Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Fasciitis, Necrotizing: A fulminating bacterial infection of the deep layers of the skin and FASCIA. It can be caused by many different organisms, with STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES being the most common.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Meningitis, Meningococcal: A fulminant infection of the meninges and subarachnoid fluid by the bacterium NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS, producing diffuse inflammation and peri-meningeal venous thromboses. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, nuchal rigidity, SEIZURES, severe HEADACHE, petechial rash, stupor, focal neurologic deficits, HYDROCEPHALUS, and COMA. The organism is usually transmitted via nasopharyngeal secretions and is a leading cause of meningitis in children and young adults. Organisms from Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W-135 have been reported to cause meningitis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp689-701; Curr Opin Pediatr 1998 Feb;10(1):13-8)Meningococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Glasgow Outcome Scale: A scale that assesses the outcome of serious craniocerebral injuries, based on the level of regained social functioning.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)United StatesQuality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.

*  Death by Liberalism: The Fatal Outcome of Well-Meaning Liberal Policies | IndieBound.org

Death by Liberalism: The Fatal Outcome of Well-Meaning Liberal Policies (Hardcover). The Fatal Outcome of Well-Meaning Liberal ... Dunn offers a cogent analysis of how liberalism has not only failed as an ideology but has proven fatal to citizens and ...
https://indiebound.org/book/9780061873805?aff=kirkus_reviews

*  Developing Delirium in the ICU Can Lead to Fatal Outcomes | Alzheimer's Front Row

However, this study establishes the most definitive link between delirium in the ICU and poor outcomes.. What's the Difference ...
alzheimersfrontrow.com/2015/06/developing-delirium-in-icu-can-lead-to.html

*  Fractures | Subtopics | TheHorse.com

Thoroughbred Racehorse Fatal Injury Rate Steady in 2014. March 13, 2015. The incidence of fatal injury for 2014 was 1.89 per ... Researchers determined that if horses were discharged from the hospital, a good long-term outcome was likely.... Read More ... Record Low for Fatal Thoroughbred Breakdowns in Kentucky. January 16, 2015. Sixteen catastrophic breakdowns occurred in 2014, ... Researchers Examine Fatal Lumbar Vertebral Fractures. October 21, 2014. Researchers found pre-existing abnormalities in all ...
thehorse.com/subtopics/fractures/3

*  Low birth weight was associated with non-fatal coronary artery disease and stroke in nurses | Evidence-Based Nursing

Main outcome measures. Data on non-fatal myocardial infarction (symptoms and either electrocardiographic changes or increased ... An inverse trend existed between birth weight and risk of non-fatal coronary artery disease and non-fatal stroke (ie, the lower ... There was an inverse trend towards birth weight and all types of non-fatal coronary heart disease (which included non-fatal ... the higher the risk of non-fatal coronary artery disease and non-fatal stroke) in nurses who were born full term. ...
ebn.bmj.com/content/1/2/57

*  Pulmonary edema - Wikipedia

... recurrence and fatal outcome". Undersea Hyperb Med. 32 (1): 39-44. PMID 15796313. Retrieved 2008-09-04.. ... Pulmonary edema, especially acute, can lead to fatal respiratory distress or cardiac arrest due to hypoxia. It is a cardinal ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulmonary_Edema

*  Detection of enterovirus 68 in serum from pediatric patients with pneumonia and their clinical outcomes - Imamura - 2013 -...

A fatal central nervous system enterovirus 68 infection. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2011; 135:793-796.. *PubMed, ... 2014) Detection of enterovirus 68 in serum from pediatric patients with pneumonia and their clinical outcomes. Influenza and ... Detection of enterovirus 68 in serum from pediatric patients with pneumonia and their clinical outcomes. ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/irv.12206/references?globalMessage=0

*  Intimal sarcoma of the superficial femoral artery with osteosarcomatous differentiation.

Fatal Outcome. Femoral Artery / pathology*, radiation effects, surgery. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance ... Treatment Outcome. Tunica Intima / pathology*, radiation effects, surgery. Vascular Neoplasms / pathology*, therapy. Vascular ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Intimal-sarcoma-superficial-femoral-artery/21276686.html

*  Death following recreational use of designer drug 'bath salts' containing 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV).

Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Pyrrolidines / poisoning*. Street Drugs / poisoning*. Chemical. Reg. No./Substance: 0/3,4- ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Death-Following-Recreational-Use-Designer/22271565.html

*  Study Comparing CT Scan and Stress Test in Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease in Patients Hospitalized for Chest Pain - Full...

Secondary Outcome Measures: *Length of Hospital Stay (time to discharge) [ Time Frame: usually from hours to a few days ( ... Non-fatal myocardial infarction [ Time Frame: 1 year ]. *Death (all cause) [ Time Frame: 1 year ]. *Post-test renal dysfunction ... Primary Outcome Measures: *Coronary catheterization that does not lead to re-vascularization [ Time Frame: 1 year ]. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00705458?recr=Open&cond="Angina Pectoris"&rank=12

*  Pulmonary Hypertension and Other Potentially Fatal Pulmonary Complications in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis - Kimura -...

Mortality outcomes in pediatric rheumatology in the US. Arthritis Rheum 2010; 62: 599-608.. *PubMed , ... C-reactive protein: a new predictor of adverse outcome in pulmonary arterial hypertension. J Am Coll Cardiol 2009; 53: 1211-8. ... Previous article in issue: Fall Incidence and Outcomes of Falls in a Prospective Study of Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis ... Macrophage activation syndrome: a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders. Arch Dis Child 2001; 85: 421-6.. * ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acr.21889/full

*  Conserving the Great Blue - a new Law of the Sea to protect our oceans - The Ecologist

The rapid deterioration of the world's oceans and the life they contain calls for a breakthrough in their governance, writes Deborah Wright. The seas must be protected, respected and policed as the common heritage of all mankind, and of all generations present and future.
theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2750479/conserving_the_great_blue_a_new_law_of_the_sea_to_protect_our_oceans.html

*  Nutrition 120 Chapter 10 Flashcards

Mrs. Davis is a 70-year-old white female who just had a DEXA measurement to asses her bone density. Her T-score of -2.1 indicates?. ...
https://flashcardmachine.com/nutrition-120-chapter10.html

Gross examinationQRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Bacteremia: (NOS) |NmVac4-A/C/Y/W-135Sepsis Alliance: Sepsis Alliance is a voluntary health organization dedicated to raising awareness of sepsis by educating patients, families, and healthcare professionals to treat sepsis as a medical emergency.http://www.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingChao Yao-dong: Chao Yao-dong (died August 20, 2008) was a Taiwanese politician, economist and former Minister of Economic Affairs (1981–84).Cancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Bacterial pneumoniaDeath of Ludwig van Beethoven: The death of Ludwig van Beethoven on 26 March 1827 followed a prolonged illness. It was witnessed by his sister-in-law and by his close friend Anselm Hüttenbrenner, who provided a vivid description of the event.Prognosis: Prognosis (Greek πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely outcome of one's current standing. When applied to large statistical populations, prognostic estimates can be very accurate: for example the statement "45% of patients with severe septic shock will die within 28 days" can be made with some confidence, because previous research found that this proportion of patients died.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==PancreatitisBacitracinPrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Hospital-acquired pneumonia: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or nosocomial pneumonia refers to any pneumonia contracted by a patient in a hospital at least 48–72 hours after being admitted. It is thus distinguished from community-acquired pneumonia.Cutaneous group B streptococcal infection: Cutaneous group B streptococcal infection may result in orbital cellulitis or facial erysipelas in neonates.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.Influenza A virus subtype H1N1: Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.Lung receptor: Lung receptors sense irritation or inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli.G-CSF factor stem-loop destabilising elementGlobal Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.AIP Conference Proceedings: AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970. It publishes the proceedings from various conferences of physics societies.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:

(1/6119) Emergence of vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Working Group.

BACKGROUND: Since the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the glycopeptide vancomycin has been the only uniformly effective treatment for staphylococcal infections. In 1997, two infections due to S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin were identified in the United States. METHODS: We investigated the two patients with infections due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides, as defined by a minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of 8 to 16 microg per milliliter. To assess the carriage and transmission of these strains of S. aureus, we cultured samples from the patients and their contacts and evaluated the isolates. RESULTS: The first patient was a 59-year-old man in Michigan with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure. Peritonitis due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides developed after 18 weeks of vancomycin treatment for recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus peritonitis associated with dialysis. The removal of the peritoneal catheter plus treatment with rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole eradicated the infection. The second patient was a 66-year-old man with diabetes in New Jersey. A bloodstream infection due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides developed after 18 weeks of vancomycin treatment for recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia. This infection was eradicated with vancomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin. Both patients died. The glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus isolates differed by two bands on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. On electron microscopy, the isolates from the infected patients had thicker extracellular matrixes than control methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. No carriage was documented among 177 contacts of the two patients. CONCLUSIONS: The emergence of S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides emphasizes the importance of the prudent use of antibiotics, the laboratory capacity to identify resistant strains, and the use of infection-control precautions to prevent transmission.  (+info)

(2/6119) Toxicological findings in a fatal ingestion of methamphetamine.

This paper presents the case history of a fatality caused by the complications brought about by the presence of methamphetamine and ethanol. Drug concentrations are reported from samples obtained approximately 15 min after the subject was last observed to be chewing what was then believed to be gum, 3 h after the initial toxic symptoms were displayed, 6, 11, and 22 h later. The subjects conditions deteriorated over the course of this time, and he was declared dead 33 h after the initial display of toxic symptoms. The toxicological findings and concentration levels of the reported biological specimens concurred with the expected findings in a case of methamphetamine toxicity.  (+info)

(3/6119) Fatal Serratia marcescens meningitis and myocarditis in a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter.

Serratia marcescens is commonly isolated from the urine of patients with an indwelling urinary catheter and in the absence of symptoms is often regarded as a contaminant. A case of fatal Serratia marcescens septicaemia with meningitis, brain abscesses, and myocarditis discovered at necropsy is described. The patient was an 83 year old man with an indwelling urinary catheter who suffered from several chronic medical conditions and from whose urine Serratia marcescens was isolated at the time of catheterisation. Serratia marcescens can be a virulent pathogen in particular groups of patients and when assessing its significance in catheter urine specimens, consideration should be given to recognised risk factors such as old age, previous antibiotic treatment, and underlying chronic or debilitating disease, even in the absence of clinical symptoms.  (+info)

(4/6119) Wasting of the small hand muscles in upper and mid-cervical cord lesions.

Four patients are described with destructive rheumatoid arthritis of the cervical spine and neurogenic wasting of forearm and hand muscles. The pathological connection is not immediately obvious, but a relationship between these two observations is described here with clinical, radiological, electrophysiological and necropsy findings. Compression of the anterior spinal artery at upper and mid-cervical levels is demonstrated to be the likely cause of changes lower in the spinal cord. These are shown to be due to the resulting ischaemia of the anterior part of the lower cervical spinal cord, with degeneration of the neurones innervating the forearm and hand muscles. These findings favour external compression of the anterior spinal artery leading to ischaemia in a watershed area as the likeliest explanation for this otherwise inappropriate and bizarre phenomenon.  (+info)

(5/6119) Poor outcome of autologous stem cell transplantation for adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma: a case report and review of the literature.

A limited number of patients with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who received autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) have been reported. We report here a case of fatal systemic Candida krusei infection in a female patient with ATL undergoing ASCT. All of the eight patients (including seven patients in the literature) with ATL who received ASCT developed relapse of ATL or death due to ASCT complication, irrespective of subtype or remission state of ATL, source or selection of SCT or conditioning regimen. At present, ASCT appears to provide little benefit for ATL in contrast to that for other types of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.  (+info)

(6/6119) Fatal familial insomnia: a new Austrian family.

We present clinical, pathological and molecular features of the first Austrian family with fatal familial insomnia. Detailed clinical data are available in five patients and autopsy in four patients. Age at onset of disease ranged between 20 and 60 years, and disease duration between 8 and 20 months. Severe loss of weight was an early symptom in all five patients. Four patients developed insomnia and/or autonomic dysfunction, and all five patients developed motor abnormalities. Analysis of the prion protein (PrP) gene revealed the codon 178 point mutation and methionine homozygosity at position 129. In all brains, neuropathology showed widespread cortical astrogliosis, widespread brainstem nuclei and tract degeneration, and olivary 'pseudohypertrophy' with vacuolated neurons, in addition to neuropathological features described previously, such as thalamic and olivary degeneration. Western blotting of one brain and immunocytochemistry in four brains revealed quantitative and regional dissociation between PrP(res)(the protease resistant form of PrP) deposition and histopathology. In the cerebellar cortex of one patient, PrP(res) deposits were prominent in the molecular layer and displayed a peculiar patchy and strip-like pattern with perpendicular orientation to the surface. In another patient, a single vacuolated neuron in the inferior olivary nuclei contained prominent intravacuolar granular PrP(res) deposits, resembling changes of brainstem neurons in bovine spongiform encephalopathy.  (+info)

(7/6119) Early diagnosis of central nervous system aspergillosis with combination use of cerebral diffusion-weighted echo-planar magnetic resonance image and polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid.

We treated a patient diagnosed as central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis with the combined use of cerebral diffusion-weighted echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and polymerase chain reaction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-PCR). DWI, a cutting-edge imaging modality to reveal the earliest changes of cerebral infarction, detected cerebral fungal embolization when the conventional computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging failed to reveal it. CSF-PCR demonstrated the presence of Aspergillus-specific DNA in the specimen, when the conventional examination and culture of CSF were nonspecific or negative. These diagnostic methods could be useful in the early diagnosis of CNS aspergillosis.  (+info)

(8/6119) Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma with metastasis to the pituitary gland: a case report.

An unusual case of metastatic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of the lung presented as a pituitary tumour in a young adult Chinese female, who subsequently died after having undergone trans-sphenoidal resection. Metastatic cancers of the pituitary are uncommon even in necropsy series and rarely give rise to clinical symptoms. This case draws attention to the fact that, although uncommon, pituitary metastases have been noted with increasing frequency and their distinction from primary pituitary tumours is often difficult. A metastatic pituitary tumour may be the initial presentation of an unknown primary malignancy, wherein the metastatic deposits may also be limited to the pituitary gland. Clinicians and pathologists alike should consider a metastatic lesion in the differential diagnosis of a non-functioning pituitary tumour.  (+info)



myocardial


  • There was an inverse trend towards birth weight and all types of non-fatal coronary heart disease (which included non-fatal myocardial infarction and coronary revascularisation) (p for trend = 0.036), coronary revascularisation alone (p for trend = 0.006), all types of non-fatal strokes (p for trend = 0.002), ischaemic stroke alone (p for trend = 0.008), and haemorrhagic stroke alone (p for trend = 0.015). (bmj.com)
  • The study by Rich-Edwards et al gives attention to birth weight as a marker of non-fatal cardiovascular disease including myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation, and stroke. (bmj.com)
  • NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. (nih.gov)
  • A Composite of Cardiovascular Death, Non-fatal Myocardial Infarction and Non-fatal Stroke. (clinicaltrials.gov)

ischaemic stroke


  • Participants with CV death, non-fatal MI or non-fatal ischaemic stroke. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Participants with CV death, non-fatal MI, non-fatal ischaemic stroke, hospitalisation for heart failure, hospitalisation for unstable angina pectoris, or hospitalisation for coronary revascularisation. (clinicaltrials.gov)

incidence


  • The incidence of fatal injury for 2014 was 1.89 per 1,000 starts, compared to 1.90 per 1,000 starts in 2013. (thehorse.com)

stroke


  • An inverse trend existed between birth weight and risk of non-fatal coronary artery disease and non-fatal stroke (ie, the lower the birth weight, the higher the risk of non-fatal coronary artery disease and non-fatal stroke) in nurses who were born full term. (bmj.com)

Lead


  • Pulmonary edema, especially acute, can lead to fatal respiratory distress or cardiac arrest due to hypoxia . (wikipedia.org)

surgery


  • Scarring, a normal outcome of any surgery, can be fatal in the throat. (meetup.com)

Pain


  • Seeking the advice of an injury attorney may not be the first thing on your mind when you're dealing with the pain of a loss,' Knauss said, 'but fatal car accidents are far more complex than many people realize. (prweb.com)

cause


  • Ketorolac tromethamine, including TORADOL can cause peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding and/or perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. (nih.gov)