Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)United StatesTeaching: The educational process of instructing.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Vocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Schools: Educational institutions.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Great BritainForecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Self-Evaluation Programs: Educational programs structured in such a manner that the participating professionals, physicians, or students develop an increased awareness of their performance, usually on the basis of self-evaluation questionnaires.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.CaliforniaFaculty, Nursing: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a nursing school.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Information Science: The field of knowledge, theory, and technology dealing with the collection of facts and figures, and the processes and methods involved in their manipulation, storage, dissemination, publication, and retrieval. It includes the fields of COMMUNICATION; PUBLISHING; LIBRARY SCIENCE; and informatics.Natural Science Disciplines: The sciences dealing with processes observable in nature.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Job Application: Process of applying for employment. It includes written application for employment or personal appearance.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Public Health Dentistry: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance of oral health through promoting organized dental health programs at a community, state, or federal level.Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Evidence-Based Dentistry: An approach or process of practicing oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinical relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. (from J Am Dent Assoc 134: 689, 2003)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Vocational Guidance: Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Newfoundland and Labrador: Province of Canada consisting of the island of Newfoundland and an area of Labrador. Its capital is St. John's.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Awards and PrizesSelf-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.

*  Alumni - About - Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education

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*  Optimizing Graduate Medical Education - Initiatives - AAMC

Graduate medical education (GME) in the United States is at a critical juncture. The AAMC and its member institutions are ... Optimizing Graduate Medical Education: A Five-Year Road Map for America's Medical Schools, Teaching Hospitals and Health ... Graduate medical education (GME) in the United States is at a critical juncture:. Changing demographics, exponential growth in ... Medical schools, teaching hospitals, and health systems are adapting education and training programs to meet these needs. ...
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*  Behavior Therapy Institute, Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic, Pittsburgh, PA, Postgraduate Training in Cognitive...

POST-GRADUATE CERTIFICATE Post Graduate/APRN Certificate Programs Purpose This distance education program is designed for the ... Date and rank of first Duke Faculty appointment: 2005 2008, Medical Center Instructor DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER CURRICULUM ... Adjunct Instructor: Fall 2013 Courses taught: NUR 6319: Curriculum and Instruction in Nursing Education (Graduate Course) 1 ... o Associate Dean of Graduate Education (see Service below for selected responsibilities and accomplishments in this role) and ...
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Nihon UniversityRon WaksmanSchool health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.Postgraduate training in general dentistry: ==Australia==Syllabus: A syllabus (pl. syllabi) is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course.DJ College of Dental Sciences and Research: Divya Jyoti (DJ) College of Dental Sciences and Research is a dental college located in Modinagar in the nagar panchayat of Niwari in Ghaziabad district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The founder and chairman is Ajit Singh Jassar.Online patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.Becky JamesList of medical schools in the United KingdomAtlantic University: Atlantic University is private, distance education institution of higher and continuing education in Virginia Beach, Virginia. It is associated with Edgar Cayce's Association for Research and Enlightenment (A.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Leiden International Medical Student ConferenceNational Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories: National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (NABL).American Osteopathic Board of Neurology and Psychiatry: United StatesDental Schools Council: The Dental Schools Council represents the interests of UK dental schools as it relates to national health, wealth, knowledge acquisition through teaching, research, and the profession of dentistry.Universities UK http://www.Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation: The Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) was established for the development, administration, and evaluation of a program for certification in oncology nursing. Incorporated in 1984 and governed by a board of directors, ONCC is the certifying body for oncology nursing and meets standards established by the Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.Fellowship (medicine): A fellowship is the period of medical training in the United States and Canada that a physician or dentist may undertake after completing a specialty training program (residency). During this time (usually more than one year), the physician is known as a fellow.Antenor Orrego Private UniversityStandard evaluation frameworkQ Services Corps (South Africa): The establishment of the 'Q' Services Corps as part of the South African Permanent Force was promulgated in the Government Gazette dated 10 November 1939.Typed copy of Proclamation 276 of 1939Upsilon Phi Delta: Upsilon Phi Delta (ΥΦΔ) is the national academic honor society for students in healthcare administration in the United States. The organization was formed in 1965 to further the profession of health administration and the professional competence and dedication of its members.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.KamaladalamGeneral Medicine Faculty of RostGMU (Rostov State Medical University): Rostov State Medical University, Faculty of General Medicine - Located in Rostov city center with 20 departments, each departments has its own clinics with numbers of beds.Special education in the United Kingdom: 'Special Educational Needs' is an umbrella term for an aspect of UK school education focusing on students primarily with learning difficulties and/or disability. In school documents, it is abbreviated to 'SEN' / 'SEND' – these abbreviations are also used in Commonwealth countries such as Australia and Singapore.Samuel Bard (physician): Samuel Bard (April 1, 1742 – May 24, 1821) was an American physician. He founded the first medical school in New York.Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Graphic facilitation: Graphic Facilitation is the use of large scale imagery to lead groups and individuals towards a goal. The method is used in various processes such as meetings, seminars, workshops and conferences.VII Photo Agency: VII is an international photo agency wholly owned and governed by its membership.The Republican War on Science: The Republican War on Science is a 2005 book by Chris C. Mooney, an American journalist who focuses on the politics of science policy.Professional student: The term Professional student has two uses in the university setting:American Board of Anesthesiology: The American Board of Anesthesiology sets standards and exams for the accreditation of Board certified anesthesiologists coming to the end of their residency. It is one of the 24 medical specialty boards that constitutes the American Board of Medical Specialties.Pre-health sciences: Pre-health sciences refers to the undergraduate courses to prepare American college students for admission in medical, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, veterinary, and physical therapy schools, and for training as a physician assistant. In the United States, colleges have moved away from the impractical designation of students as "Pre-med" majors, as only a small percentage of applicants actually achieve admission into medical schools.USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge: The USMLE-Step 2-CK ("Clinical Knowledge") is the nine-hour-long multiple-choice portion of the second part of the United States Medical Licensure Examination.Step 2 CK Content Description Online, from United States Medical Licensing Examination, accessed 22 December, 2009 It assesses clinical knowledge through a traditional, multiple-choice examination.Kiten (program)Mercuriade: Mercuriade was an Italian physician, surgeon and medical author in the 14th century. She is one of the few woman physicians known from the Middle Ages.Cigarette smoking among college students: The rates of college students smoking in the United States have fluctuated for the past twenty years. Majority of lifelong smokers begin smoking habits before the age of 24, which makes the college years a crucial time in the study of cigarette consumption.Manganin: Manganin is a trademarked name for an alloy of typically 86% copper, 12% manganese, and 2% nickel. It was first developed by Edward Weston in 1892, improving upon his Constantan (1887).Louis Melsens: Louis-Henri-Frédéric Melsens (1814 in Leuven – 1886 in Brussels) was a Belgian physicist and chemist. In 1846, he became professor of chemistry in the Veterinary School in Kureghem.Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health: The Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health is one of the eight colleges of Georgia Southern University, located in Statesboro, Georgia, in the United States.Charles Alfred Tyrrell: Charles Alfred Tyrrell(1843–1918) was a promoter of medical devices, most notably an enema appliance. He was also author of tracts promoting the use of his device for colon cleansing as therapy for detoxification pursuant to a theory of auto-intoxication.Blitzkrieg Booking and Promotions: Blitzkrieg Booking and Promotions was founded in 2000 as a musical management company. The company held a staff of over 200 members and had contractual management with over a dozen bands.Minati SenCanadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.Utah College of Dental HygieneThe Flash ChroniclesUnited States Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs: The United States Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs was a select committee of the United States Senate between 1968 and 1977. It was sometimes referred to as the McGovern committee, after its only chairperson, Senator George McGovern of South Dakota.Hacettepe University: ) Suburban ()Let's Move!: Let's Move! seeks to combat the epidemic of childhood obesity and encourage a healthy lifestyle through "a comprehensive, collaborative, and community-oriented initiative that addresses all of the various factors that lead to childhood obesity [.Ethical decisionJob satisfaction: Job satisfaction or employee satisfaction has been defined in many different ways. Some believe it is simply how content an individual is with his or her job, in other words, whether or not they like the job or individual aspects or facets of jobs, such as nature of work or supervision.

(1/1514) Follow-up of American Cancer Society Special Postdoctoral Research Fellowship recipients.

A follow-up study of the 44 recipients of American Cancer Society, Inc., Special Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from 1962 to 1973 revealed that 11 of 21 M.D. candidates obtained their second (Ph.D.) degree at the end of training. By contrast, all but one among the 23 Ph.D. candidates were awarded the second (M.D.) degree. A great majority of either group remain in active research, regardless of whether or not they obtained the second degree. A very high percentage of their research is cancer related.  (+info)

(2/1514) Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada.  (+info)

(3/1514) The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: a 21-year longitudinal study.

To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-year program developed to select and produce students likely to enter primary care fields; and Group 3, those accepted with advanced standing into the third year who spent the first two years at a foreign medical school. All three groups took the identical last two years of clinical training at the School of Medicine. These were no significant differences with respect to initial choice of generalist training programs among all three groups, with 46% of the total cohort selecting generalist training. Of those students who chose generalist programs, 58% in Group 1, 51% in Group 2, and 41% in Group 3 remained in these fields rather than progressing to fellowship training. This difference was significant only with respect to Group 3. However, when an analysis was performed among those students providing only primary care as compared to only specialty care, there were no significant differences. Analysis by gender revealed women to be more likely to select generalist fields and remain in these fields without taking specialty training (P < .0001). Differentiating characteristics with respect to choosing generalist fields were not related to either Part I or Part II scores on National Board Examinations or selection to AOA. However, with respect to those specific specialties considered quite competitive (general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and ophthalmology), total test scores on Part I and Part II were significantly higher than those of all other students. The analysis indicated that, despite the diverse characteristics of students entering the third year at the School of Medicine, no one group produced a statistically greater proportion of generalists positions than any other, and academic performance while in medical school did not have a significant influence on whether a student entered a generalist field.  (+info)

(4/1514) Attracting and training more chemical pathologists in the United Kingdom.

I have attempted to define the function of the medical graduate in the clinical biochemistry laboratory and have examined data on recrutiment in the United Kingdom into clinical biochemistry. If trainee pathologists were encouraged to become proficient in both a branch of clinical medicine and in research techniques, the resulting chemical pathologists should be able to improve the consultative and investigative functions of the laboratory. To this end I have suggested some changes in the training regulations and in the role of the chemical pathologists.  (+info)

(5/1514) Bridging the gap between managed care and academic medicine: an innovative fellowship.

Numerous challenges face academic medicine in the era of managed care. This environment is stimulating the development of innovative educational programs that can adapt to changes in the healthcare system. The U.S. Quality Algorithms Managed Care Fellowship at Jefferson Medical College is one response to these challenges. Two postresidency physicians are chosen as fellows each year. The 1-year curriculum is organized into four 3-month modules covering such subjects as biostatistics and epidemiology, medical informatics, the theory and practice of managed care, managed care finance, integrated healthcare systems, quality assessment and improvement, clinical parameters and guidelines, utilization management, and risk management. The fellowship may serve as a possible prototype for future post-graduate education.  (+info)

(6/1514) Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes.

In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.  (+info)

(7/1514) Correlating fibreoptic nasotracheal endoscopy performance and psychomotor aptitude.

We have investigated the correlation between the scores attained on computerized psychometric tests, measuring psychomotor and information processing aptitudes, and learning fibreoptic endoscopy with the videoendoscope. Sixteen anaesthetic trainees performed two adaptive tracking tasks (ADTRACK 2 and ADTRACK 3) and one information management task (MAZE) from the MICROPAT testing system. They then embarked on a standardized fibreoptic training programme during which they performed 15 supervised fibreoptic nasotracheal intubations on anaesthetized oral surgery patients. There was a significant correlation between the means of the 15 endoscopy times and both ADTRACK 2 (r = -0.599, P = 0.014) and ADTRACK 3 (r = -0.589, P = 0.016) scores. The correlation between the means of the 15 endoscopy times and MAZE scores was not significant. The ratios of the mean endoscopy time for the last seven endoscopies to the mean endoscopy time for the first seven endoscopies were not significantly correlated with ADTRACK 2, ADTRACK 3 or MAZE scores. Psychomotor abilities appeared to be determinants of trainees' initial proficiency in endoscopy, but did not appear to be determinants of trainees' rates of progress during early fibreoptic training.  (+info)

(8/1514) The UMDS MSc in general practice: attainment of intended outcomes.

BACKGROUND: The United Medical and Dental School's (UMDS's) MSc in general practice is one of the longest running courses of its kind. Although descriptive accounts of such courses have been published, little is known about their outcomes. AIM: To measure the extent to which graduates feel they have personally achieved 16 intended outcomes derived from the course objectives, and to record current academic activities, particularly teaching and research. METHOD: A postal questionnaire to graduates of the UMDS MSc in General Practice. RESULTS: The response rate was 93%. Of the 71 responders, 23 have gone on to register for or complete other degrees or diplomas. Over two-thirds of responders had an academic commitment following the MSc. Two-thirds were currently engaged in research and over half reported having had work accepted for publication. The majority of graduates confirmed the attainment of all 16 outcomes, although outcomes related to personal achievements were endorsed more strongly than those related to service delivery. CONCLUSION: UMDS graduates are making a significant contribution to their discipline and are unanimous in describing the course as an important event in their personal development. As a result of this study, the course organizers are seeking to increase the links between academic study and everyday practice.  (+info)



centers


  • It is designed to provide U.S. teaching hospitals, medical centers, health systems, and other clinical settings affiliated with ACGME-accredited institutions with periodic feedback. (bcm.edu)
  • Innovation insider is a semi-monthly e-newsletter analyzes innovations at Boston Children's, other academic medical centers and from industry. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Under the new policy, the organization will encourage insurance payers and foundations to enter into partnerships with state and local agencies, as well as academic medical centers and community hospitals, to expand GME funding. (marketwired.com)

teaching hospitals


  • Medical schools, teaching hospitals, and health systems are adapting education and training programs to meet these needs. (aamc.org)
  • Learn about policy issues important to medical schools and teaching hospitals, with Executive Vice President Atul Grover, M.D., Ph.D. (aamc.org)
  • Resident physicians have graduated from medical school and typically spend three to seven years in graduate medical education (GME) training at teaching hospitals and their associated ambulatory settings. (aamc.org)
  • The Medicare program also provides special patient care payments to teaching hospitals, referred to as indirect medical education (IME) payments, to account for the higher costs of the complex patients teaching hospitals treat and the highly specialized care they provide. (aamc.org)
  • Cuts to GME funding would jeopardize the ability of medical schools and teaching hospitals to train physicians, nurses, and other health care providers, as well as limit critical services to the community. (aamc.org)
  • The briefing highlighted the role of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) affiliated medical schools and teaching hospitals across their three shared missions of patient care, education, and research, as well as how these partnerships ultimately benefit veterans and all Americans. (aamc.org)

residents


  • The Medicare program is committed to paying its share of the costs of educating residents and provides special payments, called direct graduate medical education (DGME) payments, to hospitals to cover costs directly related to educating residents. (aamc.org)
  • At the University of Rochester Medical Center, our Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program trains its residents to acquire the essential knowledge and technical skills for rehabilitation and well-being of patients. (rochester.edu)
  • Training at SampsonRMC offers a unique opportunity for medical students and residents to learn rural medicine in a progressive, community-based medical facility and train alongside primary care physicians and specialists within the local community. (sampsonrmc.org)

practice


  • The publication reports on alumni accomplishments and informs readers about newsworthy activities at Mayo Clinic, including advances in clinical practice, education and research. (mayo.edu)
  • Our humanistic emphasis prepares each of our graduates to learn, teach and practice medicine with professionalism, compassion and discipline. (rochester.edu)
  • This includes increased funding for medical residency slots, development of innovative practice models as well as residency positions that reflect societal needs. (marketwired.com)

Program


  • Upon completion of this degree program, graduates should be able to exhibit the following. (rochester.edu)
  • The Graduate School of Medicine offers doctoral and master s programs, while the Graduate School of Nursing offers master s program. (fmu.ac.jp)
  • Each Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education program description includes application instructions and deadlines and identifies which application service you should use. (mayo.edu)
  • Review the application process for the Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education program you wish to apply to. (mayo.edu)
  • Submit your completed application, the materials required for all Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education applications, and any additional supporting materials through the application process specified for the Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education program you are applying to. (mayo.edu)
  • Ask your medical, graduate and/or dental school to send a letter directly to the education coordinator listed in the application process of the program to which you are applying. (mayo.edu)
  • The University of Rochester Medical Center's Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program is sponsored by Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) - a 850-bed, Level I trauma center that serves as URMC's main teaching hospital. (rochester.edu)
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program students, Aleta Steevens ( Dr. Amy Kiernan lab ) and Heather Natola ( Dr. Chris Pröschel lab ) were awarded the 2016 Edward Peck Curtis Award for Excellence for Graduate Student Teaching. (rochester.edu)
  • The Graduate Medical Education Program at Sampson Regional Medical Center is an important part of our hospital's mission to provide quality services and improved access to care in the communities we serve. (sampsonrmc.org)
  • To secure a rotation and receive an educational credit, fourth-year visiting medical students must first contact UC San Diego's visiting student program. (rchsd.org)

school


  • Mayo Alumni magazine is published quarterly and mailed free of charge to alumni, faculty and friends of Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education. (mayo.edu)
  • They're proud of their Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education training and of their lifelong connection to Mayo Clinic. (mayo.edu)
  • Graduate School of Medicine and Graduate School of Nursing aim to nurture scientific researchers and healthcare professionals who can contribute to development of medicine and nursing. (fmu.ac.jp)
  • Transcripts must indicate degree earned and date conferred from each medical, graduate and/or dental school you attended. (mayo.edu)
  • Valid ECFMG certificate required if you graduated from a medical school outside the U.S. or Canada. (mayo.edu)
  • We've committed to becoming a training facility for medical students through a partnership with Campbell University Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine (CUSOM). (sampsonrmc.org)
  • The AMA's Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative also addresses some of these issues by supporting medical school projects aimed at accelerating student progression through medical school allowing them to enter residency sooner and contribute more rapidly to expanding the physician workforce. (marketwired.com)
  • however, since Rady Children's is not a medical school, we cannot offer academic credit. (rchsd.org)
  • To receive educational credit, all fourth-year medical students must have their rotation at Rady Children's campus approved by UCSD School of Medicine. (rchsd.org)

healthcare


  • Baylor College of Medicine is a health sciences university that creates knowledge and applies science and discoveries to further education, healthcare and community service locally and globally. (bcm.edu)
  • We offer group medical coverage administered by United Healthcare. (sampsonrmc.org)

residencies


  • The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education ( ACGME ) is the body responsible for accrediting the majority of graduate medical training programs (i.e., internships, residencies, and fellowships, a.k.a. subspecialty residencies) for physicians in the United States . (wikipedia.org)
  • We are both Rochester natives, and have attended out of area medical schools and residencies, and chose to return to Rochester for the variety of opportunities that it has to offer. (rochester.edu)

Physician Workforce


  • The Government Accountability Office (GAO) June 26 released its report, "Physician Workforce: Locations and Types of Graduate Training Were Largely Unchanged, and Federal Efforts May Not Be Sufficient to Meet Needs. (aamc.org)

programs


  • It is a non-profit private council that evaluates and accredits medical residency and internship programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • On October 24, 2012, the ACGME, the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) announced an agreement to pursue a single, unified accreditation system for graduate medical education programs in the United States beginning in July 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plans call for the ACGME to accredit all osteopathic graduate medical education programs currently accredited by AOA. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Office of Graduate Medical Education is the central administrative office for the Affiliated Hospitals Residency Programs, and coordinates and implements policies and procedures defined by the Graduate Medical Education Committee. (bcm.edu)

Fellowship


  • Holly Beaulac, 1st year student, received this year's Graduate Alumni Fellowship Award. (rochester.edu)
  • Helen Wei, Neuroscience and MD/PhD student in Dr. Maiken Nedergaard's lab was awarded the HHMI Med-Into-Grad Fellowship (September 2013-August 2014). (rochester.edu)

Funding


  • ATLANTA, GA --(Marketwired - November 17, 2015) - The American Medical Association (AMA) today renewed its support for securing alternative funding sources for graduate medical education (GME) to increase the number of medical residency slots needed to care for patients in today's health care system and to help address the national physician shortage. (marketwired.com)
  • These bills would increase funding for graduate medical education, improve access to health care for patients in underserved areas, and address physician shortages. (marketwired.com)
  • The AMA also supports the maintenance and expansion of GME as part of its SaveGME campaign, which urges Congress to protect federal funding for graduate medical education and preserve access to care in undersupplied specialties and underserved areas. (marketwired.com)

Specialties


  • The ACGME's member organizations are the American Board of Medical Specialties , American Hospital Association , American Medical Association , Association of American Medical Colleges , and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies each of whom appoints four members to the ACGME's board of directors. (wikipedia.org)

Contribute


  • In response to growing demands for high quality medical science and medical care, and for specialists who can take an active role in diverse medical fields, the graduate schools set their goals to nurture researchers and professionals who can contribute to progress in medicine and nursing, and to create new medical and nursing sciences. (fmu.ac.jp)
  • Have motivation to contribute to communities in the fields of public health, medical care and welfare. (fmu.ac.jp)

schools


  • The graduate schools offer postgraduate students opportunities to not only acquire profound academic knowledge and practical skills but also experience various medical settings. (fmu.ac.jp)

internship


  • For more information about our Traditional Rotating Internship, Dermatology Residency, or Family Medicine Residency, contact Cheryl Barefoot or Brittney Gainey , Graduate Medical Education Coordinators. (sampsonrmc.org)

Organization


  • The American Medical Association is the premier national organization dedicated to empowering the nation's physicians to continually provide safer, higher quality, and more efficient care to patients and communities. (marketwired.com)

physicians


  • We improve health care by assessing and advancing the quality of resident physicians' education through accreditation. (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] The ACGME currently oversees the post-graduate education and training for all MD and the majority of DO physicians in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Changing demographics, exponential growth in medical discovery, and new expectations about the way physicians and patients partner and interact are demanding innovative change in medical education and health care delivery. (aamc.org)
  • With our nation facing a serious shortage of between 61,700 and 94,700 physicians by 2025 , any number of medical students who do not have the opportunity to complete residency training is a serious concern. (aamc.org)

Societies


  • Describe your activities with professional societies, publications, and any other relevant information about your education or experience. (mayo.edu)

care


  • The AAMC joined over 70 national health organizations in a letter to congressional leadership urging them to ensure that all members of the health care workforce with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status are able to continue their employment, education, training, and research, with passage of a permanent legislative remedy, such as the bipartisan, bicameral Dream Act of 2017 (S. 1615, H.R. 3440). (aamc.org)
  • Each of these medical conditions requires long-term rehabilitation and assistance from a dedicated team of health care professionals. (rochester.edu)
  • Most recently, the AMA urged support of two federal bills, including the Creating Access to Residency Education (CARE) Act and the Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act of 2015. (marketwired.com)

student


  • Additionally, the AMA plans to increase public awareness of the importance of graduate medical education, student debt and the state of the medical profession. (marketwired.com)

science


  • Julianne Feola received a travel award from Graduate Women in Science to attend the Gordon Research Conference in Italy from June 29 - July 4,2014. (rochester.edu)

society


  • More and more people are living longer in our increasingly advanced society and they are faced with highly complex medical conditions. (rochester.edu)

Association


  • The Mayo Clinic Alumni Association will help you stay in touch with your Mayo colleagues and maintain a valuable professional connection to Mayo Clinic throughout your medical and/or research career. (mayo.edu)

available


  • Explore Mayo Clinic's many resources and see jobs available for medical professionals. (mayo.edu)