Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation: A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.Depressive Disorder, Treatment-Resistant: Failure to respond to two or more trials of antidepressant monotherapy or failure to respond to four or more trials of different antidepressant therapies. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 9th ed.)Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors: Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Citalopram: A furancarbonitrile that is one of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS used as an antidepressant. The drug is also effective in reducing ethanol uptake in alcoholics and is used in depressed patients who also suffer from tardive dyskinesia in preference to tricyclic antidepressants, which aggravate this condition.Cyclohexanols: Monohydroxy derivatives of cyclohexanes that contain the general formula R-C6H11O. They have a camphorlike odor and are used in making soaps, insecticides, germicides, dry cleaning, and plasticizers.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Fluoxetine: The first highly specific serotonin uptake inhibitor. It is used as an antidepressant and often has a more acceptable side-effects profile than traditional antidepressants.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Sertraline: A selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is used in the treatment of depression.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Electroconvulsive Therapy: Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Affective Disorders, Psychotic: Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Anhedonia: Inability to experience pleasure due to impairment or dysfunction of normal psychological and neurobiological mechanisms. It is a symptom of many PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., DEPRESSIVE DISORDER, MAJOR; and SCHIZOPHRENIA).Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Neurotic Disorders: Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins: Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic: Substances that contain a fused three-ring moiety and are used in the treatment of depression. These drugs block the uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin into axon terminals and may block some subtypes of serotonin, adrenergic, and histamine receptors. However the mechanism of their antidepressant effects is not clear because the therapeutic effects usually take weeks to develop and may reflect compensatory changes in the central nervous system.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Psychodrama: Primarily a technique of group psychotherapy which involves a structured, directed, and dramatized acting out of the patient's personal and emotional problems.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Personality Disorders: A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.ThiophenesAdjustment Disorders: Maladaptive reactions to identifiable psychosocial stressors occurring within a short time after onset of the stressor. They are manifested by either impairment in social or occupational functioning or by symptoms (depression, anxiety, etc.) that are in excess of a normal and expected reaction to the stressor.Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Combat Disorders: Neurotic reactions to unusual, severe, or overwhelming military stress.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Community Psychiatry: Branch of psychiatry concerned with the provision and delivery of a coordinated program of mental health care to a specified population. The foci included in this concept are: all social, psychological and physical factors related to etiology, prevention, and maintaining positive mental health in the community.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1A: A serotonin receptor subtype found distributed through the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM where they are involved in neuroendocrine regulation of ACTH secretion. The fact that this serotonin receptor subtype is particularly sensitive to SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS such as BUSPIRONE suggests its role in the modulation of ANXIETY and DEPRESSION.United StatesAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hypericum: Genus of perennial plants in the family CLUSIACEAE (sometimes classified as Hypericaceae). Herbal and homeopathic preparations are used for depression, neuralgias, and a variety of other conditions. Hypericum contains flavonoids; GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, TANNINS; volatile oils (OILS, ESSENTIAL), hypericin and hyperforin.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Agoraphobia: Obsessive, persistent, intense fear of open places.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Postmortem Changes: Physiological changes that occur in bodies after death.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: A member of the nerve growth factor family of trophic factors. In the brain BDNF has a trophic action on retinal, cholinergic, and dopaminergic neurons, and in the peripheral nervous system it acts on both motor and sensory neurons. (From Kendrew, The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Pituitary-Adrenal System: The interactions between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands, in which corticotropin (ACTH) stimulates the adrenal cortex and adrenal cortical hormones suppress the production of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Dependent Personality Disorder: A personality disorder characterized by a pervasive and excessive need to be taken care of that leads to submissive and clinging behavior and fears of separation, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (From DSM-IV, 1994)OregonChild Guidance Clinics: Facilities which administer the delivery of mental health counseling services to children.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Moclobemide: A reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type A; (RIMA); (see MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS) that has antidepressive properties.General Adaptation Syndrome: The sum of all nonspecific systemic reactions of the body to long-continued exposure to systemic stress.Paroxetine: A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of depression.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Antimanic Agents: Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.Endophenotypes: Measurable biological (physiological, biochemical, and anatomical features), behavioral (psychometric pattern) or cognitive markers that are found more often in individuals with a disease than in the general population. Because many endophenotypes are present before the disease onset and in individuals with heritable risk for disease such as unaffected family members, they can be used to help diagnose and search for causative genes.Diseases in Twins: Disorders affecting TWINS, one or both, at any age.Bupropion: A unicyclic, aminoketone antidepressant. The mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not well understood, but it does appear to block dopamine uptake. The hydrochloride is available as an aid to smoking cessation treatment.Trazodone: A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is used as an antidepressive agent. It has been shown to be effective in patients with major depressive disorders and other subsets of depressive disorders. It is generally more useful in depressive disorders associated with insomnia and anxiety. This drug does not aggravate psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p309)Psychotherapy, Brief: Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Adult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.Helplessness, Learned: Learned expectation that one's responses are independent of reward and, hence, do not predict or control the occurrence of rewards. Learned helplessness derives from a history, experimentally induced or naturally occurring, of having received punishment/aversive stimulation regardless of responses made. Such circumstances result in an impaired ability to learn. Used for human or animal populations. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Lithium Carbonate: A lithium salt, classified as a mood-stabilizing agent. Lithium ion alters the metabolism of BIOGENIC MONOAMINES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, and affects multiple neurotransmission systems.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Compulsive Personality Disorder: Disorder characterized by an emotionally constricted manner that is unduly conventional, serious, formal, and stingy, by preoccupation with trivial details, rules, order, organization, schedules, and lists, by stubborn insistence on having things one's own way without regard for the effects on others, by poor interpersonal relationships, and by indecisiveness due to fear of making mistakes.Vagus Nerve Stimulation: An adjunctive treatment for PARTIAL EPILEPSY and refractory DEPRESSION that delivers electrical impulses to the brain via the VAGUS NERVE. A battery implanted under the skin supplies the energy.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Neurobiology: The study of the structure, growth, activities, and functions of NEURONS and the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitors: Drugs that block the transport of adrenergic transmitters into axon terminals or into storage vesicles within terminals. The tricyclic antidepressants (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) and amphetamines are among the therapeutically important drugs that may act via inhibition of adrenergic transport. Many of these drugs also block transport of serotonin.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Twin Studies as Topic: Methods of detecting genetic etiology in human traits. The basic premise of twin studies is that monozygotic twins, being formed by the division of a single fertilized ovum, carry identical genes, while dizygotic twins, being formed by the fertilization of two ova by two different spermatozoa, are genetically no more similar than two siblings born after separate pregnancies. (Last, J.M., A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Akathisia, Drug-Induced: A condition associated with the use of certain medications and characterized by an internal sense of motor restlessness often described as an inability to resist the urge to move.Pleasure: Sensation of enjoyment or gratification.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Seasonal Affective Disorder: A syndrome characterized by depressions that recur annually at the same time each year, usually during the winter months. Other symptoms include anxiety, irritability, decreased energy, increased appetite (carbohydrate cravings), increased duration of sleep, and weight gain. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) can be treated by daily exposure to bright artificial lights (PHOTOTHERAPY), during the season of recurrence.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Monoamine Oxidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of naturally occurring monoamines. It is a flavin-containing enzyme that is localized in mitochondrial membranes, whether in nerve terminals, the liver, or other organs. Monoamine oxidase is important in regulating the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and serotonin in neural or target tissues. Hepatic monoamine oxidase has a crucial defensive role in inactivating circulating monoamines or those, such as tyramine, that originate in the gut and are absorbed into the portal circulation. (From Goodman and Gilman's, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p415) EC 1.4.3.4.Gene-Environment Interaction: The combined effects of genotypes and environmental factors together on phenotypic characteristics.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.

*  Depression (major depressive disorder) - Overview - Mayo Clinic

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest and can interfere with your ... Also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression, it affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a ... Depressive disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American ... Bipolar and related disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: ...
mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/home/ovc-20321449

*  Deep brain stimulation benefits highly treatment resistant patients with major depressive disorder

... for major depressive disorder were published online today by the Journal of Neurosurgery. The study, conducted at three ... Depressive Disorder, Electroconvulsive Therapy, Essential Tremor, Headache, Hospital, Major Depressive Disorder, Mental Health ... Deep brain stimulation benefits highly treatment resistant patients with major depressive disorder. *Download PDF Copy ... Results from the first multi-center pilot study of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for major depressive disorder were published ...
https://news-medical.net/news/20111118/Deep-brain-stimulation-benefits-highly-treatment-resistant-patients-with-major-depressive-disorder.aspx

*  AZD6765 Severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) IV - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Depressive Disorder. Depression. Depressive Disorder, Major. Pathologic Processes. Mood Disorders. Mental Disorders. Behavioral ... AZD6765 Severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) IV. This study has been completed. ... The patient is previously diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and currently taking an antidepressant for at least 6 ... Placebo-controlled Efficacy and Safety Study of Adjunctive AZD6765 in Subjects With Severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00781742

*  Alkermes plc Announces Positive Results From Clinical Study of ALKS 5461 for Major Depressive Disorder

... a person who suffers from major depressive disorder (MDD) must exhibit depressive symptoms, such as a depressed mood or a loss ... Alkermes plc (ALKS) Announces Positive Results From Clinical Study of ALKS 5461 for Major Depressive Disorder ... a novel drug compound for major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients who have an inadequate response to standard therapies for ... In the phase 1/2 clinical study, ALKS 5461 was shown to significantly reduce depressive symptoms, as measured by the Hamilton ...
biospace.com/News/alkermes-plc-announces-positive-results-from/245061

*  neuroscienceCME - Perspectives in Major Depressive Disorder

The activity "Perspectives in Major Depressive Disorder" is currently unavailable.. Please refer to the Educational Activities ... On average, how many patients do you see during a month with major depressive disorder?. 0. 1 to 5. 6 to 10. 11 to 15. 16 to 20 ... Assess and rate your competence in the diagnosis and treatment of major depressive disorder.. ... The educational activity, Perspectives in Major Depressive Disorder, is available on 11/5/2014. ...
neurosciencecme.com/activity/index.asp?ID=927

*  Role of Inflammation Factors and Insulin Resistance in Major Depressive Disorder - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Depressive Disorder. Depression. Depressive Disorder, Major. Insulin Resistance. Pathologic Processes. Mood Disorders. Mental ... evidence-based guidelines for treating major depressive disorder to full remission in Taiwanese major depressive disorder (MDD ... Role of Inflammation Factors and Insulin Resistance in Major Depressive Disorder. The recruitment status of this study is ... The curative effect of fluoxetine add-on placebo therapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01699490?intr=fluoxetine&rank=3

*  Pilot Study of Open-label Placebo to Treat Major Depressive Disorder - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Depressive Disorder. Depression. Depressive Disorder, Major. Pathologic Processes. Mood Disorders. Mental Disorders. Behavioral ... disorders that present as chief complaint and/or have their onset preceding the onset of major depressive disorder). ... Harnessing the Placebo Effect in Major Depressive Disorder. Further study details as provided by Maurizio Fava, MD, ... Pilot Study of Open-label Placebo to Treat Major Depressive Disorder. This study has been completed. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01103271

*  BRIEF-Allergan reports topline Phase II data supporting advancement of Botox for the treatment of major depressive disorder |...

BRIEF-Allergan reports topline Phase II data supporting advancement of Botox for the treatment of major depressive disorder. ... BRIEF-Allergan reports topline Phase II data supporting advancement of Botox for the treatment of major depressive disorder ... for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) * Allergan Plc - Botox 30 U dose demonstrated numerically superior ... forward and develop a Phase 3 program for a potential new treatment option for patients adults with major depressive disorder ...
in.reuters.com/article/brief-allergan-reports-topline-phase-ii-idINFWN1HD0ND

*  Safety and Efficacy of Cariprazine As Adjunctive Therapy In Major Depressive Disorder - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Depressive Disorder. Depression. Depressive Disorder, Major. Pathologic Processes. Mood Disorders. Mental Disorders. Behavioral ... Major Depressive Disorder Drug: Antidepressant + placebo Drug: Antidepressant + cariprazine (0.1-0.3 mg/day) Drug: ... Safety and Efficacy of Cariprazine As Adjunctive Therapy In Major Depressive Disorder. This study has been completed. ... A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Cariprazine (RGH-188) As Adjunctive Therapy In Major Depressive Disorder. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00854100

*  Therapy for major depressive disorder - The Clinical Advisor

Association has issued a third edition of its Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, ...
clinicaladvisor.com/features/therapy-for-major-depressive-disorder/article/206809/

*  A Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled, Fixed-Dose Study of Levomilnacipran SR in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder -...

This study compared the efficacy and tolerability of levomilnacipran (controlled-release) at two dose levels in patients with major depressive disorder.
adisinsight.springer.com/trials/700201256

*  Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation- major depressive disorder mdd treatment

After a year of treatment with minimal improvement, I suggested Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. The patient agreed and within three weeks she was back doing crossword puzzles and cooking. Within four weeks she was spending more time with her grandchildren - she looked forward to going to work, her concentration was much better, she reconnected with her friends, enjoyed going out to dinner with family, gained back weight she had lost and felt her life was meaningful again.. TMS is the latest non-pharmaceutical treatment modality for major depressive disorder that does not respond to other treatments. In a large clinical trial done by the National Institute of Mental Health involving more than 4,000 patients, it was found that only 30 percent of patients treated with antidepressants were totally free of any symptoms of depression.. TMS works by stimulating key neurons in the brain believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Unlike ...
holisticremediesnews.com/1769/transcranial-magnetic-stimulation-major-depressive-disorder-mdd-treatment/

*  MarketResearchReports.Com: Major Depressive Disorder: 5EU Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2023, New Report Launched | Jun...

Press Release issued Jun 23, 2014: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric diseases worldwide. The MDD market is a crowded and competitive market, with more than 30 marketed products available for the treatment of patients with MDD. The depression market is about to enter a dynamic phase with imminent patent expiries for top selling products, such as Eli Lilly's Cymbalta, and Otsuka/BMS's Abilify, along with the recent launch of the multimodal antidepressant, Lundbeck/Takeda's Brintellix, in January 2014, and the potential introduction of seven promising late-stage pipeline products into the market during the forecast period, from 2013 to 2023.
sbwire.com/press-releases/marketresearchreportscom-major-depressive-disorder-5eu-drug-forecast-and-market-analysis-to-2023-new-report-launched-522583.htm

*  A novel delta opioid receptor biased agonist for Major Depressive Disorder - Michael Lark

This project aims to discover and develop a new therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD), which affects 40 million people annually, profoundly reducing quali...
grantome.com/grant/NIH/U01-NS074480-02

*  Major Depressive Disorder Neuroimaging Database - Brede Wiki

The data is also stored and linked from the Brede Wiki and studies listed in this wiki that are included in the MaND are listed in the category In meta-analysis MaND. The primary data in MaND is the volume of brain structures measured from brain scans with MRI and CT. In each individual study the volume is compared between a sample of patient with major depressive disorder against a sample of normal controls. ...
neuro.compute.dtu.dk/wiki/MaND

*  Efficacy of physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorders: preliminary results - pdf descargar

Efficacy of physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorders: preliminary results. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
libros.duhnnae.com/2017/jul7/150075862983-Efficacy-of-physical-activity-in-the-adjunctive-treatment-of-major-depressive-disorders-preliminary-results.php

*  Is there protective haplotype of dysbindin gene (DTNBP1) 3 polymorphisms for major depressive disorder.

Abstract Dysbindin gene has been repeatedly associated with psychiatric disorders and schizophrenia in particular. This study aimed to investigate the variants of dysbindin gene in..
https://omicsonline.org/references/is-there-protective-haplotype-of-dysbindin-gene-dtnbp1-3-polymorphisms-for-major-depressive-disorder-1490814.html

*  An Exploratory, Multicenter, Open-label, Flexible-dose Trial of Brexpiprazole (OPC 34712) as an Adjunctive Treatment in Active...

This study investigated the efficacy and safety of flexibly dosed adjunctive brexpiprazole in adult patients (18-30 years) with major depressive disorder who
adisinsight.springer.com/trials/700240179

BrexpiprazoleS32212: S32212 is a drug which is under preclinical investigation as a potential antidepressant medicine. It behaves as a selective, combined 5-HT2C receptor inverse agonist and α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist (at all three subtypes—α2A, α2B, and α2C) with additional 5-HT2A and, to a lesser extent, 5-HT2B receptor antagonistic properties, and lacks any apparent affinity for the monoamine reuptake transporters or for the α1-adrenergic, H1, or mACh receptors.Social anxiety disorderBipolar disorderSchizophreniaDysthymiaMental disorderSelective serotonin reuptake inhibitorRating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.DesmethylcitalopramMycosporine-like amino acid: Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are small secondary metabolites produced by organisms that live in environments with high volumes of sunlight, usually marine environments. So far there are up to 20 known MAAs identified.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Olanzapine/fluoxetineOneirology: Oneirology (; from Greek [oneiron, "dream"; and -λογία], ["the study of") is the scientific study of [[dream]s. Current research seeks correlations between dreaming and current knowledge about the functions of the brain, as well as understanding of how the brain works during dreaming as pertains to memory formation and mental disorders.Martin Weaver: Martin Weaver is a psychotherapist, author and media writerRelationship obsessive–compulsive disorder: In psychology, relationship obsessive–compulsive disorder (ROCD) is a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder focusing on intimate relationships (whether romantic or non-romantic). Such obsessions can become extremely distressing and debilitating, having negative impacts on relationships functioning.Claustrophobia: Claustrophobia is the fear of having no escape and being in closed or small space or room It is typically classified as an anxiety disorder and often results in panic attack, and can be the result of many situations or stimuli, including elevators crowded to capacity, windowless rooms, and even tight-necked clothing. The onset of claustrophobia has been attributed to many factors, including a reduction in the size of the amygdala, classical conditioning, or a genetic predisposition to fear small spaces.Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorderSertralineCognitive behavioral treatment of eating disorders: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is derived from both the cognitive and behavioral schools of psychology and focuses on the alteration of thoughts and actions with the goal of treating various disorders. The cognitive behavioral treatment of eating disorders emphasizes the minimization of negative thoughts about body image and the act of eating, and attempts to alter negative and harmful behaviors that are involved in and perpetuate eating disorders.Substance-related disorderHypervigilance: Hypervigilance is an enhanced state of sensory sensitivity accompanied by an exaggerated intensity of behaviors whose purpose is to detect threats. Hypervigilance is also accompanied by a state of increased anxiety which can cause exhaustion.David Budescu: David Budescu is a psychologist and academic. He is the Anne Anastasi Professor of Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology at Fordham University.List of people who have undergone electroconvulsive therapy: This is a list of notable cases of treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).Girl, Interrupted: Girl, Interrupted is a best-sellingThe Unconfessional Confessionalist, Time Magazine, July 11, 1994 1993 memoir by American author Susanna Kaysen, relating her experiences as a young woman in a psychiatric hospital in the 1960s after being diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The memoir's title is a reference to the Vermeer painting Girl Interrupted at her Music.DSM-IV Codes (alphabetical): __FORCETOC__QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Teenage suicide in the United States: Teenage suicide in the United States remains comparatively high in the 15 to 24 age group with 10,000 suicides in this age range in 2004, making it the third leading cause of death for those aged 15 to 24. By comparison, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death for all those age 10 and over, with 33,289 suicides for all US citizens in 2006.Psychotic depression: Psychotic depression, also known as depressive psychosis, is a major depressive episode that is accompanied by psychotic symptoms.Hales E and Yudofsky JA, eds, The American Psychiatric Press Textbook of Psychiatry, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Panic Disorder Severity Scale: The Panic Disorder Severity Scale is a questionnaire developed for measuring the severity of panic disorder. The clinician-administered PDSS is intended to assess severity and considered a reliable tool for monitoring of treatment outcome.Cingulate sulcus: The cingulate sulcus is a sulcus (brain fold) on the medial wall of the cerebral cortex. The frontal and parietal lobes are separated from the cingulate gyrus by the cingulate sulcus.Anhedonia: Anhedonia ( ; Greek: ἀν- an-, "without" and ἡδονή hēdonē, "pleasure") is defined as the inability to experience pleasure from activities usually found enjoyable, e.g.Emotion and memory: Emotion can have a powerful response on humans and animals. Numerous studies have shown that the most vivid autobiographical memories tend to be of emotional events, which are likely to be recalled more often and with more clarity and detail than neutral events.The Newtown Neurotics: The Newtown Neurotics (later just The Neurotics) are an English punk rock/post-punk group formed in 1979. They are noted for their openly political music.Serotonin transporter: The serotonin transporter (SERT or 5-HTT) also known as the sodium-dependent serotonin transporter and solute carrier family 6 member 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC6A4 gene. SERT is a type of monoamine transporter protein that transports serotonin from the synaptic cleft to the presynaptic neuron.Stressor: A stressor is a chemical or biological agent, environmental condition, external stimulus or an event that causes stress to an organism.HyperintensityKetipramine: Ketipramine (G-35,259), also known as ketimipramine or ketoimipramine, is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) that was tested in clinical trials for the treatment of depression in the 1960s but was never marketed. It differs from imipramine in terms of chemical structure only by the addition of a ketone group, to the azepine ring, and is approximately equivalent in effectiveness as an antidepressant in comparison.Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.PsychodramaFocus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the field of special education. The editors-in-chief are Alisa K.Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a 10-item questionnaire that was developed to identify women who have PPD. Items of the scale correspond to various clinical depression symptoms, such as guilt feeling, sleep disturbance, low energy, anhedonia, and suicidal ideation.Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is a neuropsychological assessment initially introduced in 1998. It consists of ten subtests which give five scores, one for each of the five domains tested (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory).Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law: The Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law (麻薬及び向精神薬取締法 Mayaki oyobi kousei shin'yaku torishimari hou) is a law enacted in Japan in 1953 to control most narcotic and psychotropic drugs.Research Society on Alcoholism: The Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) is a learned society of over 1600 active members based in Austin, Texas. Its objective is to advance research on alcoholism and the physiological and cognitive effects of alcohol.Personality disorder not otherwise specifiedReligion and schizophrenia: == Background ==Relationship Development Intervention: Relationship Development Intervention (RDI) is a trademarked proprietary treatment program for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), based on the belief that the development of dynamic intelligence is the key to improving the quality of life for individuals with autism. The program's core philosophy is that individuals with autism can participate in authentic emotional relationships if they are exposed to them in a gradual, systematic way.Benzo(c)thiopheneAdjustment disorderSkyland Trail: Skyland Trail is a private, not-for profit organization in Atlanta, Georgia offering treatment to adults with mental illness. Skyland Trail specializes in treating adults with Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, and Dual Diagnosis.Combat stress reaction: Combat stress reaction (CSR) is a term used within the military to describe acute behavioral disorganization seen by medical personnel as a direct result of the trauma of war. Also known as "combat fatigue" or "battle neurosis", it has some overlap with the diagnosis of acute stress reaction used in civilian psychiatry.Netherlands national rollball team: Vishwaraj JadejaDevelopmental psychopathology: Developmental psychopathology is the study of the development of psychological disorders, such as psychopathy, autism, schizophrenia and depression, with a lifecourse perspective.Cicchetti, D.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Hypericum hirsutum: Hypericum hirsutum is a flowering plant in the genus Hypericum commonly known as hairy St John's-wort. It is found in Western Europe.Halfdan T. MahlerTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studying

(1/2979) Alcohol-related problems among adolescent suicides in Finland.

We studied 106 adolescent suicides out of a total nationwide population of 1397 suicides. Forty-four (42%) of these 13-22-year-old victims were classified as having suffered either a DSM-III-R alcohol use disorder or diagnostically subthreshold alcohol misuse according to retrospective evaluation using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). These victims were found to differ from the other adolescent suicides in several characteristics: they were more likely to have comorbid categorical DSM-III-R disorders, antisocial behaviour, disturbed family backgrounds, precipitating life-events as stressors and severe psychosocial impairment. In addition, they also had a greater tendency to be alcohol-intoxicated at the time of the suicidal act, which tended to occur during weekends, suggesting that drinking in itself, and its weekly pattern, each contributed to the completion of their suicides.  (+info)

(2/2979) Electrical stimulation of rat medial prefrontal cortex enhances forebrain serotonin output: implications for electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression.

Decreased activity of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as well as reduced serotonergic neurotransmission, is considered as a characteristic feature of major depression. The mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) achieve their antidepressant effects may involve changes in PFC activity. It is, however, still unclear whether these changes are accompanied by increased synaptic availability of serotonin (5-HT). In the present study, 5-HT efflux in the rat ventral hippocampus and amygdala was analyzed using in vivo microdialysis during low-current electrical stimulation of PFC and other cortical regions. Electrical stimulation of the medial PFC produced current-dependent increases in limbic 5-HT output in both urethane-anesthetized and behaving rats. No effects on 5-HT levels were seen after comparable stimulation of either the lateral parts of the PFC, the medial precentral area, the primary motor cortex or the parietal cortex. This pronounced regional specificity of the effect of medial PFC stimulation on limbic 5-HT output suggests that activation of this particular area might play a crucial role in such antidepressant treatments as ECT and TMS.  (+info)

(3/2979) Melatonin sensitivity to dim white light in affective disorders.

Both dim and bright light has been shown to suppress the nocturnal secretion of the pineal hormone melatonin. Early reports suggests that an abnormal response to light occurs in patients with bipolar affective disorder, where as patients with major depressive disorder respond similarly to controls. It has been suggested that this abnormal sensitivity of the melatonin response to light could be a trait marker of bipolar affective disorder. However reports lack consistency. Hence, we investigated the melatonin suppression by dim light (200 lux) in patients with bipolar affective disorder, seasonal affective disorder and major depressive disorder. Results suggest that a supersensitive melatonin suppression to light in bipolar affective disorder (p < .005), and seasonal affective disorder (p < .05), whereas patients with major depressive disorder display similar suppression to controls. The supersensitivity may be a mechanism where by phase-delayed rhythms, are resynchronised to a new circadian position. Conversely, an abnormality may exist in the pathway from the retina to the suprachiamatic nucleus.  (+info)

(4/2979) Poststroke depression correlates with cognitive impairment and neurological deficits.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The prevalence of poststroke depression is known to be high, but the knowledge of its neuropsychological correlates is limited. This 12-month prospective study was designed to evaluate the natural history of poststroke depression and to study its neuropsychological, clinical, and functional associates. METHODS: We studied a series of 106 consecutive patients (46 women and 60 men, mean age 65.8 years) with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The patients underwent a neurological, psychiatric, and neuropsychological examination at 3 and 12 months after the stroke. The psychiatric diagnosis of depression was based on DSM-III-R-criteria. RESULTS: Depression was diagnosed in 53% of the patients at 3 months and in 42% of the patients at 12 months after the stroke. The prevalence of major depression was 9% at 3 months and 16% at 12 months. There was an association between poststroke depression and cognitive impairment; the domains most likely to be defective in stroke-related depression were memory (P=0.022), nonverbal problem solving (P=0.039), and attention and psychomotor speed (P=0.020). The presence of dysphasia increased the risk of major depression. The depressive patients were more dependent in ADL and had more severe impairment and handicap than the nondepressive patients. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the patients suffer from depression after stroke, and the frequency of major depression seems to increase during the first year. In addition to dysphasia, poststroke depression is correlated with other cognitive deficits. We emphasize the importance of psychiatric evaluation of stroke patients.  (+info)

(5/2979) Depression in the workplace: effects on short-term disability.

We analyzed data from two national surveys to estimate the short-term work disability associated with thirty-day major depression. Depressed workers were found to have between 1.5 and 3.2 more short-term work-disability days in a thirty-day period than other workers had, with a salary-equivalent productivity loss averaging between $182 and $395. These workplace costs are nearly as large as the direct costs of successful depression treatment, which suggests that encouraging depressed workers to obtain treatment might be cost-effective for some employers.  (+info)

(6/2979) Depression without sadness: alternative presentations of depression in late life.

Older adults often deny feeling sad while exhibiting other characteristics of depression. Elderly patients with depression who do not present with sadness often have unexplained somatic complaints and exhibit a sense of hopelessness. Anxiety and anhedonia (a general loss of ability to feel pleasure) are also encountered frequently. Other features that may indicate underlying depression include slowness of movement and lack of interest in personal care. A screening device, such as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies--Depression Scale, Revised (CES-D-R), may identify depression in suspicious cases. When this condition is identified, treatment should generally include the use of an antidepressant medication, usually a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.  (+info)

(7/2979) Patterns of brain activity in patients with epilepsy and depression.

Depression is a recognized feature of epilepsy. This study tested the hypothesis that depression arising in patients with epilepsy would be associated with decreased activity in brain regions previously demonstrated to be hypoperfused both in primary depression and in depression secondary to movement disorders. Two groups of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were studied, one of which also met DSM IV criteria for a major depressive episode. All underwent a SPECT scan using the blood flow marker,(99m)Tc-HMPAO. An automated voxel-based analysis demonstrated no regions of relatively decreased activity in the depressed compared with the non-depressed patients. Sites of relative hyperactivity in the depressed group were concentrated in the left hemisphere, particularly in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, striatum, thalamus and temporo-parietal regions. Comparison of these data with normal population data revealed that in the depressed epilepsy group regional activities were within the normal range whilst corresponding results from the non-depressed group were below it. Depressed patients with epilepsy have cerebral regions with greater perfusion than non-depressed people with epilepsy, although they are not hyperperfused compared with normals. Our results suggest that depression in people with epilepsy may arise from a mechanism which differs from that underlying the development of depression in patients with movement disorders.  (+info)

(8/2979) Eosinophilic pneumonia and respiratory failure associated with venlafaxine treatment.

Drugs are well known causes of eosinophilic lung disease. In many patients, symptoms increase slowly, pulmonary infiltrates and eosinophilia progress over weeks, and resolve upon withdrawal of the offending agent. Rarely, the disease presents like acute eosinophilic pneumonia with acute onset of symptoms and rapidly progressing infiltrates which may be associated with respiratory failure. This report describe a case of venlafaxine-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia causing respiratory insufficiency that rapidly resolved upon institution of corticosteroid treatment. This 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor was previously not known to cause lung or peripheral blood eosinophilia. Considering the increasing use of this class of medication physicians have to be aware of this life-threatening and fully reversible complication.  (+info)



Placebo


  • In both dosing cohorts, patients administered ALKS 5461 demonstrated greater reductions from baseline in depressive symptoms, as measured by the HAM-D17, compared to those administered placebo. (biospace.com)
  • The curative effect of fluoxetine add-on placebo therapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine whether people will be willing to enter an open-label non-deceptive placebo treatment for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and whether open-label placebo can be effective for treating MDD in the context of a supportive physician-patient relationship. (clinicaltrials.gov)

previous antidepressant therapy


  • Specifically, patients who had experienced an inadequate response to previous antidepressant therapy showed a meaningful reduction in depressive symptoms after only seven days of treatment with ALKS 5461," stated Elliot Ehrich, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of Alkermes. (biospace.com)

obsessive compulsi


  • 10) current primary diagnoses of panic disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) (disorders that present as chief complaint and/or have their onset preceding the onset of major depressive disorder). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Pexeva (paroxetine mesylate) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor ( SSRI ) type of antidepressant used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder , anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder ( PMDD ). (rxlist.com)

reduction in depressive


  • Previous failure to respond to adequate trials of one or two ADTs with less than 50% reduction in depressive symptoms during the present episode. (clinicaltrials.gov)

Depression


  • Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression, it affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Depression affects millions of patients worldwide with more than 21 million adults in the U.S. suffering from some kind of depressive disorder, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. (news-medical.net)
  • DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Alkermes plc (NASDAQ: ALKS) today announced positive topline results from a phase 1/2 study of ALKS 5461, a novel drug compound for major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients who have an inadequate response to standard therapies for clinical depression. (biospace.com)
  • The company has a diversified portfolio of more than 20 commercial drug products and a substantial clinical pipeline of product candidates that address central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as addiction, schizophrenia and depression. (biospace.com)
  • Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with an increased risk of suicide. (drugs.com)
  • Fluoxetine monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with Bipolar I Disorder or the treatment of treatment resistant depression. (drugs.com)

remission


  • The purpose of this study is to identify evidence-based guidelines for treating major depressive disorder to full remission in Taiwanese major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), augmentation with aripiprazole is associated with an increased likelihood of remission, according to a study published in the July 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association . (gulfbend.org)

antidepressant


  • To evaluate the rapid antidepressant efficacy of AZD6765 at 1 day after a first infusion, as assessed by a change in the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology Self-Report 16-item scale (QIDS-SR-16) total score. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The patient is previously diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and currently taking an antidepressant for at least 6 weeks. (clinicaltrials.gov)

psychiatric disorders


  • Abstract Dysbindin gene has been repeatedly associated with psychiatric disorders and schizophrenia in particular. (omicsonline.org)

symptoms


  • According to the DSM-IV-TR® (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision), a person who suffers from major depressive disorder (MDD) must exhibit depressive symptoms, such as a depressed mood or a loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities consistently for at least a two-week period, and demonstrate impaired social, occupational, educational or other important functioning. (biospace.com)
  • however, researchers have not examined whether avoidance, an important predictor of depressive symptoms ( Ottenbreit & Dobson, 2004 ), may play an important role in this association. (wiley.com)
  • A hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between positive outcome expectancies and avoidance for predicting changes in depressive symptoms after CBT. (wiley.com)

therapy


  • The curative effect of fluoxetine add-on valsartan 40 mg per day for 12 weeks therapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), individual differences in the effectiveness of CBT have been observed. (wiley.com)

clinical


  • ALKS 33 is an oral opioid modulator that builds on Alkermes' scientific expertise in opioid biology and pharmacology, as well as the company's clinical and commercial knowledge in the field of addiction and central nervous system disorders. (biospace.com)

Revision


  • The American Psychiatric Association has issued a third edition of its Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Major Depressive Disorder , the first full revision in 10 years. (clinicaladvisor.com)

treatment of major


  • A l l patients - As with other drugs effective in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder, the full effect may be delayed until 4 weeks of treatment or longer. (drugs.com)

patients with major


  • The interaction between avoidance and positive outcome expectancies has only been examined in patients with major depressive disorder and the findings may not extend to patients with other psychological disorders. (wiley.com)
  • Assessment of fatigue using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). (sclero.org)
  • Major Depressive Disorder Neuroimaging Database ( MaND ) is a database of brain region volume data from structural neuroimaging studies involving patients with major depressive disorder . (dtu.dk)

study


  • Results from the first multi-center pilot study of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for major depressive disorder were published online today by the Journal of Neurosurgery . (news-medical.net)
  • This study aimed to investigate the variants of dysbindin gene in major depressive disorder (MDD). (omicsonline.org)
  • In each individual study the volume is compared between a sample of patient with major depressive disorder against a sample of normal controls. (dtu.dk)

respond


  • TMS is the latest non-pharmaceutical treatment modality for major depressive disorder that does not respond to other treatments. (holisticremediesnews.com)