Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Human Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Moral Development: The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Philosophy, MedicalCommittee Membership: The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Ethical Relativism: The philosophical view that conceptions of truth and moral values are not absolute but are relative to the persons or groups holding them. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Pharmacy: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the pharmacist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the pharmacist in health care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Metaphysics: The branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, including ontology (the nature of existence or being) and cosmology (the origin and structure of the universe). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Helsinki Declaration: An international agreement of the World Medical Association which offers guidelines for conducting experiments using human subjects. It was adopted in 1962 and revised by the 18th World Medical Assembly at Helsinki, Finland in 1964. Subsequent revisions were made in 1975, 1983, 1989, and 1996. (From Encyclopedia of Bioethics, rev ed, 1995)Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Therapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed.Whistleblowing: The reporting of observed or suspected PROFESSIONAL MISCONDUCT or incompetence to appropriate authorities or to the public.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Researcher-Subject Relations: Interaction between research personnel and research subjects.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Confucianism: A school of thought and set of moral, ethical, and political teachings usually considered to be founded by Confucius in 6th-5th century B.C. China. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995)Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from accessed 1/31/2003)Beginning of Human Life: The point at which religious ensoulment or PERSONHOOD is considered to begin.Double Effect Principle: Guideline for determining when it is morally permissible to perform an action to pursue a good end with knowledge that the action will also bring about bad results. It generally states that, in cases where a contemplated action has such double effect, the action is permissible only if: it is not wrong in itself; the bad result is not intended; the good result is not a direct causal result of the bad result; and the good result is "proportionate to" the bad result. (from Solomon, "Double Effect," in Becker, The Encyclopedia of Ethics, 1992)Conscience: The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Empiricism: One of the principal schools of medical philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome. It developed in Alexandria between 270 and 220 B.C., the only one to have any success in reviving the essentials of the Hippocratic concept. The Empiricists declared that the search for ultimate causes of phenomena was vain, but they were active in endeavoring to discover immediate causes. The "tripod of the Empirics" was their own chance observations (experience), learning obtained from contemporaries and predecessors (experience of others), and, in the case of new diseases, the formation of conclusions from other diseases which they resembled (analogy). Empiricism enjoyed sporadic continuing popularity in later centuries up to the nineteenth. (From Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, p186; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Health Physics: The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Behavior Control: Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by biomedical, physical, psychological, or social means, including for nontherapeutic reasons.Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees: Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Religious Philosophies: Sets of beliefs on the nature of the universe or Man.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Embryo Research: Experimentation on, or using the organs or tissues from, a human or other mammalian conceptus during the prenatal stage of development that is characterized by rapid morphological changes and the differentiation of basic structures. In humans, this includes the period from the time of fertilization to the end of the eighth week after fertilization.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Casuistry: A method of ETHICAL ANALYSIS that emphasizes practical problem solving through examining individual cases that are considered to be representative; sometimes used to denote specious argument or rationalization. Differentiate from casuistics, which is the recording and study of cases and disease.Dehumanization: The process by which a person or group of persons comes to be regarded or treated as lacking in human qualities.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Great BritainFeminism: The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes and organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests. (Webster New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Logic: The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Postmodernism: A late 20th-century philosophical approach or style of cultural analysis that seeks to reveal the cultural or social construction of concepts conventionally assumed to be natural or universal. (from E.R. DuBose, The Illusion of Trust: Toward a Medical Theological Ethics in the Postmodern Age, Kluwer, 1995)War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Voluntary Programs: Programs in which participation is not required.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Anonymous Testing: Testing in which the source of the specimen or the person being tested is not individually identified.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.National Socialism: The doctrines and policies of the Nazis or the National Social German Workers party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933-1945. These doctrines and policies included racist nationalism, expansionism, and state control of the economy. (from Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. and American Heritage College Dictionary, 3d ed.)History of MedicineTrust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Commodification: The social process by which something or someone comes to be regarded and treated as an article of trade or commerce.Persons: Persons as individuals (e.g., ABORTION APPLICANTS) or as members of a group (e.g., HISPANIC AMERICANS). It is not used for members of the various professions (e.g., PHYSICIANS) or occupations (e.g., LIBRARIANS) for which OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS is available.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Complicity: Association with or participation in an act that is, or is perceived to be, criminal or immoral. One is complicitous when one promotes or unduly benefits from practices or institutions that are morally or legally suspect.Holocaust: A massive slaughter, especially the systematic mass extermination of European Jews in Nazi concentration camps prior to and during World War II.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Germany, WestRight to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Animal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.United StatesResearch Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Philosophy, NursingVulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Group Structure: The informal or formal organization of a group of people based on a network of personal relationships which is influenced by the size and composition, etc., of the group.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Nunavut: A self-governing territory formed from the central and eastern portions of the Northwest Territories. It was officially established April 1, 1999. The capital is Iqaluit.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Prussia: Former state in north central Germany. Formally abolished March 1, 1947. Kingdom established 1701.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Therapeutic Equipoise: Expectation of real uncertainty on the part of the investigator regarding the comparative therapeutic merits of each arm in a trial.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Political Systems: The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.

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Welcome to the official website of the Florida Commission on Ethics. We hope visitors will find it easier to navigate and ... Each year, the Commission makes recommendations for legislation in an effort to improve Florida's Code of Ethics and its ... The Florida Commission on Ethics. P. O. Drawer 15709. Tallahassee, FL 32317-5709. (850) 488-7864 ...
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Papers here emerge from a remarkable panel presentation organized for the Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiries (CEPE) ... Research Ethics in Internet-Enabled Research: Human Subjects Issues and Methodological Myopia Joseph B. Walther Studying the ... Ethics of Internet Research: Contesting the Human Subjects Research Model E. H. Bassett & Kathleen O'Riordan ... there is much to be learned from the work that has already been been done on research ethics in the social sciences and the ...
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Opinion: How come discovering vulnerabilities and writing exploits is 'research,' but viruses for testing is a crime against humanity?
*  medical ethics
Tags: Center for Health Care Ethics, evidence-based medicine, medical ethics, medical evidence, medical reversal, MedPage ... Posts Tagged 'medical ethics'. When evidence contradicts entrenched medical practices. 'Medical reversal' harms patients and ...
*  OECD Ethics: Australia Case Study
General forces impacting on the environment in which public servants operate that have implications for ethics and standards of ... d) Codes of conduct/ethics. As mentioned in the text of this document, the APS-wide code of conduct is primarily set out in the ... Our approach to ethics has been to articulate a set of Key Public Service Values which describe the culture sought in the APS. ... C. The Ethics Infrastructure. The Public Service and Merit Protection Commission has overall responsibility for maintaining the ...
*  New Jersey Legal Ethics
... VIII. MAINTAINING THE INTEGRITY OF THE PROFESSION. 8.1 Rule 8.1 Bar Admission and Disciplinary Matters ... NJ Commentary: Section 41:2-2, Michels, New Jersey Attorney Ethics (Gann Law Books, Newark, 2000) Under RPC 8.4(b), all that is ... NJ Commentary: Section 41:2-2, Michels, New Jersey Attorney Ethics (Gann Law Books, Newark, 2000) Under RPC 8.4(g), it is ... NJ Commentary: Section 41:2-2, Michels, New Jersey Attorney Ethics (Gann Law Books, Newark, 2000) RPC 8.4(d) and its ...
*  New Jersey Legal Ethics
... 1.10 Rule 1.10 Imputed Disqualification: General Rule. 1.10:100 Comparative Analysis of New Jersey ... End-of-life notice: American Legal Ethics Library. As of March 1, 2013, the Legal Information Institute is no longer ... See Section 24:1-1, Michels, New Jersey Attorney Ethics (Gann Law Books, Newark, 2000). ... See Section 24:1-1, Michels, New Jersey Attorney Ethics (Gann Law Books, Newark, 2000). ...
*  Policy & Ethics - Scientific American
CDC Director's Investment in Tobacco, Drug Companies Baffles Ethics Experts. The purchases occurred after she took over the ...
*  Compliance & Ethics
Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics. The Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics is responsible for the day ... The Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics will oversee and use the resources and knowledge of the members of the ... The Compliance Committee will work together with the Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics with all aspects of the ... The Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics will not assume the duties of the various substantive compliance areas, and ...
*  controversy & ethics
The new ethics discussion which in many instances leaves this old tradition very often does not earn the name of ethics. The ... Where's the 'ethics' here? Is it intrinsically :'wrong' to alter plant or pest populations by our cultural practices? If so, : ... controversy & ethics. Christine von Weizsaecker fweizsae at Thu Feb 9 14:07:07 EST 1995 *Previous message: PCR ... no ethics. The question here appears :to be, is it wrong to 'depress' the economies of struggling countries, and :again, hasn't ...
*  Medical ethics | The BMJ
Recent advances in medical ethics? This may sound odd if your vision of medical ethics is the application to medicine of the ... If, however, you believe that the goal of medical ethics is to improve the quality of patient care by identifying, analysing, ... A discussion of common medical ethics topics for clinical readers can be found in the Canadian Medical Association Journal's ... Any selection of "recent advances" in medical ethics will be somewhat arbitrary, but I took two steps to diminish this. Firstly ...
*  Earth Ethics | America Magazine
Likewise, he cannot reject all non-theological ethics, yet expect both believers and nonbelievers to accept his climate-change ... By accepting only theological methods of ethics, he also excludes nonbelievers from being ethical and leads to extremism. ... Also addressing the science-ethics interface, Brown Universitys Kenneth R. Miller, a Catholic and a biologist, wrote a ... This article also appeared in print, under the headline "Earth Ethics," in the March 24, 2008 issue. ...
*  Questionable Ethics Lyrics - Dismember
Lyrics to Questionable Ethics by Dismember: You look at me with eyes filled with pain / And I stare back with a promise of ... Questionable Ethics Lyrics Languages Arabic Deutsch Greek English Spanish French Italian Japanese Korean Netherlands Portuguese ... Questionable ethics. Predator of first degree. Crimson tides gushes forth. As I cut your throat. The urban jungle is my killing ...
*  District of Columbia Legal Ethics
It also noted that in DC Ethics Opinion 276 (1997), the Legal Ethics Committee had discussed the ethical obligations of lawyer ... District of Columbia Legal Ethics. II. COUNSELOR. 2.1 Rule 2.1 Advisor. 2.1:100 Comparative Analysis of DC Rule. · Primary DC ... DC Ethics Opinion 243 (1993) responded to an inquiry from a lawyer who was also an ordained minister and had been doing ... DC Ethics Opinion 296 (2000) [which is more fully discussed under 1.7:330, above] commented on the close similarity between a ...
*  Public Ethics Products - Routledge
This book examines the issue of ethics in the context of the provision of military health care in an epidemic. Outbreaks of ... Administrative Ethics and Executive Decisions. Channeling and Containing Administrative Discretion. By Chad B. Newswander ... This book offers a critical analysis, both theoretical and practical, of ethics education in the military. In the twenty-first ... Contemporary Challenges and Responses in Military Ethics Education. Edited by Don Carrick, James Connelly, David Whetham ...
*  'Medical Ethics' by William...
Journal of Clinical Ethics Journal of Medical Ethics Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal ... General professional ethics addresses such contracts and privileges.). As these social issues emerge, medical ethics becomes ... In short, the field has become less iatrocentric, expanding into the larger domain of health care ethics and clinical ethics. ... Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1992. Essays from Hypatia on ethics of care and ...
*  Ethics Watch
These are some of the issues we need to talk over with the NCT, the Maternity Alliance and Consumers for Ethics in Research. We ...
*  market Archives - Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Wall Street Ethics. We explore the ethical issues underlying the financial meltdown with Rebecca Blank, an economist, a senior ... Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ...
*  Video | Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly | PBS
Ethics of Human Enhancement. "Computers will match us in emotional intelligence, which includes our whole moral system," says ... Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ...
*  Haitians Archives - Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ...
*  embryo Archives - Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ... a lecturer on ethics in science at Harvard Medical School. More → ...
*  Vietnam Archives - Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ... professor of Christian ethics at Howard University School of Divinity and senior pastor at Third Street Church of God in ...

Mark Siegler: Mark Siegler (born June 20, 1941) is an American physician who specializes in internal medicine. He is the Lindy Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Chicago.Research ethics consultation: Analogous to clinical ethics consultation, Research Ethics Consultation (REC) describes a formal way for researchers to solicit and receive expert ethical guidance related to biomedical research. The first REC service was established at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in 1997.Ageing Research Reviews: Ageing Research Reviews is a scientific journal covering ageing published by Elsevier. The editor in chief is Mark Mattson.Henry Lygon, 5th Earl Beauchamp: Henry Lygon, 5th Earl Beauchamp (13 February 1829 – 4 March 1866), styled Viscount Elmley between 1853 and 1863, was a British politician.The Schizophrenia of Modern Ethical Theories: The Schizophrenia of Modern Ethical Theories (1976) is a popular paper in ethics by Michael Stocker. The central claim of the paper is that some modern ethical theories fail to account for motive in their theories, producing a sort of schizophrenia because the agent is unable to use his reasons or motives as a basis for his actions.Dignitas Personae: Dignitas Personae is the title of a 2008 instruction by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith giving doctrinal directives on certain embryonic ethical controversies that had emerged since 1987, after Donum Vitae was released.Regulation of science: The regulation of science refers to use of law, or other ruling, by academic or governmental bodies to allow or restrict science from performing certain practices, or researching certain scientific areas. It is a bioethical issue related to other practices such as abortion and euthanasia; and areas of research such as stem-cell research and cloning synthetic biology.University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics: The University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, or JCB, is an academic research centre located on the downtown campus of the University of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Joint Centre for Bioethics is a partnership between the University and 15 affiliated health care organizations in the Greater Toronto Area.Morality and religion: Morality and religion is the relationship between religious views and morals. Many religions have value frameworks regarding personal behavior meant to guide adherents in determining between right and wrong.Erga omnes: Erga omnes is a Latin phrase which means "towards all" or "towards everyone". In legal terminology, erga omnes rights or obligations are owed toward all.Human subject research legislation in the United States: Human subject research legislation in the United States can be traced to the early 20th century. Human subject research in the United States was mostly unregulated until the 20th century, as it was throughout the world, until the establishment of various governmental and professional regulations and codes of ethics.Motivations for joining the Special OlympicsJump for the Cause: Jump for the Cause is a non-profit group of women who perform mass skydiving formations to raise money. A new world's record was set on Saturday, September 26, 2009; when 181 women from 31 countries jumped in formation.Indignation (novel): Indignation is a novel by Philip Roth, released by Houghton Mifflin on September 16, 2008. It is his twenty-ninth book.American Mixed Breed Obedience Registry: The American Mixed Breed Obedience Registry (AMBOR) is a registry for mixed-breed dogs to enable them to compete in obedience and dog agility.Swadeshi Jagaran Manch: The Swadeshi Jagaran Manch or SJM is an economic wing of Sangh Parivar that again took the tool of Swadeshi advocated in India before its independence to destabilize the British Empire. SJM took to the promotion of Swadeshi (indigenous) industries and culture as a dote against LPG.Hoya Corporation: TOPIX 100 ComponentModern Moral Philosophy: "Modern Moral Philosophy" is an influential article on moral philosophy by G. E.Injustice SocietyOil imperialism theories: Oil imperialism theories assert that direct and indirect control of world petroleum reserves is a root factor in current international politics.Islamic sexual hygienical jurisprudence: Islamic sexual hygienical jurisprudence is a prominent topic in Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh) due to its everyday nature.Medix UK Limited: Medix UK Limited is a UK-based market research consultancy providing online research in healthcare.Research participant: A research participant, also called a human subject or an experiment, trial, or study participant or subject, is a person who participates in human subject research by being the target of observation by researchers.British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal: The British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal is a quasi-judicial human rights body in British Columbia, Canada. It was established under the British Columbia Human Rights Code.John Smoke JohnsonDavid S. Oderberg: Professor David S. Oderberg (born 1963) is an Australian philosopher of metaphysics and ethics based in Britain since 1987.Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur: Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur (August 30, 1837 – January 12, 1880) was the wife of the 21st President of the United States, Chester A. Arthur I.Voluntary euthanasia: Voluntary euthanasia is the practice of ending a life in a painless manner. Voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) have been the focus of great controversy in recent years.Patient advocacySystematic Protein Investigative Research EnvironmentNever Come UndoneLibertarian perspectives on political alliances: Libertarian perspectives on political alliances vary greatly, with controversies among libertarians as to which alliances are acceptable or useful to the movement.Helsinki Roller DerbyATC code V07: ==V07A All other non-therapeutic products==Syllabus: A syllabus (pl. syllabi) is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course.Prince (musician)Rainer Moormann: Rainer Moormann (born 1950) is a German chemist and nuclear whistleblower. He grew up in Osnabrück.Daesun Jinrihoe: Daesun Jinrihoe (Also transliterated as Daesunjinrihoe, Daesun Chillihoe, Taesunchillihoe, Daesoonjinrihoe, Daesoon Jinrihoe and Taesŏn Chillihoe) is a Korean new religious movement, founded in April 1969 by Park Han-gyeong (박한경) (1918–96). It is a splinter of the syncretic religion founded by Gang Il-Sun (1871–1909, also known as Chungsan Kang).A Confucian ConfusionScientific misconduct: Scientific misconduct is the violation of the standard codes of scholarly conduct and ethical behavior in professional scientific research. A Lancet review on Handling of Scientific Misconduct in Scandinavian countries provides the following sample definitions: (reproduced in The COPE report 1999.Ritual washing in JudaismThe Final Decision: The Final Decision is an episode from season 1 of the animated TV series X-Men Animated Series.Criticisms of globalization: Criticism of globalization is skepticism of the claimed benefits of globalization. Many of these views are held by the anti-globalization movement.Groningen Protocol: The Groningen Protocol is a text created in September 2004 by Eduard Verhagen, the medical director of the department of pediatrics at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in Groningen, the Netherlands. It contains directives with criteria under which physicians can perform "active ending of life on infants" (child euthanasia) without fear of legal prosecution.Joachim Kahl: Joachim Kahl (born 1941 in Cologne, Germany) is a German freelance philosopher whose work focuses on the criticism of religion, ethics and aesthetics. His central theme is ‘secular humanism’.Manganin: Manganin is a trademarked name for an alloy of typically 86% copper, 12% manganese, and 2% nickel. It was first developed by Edward Weston in 1892, improving upon his Constantan (1887).Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987: The Civil Rights Restoration Act was a U.S.The Human Life ReviewScience and Conscience: Science and Conscience is a Canadian current affairs television miniseries which aired on CBC Television in 1968.David S. Cafiso: David S. Cafiso (born 18 March 1952) is an American biochemist and a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Virginia.Information source: An information source is a source of information for somebody, i.e.Human Nature (America album): Human Nature is the fourteenth original studio album by American folk rock duo America, released by Oxygen Records in 1998 (see 1998 in music). It was their first new studio album since 1994's "Hourglass".Certified Health Physicist: Certified Health Physicist is an official title granted by the American Board of Health Physics, the certification board for health physicists in the United States. A Certified Health Physicist is designated by the letters CHP or DABHP after his or her name.Program for Torture VictimsChild life specialist: Child Life}}TremelimumabMedical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment: MOLST is an acronym for Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. The MOLST Program is an initiative to facilitate end-of-life medical decision-making in New York State, Massachusetts, Ohio and Maryland, that involves use of the MOLST form.Legal status of tattooing in the United States: In the United States, there is no federal law regulating the practice of tattooing. However, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have statutory laws requiring a person receiving a tattoo be 18 years of age or older.Swami Shyam: Swami Shyam styled himself as a god-man."Guru's devotees compensated for losses" The Globe and Mail 7 March 2001 Born in 1924 in Chandani, Jalaun district, Uttar Pradesh, India, he was raised in the Vedic tradition of Knowledge of the Self (Atma-gyan).Terri (film)Howard Phillips (politician)

(1/257) Do case studies mislead about the nature of reality?

This paper attempts a partial, critical look at the construction and use of case studies in ethics education. It argues that the authors and users of case studies are often insufficiently aware of the literary nature of these artefacts: this may lead to some confusion between fiction and reality. Issues of the nature of the genre, the fictional, story-constructing aspect of case studies, the nature of authorship, and the purposes and uses of case studies as "texts" are outlined and discussed. The paper concludes with some critical questions that can be applied to the construction and use of case studies in the light of the foregoing analysis.  (+info)

(2/257) Indigenous peoples and the morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project.

In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about indigenous peoples has confused rather than illuminated the deeper issues involved, as well as causing much antagonism among indigenous peoples. There are more serious ethical issues raised by the project for all geneticists, including those who are sympathetic to the problems of indigenous peoples. With particular attention to the history and attitudes of Australian indigenous peoples, we argue that the Human Genome Diversity Project can only proceed if those who further its objectives simultaneously: respect the cultural beliefs of indigenous peoples; publicly support the efforts of indigenous peoples to achieve respect and equality; express respect by a rigorous understanding of the meaning of equitable negotiation of consent, and ensure that both immediate and long term economic benefits from the research flow back to the groups taking part.  (+info)

(3/257) Role conflict and confidentiality in multidisciplinary athlete support programmes.

As medical and scientific staff have increasingly been called upon to provide multidisciplinary support to elite performers the potential for ethical, professional, and legal conflicts has also increased. Although this has been recognised, little guidance has been provided to help resolve such conflicts. This paper identifies key issues in the provision of effective support and specifically addresses the roles of medical and scientific staff and their relations to coaches and performers. An athlete charter is presented that has successfully been used to resolve ethical conflicts and clarify the lines of communication, confidentiality, and responsibility within a national governing body.  (+info)

(4/257) Ethical requirements for occupational health research--compliance arrangements for a single company in relation to a recent major nuclear industry study.

The media coverage given to occupational health studies in the field of ionizing radiation has, on occasion, been the cause of very real distress to radiation workers and their families. In response to this situation the Chief Medical Officers of the major UK nuclear companies developed an ethical policy for future involvement in research, based on the duty of care which researchers owe to a key customer of such studies: the worker. The policy consists of four principal elements: medical confidentiality; worker information; worker consent and the guarantee of the availability to the workers of pre-publication knowledge of the results. The policy issued in 1991/92 has achieved growing acceptance among researchers and medical journals, though the medical officers involved have been aware of some scepticism, particularly in relation to the practicalities of the dissemination of pre-publication information. The Record Linkage Study published in November 1997 marked a major piece of research work involving data from 120,000 radiation workers that had been carried out since the development of the policy. This paper reports on the successful compliance arrangements to meet the ethical requirements of that study within a single UK nuclear company, and is published to demonstrate that with commitment from researchers, the journal and occupational health staff such ethical requirements, and particularly the need for pre-publication information can be met in full.  (+info)

(5/257) Withholding/withdrawing treatment from neonates: legislation and official guidelines across Europe.

Representatives from eight European countries compared the legal, ethical and professional settings within which decision making for neonates takes place. When it comes to limiting treatment there is general agreement across all countries that overly aggressive treatment is to be discouraged. Nevertheless, strong emphasis has been placed on the need for compassionate care even where cure is not possible. Where a child will die irrespective of medical intervention, there is widespread acceptance of the practice of limiting aggressive treatment or alleviating suffering even if death may be hastened as a result. Where the infant could be saved but the future outlook is bleak there is more debate, but only two countries have tested the courts with such cases. When it comes to the active intentional ending of life, the legal position is standard across Europe; it is prohibited. However, recognising those intractable situations where death may be lingering and unpleasant, Dutch paediatricians have reported that they do sometimes assist babies to die with parental consent. Two cases have been tried through the courts and recent official recommendations have set out standards by which such actions may be assessed.  (+info)

(6/257) Power and the teaching of medical ethics.

This paper argues that ethics education needs to become more reflective about its social and political ethic as it participates in the construction and transmission of medical ethics. It argues for a critical approach to medical ethics and explores the political context in medical schools and some of the peculiar problems in medical ethics education.  (+info)

(7/257) Ethical considerations in international HIV vaccine trials: summary of a consultative process conducted by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

Research that is initiated, designed or funded by sponsor agencies based in countries with relatively high social and economic development, and conducted in countries that are relatively less developed, gives rise to many important ethical challenges. Although clinical trials of HIV vaccines began ten years ago in the US and Europe, an increasing number of trials are now being conducted or planned in other countries, including several that are considered "developing" countries. Safeguarding the rights and welfare of individuals participating as research subjects in developing countries is a priority. In September, 1997, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) embarked on a process of international consultation; its purpose was further to define the important ethical issues and to formulate guidance that might facilitate the ethical design and conduct of HIV vaccine trials in international contexts. This paper summarises the major outcomes of the UNAIDS consultative process.  (+info)

(8/257) Death--whose decision? Euthanasia and the terminally ill.

In Australia and Oregon, USA, legislation to permit statutory sanctioned physician-assisted dying was enacted. However, opponents, many of whom held strong religious views, were successful with repeal in Australia. Similar opposition in Oregon was formidable, but ultimately lost in a 60-40% vote reaffirming physician-assisted dying. This paper examines the human dilemma which arises when technological advances in end-of-life medicine conflict with traditional and religious sanctity-of-life values. Society places high value on personal autonomy, particularly in the United States. We compare the potential for inherent contradictions and arbitrary decisions where patient autonomy is either permitted or forbidden. The broader implications for human experience resulting from new legislation in both Australia and Oregon are discussed. We conclude that allowing autonomy for the terminally ill, within circumscribed options, results in fewer ethical contradictions and greater preservation of dignity.  (+info)

  • 2000
  • The only changes recommended by the Ethics 2000 Commission with respect to Model Rule 2.1 were in Comment : there, it added a sentence reminding lawyers that informing a client of various forms of dispute resolution may be required by Rule 1.4 when a different form of dispute resolution would be a reasonable alternative to litigation. (
  • The Ethics 2000 Commission recommended deleting Model Rule 2.2 and moving any discussion of common representation to the Comments following Rule 1.7. (
  • Pragmatic ethics also differs from other normative approaches theoretically, according to Lafollette (2000): It focuses on society, rather than on lone individuals, as the entity which achieves morality. (
  • medical ethics
  • Recent advances in medical ethics? (
  • This may sound odd if your vision of medical ethics is the application to medicine of the Hippocratic oath. (
  • If, however, you believe that the goal of medical ethics is to improve the quality of patient care by identifying, analysing, and attempting to resolve the ethical problems that arise in the practice of clinical medicine, 1 the concept of "recent advances" won't come as such a shock. (
  • In this article I review advances in medical ethics in five areas-end of life care, medical error, priority setting, biotechnology, and medical ethics education-and anticipate two future issues, "eHealth" and global bioethics. (
  • Any selection of "recent advances" in medical ethics will be somewhat arbitrary, but I took two steps to diminish this. (
  • I have included both advances in medical ethics and advances in medicine and science with enormous ethical ramifications. (
  • The topics span clinical medicine (end of life care and medical error), healthcare management (priority setting), science (biotechnology), and education (of medical ethics). (
  • A discussion of common medical ethics topics for clinical readers can be found in the Canadian Medical Association Journal 's series on bioethics for clinicians. (
  • This exponential growth invites differentiation of medical ethics (primarily, physician-centered) and health care ethics (including nurses and other healthcare providers), clinical ethics (focused on hospital case decisions with the aid of diverse committees and consultants), and bioethics (including general issues of reproduction, fair distribution of organs and other scarce life-saving resources, and protection of the biosphere). (
  • As clinicians increasingly share or preempt medical ethics teaching in medical schools, the issue of appropriate philosophical training has arisen. (
  • Clinical Ethics is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal that covers medical ethics. (
  • Aristotle
  • For example, Aristotle implies that less precise knowledge is possible in ethics than in other spheres of inquiry, and he regards ethical knowledge as depending upon habit and acculturation in a way that makes it distinctive from other kinds of knowledge. (
  • Ethics, as now separated out for discussion by Aristotle, is practical rather than theoretical, in the original Aristotelian senses of these terms. (
  • The first philosopher to write ethical treatises, Aristotle argues that the correct approach for studying such controversial subjects as Ethics or Politics, which involve discussing what is beautiful or just, is to start with what would be roughly agreed to be true by people of good up-bringing and experience in life, and to work from there to a higher understanding. (
  • Moral
  • Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. (
  • As bioethicist Larry Churchill has written: "Ethics, understood as the capacity to think critically about moral values and direct our actions in terms of such values, is a generic human capacity. (
  • Habermas's discourse ethics attempts to distill the idealized moral point of view that accompanies a perfectly rational process of argumentation (also idealized), which would be the moral principle implied by the presuppositions listed above. (
  • Nuclear ethics is a cross-disciplinary field of academic and policy-relevant study in which the problems associated with nuclear warfare, nuclear deterrence, nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, or nuclear energy are examined through one or more ethical or moral theories or frameworks. (
  • Nuclear ethics assumes that the very real possibilities of human extinction, mass human destruction, or mass environmental damage which could result from nuclear warfare are deep ethical or moral problems. (
  • Generally speaking communication ethics deals with the moral good present in any form of human communication. (
  • ethically
  • Robot ethics, sometimes known by the short expression "roboethics", concerns ethical problems that occur with robots, such as whether robots pose a threat to humans in the long or short run, whether some uses of robots are problematic (such as in healthcare or as 'killer robots' in war), and how robots should be designed such as they act 'ethically' (this last concern is also called machine ethics). (
  • Committee
  • The Compliance Committee is constituted pursuant to the Compliance Policy and Code of Ethical Conduct and the Compliance Program and Procedure to assist the Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics and the Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees in fulfilling their oversight responsibilities with regard to compliance and ethics at RIT. (
  • The Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics will oversee and use the resources and knowledge of the members of the committee to accomplish this end. (
  • The Compliance Committee will work together with the Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics with all aspects of the implementation of the Compliance Program. (
  • consists
  • This type of ethics consists of conversations about ideas in civic or community contexts marked by diversity of perspectives requiring thoughtful public engagement. (
  • The work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum. (
  • context
  • This book examines the issue of ethics in the context of the provision of military health care in an epidemic. (
  • Democracy
  • In Japan, modern Confucian scholars like Uno Tetsuto and Ichimura Sanjiro have attempted to mix Confucian role ethics with concepts such as democracy and human rights. (
  • discussion
  • The new ethics discussion which in many instances leaves this old tradition very often does not earn the name of ethics. (
  • Since antiquity, the discussion of ethics in relation to the treatment of non-human and even non-living things and their potential "spirituality" have been discussed. (
  • People
  • Paul and Elder state that most people confuse ethics with behaving in accordance with social conventions, religious beliefs and the law and don't treat ethics as a stand-alone concept. (
  • For public discourse ethics to be successful there must be an effective level of civility between people or persons involved. (
  • Population ethics may be also applied to evaluate scenarios that influence how people value averting deaths in charitable organizations. (
  • field
  • Robot ethics is a sub-field of ethics of technology, specifically information technology, and it has close links to legal as well as socio-economic concerns. (
  • Development ethics is a field of enquiry that reflects on both the ends and the means of economic development. (
  • Gasper, D. (1994) "Development Ethics: An Emergent Field? (
  • course
  • Unless, of course, ethics is being reduced to the status of 'court-advisor' busy legitimising the perpetrators instead of fighting possible victimization. (
  • social
  • Marxist-Leninist ethics is materialist: the ideals, standards and virtues prevailing in society are interpreted as a reflection of actually existing interpersonal (value) relations, an expression of interests and requirements of social groups and classes. (
  • Science
  • Pragmatic ethics may be misunderstood as relativist, as failing to be objective, but that is like suggesting that science fails to be objective. (
  • The first publication directly addressing and setting the foundation for robot ethics was Runaround (story), a science fiction short story written by Isaac Asimov in 1942 which featured his well known Three Laws of Robotics. (
  • Books
  • The Nicomachean Ethics is very often abbreviated "NE", or "EN", and books and chapters are generally referred to by Roman and Arabic numerals, respectively, along with corresponding Bekker numbers. (
  • In many ways this work parallels Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics, which has only eight books, and the two works can be fruitfully compared. (
  • Books V, VI, and VII of the Nicomachean Ethics are identical to Books IV, V, and VI of the Eudemian Ethics. (
  • describe
  • Animal ethics is a term used in academia to describe human-animal relationships and how animals ought to be treated. (
  • Commission
  • Welcome to the official website of the Florida Commission on Ethics. (
  • Each year, the Commission makes recommendations for legislation in an effort to improve Florida's Code of Ethics and its enforcement. (
  • SCA Communication Ethics Commission - Newsletter" (PDF). (
  • possible
  • So far ethics had a strong element of the latter, being the precautionary voice of the possible victims. (
  • community
  • Ethics is about how individuals should best live, while the study of politics is from the perspective of a law-giver, looking at the good of a whole community. (
  • Narrative ethics is an approach that focuses on personal identity through story, and particular events in the life story of the individual or community. (
  • philosophy
  • The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values. (
  • Average and total utilitarianism Mere addition paradox (also called the repugnant conclusion) Person-affecting view Overpopulation The Asymmetry (population ethics) Population Ethics, Aggregate Welfare, and the Repugnant Conclusion The Repugnant Conclusion in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy On the Buddhist Truths and the Paradoxes in Population Ethics Greaves, Hilary. (
  • include
  • Perspectives in population ethics include natalism (encouraging childbearing and population growth) and antinatalism (which sees birth as undesirable). (
  • Values
  • In ethics, two values (or norms, reasons, or goods) are incommensurable (or incommensurate, or incomparable) when they do not share a common standard of measurement or cannot be compared to each other in a certain way. (
  • University
  • Communication ethics is also a division of the NCA (National Communication Association) which was established by Western Michigan University in 1985, as well the NCA has adopted a Credo for Ethical Communication. (
  • modern
  • German philosophers Jürgen Habermas and Karl-Otto Apel are considered the originators of modern discourse ethics. (