Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Diet, Reducing: A diet designed to cause an individual to lose weight.Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Diet, Fat-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of fat with less than 30% of calories from all fats and less than 10% from saturated fat. Such a diet is used in control of HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. (From Bondy et al, Metabolic Control and Disease, 8th ed, pp468-70; Dorland, 27th ed)Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Diet, Mediterranean: A diet typical of the Mediterranean region characterized by a pattern high in fruits and vegetables, EDIBLE GRAIN and bread, potatoes, poultry, beans, nuts, olive oil and fish while low in red meat and dairy and moderate in alcohol consumption.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Diet, Protein-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of protein. It is prescribed in some cases to slow the progression of renal failure. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Diet, Vegetarian: Dietary practice of completely avoiding meat products in the DIET, consuming VEGETABLES, CEREALS, and NUTS. Some vegetarian diets called lacto-ovo also include milk and egg products.Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of CARBOHYDRATES. This is in distinction to a regular DIET.Ketogenic Diet: A course of food intake that is high in FATS and low in CARBOHYDRATES. This diet provides sufficient PROTEINS for growth but insufficient amount of carbohydrates for the energy needs of the body. A ketogenic diet generates 80-90% of caloric requirements from fats and the remainder from proteins.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Diet, Atherogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and acceleration of ATHEROGENESIS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Diet Therapy: By adjusting the quantity and quality of food intake to improve health status of an individual. This term does not include the methods of food intake (NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT).Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Diet Fads: Diets which become fashionable, but which are not necessarily nutritious.(Lehninger 1982, page 484)Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Diet, Sodium-Restricted: A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Diabetic Diet: A diet prescribed in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, usually limited in the amount of sugar or readily available carbohydrate. (Dorland, 27th ed)Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Diet, Gluten-Free: A diet which is devoid of GLUTENS from WHEAT; BARLEY; RYE; and other wheat-related varieties. The diet is designed to reduce exposure to those proteins in gluten that trigger INFLAMMATION of the small intestinal mucosa in patients with CELIAC DISEASE.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.TriglyceridesOrgan Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Caseins: A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Phosphorus, Dietary: Phosphorus used in foods or obtained from food. This element is a major intracellular component which plays an important role in many biochemical pathways relating to normal physiological functions. High concentrations of dietary phosphorus can cause nephrocalcinosis which is associated with impaired kidney function. Low concentrations of dietary phosphorus cause an increase in calcitriol in the blood and osteoporosis.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Protein Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of proteins in the diet, characterized by adaptive enzyme changes in the liver, increase in amino acid synthetases, and diminution of urea formation, thus conserving nitrogen and reducing its loss in the urine. Growth, immune response, repair, and production of enzymes and hormones are all impaired in severe protein deficiency. Protein deficiency may also arise in the face of adequate protein intake if the protein is of poor quality (i.e., the content of one or more amino acids is inadequate and thus becomes the limiting factor in protein utilization). (From Merck Manual, 16th ed; Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p406)Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Weight Loss: Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Diet, Macrobiotic: An approach to nutrition based on whole cereal grains, beans, cooked vegetables and the Chinese YIN-YANG principle. It advocates a diet consisting of organic and locally grown foods, seasonal vegetables, complex carbohydrates, and fewer fats, sugars, and chemically processed foods.Soybean Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from SOYBEANS.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Fatty Acids, Unsaturated: FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.Corn Oil: Oil from ZEA MAYS or corn plant.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Dietary Sucrose: Sucrose present in the diet. It is added to food and drinks as a sweetener.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.6-Phytase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate and water to 1L-myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5-pentakisphosphate and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.26.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Choline Deficiency: A condition produced by a deficiency of CHOLINE in animals. Choline is known as a lipotropic agent because it has been shown to promote the transport of excess fat from the liver under certain conditions in laboratory animals. Combined deficiency of choline (included in the B vitamin complex) and all other methyl group donors causes liver cirrhosis in some animals. Unlike compounds normally considered as vitamins, choline does not serve as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated: Fatty acids which are unsaturated in only one position.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Fatty Acids, Omega-3: A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.Mice, Inbred C57BLVegetable Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from vegetables or vegetable products used as food. The concept is distinguished from PLANT PROTEINS which refers to non-dietary proteins from plants.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Soybean Oil: Oil from soybean or soybean plant.Sodium, Dietary: Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.Rats, Inbred F344Methionine: A sulfur-containing essential L-amino acid that is important in many body functions.Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Fats: The glyceryl esters of a fatty acid, or of a mixture of fatty acids. They are generally odorless, colorless, and tasteless if pure, but they may be flavored according to origin. Fats are insoluble in water, soluble in most organic solvents. They occur in animal and vegetable tissue and are generally obtained by boiling or by extraction under pressure. They are important in the diet (DIETARY FATS) as a source of energy. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Caloric Restriction: Reduction in caloric intake without reduction in adequate nutrition. In experimental animals, caloric restriction has been shown to extend lifespan and enhance other physiological variables.Fructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Blood Urea Nitrogen: The urea concentration of the blood stated in terms of nitrogen content. Serum (plasma) urea nitrogen is approximately 12% higher than blood urea nitrogen concentration because of the greater protein content of red blood cells. Increases in blood or serum urea nitrogen are referred to as azotemia and may have prerenal, renal, or postrenal causes. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Nuts: Botanically, a type of single-seeded fruit in which the pericarp enclosing the seed is a hard woody shell. In common usage the term is used loosely for any hard, oil-rich kernel. Of those commonly eaten, only hazel, filbert, and chestnut are strictly nuts. Walnuts, pecans, almonds, and coconuts are really drupes. Brazil nuts, pistachios, macadamias, and cashews are really seeds with a hard shell derived from the testa rather than the pericarp.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Cholesterol, LDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to low density lipoproteins (LDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Selenium: An element with the atomic symbol Se, atomic number 34, and atomic weight 78.96. It is an essential micronutrient for mammals and other animals but is toxic in large amounts. Selenium protects intracellular structures against oxidative damage. It is an essential component of GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE.Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Phytic Acid: Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Linoleic Acid: A doubly unsaturated fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycosides. It is an essential fatty acid in mammalian nutrition and is used in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and cell membranes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Glycemic Index: A numerical system of measuring the rate of BLOOD GLUCOSE generation from a particular food item as compared to a reference item, such as glucose = 100. Foods with higher glycemic index numbers create greater blood sugar swings.Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Vitamin E: A generic descriptor for all TOCOPHEROLS and TOCOTRIENOLS that exhibit ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL activity. By virtue of the phenolic hydrogen on the 2H-1-benzopyran-6-ol nucleus, these compounds exhibit varying degree of antioxidant activity, depending on the site and number of methyl groups and the type of ISOPRENOIDS.Safflower Oil: An oily liquid extracted from the seeds of the safflower, Carthamus tinctorius. It is used as a dietary supplement in the management of HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA. It is used also in cooking, as a salad oil, and as a vehicle for medicines, paints, varnishes, etc. (Dorland, 28th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cholesterol, HDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Flax: A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Deficiency Diseases: A condition produced by dietary or metabolic deficiency. The term includes all diseases caused by an insufficient supply of essential nutrients, i.e., protein (or amino acids), vitamins, and minerals. It also includes an inadequacy of calories. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Amino Acids, Essential: Amino acids that are not synthesized by the human body in amounts sufficient to carry out physiological functions. They are obtained from dietary foodstuffs.Fatty Acids, Omega-6: FATTY ACIDS which have the first unsaturated bond in the sixth position from the omega carbon. A typical American diet tends to contain substantially more omega-6 than OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Fatty Acids, Nonesterified: FATTY ACIDS found in the plasma that are complexed with SERUM ALBUMIN for transport. These fatty acids are not in glycerol ester form.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Leptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Cocos: A plant genus of the family ARECACEAE. It is a tropical palm tree that yields a large, edible hard-shelled fruit from which oil and fiber are also obtained.Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Eggs: Animal reproductive bodies, or the contents thereof, used as food. The concept is differentiated from OVUM, the anatomic or physiologic entity.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Copper: A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.Nutrition Assessment: Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Cottonseed Oil: Oil obtained from the seeds of Gossypium herbaceum L., the cotton plant. It is used in dietary products such as oleomargarine and many cooking oils. Cottonseed oil is commonly used in soaps and cosmetics.alpha-Linolenic Acid: A fatty acid that is found in plants and involved in the formation of prostaglandins.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Fats, Unsaturated: Fats containing one or more double bonds, as from oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid.Dairy Products: Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.Vitamin E Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN E in the diet, characterized by posterior column and spinocerebellar tract abnormalities, areflexia, ophthalmoplegia, and disturbances of gait, proprioception, and vibration. In premature infants vitamin E deficiency is associated with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytosis, edema, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increasing risk of retrolental fibroplasia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. An apparent inborn error of vitamin E metabolism, named familial isolated vitamin E deficiency, has recently been identified. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1181)Amino Acids, SulfurRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Butter: The fatty portion of milk, separated as a soft yellowish solid when milk or cream is churned. It is processed for cooking and table use. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Hyperlipidemias: Conditions with excess LIPIDS in the blood.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Cellulose: A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.Pregnancy, Animal: The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Vitamin A: Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Vitamins: Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Isoflavones: 3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Linoleic Acids: Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain two double bonds.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Ketosis: A condition characterized by an abnormally elevated concentration of KETONE BODIES in the blood (acetonemia) or urine (acetonuria). It is a sign of DIABETES COMPLICATION, starvation, alcoholism or a mitochondrial metabolic disturbance (e.g., MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE).Litter Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by a viviparous animal.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Digestive System Physiological Phenomena: Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Potassium, Dietary: Potassium or potassium compounds used in foods or as foods.Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.Plants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Drinking: The consumption of liquids.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.

*  Endometriosis and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease | Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

Alternate healthy eating index 201035 is a score that measures adherence to a diet pattern based on foods and nutrients most ... a score that measures adherence to a diet pattern based on foods and nutrients most predictive of disease risk in the ...
circoutcomes.ahajournals.org/content/9/3/257/tab-figures-data

*  Royal Canin Canine Diet Gastro-Intestinal | Healthy Dog Food | Chemist Direct

... highly digestible diet. It is ideal nutrition for pets with intestinal disorders ... Gastro intestinal low fat is a complete diet for the dogs that require a very low fat, ... Royal Canin intestinal diet presents you with healthy dog food that is recommended for nutrition support of the following ... Royal Canin Canine Veterinary Diet Gastro-Intestinal provides you with a selection of only the best healthy dog food. The two ...
https://chemistdirect.co.uk/royal-canin-canine-veterinary-diet-gastro-intestinal/prd-4e2

*  DASH diet: Healthy eating to lower your blood pressure - Mayo Clinic

In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet ... Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet ... Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical ... The foods at the core of the DASH diet are naturally low in sodium. So just by following the DASH diet, you're likely to reduce ...
mayoclinic.org/dash-diet/ART-20048456?pg=2&p=1

*  dietary changes - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for dietary changes

My Diet Diary. Sugar Sense. Copyright 1994-2017 MedHelp International. All rights reserved.. MedHelp is a division of Aptus ...
medhelp.org/tags/show/33931/dietary-changes

*  The Diet Center | Four-Week Reducing System From The Diet Center | Sedalia - Warrensburg, MO | Seize the Deal

Four-Week Reducing System From The Diet Center View more by: The Diet Center ... Backed by over 40 years of experience, The Diet Center can help you achieve quick weight loss results. They will help you ... The system includes a food exchange program, first supply of Diet Center vitamins, body composition testing, a restaurant guide ... Diet Center Exclusively You reducing book, weekly visits with your certified weight loss trainer and valuable information to ...
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*  Feed Your Children a Balanced "Diet" of Technology | Psychology Today

The same holds true for your children's diet of technology. ... A balanced diet involves ensuring that your children get ... A balanced nutritional diet doesn't mean 50 percent healthy food and 50 percent junk food. Rather, a balanced diet involves ... If your technology diet balanced, your children are more likely to have a healthy diet of technology as well. ... Feed Your Children a Balanced "Diet" of Technology. Are your children consuming a healthy technology diet? ...
https://psychologytoday.com/blog/the-power-prime/201306/feed-your-children-balanced-diet-technology

*  Gut bacteria reflect dietary differences | Science News

"We should move our habits toward a diet more heavy in fiber, with the same amount of calories.". Animals have bacteria in their ... African children who eat a high-fiber diet (and the occasional wood-digesting insect) have gut bacteria that help them digest ...
https://sciencenews.org/article/gut-bacteria-reflect-dietary-differences?mode=magazine&context=715

*  What Does Alkaline Diet Mean? - Gourmet Services

The alkaline diet is also known as the acid-alkaline diet or alkaline ash diet, is high in potassium, magnesium and bicarbonate ... What Does Alkaline Diet Mean?. May 18, 2017. by admin Through out human history we've mostly eaten fruit, vegetables, and lean ... With the alkaline diet balance is key, and when it comes to our bodies' pH levels, it's the key to life. Our pH is a measure of ... The diet encourages eating mostly organic plant-based foods high in vitamin C, selenium, iron, and zinc, all of which sustain ...
gourmetservicesinc.com/alkaline-diet-mean/

*  When Should You Try A Low Carb Diet?

What is a low carb diet, really? When can a low carb diet be beneficial? Should everyone follow a low carb diet? Or, can a low ... She was on a LC diet on which her BGs went high after carbs and then switched to a vegan diet in which her BGs stayed normal ... At that point you haven't been on the diet long enough to know whether it will work for you. You must give the diet at least a ... Paleo Diet Challenges & Solutions*. The Paleo diet has the potential to dramatically improve your health-but the transition ...
https://chriskresser.com/when-should-you-try-a-low-carb-diet/

*  Consumption of a Diet Low in Advanced Glycation End Products for 4 Weeks Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Women |...

Advanced glycation end products in foods and a practical guide to their reduction in the diet. J Am Diet Assoc 2010;110:911-916 ... The urinary excretion of CML and MG-H1 indicates that the high-AGE diet corresponded well to the volunteers' habitual diet ... of IR was increased after a high-heat-treated diet, compared with a low-heat-treated diet (12), but the change in HOMA-IR was ... energy intake in that study was higher in the high-heat-treated diet than in the low-heat-treated diet, as were carbohydrate ...
care.diabetesjournals.org/content/37/1/88

*  3FatChicks on a Diet! - Diet & Weight Loss Support

The 5 Factor World Diet. The 5 factor world diet is virtually the same as the 5 factor diet. The only difference is the food ... You are at:Home»Diets»Diet Information»5 Factor Diet vs. 5 Factor World Diet ... The 5 Factor Diet or the 5 Factor World Diet. Both run on the same basic principals, but the world version includes foods and ... The 5 factor diet and the 5 factor world diet were both created by the same person, Harley Pasternak and was designed with ...
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*  What happens if you don't abide by the renal diet prescribed by your doctor? | Reference.com

... says Diet.com. Renal diets are designed to balance the patients'... ... Patients who have been prescribed a renal diet and fail to follow it experience a rapid worsening of their kidney disease ... What kind of diet should you follow if you have a single kidney?. A: People with only one kidney do not require a special diet ... What is the recommended diet plan for kidney patients?. A: The recommended diet plan for patients with kidney disease focuses ...
https://reference.com/health/happens-don-t-abide-renal-diet-prescribed-doctor-879a0d910851b70c

*  Specially formulated foods for dogs. | masslive.com

Your dog was put on a 'novel food' diet. For what reason? These diets are necessary for intestinal hypersensitivity to proteins ... Your dog was put on a "novel food" diet. For what reason? These diets are necessary for intestinal hypersensitivity to proteins ...
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*  Healthful Diet Should Be A Top Lifestyle Goal After Breast Cancer Treatment - Orlando Sentinel

They recommend a mostly plant-based diet with limited red meat and processed meats,' she says. 'The diet is heavy on vegetables ... Making small diet changes over time works better than many major changes at once, Malcher says. 'We try to get people to ... A healthful diet, physical exercise and proper body weight contribute to well-being at any age. These lifestyle goals are ... Fresh fruit also will lend color and fiber to the diet. 'Berries such as blueberries and blackberries, pomegranates and prunes ...
orlandosentinel.com/hc-breast-cancer-nutrition-20120930-story.html

*  Diet to Kill Parasites - Can Food Kill Parasites - InfoBarrel

The alkaline diet is sometimes called the PH Diet or Acid/Alkaline diet and we could also say the Anti Parasites Diet. It is ... The only diet that addresses parasites in the human body is the alkaline diet. ... the only diet designed to kill parasites. When you consume foods... ... The alkaline diet is sometimes called the PH Diet or Acid/Alkaline diet and we could also say the Anti Parasites Diet. It is ...
infobarrel.com/Diet_to_Kill_Parasites_-_Can_Food_Kill_Parasites

*  Diabetes Diet Review: Cheryls blood sugar went from 325 to 145 | Liquid Amino Diet

The Amino Diet Diabetes Program is a low glycemic diet with natural supplements that can help lower your blood sugar and help ... Diabetes Diet Review: Cheryls blood sugar went from 325 to 145†. Posted on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 I really don't know how to ... I started this diet on Jan.28, 2013 weighing 264 pounds, I wore size 26 in pants and 4x in tops. My goal was to become healthy ... I tried almost every diet out there only to have failed, it seemed as if nothing was going to help. My daughter in law told me ...
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*  7 Reasons Fad Diets Don't Work ... Diet

In order for a diet to work long-term, you have to learn what you're doing wrong now, so you can fix it, and move on to your ... It seems like every time I turn on the TV, there's a commercial for, or a study on, some crazy new fad diet. ... And there's a reason there's a new fad diet every few weeks - they don't work.2 ... Let's face it: even if sticking to the grapefruit or Grape-Nuts or grape-free diet works for you, you're never, ever going to ...
allwomenstalk.com/reasons-fad-diets-dont-work-2

*  THE ULTIMATE DIET PLAN

If you're slimming down on a diet of bacon and butter, it's not because you've reset your metabolism, as some diet gurus would ... the agency assembled an expert panel to review the evidence on diet and weight. Its findings, released in summary form last ... If you're slimming down on a diet of bacon and butter, it's not because you've reset your metabolism, as some diet gurus would ... THE ULTIMATE DIET PLAN. By Geoffrey Cowley On 1/21/01 at 7:00 PM ... agency assembled an expert panel to review the evidence on diet ...
newsweek.com/ultimate-diet-plan-150749

*  The F-Factor Diet

... , by Tanya Zuckerbrot, M.S., R.D., is a four-week plan that encourages you to add certain foods to your diet ... Perhaps the most important element of a diet is the food. And as we previously mentioned, The F-Factor Diet is all about ... we thought we would focus on a diet that is all about helping you eat more fiber: The F-Factor Diet. ... The F-Factor Diet. The American Dietetic Association has named March National Nutrition Month. But to help us think a bit more ...
dietsinreview.com/diet_column/03/the-f-factor-diet/

*  Getting to the Heart of a Healthful Diet: Fats | West Hills Hospital

Learn more about Getting to the Heart of a Healthful Diet: Fats at West Hills Hospital Related Media: Managing High Cholesterol ... Remember, fats eaten in moderation are a part of a healthy diet, so do not be afraid to add the right ingredients to your menu ... The trick is to know which fats are good and which are bad and create a balanced diet with this knowledge. Dietary choices can ... They should be the preferred choice in your diet. These fats are mostly plant-based and can be found on food labels as ...
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*  3FatChicks on a Diet! - Diet & Weight Loss Support

The average diet for a 140 pound woman is 2000 calories per day, but you'll need to change your figures, based on your height, ... You are at:Home»Diets»Diet Information»5 Tips to Make Counting Calories Easy ... 3FC began as a personal source of diet support for sisters Suzanne, Jennifer, and Amy in 1997. The site has grown considerably ...
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*  Diet and Eating Habits | RAND

RAND research on diet and eating habits investigates economic and social factors behind such concerns as diet choices, ... RAND research on diet and eating habits investigates economic and social factors behind such concerns as diet choices, ... Diet and Eating Habits. The ubiquity of food in developed nations does not necessarily imply that people will choose healthy ... New Nutrition Labels Will Do Little to Bring Quality to American Diet. Although good intentions led to the new nutrition labels ...
https://rand.org/topics/diet-and-eating-habits.html

*  Interstitial Cystitis and Diet - Interstitial Cystitis Association

Interstitial Cystitis and Diet Changes in diet help many patients control their symptoms and IC treatment guidelines recommend ... Other IC patients find that diet does not affect their flares.. While research into the link between IC and foods/beverages is ... Shorter completed the first validated, systematic food sensitivity questionnaire on IC and diet. ... "IC Diet," ICA worked with Medical Advisory Board Member Dr. Barbara Shorter*, Ed, RD, CDN and Barbara Gordon, RDN, LD, former ...
https://ichelp.org/living-with-ic/interstitial-cystitis-and-diet/

*  Diet - Business Insider

One type of diet is the best for your body and brain - but a lot of people are doing it wrong. *Erin Brodwin ... Men who eat a certain diet may be more attractive to women - but it has nothing to do with how they look. *Erin Brodwin ... A bodybuilder with a rare disorder died on a high-protein diet - here's how much you should have in a day. *Erin Brodwin ... Anna Kendrick's diet and exercise routine is surprisingly simple. *Shimal Bharadwaj, Spoon University ...
businessinsider.com/category/diet?page=2

*  mediterranean diet : NPR

mediterranean diet
npr.org/tags/172883560/mediterranean-diet/archive?start=placeholder&date=8-31-1997

Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.Dieter Weichert: Dieter Weichert (born 1948) is a German mechanical engineer specialising in solid mechanics and polymer rheology. Since 1995 he is the Director of the Institute for General Mechanics of RWTH Aachen.Dry matter: The dry matter (or otherwise known as dry weight) is a measurement of the mass of something when completely dried.Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid is a nutrition guide that was developed by Oldways, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the World Health Organization in 1993. It summarizes the Mediterranean Diet pattern of eating, suggesting the types and frequency of foods that should be enjoyed every day.Animal fatLow-protein diet: A low-protein diet is a diet in which people reduce their intake of protein. A low-protein diet is prescribed for those with inherited metabolic disorders, such as Phenylketonuria and Homocystinuria and reduced protein levels have been used by people with kidney or liver disease.Vegetarian cuisine: Vegetarian cuisine is based on food that meets vegetarian standards by not including meat and animal tissue products (such as gelatin or animal derived rennet). For lacto-ovo vegetarianism (the most common type of vegetarianism in the Western world), eggs and dairy products such as milk and cheese are permitted.Cyclic ketogenic diet: A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general Ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise.Protein toxicity: Protein toxicity with proteinuria can result in those with preexisting kidney disease, or those who have lost kidney function due to age.Carbohydrate loading: Carbohydrate loading, commonly referred to as carb-loading or carbo-loading, is a strategy used by endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, to maximize the storage of glycogen (or energy) in the muscles and liver.http://www.List of countries by food energy intake: Food consumption refers to the amount of food available for human consumption as estimated by the FAO Food Balance Sheets. However the actual food consumption may be lower than the quantity shown as food availability depending on the magnitude of wastage and losses of food in the household, e.South Beach Diet: The South Beach Diet is a popular fad diet developed by Arthur Agatston and promoted in a best-selling 2003 book.Sandra Bastin for University of Kentucky Extension Service.Complete Wheat Bran Flakes: Kellogg's Complete Wheat Bran Flakes is a breakfast cereal containing 100% of the United States' Recommended Dietary Allowance of eleven vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B1, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, E, and Iron, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, and Zinc. One 3/4 cup serving contains 3 grams of protein, 5 grams of dietary fiber and 90 calories, 5 of which come from fat.PRX-07034: PRX-07034 is a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist. It has cognition and memory-enhancing properties and potently decreases food intake and body weight in rodents.Low sodium diet: A low sodium diet is a diet that includes no more than 1,500 to 2,400 mg of sodium per day.Heart Failure Society of America, How to follow a low sodium dietDiabetic diet: Diabetic diet refers to the diet that is recommended for people with diabetes mellitus, or high blood glucose. There is much disagreement regarding what this diet should consist of.Subtherapeutic antibiotic use in swine: Antibiotics are commonly used in commercial swine production in the United States and around the world. They are used for disease treatment, disease prevention and control, and growth promotion.Glycine soja: Glycine soja, or wild soybean (previously G. ussuriensis) is an annual plant in the legume family.Dietary Supplements (database): The PubMed Dietary Supplement Subset (PMDSS) is a joint project between the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS). PMDSS is designed to help people search for academic journal articles related to dietary supplement literature.Nitrogen deficiencyProtein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score: Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) is a method of evaluating the protein quality based on both the amino acid requirements of humans and their ability to digest it. The PDCAAS rating was adopted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) in 1993 as "the preferred 'best'" method to determine protein quality.Gluten-free diet: A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a diet that excludes gluten, a protein composite found in wheat, barley, rye, and all their species and hybrids (such as spelt, kamut, and triticale). The inclusion of oats in gluten-free diet remains controversial.CholesterolGeneral Mills monster-themed breakfast cerealsSouthern corn leaf blight: Southern corn leaf blight (SCLB) is a fungal disease of maize caused by the plant pathogen Bipolaris maydis (also known as Cochliobolus heterostrophus in its teleomorph state).Lipid droplet: Lipid droplets, also referred to as lipid bodies, oil bodies or adiposomes, are lipid-rich cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids and are found largely in the adipose tissue.Mobilization and cellular uptake of stored fats and triacylglycerol (with Animation) They also serve as a reservoir for cholesterol and acyl-glycerols for membrane formation and maintenance.TriglycerideClassification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.Heptadecanoic acidIndex of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.White meat: White meat or light meat refers to the lighter-colored meat of poultry as contrasted with dark meat. In a more general sense, white meat may also refer to any lighter-colored meat, as contrasted with red meats like beef and some types of game.Casein: Casein ( or , from Latin caseus, "cheese") is the name for a family of related phosphoproteins (αS1, αS2, β, κ). These proteins are commonly found in mammalian milk, making up 80% of the proteins in cow milk and between 20% and 45% of the proteins in human milk.Short-chain fatty acid: Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), also referred to as volatile fatty acids (VFAs),"Role of Volatile Fatty Acids in Development of the Cecal Microflora in Broiler Chickens during Growth" at asm.org are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail of less than six carbon atoms.Lipotoxicity: Lipotoxicity is a metabolic syndrome that results from the accumulation of lipid intermediates in non-adipose tissue, leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The tissues normally affected include the kidneys, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.Starch gelatinization: Starch gelatinization is a process of breaking down the intermolecular bonds of starch molecules in the presence of water and heat, allowing the hydrogen bonding sites (the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygen) to engage more water. This irreversibly dissolves the starch granule in water.Blood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.Vegetable juiceMicronutrient Fortification Programs: The 2002 farm bill (P.L.Monosodium phosphateBeef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Adipose tissue macrophages: Adipose tissue macrophages (abbr. ATMs) comprise tissue resident macrophages present in adipose tissue.Management of obesity: The main treatment for obesity consists of dieting and physical exercise. Diet programs may produce weight loss over the short term, but maintaining this weight loss is frequently difficult and often requires making exercise and a lower calorie diet a permanent part of an individual's lifestyle.Lunasin: Lunasin is a peptide found in soy and some cereal grains, which has been the subject of research since 1996 focusing on cancer, cholesterol and cardiovascular disease and inflammation.Phosphorus deficiency: Phosphorus deficiency is a plant disorder associated with insufficient supply of phosphorus. Phosphorus refers here to salts of phosphates (PO43−), monohydrogen phosphate (HPO42−), and dihydrogen phosphate (H2PO4−).Corn (medicine): A corn (or clavus, plural clavi or clavuses) is a distinctively shaped callus of dead skin that usually occurs on thin or glabrous (hairless and smooth) skin surfaces, especially on the dorsal surface of toes or fingers. They can sometimes occur on the thicker palmar or plantar skin surfaces.Male lactation: Male lactation in zoology means production of milk from mammary glands in the presence of physiological stimuli connected with nursing infants. It is well documented in the Dayak fruit bat.Monogastric: A monogastric organism has a simple single-chambered stomach, compared with a ruminant organism, like a cow, goat, or sheep, which has a four-chambered complex stomach. Examples of monogastric animals include omnivores such as humans, rats, dogs and pigs, and carnivores such as cats, and herbivores such as horses and rabbits.List of minerals (complete): Mineralogy is an active science in which minerals are discovered or recognised on a regular basis. Use of old mineral names is also discontinued, for example when a name is no longer considered valid.Insulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.Gluten exorphin: Gluten exorphins are a group of opioid peptides formed during digestion of the gluten protein. It has been hypothesized that people with autism and schizophrenia have abnormal leakage from the gut of these compounds, which then pass into the brain and disrupt brain functionAutism and Schizophrenia: Intestinal Disorders, Cade, et al.Lactic acid fermentationFruit snack: A fruit snack is a processed food eaten as a snack in the United States. Fruit snacks are very similar to gummi candies.Powdered milk: Powdered milk or dried milk is a manufactured dairy product made by evaporating milk to dryness. One purpose of drying milk is to preserve it; milk powder has a far longer shelf life than liquid milk and does not need to be refrigerated, due to its low moisture content.Lipokine: A lipokine is a lipid-controlling hormone. The term "lipokine" was first used by Haiming Cao in 2008 to classify fatty acids which modulate lipid metabolism by what he called a "chaperone effect".Calcium deficiency (plant disorder): Calcium (Ca) deficiency is a plant disorder that can be caused by insufficient calcium in the growing medium, but is more frequently a product of low transpiration of the whole plant or more commonly the affected tissue. Plants are susceptible to such localized calcium deficiencies in low or nontranspiring tissues because calcium is not transported in the phloem.Proteinogenic amino acid: Proteinogenic amino acids are amino acids that are precursors to proteins, and are incorporated into proteins cotranslationally — that is, during translation. There are 23 proteinogenic amino acids in prokaryotes (including N-Formylmethionine, mainly used to initiate protein synthesis and often removed afterward), but only 21 are encoded by the nuclear genes of eukaryotes.Banquet Foods: Banquet Foods is a subsidiary of ConAgra Foods that sells various food products, including frozen pre-made entrées, meals, and desserts.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingPrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Zinc toxicity

(1/20742) Vitamin D status in different subgroups of British Asians.

To assess the effect of religious dietary practices and social customs on the vitamin D status of Asian immigrants, we kept records of the dietary intake and time spent out of doors of 81 Ugandan Asian men, women, and girls (9-19 years old). Sera were analysed for 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHD3), and 28% of the subjects were found to have levels below the lower limit of normal. The (vegetarian) Hindus had the lowest dietary intakes, least time out of doors, and lowest serum 25-OHD3. The Goan (Roman Catholic) Asians, despite more pigmentation, had 25-OHD3 levels similar to those found among indigenous British people and had the most satisfactory vitamin D intakes. Among Asians, whose exposure to sunlight may be limited, dietary vitamin D becomes the major determinant of serum 25-OHD3.  (+info)

(2/20742) Infleuce of dietary levels of vitamin E and selenium on tissue and blood parameters in pigs.

Eighteen barrows approximately three weeks of age were used in a 3 X 3 factorial arrangement to investigate the effect of level of supplemental vitamin E and selenium on tissue and blood parameters. Tissue selenium concentrations increased in a quadratic manner with increased selenium intake with kidney tissue containing considerably greater concentrations than liver, heart or muscle. Supplementation of the diet caused a three-fold increase in serum selenium within the first week with a slight tendency to further increases in subsequent weeks. Serum vitamin E of unsupplemented pigs declined by fifty percent during the experiment, whereas supplemental vitamin E resulted in increased serum vitamin E. There was a considerable viration in percent peroxide hemolysis. Correlation of -0.63 between percent peroxide hemolysis and vitamin E intake and -0.85 between percent peroxide hemolysis and serum vitamin E were observed.  (+info)

(3/20742) Acute and chronic dose-response relationships for angiotensin, aldosterone, and arterial pressure at varying levels of sodium intake.

We examined the acute and chronic dose-response relationships between intravenously infused angiotensin II (A II) and the resulting changes in arterial pressure and plasma aldosterone concentration at varying levels of sodium intake. Sequential analysis of plasma aldosterone at each A II infusion rate resulted in an acute dose-related increase in plasma aldosterone which was markedly attenuated after the first 24 hours of infusion, the final level being directly related to the dose of A II and inversely related to sodium intake. A II infused at 5,15, and 23 ng/kg per min was associated with an initial increase (2nd to 8th hour) in plasma aldosterone to 2,6, and 9 times control values, respectively, in dogs receiving 40 mEq Na+/day. But, after the 1st day, aldosterone averaged only 1, 1.7, and 3 times control values for the next 2 weeks at the same rates of A II infusion. Dogs receiving 120 mEq Na+/day during A II infusion exhibited only a transient increase in plasma aldosterone during the 1st day. Sustained hypertension developed over a period of a week at all doses of A II at normal and high sodium intake, but did not occur at any dose of A II in sodium-depleted dogs. Increasing sodium intake from 40 to 120 mEq/day resulted in higher levels of hypertension, 125% compared to 140% of ocntrol values for dogs infused with A II, 5.0 ng/kg per min. We conclude that primary angiotensin-induced hypertension need not be associated with increased levels of plasma aldosterone, which appears to remain elevated only with amounts of A II greater than those required to sustain a significant degree of hypertension.  (+info)

(4/20742) Dietary intake and practices in the Hong Kong Chinese population.

OBJECTIVES: To examine dietary intake and practices of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population to provide a basis for future public health recommendations with regard to prevention of certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and osteoporosis. PARTICIPANTS: Age and sex stratified random sample of the Hong Kong Chinese population aged 25 to 74 years (500 men, 510 women). METHOD: A food frequency method over a one week period was used for nutrient quantification, and a separate questionnaire was used for assessment of dietary habits. Information was obtained by interview. RESULTS: Men had higher intakes of energy and higher nutrient density of vitamin D, monounsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol, but lower nutrient density of protein, many vitamins, calcium, iron, copper, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. There was an age related decrease in energy intake and other nutrients except for vitamin C, sodium, potassium, and percentage of total calorie from carbohydrate, which all increased with age. Approximately 50% of the population had a cholesterol intake of < or = 300 mg; 60% had a fat intake < or = 30% of total energy; and 85% had a percentage of energy from saturated fats < or = 10%; criteria considered desirable for cardiovascular health. Seventy eight per cent of the population had sodium intake values in the range shown to be associated with the age related rise in blood pressure with age. Mean calcium intake was lower than the FAO/WHO recommendations. The awareness of the value of wholemeal bread and polyunsaturated fat spreads was lower in this population compared with that in Australia. There was a marked difference in types of cooking oil compared with Singaporeans, the latter using more coconut/palm/mixed vegetable oils. CONCLUSION: Although the current intake pattern for cardiovascular health for fat, saturated fatty acid, and cholesterol fall within the recommended range for over 50% of the population, follow up surveys to monitor the pattern would be needed. Decreasing salt consumption, increasing calcium intake, and increasing the awareness of the health value of fibre may all be beneficial in the context of chronic disease prevention.  (+info)

(5/20742) Physician advice and individual behaviors about cardiovascular disease risk reduction--seven states and Puerto Rico, 1997.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) (e.g., heart disease and stroke) is the leading cause of death in the United States and accounted for 959,227 deaths in 1996. Strategies to reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke include lifestyle changes (e.g., eating fewer high-fat and high-cholesterol foods) and increasing physical activity. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that, as part of a preventive health examination, all primary-care providers counsel their patients about a healthy diet and regular physical activity. AHA also recommends low-dose aspirin use as a secondary preventive measure among persons with existing CVD. To determine the prevalence of physician counseling about cardiovascular health and changes in individual behaviors, CDC analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for seven states and Puerto Rico. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate a lower prevalence of counseling and behavior change among persons without than with a history of heart disease or stroke.  (+info)

(6/20742) Low calorie diet enhances renal, hemodynamic, and humoral effects of exogenous atrial natriuretic peptide in obese hypertensives.

The expression of the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor is abundant in human and rat adipose tissue, where it is specifically inhibited by fasting. In obese hypertensives, plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were found to be lower than in obese normotensives. Therefore, the increased adipose mass might influence ANP levels and/or its biological activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the humoral, hemodynamic, and renal effects of exogenous ANP in obese hypertensives might be enhanced by a very low calorie diet. Eight obese hypertensives received a bolus injection of ANP (0.6 mg/kg) after 2 weeks of a normal calorie/normal sodium diet, and blood pressure (BP), heart rate, ANP, cGMP, plasma renin activity, and aldosterone were evaluated for 2 hours before and after the injection. Diuresis and natriuresis were measured every 30 minutes. The patients then started a low calorie/normal sodium diet (510 kcal/150 mmol/d) for 4 days, and then the ANP injection protocol was repeated. The low calorie diet induced a slight weight loss (from 90.6+/-1.1 to 87. 7+/-1.2 kg; P<0.01), which was accompanied by increase of cGMP excretion (from 146.0+/-10.1 to 154.5+/-9.5 nmol/24 h; P<0.05) together with a reduction of BP (P<0.01 versus basal levels). ANP injection after diet was followed by an increase of ANP levels similar to that observed before diet, but plasma cGMP, diuresis, and natriuresis increased significantly only after diet. Similarly, the decrease of BP after ANP administration was significantly higher after diet (change in mean arterial pressure, -6.4+/-0.7 versus -4. 0+/-0.6 mm Hg; P<0.05) as well as that of aldosterone (P<0.01). These data show that a low calorie diet enhances the humoral, renal, and hemodynamic effects of ANP in obese hypertensives and confirm the importance of caloric intake in modulating the biological activity of ANP, suggesting that the natriuretic peptide system can play a role in the acute changes of natriuresis and diuresis associated with caloric restriction.  (+info)

(7/20742) Thiamine deficiency is prevalent in a selected group of urban Indonesian elderly people.

This cross-sectional study involved 204 elderly individuals (93 males and 111 females). Subjects were randomly recruited using a list on which all 60-75 y-old-people living in seven sub-villages in Jakarta were included. The usual food intake was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Hemoglobin, plasma retinol, vitamin B-12, red blood cell folate and the percentage stimulation of erythrocyte transketolase (ETK), as an indicator of thiamine status, were analyzed. Median energy intake was below the assessed requirement. More than 75% of the subjects had iron and thiamine intakes of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake, and 20.2% of the study population had folate intake of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake. Intakes of vitamins A and B-12 were adequate. Biochemical assessments demonstrated that 36.6% of the subjects had low thiamine levels (ETK stimulation > 25%). The elderly men tended to have lower thiamine levels than the elderly women. The overall prevalence of anemia was 28.9%, and the elderly women were affected more than the elderly men. Low biochemical status of vitamins A, B-12 and RBC folate was found in 5.4%, 8.8 % and 2.9% of the subjects, respectively. Dietary intakes of thiamine and folate were associated with ETK stimulation and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (r = 0.176, P = 0.012 and r = 0.77, P = 0.001), respectively. Results of this study suggest that anemia, thiamine and possibly vitamin B-12 deficiency are prevalent in the elderly living in Indonesia. Clearly, micronutrient supplementation may be beneficial for the Indonesian elderly population living in underprivileged areas.  (+info)

(8/20742) Metallothionein-null mice absorb less Zn from an egg-white diet, but a similar amount from solutions, although with altered intertissue Zn distribution.

The influence of metallothionein (MT) on Zn transfer into non-gut tissues was investigated in MT-null (MT-/-) and normal (MT+/+) mice 4 h after oral gavage of aqueous 65ZnSO4solution at doses of 154, 385, 770 and 1540 nmol Zn per mouse. Zn transfer was not significantly different between MT+/+ and MT-/- mice and was directly proportional to the oral dose (slope = 0.127, r = 0.991; 0. 146, r = 0.994, respectively). Blood 65Zn and plasma Zn concentrations increased progressively in MT-/- mice at doses >154 nmol Zn, reaching levels of 2.4% of oral dose and 60 micromol/L, respectively, at the 1540 nmol Zn dose. The corresponding values for MT+/+ mice were approximately half, 1.0% and 29 micromol/L. Intergenotypic differences were found in tissue distribution of 65Zn within the body; MT-/- mice had higher 65Zn levels in muscle, skin, heart and brain, whereas MT+/+ mice retained progressively more Zn in the liver, in conjunction with a linear increase in hepatic MT up to the highest Zn dose. MT induction in the small intestine reached its maximum at an oral dose of 385 nmol Zn and did not differ at higher doses. Absorption of a 770 nmol 65Zn dose from a solid egg-white diet was only one fourth (MT+/+) and one eighth (MT-/-) of the Zn absorption from the same dose of 65Zn in aqueous solution. MT+/+ mice had greater (P < 0.05) Zn absorption from the egg-white diet than did MT-/- mice, indicating that gut MT confers an absorptive advantage, but only when Zn is incorporated into solid food.  (+info)



ketogenic diet


  • The ketogenic diet is a proven therapy for epilepsy, but can be difficult to use in children. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It is different from the ketogenic diet in four major ways: no calorie restriction, no fluid restriction, no protein restriction, and is easy to start outside the hospital. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • People on the Atkins Diet become ketotic (produce high levels of ketones, a certain substance in the body), like patients on the ketogenic diet, and the investigators believe this may lead to seizure control. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A Trinity study saw improvements in multiple autistic behaviors in BTBR mice fed a ketogenic diet. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • The ketogenic diet provided to the mice is a strict high fat, low carbohydrate and protein diet that is commonly used to treat epilepsy. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • The aim of the study is, to study the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in delaying or preventing recurrence and tumor growth progression of patients who have been previously treated by concomitant chemoradiotherapy (6 months) for high-grade glial tumors. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To study the effect of the ketogenic diet on tumor growth progression and longevity in patients with Malignant glioblastoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Experimental: Nutritional intervention: Ketogenic diet. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Early termination - patients who will wish to stop their participation in the trial will discontinue the ketogenic diet and return to their usual diet. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This session will have two topics - "Ketogenic Diet Therapies for Epilepsy: For the New Patient" presented by Robyn Blackford, and "Ketogenic Diet Therapies for Epilepsy: For the Experienced Patient" presented by Wes Lowman. (epilepsychicago.org)
  • The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet has been managed through the Pediatric Epilepsy team at Johns Hopkins since its beginnings in the 1920s. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • We are the premiere center in the world for clinical and research expertise regarding the ketogenic diet, having enrolled hundreds of children on the ketogenic diet and the modified Atkins diet . (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • At this time, we are not starting adults on the traditional ketogenic diet. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • In many ways, the ketogenic diet is as much an art as a science. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Recognizing that "fine tuning" the ketogenic diet and modified Atkins diet can be experience-based, we do offer single, 1-hour long, second opinion visits to families of children in other ketogenic diet centers. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • This request must also come from the ketogenic diet neurologist in charge, who will continue to manage the child after the second opinion, and all medical records must be sent in advance. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • For more information, contact The Ketogenic Diet Center at 410-955-4259. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • We offer both 2-week trainings in the ketogenic and modified Atkins diet for international hospitals who wish to start a ketogenic diet center for a fee. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • In addition, for centers already with ketogenic diet expertise, we welcome visits to our monthly ketogenic diet follow-up clinics. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • For more information about the Ketogenic Diet Center or to consult with a doctor, request an appointment at the Epilepsy Center. (hopkinsmedicine.org)

Vegetarian


  • If you've considered adopting a vegetarian diet, there's a lot of clinical evidence to support your decision to do so. (bcbst.com)
  • In other words, there are many benefits of a vegetarian diet. (bcbst.com)
  • One of the benefits of a vegetarian diet is that it's typically lower in saturated fat and animal protein, and higher in fiber, complex carbohydrates, and vitamins C and E. Several published reports show that vegetarians also have a lower risk of obesity, hypertension, and of developing diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. (bcbst.com)
  • Calories still count in a vegetarian diet and if you consume too many calories, you'll likely gain weight. (bcbst.com)
  • A healthy vegetarian diet consists of high-fiber, whole-grain foods, and lots of fruits and vegetables. (bcbst.com)
  • Flexitarians eat mostly a vegetarian diet but sometimes eat meat in small quantities. (bcbst.com)
  • Overall, improved health is one of the major benefits of a vegetarian diet. (bcbst.com)
  • The type of vegetarian diet can also impact weight status. (weightwatchers.com)
  • 3 A vegetarian diet also may impact the accumulation of excess weight. (weightwatchers.com)
  • One strategy that can be used to reduce caloric intake is to follow a vegetarian diet. (weightwatchers.com)
  • Research shows that following a vegetarian diet can result in, but does not guarantee successful weight loss. (weightwatchers.com)
  • For example, results from a study published in January 2008 found that sedentary and overweight adults assigned to follow a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet lost an average of 7.9 percent of their body weight after 18 months. (weightwatchers.com)
  • 5 The insignificant difference in weight loss between those following a standard vs. vegetarian diet shows that it is not the type of diet that controls weight loss, but rather the caloric deficit. (weightwatchers.com)
  • Any type of vegetarian diet can be incorporated into the Weight Watchers plan. (weightwatchers.com)
  • A randomized clinical trial of a standard versus vegetarian diet for weigh loss: the impact of treatment preference Int J Obes (Lond). (weightwatchers.com)
  • While a vegetarian diet can provide all the nutrients a healthy child needs for growth and development, special consideration needs to be taken as your child has higher needs for proteins and certain vitamins and minerals to meet their daily requirements. (kidspot.com.au)
  • Introducing a vegetarian diet to a very young child is not difficult or complicated as long as you ensure that his protein needs are met once you've introduced solid food to his diet. (kidspot.com.au)
  • I am a 22 year old female (5`7" 130#) and have been practicing a vegetarian diet (although I do eat eggs) for a year and a half. (uc.edu)
  • Although a vegetarian diet may be healthier for you in the long run, your current dietary habits most likely have something to do with a weakened immune system. (uc.edu)
  • Assuming you are going to continue to eat a vegetarian diet, try to include more dried beans or lentils which provide the protein your diet is lacking. (uc.edu)
  • In order to optimize your iron intake while continuing a vegetarian diet, eat foods high in vitamin C along with non-animal iron foods. (uc.edu)
  • is a strict vegetarian diet healthy? (peertrainer.com)
  • Interstingly, I found this article by Joel Fuhrman, who I assumed advocated a total vegan/vegetarian diet. (peertrainer.com)
  • People often ask me whether it is absolutely necessary to follow a vegetarian diet. (peertrainer.com)
  • Let me stress this: Following a strict vegetarian diet is not as important as eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. (peertrainer.com)
  • That combination of little or no animal products with a higher consumption of fresh produce is the crucial factor that makes a vegetarian diet healthful. (peertrainer.com)
  • So the question is: can the total protection offered by increasing the nutritious foods - the high phytochemical/antioxidant (protective plant foods)-- to make ones diet produce-predominant be achieved, even if the diet is not totally vegetarian and includes some animal products? (peertrainer.com)
  • In other words, you can achieve the benefits of a vegetarian diet, without being a vegetarian or a vegan, and the science available seems to support this. (peertrainer.com)
  • Vegetarian" is a flexible term used to describe people who exclude animal-derived foods from their diet. (weightlossforall.com)
  • In fact, a recent study found that people who consume a vegetarian diet weight about 15 percent less than non-vegetarians. (weightlossforall.com)
  • A vegetarian diet must be appropriately planned to reap all the benefits. (weightlossforall.com)
  • Eating poorly on a vegetarian diet is still easy to do. (weightlossforall.com)
  • The abundance of plant-based foods in a vegetarian diet provides an array of beneficial nutrients with health-promoting properties. (weightlossforall.com)
  • Individuals following a vegetarian, especially vegan, diet should be careful to get enough certain vitamins and nutrients. (weightlossforall.com)
  • These nutrients may be low without a balanced vegetarian diet that is properly planned. (weightlossforall.com)
  • Whether you are going full blown vegetarian or just incorporating a few meatless meals into your routine, make sure to plan properly and include plenty of health-promoting plant-based foods into your diet. (weightlossforall.com)

modified Atkins diet


  • We are also actively investigating and using the modified Atkins diet for epilepsy in clinical trials for both children and adults. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The modified Atkins diet can be used successfully for adults and can be started at Johns Hopkins through our Adult Epilepsy Diet Center . (hopkinsmedicine.org)

carbohydrate


  • The Atkins Diet is a high fat, high protein, low carbohydrate diet introduced in the 1970s to help with weight loss. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Not only are you missing out on iron and zinc (2 very important minerals associated with immunity), but your current diet is too low in calories, protein, calcium, carbohydrate and probably vitamins D and E. I am surprised that you have enough energy to run and lift weights so often! (uc.edu)

vegan diet


  • Another study showed that overweight, postmenopausal women who were assigned to 14-week a low-fat, vegan diet lost 12.76 pounds (+/- 7.04 pounds) compared to 8.36 pounds (+/- 6.16 pounds) lost by those following a control diet based on National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, 6 as well as after one and two years. (weightwatchers.com)
  • 7 The higher weight loss seen with the low-fat, vegan diet may be attributed to its low energy density. (weightwatchers.com)
  • For this reason, a strict vegan diet is usually not recommended for young children, as small deficiencies in vitamins and minerals can have a huge impact on development. (kidspot.com.au)

lentils


  • Introduce dairy foods and eggs, and then start to add the non-meat proteins into his diet - soft cooked beans and lentils, tofu, tahini, nut pastes. (kidspot.com.au)

Epilepsy


nutritional


  • During the very last years, we documented a rapid shifting from the Mediterranean diet in the whole population, but it might also be that the weakest citizens tend to buy 'Mediterranean' food with lower nutritional value. (foodnavigator.com)
  • In a subgroup of individuals of different socioeconomic status but sharing similar MDS, diet-related disparities were found as different nutritional intakes were noted. (foodnavigator.com)
  • "These substantial differences in consuming products belonging to Mediterranean diet lead us to think that quality of foods may be as important for health as quantity and frequency of intake", ​ said Licia Lacoviello, head of the Laboratory of Nutritional and Molecular Epidemiology at I.R.C.C.S and study author. (foodnavigator.com)
  • The Diet plan will be based on each patient individually according to his nutritional needs. (clinicaltrials.gov)

intake


  • Findings from the influential Moli-Sani study conclude that inequalities in diet-related behaviours and nutrient intake persist amongst individuals of high and low income. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Adherence to the diet was assessed by the Mediterranean diet score (MDS) assigning values to fruits and nuts, vegetables, legumes, cereals, fish, fats, meat, dairy products consumed as well as alcohol intake. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Variety of fruit and/or vegetable intake was assessed by four (fruit, vegetables, vegetables subgroups and fruit/vegetable combined) different diet diversity scores. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Taking in fewer calories than your body needs, by either decreasing caloric intake through your diet and/or expending energy through exercise, is the only way to lose weight. (weightwatchers.com)

protein


  • If you don`t eat enough protein in your diet, you will not have adequate amino acids to repair tissue, build muscle and carry on other the above functions. (uc.edu)

diets


  • Despite all the negative press carbohydrates have been getting due to fad diets, carbohydrates are really the foundation of a healthy diet. (uc.edu)

patients


  • This is open-label - all patients are placed on the diet. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients ranging from infants to adolescents are admitted for a four-day period during which the diet is started and education provided. (hopkinsmedicine.org)

vegetarians


  • 2 Spencer EA, Appleby PN, Davey GK, Key TJ Diet and body mass index in 38000 EPIC-Oxford meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans Int J Obes Relat Metab Disorder. (weightwatchers.com)

meat


foods


  • Research has shown that incorporating low energy density foods as part of a diet can lead to greater weight loss. (weightwatchers.com)

benefits


  • The cardiovascular benefits of the Mediterranean diet appear only to apply to higher socioeconomic groups despite similar adherence as a study points to other influencing factors. (foodnavigator.com)
  • While the benefits of a Mediterranean diet are not in question, the study raises concerns as to the choices available to low-income individuals as well as the quality and diversity of food. (foodnavigator.com)

Health


  • "Our study has revealed that the socioeconomic position is able to modulate the health advantages linked to the Mediterranean diet," ​ said lead study author Dr Marialaura Bonaccio, researcher at the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention at The Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (I.R.C.C.S.) Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy. (foodnavigator.com)
  • "We can't keep on saying that the Mediterranean diet is good for health if we are not able to guarantee an equal access to it," ​he added. (foodnavigator.com)

provide


  • We will ask you to keep track of your child's seizures daily for 2 weeks before starting the Atkins diet and provide us with a 3-day food record as well. (clinicaltrials.gov)

children


  • This research is being done to find out if the Atkins Diet can be used safely and effectively to reduce seizures in children who have Sturge Weber syndrome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After medical review to determine if it is an appropriate treatment, we admit approximately four children for the diet monthly. (hopkinsmedicine.org)

months


standard


  • However, participants who followed a standard diet also lost 8 percent of their body weight. (weightwatchers.com)

child


  • Check urine for ketones (to make sure the diet is working) and specific gravity (to make sure your child is well hydrated) twice a week and when you come to clinic. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After being on the diet for one month, Dr. Kossoff will contact you by telephone to discuss how your child is doing. (clinicaltrials.gov)

good


  • The good news is, you can improve your diet and feel much better. (uc.edu)

make


  • Is it possible that my immune system has been weakened due to my diet and, if so, do you have any suggestions for changes I should make? (uc.edu)