Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Dental Plaque Index: An index which scores the degree of dental plaque accumulation.Actinomyces: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Streptococcus sanguis: A gram-positive organism found in dental plaque, in blood, on heart valves in subacute endocarditis, and infrequently in saliva and throat specimens. L-forms are associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Veillonella: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic cocci parasitic in the mouth and in the intestinal and respiratory tracts of man and other animals.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Gingivitis: Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.Streptococcus oralis: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria that is numerous in the mouth and throat. It is a common cause of endocarditis and is also implicated in dental plaque formation.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Cariogenic Agents: Substances that promote DENTAL CARIES.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Streptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Periodontitis: Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Streptococcus gordonii: A species of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family STREPTOCOCCACEAE. It is a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and causes DENTAL PLAQUE and ENDOCARDITIS. It is being investigated as a vehicle for vaccine delivery.Fusobacterium nucleatum: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the gingival margin and sulcus and from infections of the upper respiratory tract and pleural cavity.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Mouthwashes: Solutions for rinsing the mouth, possessing cleansing, germicidal, or palliative properties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Dental Pellicle: A thin protein film on the surface of DENTAL ENAMEL. It is widely believed to result from the selective adsorption of precursor proteins present in SALIVA onto tooth surfaces, and to reduce microbial adherence to the TEETH.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Oral Hygiene Index: A combination of the debris index and the dental calculus index to determine the status of oral hygiene.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Streptococcus sobrinus: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from the human tooth surface. Strains have been shown to be cariogenic in experimental animals and may be associated with human dental caries.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.DextranaseDental Prophylaxis: Treatment for the prevention of periodontal diseases or other dental diseases by the cleaning of the teeth in the dental office using the procedures of DENTAL SCALING and DENTAL POLISHING. The treatment may include plaque detection, removal of supra- and subgingival plaque and calculus, application of caries-preventing agents, checking of restorations and prostheses and correcting overhanging margins and proximal contours of restorations, and checking for signs of food impaction.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Dental Calculus: Abnormal concretion or calcified deposit that forms around the teeth or dental prostheses.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Streptococcus mitis: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria commensal in the respiratory tract.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Periodontal Index: A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.Viral Plaque Assay: Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Diet, Cariogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and advancement of DENTAL CARIES.Gingiva: Oral tissue surrounding and attached to TEETH.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Porphyromonas gingivalis: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium produces a cell-bound, oxygen-sensitive collagenase and is isolated from the human mouth.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Capnocytophaga: A gram-negative gliding bacterium isolated from the oral cavity. It is a pathogen often causing PERIODONTITIS.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Piper betle: A plant genus of the family PIPERACEAE that is indigenous in the Indian Malay region and cultivated in Madagascar, and the West Indies. It contains chavibetol, chavicol and cadinene. The leaf is chewed as a stimulant, antiseptic and sialogogue. The common name of betel is also used for ARECA.Cariostatic Agents: Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Chlorhexidine: A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.Fusobacteria: A phylum of anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria with a chemoorganotrophic heterotrophic metabolism. They are resident flora of the OROPHARYNX.Dentifrices: Any preparations used for cleansing teeth; they usually contain an abrasive, detergent, binder and flavoring agent and may exist in the form of liquid, paste or powder; may also contain medicaments and caries preventives.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Bacteroides: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.Prevotella melaninogenica: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium has been isolated from the mouth, urine, feces, and infections of the mouth, soft tissue, respiratory tract, urogenital tract, and intestinal tract. It is pathogenic, but usually in association with other kinds of organisms.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Spirochaetaceae: A family of spiral bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Fluorides: Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.Actinomycetaceae: A family of bacteria including numerous parasitic and pathogenic forms.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Comprehensive Dental Care: Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.Periodontal Abscess: Localized circumscribed purulent area of inflammation in the periodontal tissue. It is a derivative of marginal periodontitis and commonly associated with suprabony and infrabony pockets and interradicular involvements, in contrast to periapical abscess which is attributable to pulp necrosis.Urease: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of urea and water to carbon dioxide and ammonia. EC A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE that bears an edible fruit and contains guavin B and quercetin glycosides.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Chronic Periodontitis: Chronic inflammation and loss of PERIODONTIUM that is associated with the amount of DENTAL PLAQUE or DENTAL CALCULUS present. Chronic periodontitis occurs mostly in adults and was called adult periodontitis, but this disease can appear in young people.Paullinia: A plant genus of the family SAPINDACEAE. The seed of P. cupana is the source of guarana powder which contains 4% CAFFEINE.Infection Control, Dental: Efforts to prevent and control the spread of infections within dental health facilities or those involving provision of dental care.Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Tooth DiseasesAggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: A species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic spherical or rod-shaped bacteria indigenous to dental surfaces. It is associated with PERIODONTITIS; BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and ACTINOMYCOSIS.Eikenella corrodens: Gram-negative bacteria isolated from infections of the respiratory and intestinal tracts and from the buccal cavity, intestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are probably part of the normal flora of man and animals.Gingival Overgrowth: Excessive growth of the gingiva either by an increase in the size of the constituent cells (GINGIVAL HYPERTROPHY) or by an increase in their number (GINGIVAL HYPERPLASIA). (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p574)Prevotella: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.Lactobacillus: A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.Treponema: A genus of microorganisms of the order SPIROCHAETALES, many of which are pathogenic and parasitic for man and animals.Dental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.Dental Scaling: Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Dental Caries Susceptibility: The predisposition to tooth decay (DENTAL CARIES).Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Bifidobacteriales Infections: Infections with BACTERIA of the order Bifidobacteriales. This includes infections in the genera BIFIDOBACTERIUM and GARDNERELLA, in the family Bifidobacteriaceae.Glucosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glucose from a nucleoside diphosphate glucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Nanocomposites: Nanometer-scale composite structures composed of organic molecules intimately incorporated with inorganic molecules. (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechology Terms, 4th ed)Periodontal Pocket: An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment and bone resorption.Carnobacteriaceae: A family of gram-positive, lactic acid-producing bacteria in the order Lactobacillales. It includes both high-pressure-loving species (piezophiles) found in the deep ocean, and Antarctic species.Dental Informatics: The application of computer and information sciences to improve dental practice, research, education and management.Campylobacter rectus: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from cases of human PERIODONTITIS. It is a microaerophile, capable of respiring with OXYGEN.Shiitake Mushrooms: Mushrooms in the order AGARICALES containing B vitamins, cortinelin, and the polysaccharide LENTINAN.Mouth Mucosa: Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.Neisseria: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid bacteria whose organisms are part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, and genitourinary tract. Some species are primary pathogens for humans.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Microbial Interactions: The inter- and intra-relationships between various microorganisms. This can include both positive (like SYMBIOSIS) and negative (like ANTIBIOSIS) interactions. Examples include virus - bacteria and bacteria - bacteria.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Preventive Dentistry: The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Stomatognathic Diseases: General or unspecified diseases of the stomatognathic system, comprising the mouth, teeth, jaws, and pharynx.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.American Dental Association: Professional society representing the field of dentistry.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Dental Polishing: Creation of a smooth and glossy surface finish on a denture or amalgam.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Bacteroidaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family BACTEROIDACEAE.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Sodium Fluoride: A source of inorganic fluoride which is used topically to prevent dental caries.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.

*  Presence of Helicobacter pylori in supragingival dental plaque of individuals with periodontal disease and upper gastric...
Presence of Helicobacter pylori in supragingival dental plaque of individuals with periodontal disease and upper gastric ... H. pylori was detected in the supragingival plaque, but not in the subgingival plaque, of individuals with periodontal disease ... H. pylori was detected in supragingival plaque of 9/36 (25%) of group A, 1/31 (0.3%) of group B, 0 (0%) of group C and 3/36 ( ... Supra and subgingival plaque samples were collected from posterior teeth of the individuals with sterile paper points, and ...
*  Chemical Plaque Control
... PLAQUE Dental plaque is defined as a highly specific variable structural entity formed by sequential ... Chemical Plaque Control * 1. CHEMICAL PLAQUE CONTROL PLAQUE Dental plaque is defined as a highly specific variable structural ... jose richard , professor at mes dental college at mes dental college it is not complete ... 2. Plaque control It is the removal of microbial plaque and the prevention of its accumulation on the teeth and adjacent ...
*  Nanoparticles provide novel way to apply drugs to dental plaque
Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental plaque and prevent tooth decay are often removed by saliva and the act of ... Nanoparticles provide novel way to apply drugs to dental plaque. (Nanowerk News) Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental ... Dental plaque is made up of bacteria enmeshed in a sticky matrix of polymers a polymeric matrix that is firmly attached to ... Plaque formation and tooth decay are chronic conditions that need to be monitored through regular visits to the dental office. ...
*  HKU Scholars Hub: Predominant cultivable microflora of supragingival dental plaque in Chinese individuals
Predominant cultivable microflora of supragingival dental plaque in Chinese individuals. Authors. Zee, KYSamaranayake, LP ... Article: Predominant cultivable microflora of supragingival dental plaque in Chinese individuals. *Show simple item record ... Predominant cultivable microflora of supragingival dental plaque in Chinese individuals. en_US. ... In the fourth week, after prophylaxis, the participants entered a 14- day period without any plaque control. A plaque sample ...
*  Frontiers | Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral bacteria in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults |...
... nor did the microbial composition of plaque during a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing. Plaque scores ... Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193), nor did the microbial composition of ... of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque ... Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193), ...
*  Christina Warinner uncovers ancient tales in dental plaque | Science News
... or fossilized dental plaque, which contains a trove of genetic clues to past human diet and disease. ... fossilized dental plaque, or calculus. Ancient DNA and proteins in the plaque belong to microbes that could spill the secrets ... Christina Warinner uncovers ancient tales in dental plaque. DNA on fossil teeth offers clues to past lifestyles, health and ... Ancient dental plaque tells tales of Neandertal diet and disease. Science News Online, March 8, 2017. ...
*  Toothpaste significantly reduces dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body | EurekAlert! Science News
Plaque HD®, produced statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body as measured by ... Results from a randomized trial of a novel plaque identifying toothpaste, ... show that Plaque HD®, produced statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body as ... Plaque HD®), show statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body. Inflammation ...
*  Dental plaque
... dental plaque removal, floss, gingivitis, plaque disclosing products, plaque on teeth, teeth plaque, tooth plaque on December 9 ... Tag Archives: Dental plaque. Is Dental Plaque the Main Cause of Dental Caries? Leave a reply ... Dental Plaque, the main cause of Dental Caries. Dental Plaque is a soft but adherent deposit of bacteria and their products, ... This entry was posted in Oral Care and tagged dental calculus, dental cleaning, Dental plaque, dental tartar removal, remove ...
*  Search of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | 'Dental Plaque' - Results on Map -
Click on a [studies] link to search within your current results for studies in that region. Use the back button to return to this list and try another region ...
*  Researchers: Dental plaque led to nursing-home residents' deaths - McKnight's Long Term Care News
Researchers said nursing homes must help residents maintain clean teeth and dentures because germs found in dental plaque can ... Researchers: Dental plaque led to nursing-home residents' deaths. Share this content: *facebook ... Of the 49 patients, 28 had germs known to cause respiratory disease in their dental plaque samples. Of the 14 who eventually ... Researchers said nursing homes must help residents maintain clean teeth and dentures because germs found in dental plaque can ...
*  Dental Plaque -
This image demonstrates dental plaque stained by neutral red on an original tooth surface on a human volunteer after nine days ... This image demonstrates dental plaque stained by neutral red on an original tooth surface on a human volunteer after nine days ...
*  Dental plaque - Wikipedia
Dental plaque is also known as microbial plaque, oral biofilm, dental biofilm, dental plaque biofilm or bacterial plaque ... The most common way dental plaque is assessed is through dental assessment in the dental clinic where dental instruments are ... Plaque disclosing gels can be either completed at home or in the dental clinic. Before using these at home or in the dental ... Dental biofilm begins to form on the tooth only minutes after brushing. It can be difficult to see dental plaque on the hard ...
*  The association of dental plaque with cancer mortality in Sweden. A longitudinal study | BMJ Open
The association of dental plaque with cancer mortality in Sweden. A longitudinal study. BMJ Open 2012;2:e001083. doi:10.1136/ ... The amount of dental plaque between those who had died versus survived was statistically significant (p,0.001). In multiple ... Objectives To study whether the amount of dental plaque, which indicates poor oral hygiene and is potential source of oral ... Conclusions This study hypothesis was confirmed by showing that poor oral hygiene, as reflected in the amount of dental plaque ...
*  H2 Clinical Trials Dental Plaque Market Analysis, Key Manufacturers and top Companies VOCO GmbH, GABA International AG Review...
"Dental Plaque Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016″ provides an overview of Dental Plaque clinical trials scenario. This ... Clinical Trials by G7 Countries: Proportion of Dental Plaque to Mouth and Dental Disorders Clinical Trials 14. Clinical Trials ... Clinical Trials by E7 Countries: Proportion of Dental Plaque to Mouth and Dental Disorders Clinical Trials 17. Clinical Trials ... H2 Clinical Trials Dental Plaque Market Analysis, Key Manufacturers and top Companies VOCO GmbH, GABA International AG Review ...
*  JCDR - Decay, Missing filled tooth index, Dental caries, Dental plaque
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research aims to publish findings of doctors at grass root level and post graduate students, so that all unique medical experiences are recorded in literature.
*  Dental Plaque
How To Remove Plaque-It's Like Dried Grape Jelly. If how to remove plaque is on your mind, you already know plaque's a problem ... How To Remove Plaque-It's Like Dried Grape Jelly If how to remove plaque is on your mind, you… ... Failure To Floss-Deal Breaker In New Relationships Dental Floss, Does It Really Matter? Who would guess a… ... Teeth scaling is a common dental procedure through which your dentist will professionally clean your teeth. It is a nonsurgical ...
*  Dental Plaque
Various plaque hypothesis including specific plaque hypothesis, non-specific, ecological plaque hypothesis and keystone ... Various plaque hypothesis including specific plaque hypothesis, non-specific, ecological plaque hypothesis and keystone ... Various plaque hypothesis including specific plaque hypothesis, non-specific, ecological plaque hypothesis and keystone ... A detailed description of dental plaque including its formation and organization. ...
*  Dental Plaque May Provide a Pathway to Pneumonia in Ventilated Patients
Dental plaque may be a culprit in the development of pneumonia, but better oral health can mitigate that risk both in ... and from dental plaque. Each patient's oral hygiene was assessed at the beginning of the study, and each received basic dental ... The researchers found that the dental plaque of patients on respirators may undergo a sort of shift. For reasons yet unknown, ... Researchers at Cardiff University in Wales recently discovered that dental plaque-far from simply being a precursor to cavities ...
*  What is dental plaques & How are they removed ? - Doctor's insight on HealthcareMagic
What is dental plaques & How are they removed ?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Gingivitis, Ask a ... Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops naturally on the teeth. Like any biofilm, dental plaque is ... Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops naturally on the teeth. Like any biofilm, dental plaque is ... plaque is the accumulation of food debris plus bacteria . there is a complex process of plaque accumulation in the inter dental ...
*  Artisan Dental: Dental Plaque
We provide a full range of dental care services and dental treatments at Artisan Dental in Sonora CA. Our dental services ... Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental plaque.. The above video is found on the American ... Dental Association YouTube Channel. Artisan Dental Jeff Berger, DDS 19604 Mono Way Sonora, CA 95370 (209) 532-2915 ArtisanDDS. ... Berger is an active participant in the community, providing dental care to veterans and to children through the Artisan Dental ...
*  GC America | Operatory Product - GC Dry Mouth Gel
GC Tri Plaque ID Gel™. MI Paste®. MI Paste Plus®. Dental Plaque. Disclosing Gel. Topical Tooth Crème Containing. Calcium & ...
*  Dr. Yohei Tanaka | OMICS International
Dental Orofacial Surgery. *Dentoalveolar Surgery. *Dermato-Oncology. *Dermatopathology. *Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra. *Diabetic ... Plaque Psoriasis. *Plastic Surgery. *Poikiloderma Vasculare Atrophicans. *Poikiloderma of Civatte. *Prosthesis. *Prosthetic ...
*  Oral Hygiene Aids
Learn more about the dental procedures offered at our dental practice in Yorktown Heights, NY. Schedule an appointment online ... Dental Flosses. Dental floss is the most common interdental and subgingival (below the gum) cleaner and comes in a variety of ... Any plaque on the tip can be rinsed off with tap water. It is important to replace the tip as soon as it starts to appear worn ... Regular dental check ups are essential for maintaining excellent oral hygiene and diagnosing potential problems, but they are ...
*  Feline Greenies Dental Treats - Beef 2.5oz
Not only does this treat deliver a taste cats love, but the unique teeth-cleaning shape of Feline Greenies® dental trea ... div id='summary', ,p,The moment you give Feline Greenies® dental treats to your cat, you'll hear nothing but the sweet purring ... dental treats is clinically proven to help reduce tartar and plaque buildup cleans teeth, freshens breath, and stirs up purrs ... dental treats is clinically proven to help reduce tartar and plaque buildup cleans teeth, freshens breath, and stirs up purrs ...

Dental plaque: Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that grows on surfaces within the mouth. It appears as a white or pale yellow "slime layer", that is commonly found between the teeth and along the cervical margins.Dental cariesDental Procedure Education System: The Dental Procedure Education System (DPES), is a web-based resource containing a collection of procedures from the dental disciplines. The procedures presented in DPES were developed by individual faculty members at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, in collaboration with a group of educational media and technology experts.Franz Hein: Franz Hein (1892–1976) was a German scientist and artist.Actinomyces israelii: Actinomyces israelii is a species of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria within the Actinomyces. Known to live commensally on and within humans, A.Streptococcus mutans: Streptococcus mutans is facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive coccus-shaped bacterium commonly found in the human oral cavity and is a significant contributor to tooth decay.DJ College of Dental Sciences and Research: Divya Jyoti (DJ) College of Dental Sciences and Research is a dental college located in Modinagar in the nagar panchayat of Niwari in Ghaziabad district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The founder and chairman is Ajit Singh Jassar.Dental Schools Council: The Dental Schools Council represents the interests of UK dental schools as it relates to national health, wealth, knowledge acquisition through teaching, research, and the profession of dentistry.Universities UK http://www.Veillonella parvula: Veillonella parvula is a bacterium in the genus Veillonella. It is a normal part of the oral flora but can be associated with diseases such as periodontitis and dental caries as well as various systemic infections.Vulnerable plaque: A vulnerable plaque is a kind of atheromatous plaque – a collection of white blood cells (primarily macrophages) and lipids (including cholesterol) in the wall of an artery – that is particularly unstable and prone to produce sudden major problems such as a heart attack or stroke.Desquamative gingivitisStreptococcus oralis: Streptococcus oralis is a Gram positive bacterium that grows characteristically in chains. It forms small white colonies on a Wilkins-Chalgren agar plate.Saliva testing: Saliva testing is a diagnostic technique that involves laboratory analysis of saliva to identify markers of endocrine, immunologic, inflammatory, infectious, and other types of conditions. Saliva is a useful biological fluid for assaying steroid hormones such as cortisol, genetic material like RNA, proteins such as enzymes and antibodies, and a variety of other substances, including natural metabolites, including saliva nitrite, a biomarker for nitric oxide status (see below for Cardiovascular Disease, Nitric Oxide: a salivary biomarker for cardio-protection).Bone destruction patterns in periodontal disease: In periodontal disease, not only does the bone that supports the teeth, known as alveolar bone, reduce in height in relation to the teeth, but the morphology of the remaining alveolar bone is altered.Carranza, FA: Bone Loss and Patterns of Bone Destruction.Happy Tooth: 72px|thumb|right|"Happy Tooth" logoMallow General Hospital: Mallow General Hospital is a public hospital located in Mallow, County Cork, Ireland.http://www.Streptococcus dysgalactiae: Streptococcus dysgalactiae is a species of Streptococcus.Pulp (tooth): The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The dental pulp is a part of the dentin–pulp complex (endodontium).Utah College of Dental HygienePeriodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease: Periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases is one of the seven categories of periodontitis as defined by the American Academy of Periodontology 1999 classification system. At least 16 systemic diseases have been linked to periodontitis.Streptococcus gordonii: Streptococcus gordonii is a Gram-positive bacterium included among some of the initial colonizers of the periodontal environment. American Academy of Periodontology 2010 In-Service Exam, question 82 The organism, along with related oral streptococci, has a high affinity for molecules in the salivary pellicle (or coating) on tooth surfaces.Fusobacterium nucleatum: Fusobacterium nucleatum is an oral bacterium, indigenous to the human oral cavity, that plays a role in periodontal disease. This organism is commonly recovered from different monomicrobial and mixed infections in humans and animals.BiofilmListerineToothbrush: The toothbrush is an oral hygiene instrument used to clean the teeth and gums that consists of a head of tightly clustered bristles mounted on a handle, which facilitates the cleansing of hard-to-reach areas of the mouth.International Association for Dental Research: The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a professional association that focuses on research in the field of dentistry. The aim of this association by constitution is to promote research in all fields of oral and related sciences, to encourage improvements in methods for the prevention and treatment of oral and dental disease, to improve the oral health of the public through research, and to facilitate cooperation among investigators and the communication of research findings and their implications throughout the world.SOAP note: The SOAP note (an acronym for subjective, objective, assessment, and plan) is a method of documentation employed by health care providers to write out notes in a patient's chart, along with other common formats, such as the admission note. Documenting patient encounters in the medical record is an integral part of practice workflow starting with patient appointment scheduling, to writing out notes, to medical billing.Glycoside hydrolase family 66: In molecular biology, glycoside hydrolase family 66 is a family of glycoside hydrolases.Glot-Up: A Glot-Up is type of dental equipment, something in between a mouth guard and an adult-sized pacifier.MFDS: MFDS is the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, a government department in South Korea. This is former KFDA, Korean Food and Drug Administration.Human tooth: The human teeth function in mechanically breaking down items of food by cutting and crushing them in preparation for swallowing and digestion. There are four different types of teeth, namely incisors, canines, molars and premolars.Amalgam (chemistry): An amalgam is a substance formed by the reaction of mercury with another metal. Almost all metals can form amalgams with mercury, the notable exceptions being iron, platinum, tungsten, and tantalum.Streptococcus mitis: Streptococcus mitis, previously known as Streptococcus mitior, is a mesophilic alpha-hemolytic species of Streptococcus that inhabits the human mouth. It is most commonly found in the throat, nasopharynx, and mouth.Implant stability quotient: The implant stability quotient (ISQ) is the value on a scale that indicates the level of stability and osseointegration in dental implants. The scale ranges from 1 to 100 and is measured by implant stability meters instruments using resonance frequency analysis (RFA) technique.International Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies: The International Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies (IFDAS) is a professional association established in 1976. IFDAS is devoted solely to promoting the safe and effective use of sedation and anesthesia by educationally qualified dentists for their patients.Dental radiographyPostgraduate training in general dentistry: ==Australia==Porphyromonas gingivalis: Porphyromonas gingivalis belongs to the phylum Bacteroidetes and is a nonmotile, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, anaerobic, pathogenic bacterium. It forms black colonies on blood agar.Sydney Dental HospitalAmerican Dental Society of Anesthesiology: The American Dental Society of Anesthesiology (ADSA) is an American professional association established in 1953 and based in Chicago.Dental fluorosisUniversity of the East College of Dentistry: The University of the East College of Dentistry was first established as a unit of the Philippine College of Commerce and Business Administration in 1948. The college is one of the pioneers of dental education and labeled as one of the top dental schools in the Philippines.Nordic Institute of Dental Materials: NorwayCapnocytophaga canimorsus: Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a fastidious, slow-growing Gram-negative rod of the genus Capnocytophaga.Pers C, Gahrn-Hansen B, and Frederiksen W.Enamel spindles: Enamel spindles are "short, linear defects, found at the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) and extend into the enamel, often being more prevalent at the cusp tips."Histology Course Notes: "Mature Enamel", New Jersey Dental School, 2003-2004, page 2.Coronation Dental Specialty GroupH. Beam PiperDenturist: A Denturist in the United States and Canada, clinical dental technician in the UK or (in Australia) a dental prosthetist, is a member of the oral health care team who provides an oral health examination, takes impressions of the surrounding oral tissues, constructs and delivers removable oral prosthesis (dentures and partial dentures) directly to the patient.American Academy of denturitry.ChlorhexidineSucrose gap: The sucrose gap technique is used to create a conduction block in nerve or muscle fibers. A high concentration of sucrose is applied to the extracellular space to increase resistance between two groups of cells, which prevents the correct opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels.Dentifrice: Dentifrices are agents used along with a toothbrush to clean and polish natural teeth. They are supplied in paste, powder, gel or liquid form.Exogenous bacteria: Exogenous bacteria are microorganisms introduced to closed biological systems from the external world. They exist in aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as the atmosphere.Gentamicin protection assay: The gentamicin protection assay or survival assay or invasion assay is a method used in microbiology. It is used to quantify the ability of pathogenic bacteria to invade eukaryotic cells.OverjetSpirochaetaceaeOutline of dentistry and oral health: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to dentistry and oral health:Fluoride toxicity

(1/947) Rapid identification of Actinomycetaceae and related bacteria.

Identification of new isolates belonging to the family Actinomycetaceae requires extensive numbers of biochemical tests, supplemented with gas-liquid chromatography determination of fermentation end products and, often, analysis of cell wall composition. This paper describes the results of the testing of 162 strains of Actinomycetaceae and related taxa for 20 different enzymatic activities including phosphatases, esterases, aminopeptidases, and glycosidases. The results of all tests were read after 4 h of incubation. The results obtained in the study provide significant new information on the biochemical properties of these groups of bacteria. An identification scheme based upon 13 selected tests, which allow the identification of these groups of bacteria within 4 h, is proposed.  (+info)

(2/947) Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to oral bacterial antigens: comparison of individuals with periodontal disease to normal and edentulous subjects.

Cell-mediated immunity in humans to antigens derived from oral plaque bacteria was investigated by using the lymphocyte blastogenesis assay. Subjects with varying severities of periodontal disease including normal, gingivitis, periodontitis, and edentulous were compared. Mononuclear leukocytes were separated from peripheral blood and cultured with antigens prepared by sonication of Actinomyces viscosus (AV), Actinomyces naeslundii (AN), Veillonella alcalescens (VA), Leptotrichia buccalis (LB), Bacteroides melaninogenicus (BM), and homologous dental plaque (DP). The lymphocyte response of subjects with gingivitis or periodontitis was significantly greater than that of normal subjects to antigens of AV, AN, and DP, but did not differ from the response of edentulous subjects. Periodontitis subjects were significantly more reactive than edentulous and normal subjects in response to VA, LB, and BM. These findings suggest that the tested gram-negative bacteria and the host response they evoke are associated with advanced periodontal destruction.  (+info)

(3/947) Identification by PCR of Helicobacter pylori in subgingival plaque of adult periodontitis patients.

The PCR was used to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in subgingival plaque samples from patients with adult periodontitis. Primers based upon the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence of H. pylori were used in a single round of PCR to amplify a 295-bp DNA fragment and the identity of the amplified products was confirmed by Southern blot hybridisation to a digoxigenin-labelled H. pylori probe. Further confirmation of product identity was obtained by DNA sequencing of a proportion of the amplified products. The assay was demonstrated to be specific for H. pylori with a lower limit of detection of 100 fg of bacterial genomic DNA. In all, 73 samples from 29 patients were analysed, of which 24 (33%) were H. pylori-positive by PCR; the proportion of patients carrying H. pylori in at least one sampled site was 38% (11 of 29). This is the first study to demonstrate the presence of H. pylori in the subgingival plaque of patients with adult periodontitis and indicates that, in this patient group at least, subgingival plaque may be a reservoir for H. pylori infection.  (+info)

(4/947) Antimicrobial susceptibility and composition of microcosm dental plaques supplemented with sucrose.

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of repeated chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) pulsing on the viability and bacterial composition of microcosm dental plaques derived from human saliva. The biofilms were grown on bovine enamel discs in a constant-depth film fermentor fed with an artificial saliva which was supplemented thrice daily with sucrose. The microcosm plaques had total viable anaerobic counts of 5 x 10(8) CFU per mm2 and consisted of 12% Actinomyces spp., 85% streptococci, and 0.2% Veillonella spp. When pulsed twice daily with 0.2% CHG, there was an immediate 1.3-log10 reduction in the total viable (anaerobic) count. However, as pulsing continued, the viable counts recovered, and after 4 days, the anaerobic count reached its pre-CHG-pulsing level, although the bacterial composition of the biofilms had changed. The results of this study show that twice-daily pulsing with 0.2% CHG over a 4-day period was ineffective at reducing the total anaerobic viable count of the biofilms but did alter their bacterial composition.  (+info)

(5/947) Inactivation of the gbpA gene of Streptococcus mutans alters structural and functional aspects of plaque biofilm which are compensated by recombination of the gtfB and gtfC genes.

Inactivation of the gbpA gene of Streptococcus mutans increases virulence in a gnotobiotic rat model and also promotes in vivo accumulation of organisms in which gtfB and gtfC have recombined to reduce virulence (K. R. O. Hazlett, S. M. Michalek, and J. A. Banas, Infect. Immun. 66:2180-2185, 1998). These changes in virulence were hypothesized to result from changes in plaque structure. We have utilized an in vitro plaque model to test the hypothesis that the absence of GbpA alters S. mutans plaque structure and that the presence of gtfBC recombinant organisms within a gbpA background restores a wild-type (wt)-like plaque structure. When grown in the presence of sucrose within hydroxyapatite-coated wells, the wt S. mutans plaque consisted primarily of large aggregates which did not completely coat the hydroxyapatite surface, whereas the gbpA mutant plaque consisted of a uniform layer of smaller aggregates which almost entirely coated the hydroxyapatite. If 25% of the gbpA mutants used as inoculum were also gtfBC recombinants (gbpA/25%gtfBC), a wt-like plaque was formed. These changes in plaque structure correlated with differences in susceptibility to ampicillin; gbpA plaque organisms were more susceptible than organisms in either the wt or gbpA/25%gtfBC plaques. These data allow the conclusion that GbpA contributes to S. mutans plaque biofilm development. Since the changes in plaque structure detailed in this report correlate well with previously observed changes in virulence, it seems likely that S. mutans biofilm structure influences virulence. A potential model for this influence, which can account for the gtfBC recombination compensating gbpA inactivation, is that the ratio of glucan to glucan-binding protein is a critical factor in plaque development.  (+info)

(6/947) Antiphosphorylcholine antibody levels are elevated in humans with periodontal diseases.

Human immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) serum concentrations and the IgG2 antibody response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans can be influenced by genes, by environmental factors such as smoking, and by periodontal disease status. Examination of the IgG2 response to phosphorylcholine (PC), a response thought to be mainly induced by the C polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae, suggested that periodontal disease status was also associated with this response. This prompted the hypothesis that PC is an important oral antigen associated with organisms in the periodontal flora and that anti-PC antibody is elevated as a consequence of periodontal disease. Subjects in various periodontal disease diagnostic categories in which attachment loss is exhibited were tested for anti-PC in serum. Those with adult periodontitis, localized juvenile periodontitis, generalized early-onset periodontitis, and gingival recession all had similar levels of anti-PC IgG2 serum antibody which were significantly greater than in the group of subjects with no attachment loss. Analysis of plaque samples from subgingival and supragingival sites in all diseases categories for reactivity with the anti-PC specific monoclonal antibody TEPC-15 revealed that a substantial proportion of the bacteria in dental plaque (30 to 40%) bear PC antigen; this antigen was not restricted to morphotypes resembling only cocci but was also present on rods and branched filamentous organisms. We found that S. mitis, S. oralis, and S. sanguis, as well as oral actinomycetes, including A. viscosus, A. odontolyticus, and A. israelii, incorporated substantial amounts of [(3)H]choline from culture media. Further analysis of antigens derived from these organisms by Western blot indicated that S. oralis, S. sanguis, A. viscosus, A. odontolyticus, and A. israelii contained TEPC-15-reactive antigens. The data show that many commonly occurring bacterial species found in dental plaque contain PC antigen and that immunization with plaque-derived PC antigens as a consequence of inflammation and periodontal attachment loss may influence systemic anti-PC antibody concentrations.  (+info)

(7/947) A clinical comparison of the efficacy and efficiency of two professional prophylaxis procedures in orthodontic patients.

This study compared the efficacy and efficiency of two professional prophylaxis procedures in orthodontic patients performing different oral hygiene regimens: the air powder polishing system (APP), and the rubber cup and pumice (RCP) technique. Sixty-two patients were divided into two groups: group I included 40 subjects who did not use any chlorhexidine mouthwash and group II comprised 22 subjects who regularly rinsed with a chlorhexidine mouthwash (at a 0.12 per cent concentration) and showed increased tooth staining. Using a split-mouth experimental design, the buccal and lingual tooth surfaces were cleaned in half of the mouth by the APP and in the opposite half by the RCP technique. Tooth surfaces were scored before (PRE) and after (POST) the experimental procedures for the plaque index (PI), and for the presence of tooth staining. In addition, the treatment time required by each procedure was recorded. In test group I, significant reductions in the PI after APP and RCP were observed. Likewise, in test group II, both procedures significantly reduced the baseline PI values. In both experimental groups, the percentage of stained sites significantly decreased after APP and RCP, but in test group II, APP seemed to be more effective than RCP. In addition, APP required significantly less time than RCP to remove dental plaque and staining. These data show that both professional prophylaxis procedures are effective in orthodontic patients, with APP being the most time-efficient technique and the most effective method for removal of tooth staining.  (+info)

(8/947) Improved multiplex PCR using conserved and species-specific 16S rRNA gene primers for simultaneous detection of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Among putative periodontal pathogens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis are most convincingly implicated as etiological agents in periodontitis. Therefore, techniques for detection of those three species would be of value. We previously published a description of a multiplex PCR that detects A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis. The present paper presents an improvement on that technique, which now allows more sensitive detection of all three periodontal pathogens. Sensitivity was determined by testing serial dilutions of A. actinomycetemcomitans, B. forsythus, and P. gingivalis cells. Primer specificity was tested against (i) all gene sequences from the GenBank-EMBL database, (ii) six A. actinomycetemcomitans, one B. forsythus, and four P. gingivalis strains, (iii) eight different species of oral bacteria, and (iv) supra- and subgingival plaque samples from 20 healthy subjects and subgingival plaque samples from 10 patients with periodontitis. The multiplex PCR had a detection limit of 10 A. actinomycetemcomitans, 10 P. gingivalis, and 100 B. forsythus cells. Specificity was confirmed by the fact that (i) none of our forward primers were homologous to the 16S rRNA genes of other oral species, (ii) amplicons of predicted size were detected for all A. actinomycetemcomitans, B. forsythus, and P. gingivalis strains tested, and (iii) no amplicons were detected for the eight other bacterial species. A. actinomycetemcomitans, B. forsythus, and P. gingivalis were detected in 6 of 20, 1 of 20, and 11 of 20 of supragingival plaque samples, respectively, and 4 of 20, 7 of 20, and 13 of 20 of subgingival plaque samples, respectively, from periodontally healthy subjects. Among patients with periodontitis, the organisms were detected in 7 of 10, 10 of 10, and 7 of 10 samples, respectively. The simultaneous detection of three periodontal pathogens is an advantage of this technique over conventional PCR assays.  (+info)

  • teeth
  • Since the nanoparticles could bind both to saliva-coated teeth and within plaque, Benoit and colleagues used them to carry an anti-bacterial agent to the targeted sites. (
  • However, because daily dental plaque removal is more effective, it is the individual - not the hygienist or the dentist - who is vital for preserving lifelong intact teeth. (
  • Researchers said nursing homes must help residents maintain clean teeth and dentures because germs found in dental plaque can make their way into the lungs and cause deadly pneumonia in elderly residents, according to a new study report. (
  • Supra and subgingival plaque samples were collected from posterior teeth of the individuals with sterile paper points, and prepared for Polymerase Chain Reaction analysis. (
  • Teeth scaling is a common dental procedure through which your dentist will professionally clean your teeth. (
  • Dental plaque is a complex community of microorganisms that forms on the surfaces of teeth and restorations and has been implicated as the primary etiological factor in the development of periodontal diseases 1, 2 . (
  • According to WHO (1978), dental plaque is defined as a specific but highly variable structural entity resulting from sequential colonization and growth of micro-organisms on the surfaces of teeth and restoration consisting of micro organisms of various strains and species are embedded in the extra cellular matrix, composed of bacterial metabolic products and substance from serum, saliva and blood. (
  • I saw a dentist yesterday and the doctor said that i have dental plaques and it has to be reomoved other wise i will get severe infection of the gums and teeth, Is it true. (
  • hello freiend, thanks for query, Plaque is a kind of sticky bit irritatind and dirty looking film build-up on the teeth. (
  • Plaque is a sticky film of build-up on your teeth. (
  • The longer any piece of plaque remains on the teeth the more mature it becomes. (
  • He has since taken numerous postgraduate education courses, with recent training in dental implants from the renowned Misch International Implant Institute™ and in occlusion (the contact between teeth) from Frank Spear. (
  • In 1885, he embarked on a journey to improve the state of dental prostheses by designing more aesthetic artificial teeth that better matched the overall facial dimensions of the patient. (
  • Food packing is usually caused by failure to accurately reproduce the contact points when dental restorations are placed on the interproximal surfaces of teeth. (
  • Colored stains on the teeth indicate areas where plaque remains after brushing, providing feedback to improve brushing technique. (
  • stains
  • The tablets, sold over-the-counter in many countries, contain a dye (typically a vegetable dye, such as Phloxine B) that stains plaque a bright color (typically red or blue). (
  • With the most common variety, immature plaque stains red, mature purple, and pathological acidic plaque blue. (
  • salivary
  • Some salivary components are crucial for plaques ecosystem, such as salivary alpha-amylase which plays a role in binding and adhesion. (
  • researchers
  • The researchers, led by Danielle Benoit at the University of Rochester and Hyun Koo at the University of Pennsylvania s School of Dental Medicine, found a new way to deliver an antibacterial agent within the plaque, despite the presence of saliva. (
  • The researchers then needed to figure out how to effectively release the agent into the plaque. (
  • U.S. researchers said they found clear evidence in eight patients who developed pneumonia while in the hospital that the condition was caused by their own dental plaque. (
  • Researchers at Cardiff University in Wales recently discovered that dental plaque-far from simply being a precursor to cavities-may also play a role in the development of VAP. (
  • The researchers found that the dental plaque of patients on respirators may undergo a sort of shift. (
  • oral
  • Objectives To study whether the amount of dental plaque, which indicates poor oral hygiene and is potential source of oral infections, associates with premature death from cancer. (
  • Conclusions This study hypothesis was confirmed by showing that poor oral hygiene, as reflected in the amount of dental plaque, was associated with increased cancer mortality. (
  • There was an association between the supragingival colonization of H. pylori and oral hygiene parameters such as the presence of plaque and gingival bleeding. (
  • The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. (
  • Anti-plaque agents should not eradicate the oral microbiota. (
  • Each patient's oral hygiene was assessed at the beginning of the study, and each received basic dental care with a mechanical toothbrush while on a ventilator. (
  • hello there , Dental plaque is the soft deposits formed by bacterial colonization in the oral cavity due to poor oral hygiene habits like improper brushing and flossing habits. (
  • Arnim worked with oral pathologist Barnet M. Levy at the Medical College of Virginia, and he recruited Levy to the University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston in 1957, where Levy later helped to establish a dental research institute. (
  • composition
  • Understanding the formation, composition and characteristics of plaque helps in its control. (
  • The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. (
  • Thus the amount of plaque in situ was taken to determine the severity of the effect, regardless of its composition. (
  • treatments
  • We provide a full range of dental care services and dental treatments at Artisan Dental in Sonora CA. Our dental services include: children's, cosmetic, family, general, implant, orthodontic, preventive, restorative and sedation dentistry. (
  • dentistry
  • Dr. Berger earned his dental degree from the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, after earning his bachelor's degree from California Polytechnic State University. (
  • Williams also practiced dentistry in London and was one of the founders of the International Association for Dental Research. (
  • pockets
  • Surgical periodontal therapy creates a stable and maintainable environment for the patient by eliminating pathological changes in the pockets.The overall purpose of surgical therapy is to eliminate the pathogenic plaque in pocket walls to get a stable and easily maintainable state. (
  • diseases
  • However, failure to remove plaque by regular tooth-brushing allows them to proliferate unchecked and thereby build up in a thick layer, which can by virtue of their ordinary metabolism cause any of various dental diseases for the host. (
  • make
  • Williams sought to make information on these techniques available to all dentists through the pages of The Dental Cosmos. (
  • Since the management of a periodontal abscess is different from a periapical abscess, this differentiation is important to make (see Dental abscess#Diagnostic approach) For example, root canal therapy is unnecessary and has no impact on pain in a periodontal abscess. (
  • Disclosing tablets are chewable tablets used to make dental plaque visible. (
  • daily
  • During a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31) at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39) Post-exp. (
  • researcher
  • This is the first time research has been able to find a link between dental hygiene and respiratory infection, according to lead researcher Dr. Ali El-Solh of the University at Buffalo in New York. (
  • healthy
  • A total of 11 healthy dental students, mean age 22.5 years (range 20-25) were recruited. (
  • Technological developments in the twentieth century enabled scientists to analyse the chemical changes in the plaque biome from healthy to diseased environments, which then brought several problems to light. (
  • research
  • He was dean of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston and he conducted significant research work on dental plaque. (