoprotein [LDL]), 0.15 (95% CI : 0.04-0.56) for apo A1 (the protein component of high density lipoprotein [HDL]), 3.7 (95% CI: 1.4-9.4) for body mass index and 3.0 (95% CI: 1.1-8.5) for systolic blood pressure. Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) was not a significant risk factor (RO10-90 = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.6-3.0). In multivariate analysis triglyceride retained its strong association. CONCLUSION: Triglyceride appears to be a strong risk factor for ruptured AAA, although further studies are required to clarify this. If this and other associations are cause and effect, then changing the distribution of risk factors in the population (by many people stopping smoking and adopting a lower saturated fat diet and by lowering blood pressure) could achieve an important reduction in mortality from ruptured AAA.  (+info)

  • Findings
  • Ancillary Findings of a Follow-Up Study. (
  • A followup study of recent graduates from the undergraduate teacher education program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) resulted in findings on their perceived needs, proficiencies, and what produced the indicated proficiencies. (
  • This article is an overview of papers included in this volume, with emphasis on the main findings and policy implications of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) follow-up study (1988-89). (
  • This effort is an attempt to provide a critical summary of the findings and is guided by the following questions: What has been learned from the INCAP studies that is important? (
  • The first section is a discussion of the original INCAP longitudinal study and its results and is followed by sections dealing with design and analytic issues and with the key findings of the follow-up study. (
  • 1980
  • Although all villages had schools when the study began, it was not until around 1980 that instruction up to 6 y of elementary schooling was offered. (
  • research
  • To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. (
  • The purpose of this research study is to assess the long term safety of Dysport® in hemiparetic subjects with lower limb spasticity due to stroke or traumatic brain injury over repeated treatment cycles. (
  • SEATTLE - The relationship between migraine headaches in women and a significant reduction in breast cancer risk has been confirmed in a follow-on study to landmark research published last year and conducted by scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. (
  • The study appears in the July 2009 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (
  • And, the research group has submitted a third study for publication that found that the association between migraine and reduced breast cancer risk holds up independent of whether women with migraine took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen. (
  • The study is based on extensive research, inputs from experts within the conflict region and collaboration with policy experts. (
  • Waseda University School of International Liberal Studies (SILS, 国際教養学部) is the 10th department established in 2004 under the Faculty of International Research and Education. (
  • followup
  • The data reviewed come from two studies carried out over two decades: the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) longitudinal study (1966 - 1977) and its followup (1988-1989). (
  • Clinical
  • The new study found a 26 percent reduced risk of breast cancer among both premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a clinical diagnosis of migraines. (
  • NOTICE OF LIMITED COMPETITION - POST-DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM (DPP) FOLLOW-UP STUDIES Release Date: April 23, 2001 NOTICE: NOT-DK-01-013 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases ( ) The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is announcing a limited competition for competing applications from NIDDK- designated Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Clinical Centers and the DPP Coordinating Center. (
  • differences
  • This study is the third wave of the American Citizen Participation Study and was designed to examine gender differences in political and nonpolitical civic participation in the United States, in particular to examine differences between husbands and wives. (
  • alcohol consumption
  • Researchers were able to ascertain whether women in the study had lifestyle behaviors that are known migraine triggers alcohol consumption, smoking and taking hormone replacement therapy. (
  • important
  • Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. (
  • While engaging in such a study it is also important to identify what is meant by 'costs', and to differentiate between measurable costs that have a bearing on resources, and costs that have a bearing on living conditions. (
  • As in the case of the collection by Cranna and a report on the Middle East by Strategic Foresight Group, these studies began with workshops involving organizations, governments and intellectuals which proved important in setting the priorities and direction of the studies. (
  • treatment
  • The purpose of this optional observational follow-on study is to further evaluate rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms on exposure to cat dander in the EEC among subjects who completed all dosing visits in study CP005 approximately one year after the start of treatment. (
  • Subjects who completed all dosing visits and the post treatment challenge (PTC) in study CP005 will be invited to attend the Screening Visit for CP005A. (
  • Previously randomised in study CP005, completed all treatment visits and the Post Treatment Challenge (PTC). (
  • Over 20 months we recruited 137 consecutive opiate addicts who were receiving opiate detoxification as part of a 28 day inpatient treatment programme and who consented to be followed up. (
  • At present data relate only to full term infants, and all human studies of hypothermia treatment have so far been restricted to infants >36 weeks out of an expected 40 weeks gestation. (
  • Cancer
  • Dr. Sheldon Greenfield, chairman of a panel of 17 experts who conducted the study, said: "There are now 10 million Americans who have had cancer. (
  • It said government programs like Medicare, as well as insurance companies, should pay cancer specialists to prepare a comprehensive plan describing the follow-up care that ought to be provided to each person treated for cancer. (
  • In this study we saw the same reduction in breast cancer risk associated with a migraine history regardless of age. (
  • But in this study we looked at women who never drank, never smoked and who also didn t use hormones and found the same association within each of those groups, suggesting that the association between migraine and reduced breast cancer risk may be independent of those other factors and may stand alone as a protective factor, he said. (
  • Neuroscientists primarily use the term NAALADase in their studies, while those studying folate metabolism use folate hydrolase, and those studying prostate cancer or oncology, PSMA. (
  • In vitro studies using prostate and breast cancer cell lines with decreased PSMA levels showed a significant decrease in the proliferation, migration, invasion, adhesion and survival of the cells. (
  • months
  • After a median follow-up of 20 months, most lesions were still in situ or early invasive (median Breslow thickness of 0.48 mm), with only three lesions showing tumour thickness of 1 mm or more. (
  • Care
  • One reason for the lack of appropriate follow-up care, it said, is that in many cases, insurance companies and health plans do not cover the necessary tests and examinations. (
  • cases
  • The sample size was more than four times larger this time more than 4,500 cases and controls versus about 1,000 each in the first study and was more diverse geographically, drawing women from five metropolitan areas instead of only one. (
  • In most cases there is little attempt by these studies to analyze the causes of these conflicts as they would have been previously documented, and do not serve the purpose of the tool of measuring the cost of conflict. (
  • Genetic studies have proved that the overwhelming majority of cases of Tourette's are inherited, although the exact mode of inheritance is not yet known, and no gene has been identified. (
  • Genetic studies, including twin studies, have proven that the overwhelming majority of cases of Tourette syndrome are inherited, although the exact mode of inheritance is not yet known. (
  • plan
  • The students who speak Japanese follow Study Plan 1 (SP1) and those who speak other languages other than Japanese follow Study Plan 2 (SP2). (
  • The students from foreign institutes as exchange students follow Study Plan 3 (SP3). (
  • Once back in Italy in 1726, he continued to encourage scientific studies at university level and with the support of Celia Grillo Borromeo drew up a plan for an Italian scientific academy. (
  • case
  • Some studies are measured on a thematic basis, a recent example of which is the war on terror - though in this case most of the studies are done by the United States and examines the costs borne specifically by them. (
  • University
  • The School of International Liberal Studies is one of the Global Five which includes International Christian University, Akita International University, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University and Sophia University's Faculty of Liberal Arts. (
  • At this time, his family moved to the town of Cataño and he started studies in the University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras. (
  • women
  • In the six cycles of follow up 64% (179) of women with a weekly alcohol intake of less than five drinks and 55% (75) of women with a higher intake conceived. (
  • further
  • No further medication to be administered in this study. (
  • On September 30, 1968, Hensoldt was commissioned for a study for further development. (
  • Together with the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (FODTP)(Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung) it was decided to select H&K's rotating breech for further study and development. (
  • provides
  • This study provides evidence for the existence of a subgroup of slow-growing melanomas, which may explain the increase in the incidence of thin melanoma, despite stable rates of thick melanoma and melanoma-associated mortality. (
  • Model
  • By 1970, studies progressed far enough to allow the construction of an automatic single- and 3-shot burst model but without full-automatic operation. (
  • To study the dispersion a model firing 9×19mm and equipped with the reflexive sight was used. (
  • determine
  • In 1919, the New York Public Service Commission launched a study at the behest of engineer Daniel L. Turner to determine what improvements were needed in the city's public transport system. (
  • Studies have been undertaken to determine the effects of hypothermia beyond early childhood. (
  • time
  • Adverse events (AEs) were monitored from the time that the subject gave informed consent to the end of the study/early withdrawal (EOS/EW). (
  • present
  • Each study also serves as an analytical tool and assesses past, present and future costs of conflicts using a wide range of parameters. (
  • language
  • The School of International Liberal Studies conducts all classes in English under the premise of multiculturalism, which is not limited to a certain language or culture. (
  • small
  • The studies took place in four small villages of eastern Guatemala. (
  • Electricity became available in the midst of the study in the two small villages and, in the 1980s, in the larger ones. (