*  Capitellar Fractures: Background, Etiology, Epidemiology

... the eponym for this fracture pattern includes their names. ... the eponym for this fracture pattern includes their names. ...
https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1238203-overview

*  Some Obscure Eponyms : Thinkmap Visual Thesaurus

Eponyms are everywhere- in science, medicine, the arts. This list focuses on words that are historically eponyms but are so ... In this list, the history of eponyms you didn't realize were eponyms is revealed. ... When something is named after a person or a place or a company, we call that name an eponym. If you know anyone who says "Get ... The status of this eponym is a little unclear. The most probable candidate is William Lynch, who lead a group dispensing ...
https://visualthesaurus.com/wordlists/442184

*  Pigmentary Glaucoma: An Unusual Association with Wagner Syndrome | MedCrave

... under the eponym "Wagner disease" who showed a vitreal degeneration in association with an increased incidence of retinal ...
googlescholar.medcraveonline.com/scholars/article_fulltext/961

*  Guillain-Barré syndrome in children: Epidemiology, clinical features, and diagnosis

The acute immune-mediated polyneuropathies are classified under the eponym Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), after the authors of ... The acute immune-mediated polyneuropathies are classified under the eponym Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), after the authors of ...
uptodate.com/contents/guillain-barre-syndrome-in-children-epidemiology-clinical-features-and-diagnosis

*  A list of Eponyms

Eponyms. Eponyms are words and phrases that originate from a person's name. Here's a select list. ...
https://phrases.org.uk/meanings/eponyms.html

*  Medical abbreviations & eponyms for

Book, English, Medical abbreviations & eponyms for
philadelphia.edu.jo/newlibrary/eng/academic-journal/667-english-books/152549-engb-152549

*  Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms

What is an eponym?. An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus ... This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here ... Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical ... is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. ... Alternative eponyms. *Kveim-Nickerson skin test. *Nickerson- ...
whonamedit.com/synd.cfm/556.html

*  Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms

What is an eponym?. An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus ... Related eponyms. *Sydenham's chorea. Bibliography. Thomas Sydenham, English physician, born (or at least baptized) September 10 ... This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here ... Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical ...
whonamedit.com/doctor.cfm/1989.html

*  Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms

What is an eponym?. An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus ... deserving to be commemorated in the eponym "Brachmann- de Lange syndrome." This conjoined eponym is now generally accepted, ... This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here ... Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical ...
whonamedit.com/synd.cfm/1080.html

*  Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms

What is an eponym?. An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus ... Related eponyms. *Churg-Strauss disease. Bibliography. American pathologist, born April 15, 1913, Nürnberg, Germany; died July ... This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here ... Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical ...
whonamedit.com/doctor.cfm/2350.html

*  Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms

What is an eponym?. An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus ... This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here ... Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical ... It turned out to be comparatively common and numerous reports followed; the triple eponym enjoyed immediate favour and it has ...
whonamedit.com/synd.cfm/1019.html

*  The Empress - Style Invitational contest Week 892: Get a move on, plus eponyms

in which we asked you to create eponyms, words or terms based on someone's name: Many people used the verb 'rangel' to mean ...
washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/29/AR2010102903362.html

*  Search Results for 'NLM Publications and Productions' 'Abstracting and Indexing as Topic' 'Eponyms'

You searched for: Collections NLM Publications and Productions Remove constraint Collections: NLM Publications and Productions Abstracting and Indexing as Topic Remove constraint Abstracting and Indexing as Topic Eponyms Remove constraint Eponyms Start Over ...
https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/?f[drep2.isMemberOfCollection][]=DREPNLMP&f[drep2.subjectAggregateDisplay][]=Abstracting and Indexing as Topic&f[drep2.subjectAggregateDisplay][]=Eponyms&sort=score desc

*  Prince William, Duke of Cambridge - Wikipedia

Eponyms[edit]. Awards. *Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Award, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_William_of_Wales

*  Sturge-Weber syndrome - Wikipedia

Eponym[edit]. It is named for William Allen Sturge and Frederick Parkes Weber.[10][11][12] ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturge–Weber_syndrome

*  Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia - Wikipedia

Eponym[edit]. It is named for Murk Jansen (1867-1935), a Dutch Orthopedic Surgeon.[1][2] ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaphyseal_chondrodysplasia,_Murk_Jansen_type

*  Chédiak-Higashi syndrome - Wikipedia

Eponym[edit]. It is named for the Cuban physician and serologist Alejandro Moisés Chédiak (1903-1993) and the Japanese ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chédiak–Higashi_syndrome

*  Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease - Wikipedia

Eponym[edit]. VKH syndrome is named for ophthalmologists Alfred Vogt from Switzerland and Yoshizo Koyanagi and Einosuke Harada ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VKH_disease

*  Brenner tumour - WOW.com

Eponym. It is named for Fritz Brenner (1877-1969), a German surgeon who characterized it in 1907.[4] The term "Brenner tumor" ...
wow.com/wiki/Brenner_tumour?s_pt=aolsem&s_chn=9

*  Jacques Dubois - Wikipedia

Koehler, Peter J., et al.(Editors) (October 15, 2000). Neurological Eponyms. Oxford University Press. p. 51. ISBN 978- ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Dubois

*  Tongue - Wikipedia

"Whonamedit? - A dictionary of medical eponyms. Ole Daniel Enersen.. *^ Jamrozik, T.; Wender, W. (January 1952). "Topographic ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tongue

*  Bone tissue - Wikipedia

"Whonamedit - dictionary of medical eponyms". www.whonamedit.com.. *^ American Heritage Society. "Osteoblast." Dictionary.com. ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortical_bone

*  Muslim facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Muslim

... eponym • acronym • antonym •metonym • Antrim • megrim •Leitrim • pilgrim • Purim • interim •passim • maxim • kibbutzim • ...
encyclopedia.com/philosophy-and-religion/islam/islam/muslim

*  Encuentra aquí información de Applied Linguistics para tu escuela ¡Entra ya! | Rincón del Vago

Boycott: Eponym. 28-IV-2005. Learners invent and borrow new words. Sometime children try to give an English pronunciation to ...
html.rincondelvago.com/applied-linguistics.html

List of medical eponyms with Nazi associations: This article lists medical eponyms which have been associated with Nazi human experimentation or Nazi politics. While normally eponyms used in medicine serve to honor the memory of the physician or researcher who first documented a disease or pioneered a procedure, the propriety of such names resulting from unethical research practices is controversial.Mass suicides in 1945 Nazi Germany: Mass suicides in 1945 Nazi Germany among civilians, government officials and military personnel alike occurred with unusual frequency during the final weeks of Nazi Germany and the end of World War II in Europe for numerous reasons. These include the influence of Nazi propaganda, reaction to the suicide of Adolf Hitler, loyalty to the tenets of the Nazi Party, the nation's impending defeat in war, the anticipated Allied occupation of Nazi Germany, and fears of harsh treatment at the hands of military personnel both from the Western armies and the Soviet army.Ramush HaradinajBibliography of The Holocaust: This is a selected bibliography and other resources for The Holocaust.Saint-Florent Cathedral: Saint-Florent Cathedral or Nebbio Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Florent de Saint-Florent, also known as Cathédrale du Nebbio) is a former Roman Catholic cathedral and French national monument located in the town of Saint-Florent in Corsica. It is now the church of Santa Maria Assunta.Prosection: A prosection is the dissection of a cadaver (human or animal) or part of a cadaver by an experienced anatomist in order to demonstrate for students anatomic structure."Prosection.Harry Kane (illustrator): Harry Kane (Kirchner) (July 2, 1912 - March 1988) was a twentieth century American illustrator and artist who was born Harry Kirchner and was of Russian/Jewish descent. Primarily known for his work on the children's books, "The Three Investigators", he had a career that spanned over 50 years, doing work on paperback covers, advertising art, men's adventure magazines, movie posters and much more.The Flash ChroniclesInternational Committee on Aeronautical Fatigue and Structural IntegrityHuman subject research legislation in the United States: Human subject research legislation in the United States can be traced to the early 20th century. Human subject research in the United States was mostly unregulated until the 20th century, as it was throughout the world, until the establishment of various governmental and professional regulations and codes of ethics.

(1/21) Gender differences in diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease from 1981 to 1997. No evidence for the Yentl syndrome.

AIMS: The aim of the present clinical study was to evaluate whether gender-related differences existed as regards the extent and localization of coronary artery lesions in patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease, and whether these angiographic findings would lead to differences in further management. METHODS AND RESULTS: Over a 16-year period (1981-1997) we evaluated 1894 patients (1526 men, 368 women) with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (luminal stenosis >/=60%). For each patient the coronary angiographic results and subsequent revascularization procedures (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft surgery) were analysed. The study period was divided into the early angioplasty years (1981 to 1989) and the current angioplasty years (1990-1997). No gender differences in extent and localization of coronary angiographic lesions were observed. In men and women the incidence of single-vessel disease was 42% and 40%, two-vessel disease 27% and 27%, three-vessel disease 26% and 24%, and left main disease 5% and 8%, respectively (P=ns). Localization of disease in men and women was 36% and 39% for the left anterior descending coronary artery, 34% and 32% for the right coronary artery, and 27% and 26% for the left circumflex coronary artery, respectively (P=ns). There was a significant shift from multi-vessel disease towards single-vessel disease in both men and women (both P<0.001). As to subsequent management, a significant gender difference in favour of women was observed (P=0.021). Over time, the number of angioplasty procedures increased significantly from 11.6% to 23.2% for men (P<0.001), and for women from 17.6% to 28.0% (P=0.025), whereas the number of coronary artery bypass procedures decreased in men from 34.9% to 29. 5% (P=0.024) and in women from 42.6% to 30.6% (P=0.019). Referral to angioplasty (n=535) and coronary artery bypass surgery (n=616) in relation to the extent of the disease did not show any gender bias in favour of men. CONCLUSIONS: Our angiographic findings did not show significant gender differences as regards the extent and localization of coronary artery disease in patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. More importantly, no substantial evidence could be found for under-referral of women to subsequent therapeutic management. Therefore our study questions the presence of Yentl syndrome in the current era.  (+info)

(2/21) John Langdon Down: the man and the message.

John Langdon Down was the son of a village grocer. Born in Torpoint, Cornwall, in 1828, he was the 6th child of religious parents. He worked in the family business until he was 18 years old and he then qualified as a pharmacist before ultimately entering medical school at the London Hospital. He won numerous medals and prizes and immediately after taking his medical degree he was appointed medical superintendent of the Royal Earlswood Asylum for Idiots in Surrey. He reformed the institution and his efforts at classification resulted in his description of what he called Mongolian idiocy. His findings were based on measurements of the diameters of the head and of the palate and on his series of clinical photographs. He was a pioneer of the use of photography in hospitals. Mongolian idiocy became a widely used term but in 1961 a group of genetic experts wrote to the Lancet suggesting four alternatives. The editor chose Down's syndrome. WHO endorsed this later. Langdon Down was a supporter of liberal causes. He made important contributions to medical science, developed a large practice and he died a wealthy man in 1896. Normansfield, his private training and educational centre, had an international reputation. Only recently has his place in medical history been recognized.  (+info)

(3/21) Identifying proper names in parallel medical terminologies.

We propose several criteria to identify proper names in biomedical terminologies. Traditional, pattern-based methods that rely on the immediate context of a proper name are not applicable. However, the availability of translations of some terminologies supports methods based on invariant words instead. A combination of five criteria achieved 86% precision and 88% recall on the 16,401 word forms of the International Classification of Diseases.  (+info)

(4/21) The mystery of the Doctor's son, or the riddle of West syndrome.

Although the eponym "West syndrome" is used widely for infantile spasms, the originators of the term and the time frame of its initial use are not well known. This article provides historical details about Dr. West, about his son who had infantile spasms, and about the circumstances leading to the coining of the term West syndrome.  (+info)

(5/21) The Babinski sign.

Babinski's life and the story of the Babinski sign are summarised. The physiological basis of the sign is discussed.  (+info)

(6/21) Syndrome--a changing concept.

Syndrome is one of the oldest terms in the medical vocabulary. Traditionally, the term has been used mainly as a designation for complex medical entities, such as multiple abnormalities, that are characterized by clusters of concurring symptoms, usually three or more. During the mid-twentieth century, the meaning and the use of the term were altered. First to take place was an attempt to eliminate physicians' names from syndrome nomenclature, resulting in a significant increase in the use of descriptive designations in proportion to eponyms. But the trend was counterbalanced by the creation of new classes of eponyms. Eponymous syndrome nomenclature now includes the names of literary characters, patients' surnames, subjects of famous paintings, famous persons, geographic locations, institutions, biblical figures, and mythological characters. This was followed by a relaxation in the scope of the definition of syndrome, wherein the term could also be used as a modifier indicating a special (sometimes unspecified) complexity of an already named pathological condition. Eventually syndrome changed from its original use as an exclusively medical term and came to mean anything unusual, abnormal, bizarre, or humorous, whether medical, social, behavioral, or cultural. This unrestrained use of the term is the principal cause of an enormous volume of the sometimes irrelevant syndrome literature cluttering databases in the MEDLARS system and of the deterioration of "SYNDROME" as a specific MeSH term and a useful search parameter.  (+info)

(7/21) Neurological eponyms derived from literature and visual art.

Eponyms are common in medicine, and neurology is not an exception. Most neurological eponyms originate from the names of those who first described a disease or pathological condition, as well as from the names of characters from the literature and mythical or biblical heroes. The article describes en block both widespread and nowadays seldom used or even forgotten neurological eponyms derived from literature and visual art.  (+info)

(8/21) Reflections on eponyms in neuroscience terminology.

Eponyms have played a very significant linguistic role in technical and scientific terminology. They are an important feature of language that have contributed for a long time to engraving in history the names of those researchers who have devoted their lives to scientific discovery. In the field of medical terminology, they are an asset, although their semantic effectiveness has constituted a long-standing debate. We will analyze how language contributes to the advance of science and technology and the current position of eponyms in the health sciences. Eponymy in neuroscience has been used for a long time as a way to identify and recognize scientific issues, such as diseases, syndromes, methods, processes, substances, organs, and parts of organs as a way to honor those who, in a certain way, contributed to the progress of science. However, sometimes those honors do not correspond to the real contributors, thus receiving a nondeserved acknowledgment. Another problem with eponymic references is the lack of information about the matter in hand, because eponyms do not provide any clear information leading to the identification of the situation under study, as they are not reasonably descriptive. The aim of this article is to encourage the use of descriptive terms instead of eponyms and to establish a system of scientific nomenclature to consolidate the use of the language as a means of conveying scientific information among experts.  (+info)



words


  • Eponyms are words and phrases that originate from a person's name. (phrases.org.uk)
  • This list focuses on words that are historically eponyms but are so common that their history of deriving from names has been obscured. (visualthesaurus.com)
  • in which we asked you to create eponyms, words or terms based on someone's name: Many people used the verb 'rangel' to mean round up funding for a pet project. (washingtonpost.com)

Medical


  • A medical eponym is thus any word related to medicine, whose name is derived from a person. (whonamedit.com)
  • Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. (whonamedit.com)
  • This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. (whonamedit.com)
  • In a review in 1985, John Marius Opitz (1935-) commented: "Brachmann's paper is a classic of Western Medical iconography, deserving to be commemorated in the eponym "Brachmann- de Lange syndrome. (whonamedit.com)

List


  • In this list, the history of eponyms you didn't realize were eponyms is revealed. (visualthesaurus.com)

name


  • When something is named after a person or a place or a company, we call that name an eponym . (visualthesaurus.com)
  • An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. (whonamedit.com)

common


  • This conjoined eponym is now generally accepted, although the term "de Lange" or Cornelia de Lange's syndrome is also common. (whonamedit.com)

medicine