Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Decision Support Techniques: Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.Decision Making, Computer-Assisted: Use of an interactive computer system designed to assist the physician or other health professional in choosing between certain relationships or variables for the purpose of making a diagnostic or therapeutic decision.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Decision Trees: A graphic device used in decision analysis, series of decision options are represented as branches (hierarchical).Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Decision Theory: A theoretical technique utilizing a group of related constructs to describe or prescribe how individuals or groups of people choose a course of action when faced with several alternatives and a variable amount of knowledge about the determinants of the outcomes of those alternatives.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Gambling: An activity distinguished primarily by an element of risk in trying to obtain a desired goal, e.g., playing a game of chance for money.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Advance Care Planning: Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.United StatesQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Proxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Probability Learning: Usually refers to the use of mathematical models in the prediction of learning to perform tasks based on the theory of probability applied to responses; it may also refer to the frequency of occurrence of the responses observed in the particular study.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Intuition: Knowing or understanding without conscious use of reasoning. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Fuzzy Logic: Approximate, quantitative reasoning that is concerned with the linguistic ambiguity which exists in natural or synthetic language. At its core are variables such as good, bad, and young as well as modifiers such as more, less, and very. These ordinary terms represent fuzzy sets in a particular problem. Fuzzy logic plays a key role in many medical expert systems.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Great BritainAdvance Directive Adherence: Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Economics: The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Comparative Effectiveness Research: Conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. ( accessed 6/12/2009)Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Expert Systems: Computer programs based on knowledge developed from consultation with experts on a problem, and the processing and/or formalizing of this knowledge using these programs in such a manner that the problems may be solved.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Decision Support Systems, Management: Computer-based systems that enable management to interrogate the computer on an ad hoc basis for various kinds of information in the organization, which predict the effect of potential decisions.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Obstetric Nursing: A nursing specialty involving nursing care given to the pregnant patient before, after, or during childbirth.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Diagnosis: The determination of the nature of a disease or condition, or the distinguishing of one disease or condition from another. Assessment may be made through physical examination, laboratory tests, or the likes. Computerized programs may be used to enhance the decision-making process.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Patient Navigation: The process of helping patients to effectively and efficiently use the health care system when faced with one or more of these challenges: (1) choosing, understanding, and using health coverage or applying for assistance when uninsured; (2) choosing, using, and understanding different types of health providers and services; (3) making treatment decisions; and (4) managing care received by multiple providers.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Information Literacy: The ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and use the needed information effectively.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Anticipation, Psychological: The ability to foresee what is likely to happen on the basis of past experience. It is largely a frontal lobe function.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Technology Assessment, Biomedical: Evaluation of biomedical technology in relation to cost, efficacy, utilization, etc., and its future impact on social, ethical, and legal systems.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Health Information Systems: A system for the collection and/or processing of data from various sources, and using the information for policy making and management of health services. It could be paper-based or electronic. (From,,contentMDK:22239824~menuPK:376799~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:376793,00.html. of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Information Seeking Behavior: How information is gathered in personal, academic or work environments and the resources used.Genetic Counseling: An educational process that provides information and advice to individuals or families about a genetic condition that may affect them. The purpose is to help individuals make informed decisions about marriage, reproduction, and other health management issues based on information about the genetic disease, the available diagnostic tests, and management programs. Psychosocial support is usually offered.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Trail Making Test: The subject's ability to connect 25 numbered and lettered circles in sequence in a specific length of time. A score of 12 or below is suggestive of organic brain damage.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.

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You are here: Home Page , Medicine & Health , Clinical Medicine , Pain Medicine , Expert Decision Making on Opioid Treatment ... Expert Decision Making on Opioid Treatment. Edited by Jane Ballantyne and David J. Tauben. *A balanced discussion of when to ... Expert Decision Making on Opioid Treatment explains to readers how to select patients, and subsequently manage and monitor, so ... Expert Decision Making on Opioid Treatment. Edited by Jane Ballantyne and David J. Tauben. ...
*  Understanding Decision Making Processes for Undergoing Genetic Testing Among Women With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer - Full...
Understanding Decision Making Processes for Undergoing Genetic Testing Among Women With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer. The ... The decision-making on prophylactic mastectomy (PM) will be obtained from the immediate and delayed BRCA genetic testers at ... Understanding Decision Making Processes for Undergoing Genetic Testing Among Women With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer. ... and stage of decision-making with respect to PM (as this is the primary clinical reason for undergoing immediate testing). ...
*  The Effect of Decentralized Behavioral Decision Making on System-Level Risk Kim Kaivanto Department of Economics Lancaster...
Outline Classical SDT under normative rationality Behavioral factors From the decision-making literature: CPT From the phishing ... How should we model the decision making of these lay users ? Does it matter whether our modeling assumptions reflect normative ... The psychology of deception magnifies the effect of be- havioral decision making under risk and uncertainty. ... 1 The Effect of Decentralized Behavioral Decision Making on System-Level Risk Kim Kaivanto Department of Economics Lancaster ...
*  PA-11-198: Understanding Clinical Information Needs and Health Care Decision Making Processes in the Context of Health...
Understanding Clinical Information Needs and Health Care Decision Making Processes in the Context of Health Information ... 2. The nature of clinical expertise in individual and team decision making. Decision making is understood broadly to include: ... The nature of clinical expertise in individual and team decision making;. *The nature of data visualization to support skill- ... Research projects should identify the information and decision making needs and thus better frame clinical work and how it can ...
*  Improving Colorectal Cencer Screenings in Low-Income Primary Care Settings Using Shared Decision Making
... and a follow up with a personal phone call from the primary care team to provide decision support and schedule desired ... provide patients a high-quality decision aid along with primary care physician recommendation to be screened by either ... The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the impact of shared decision making on colorectal cancer screening in Maine. ... Lung Cancer Screening Shared Decision-Making $25,536 Screening Maine Medical Center 2013 Endometrial Cancer & Obesity: A ...
*  Difficult decisions on ACS pharmacotherapy in the elderly
... which are not included in the current risk scores and will certainly influence decision-making in clinical practice. Further ... We use cookies to optimise the design of this website and make continuous improvement. By continuing your visit, you consent to ...
*  Optimal decision making and the anterior cingulate cortex. - Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging
ACC lesions did not impair the performance of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) immediately after errors, but made them unable to ... Learning the value of options in an uncertain environment is central to optimal decision making. The anterior cingulate cortex ... Optimal decision making and the anterior cingulate cortex. Kennerley SW., Walton ME., Behrens TEJ., Buckley MJ., Rushworth MFS. ... Learning the value of options in an uncertain environment is central to optimal decision making. The anterior cingulate cortex ...
*  Decision-making - Wikipedia
Decision-making techniques[edit]. Decision-making techniques can be separated into two broad categories: group decision-making ... Participative decision-making occurs when an authority opens up the decision-making process to a group of people for a ... Automated decision support: setting up criteria for automated decisions.. *Decision support systems: using decision-making ... Biases usually affect decision-making processes. Here is a list of commonly debated biases in judgment and decision-making:. * ...
*  Decision Making
... learn what is decision and decision stages . • Distinguish between DM and Problem Solving • Difference between Programmed and ... 2) Never make a snap decision about anything. 3) Make written notes when you are making a decision - perform a SWOT analysis if ... 8. Decision Making Process Step 5 : Select a decision making tool There are several tools for selecting a decision , Please see ... 6) When you've made a decision, stick to it. 7) When you have made your decision, and before you take any action on it, think ...
*  decision-making - Wiktionary
decision-making (uncountable). *Alternative form of decision making * 2011 January 30, Mathew Ingram, "What If Google Is Just a ... See also: decisionmaking and decision making. English[edit]. Noun[edit]. ... attributive form of decision making * 2011 January 20, Jeremy Olson, "Ruling delayed on Al Barnes' medical decisions", in ... But what if Google's biggest problem isn't a lack of flexibility or the speed of its decision-making, but a fundamental ...
*  Decision-making - Wikipedia
... group decision-making techniques and individual decision-making techniques. Individual decision-making techniques can also ... modelling Concept driven strategy Decision downloading Decision engineering Decision fatigue Decision quality Decision-making ... Every decision-making process produces a final choice, which may or may not prompt action. Decision-making is the process of ... Participative decision-making occurs when an authority opens up the decision-making process to a group of people for a ...
*  Empowering Enterprise Decision Making
... How North Carolina State University makes data available, interconnected and usable. ... But making all that data available, connected and usable to everyone who needed it was a massive challenge. Hoit tackled the ... With access to all this rich data, university leaders can find relationships never before imagined - which helps them make ... SAS helps customers at more than 83,000 sites make better decisions faster. Since 1976, SAS has been giving customers around ...
*  Decentralized decision-making - Wikipedia
Decentralized decision-making is any process where the decision-making authority is distributed throughout a larger group. It ... tends to create less rigidity and flatter hierarchies in organizations. When upper management delegates decision-making ... Decentralized decision-making also contributes to the core knowledge of group intelligence and crowd wisdom, often in a ... The decisions arising from a process of decentralized decision-making are the functional result of group intelligence and crowd ...
*  Decision-making paradox - Wikipedia
The decision-making paradox relates to decision-making and the quest for determining reliable decision-making methods. It was ... multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), and decision analysis since then.[better source needed] To find the best decision-making ... multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) and decision analysis since then. The decision-making paradox was first described in 1989 ... multi-criteria decision making (MCDM). It arises from the observation that different decision-making methods, both normative ...
*  Participative decision-making - Wikipedia
The Autocratic category of Decision Making allow the leader to make decision entirely on his or her own without any impute from ... BATNA Decision-making software Group decision-making Participatory management Abzug, R.; Phelps, S. (1998). "Everything old is ... Though the Collective-Participative decision-making is one of the best style in business decision-making, they seem to be less ... Consensus style of participative decision-making is the less practice style of decision-making in our financial organization ...
*  Group decision-making - Wikipedia
Group decision-making (also known as collaborative decision-making) is a situation faced when individuals collectively make a ... the leader makes the decision or, in an oligarchy, a coalition of leading figures makes the decision. Averaging Each group ... Victor Vroom developed a normative model of decision-making that suggests different decision-making methods should be selected ... This decision rule is what dictates the decision-making for most juries. Random The group leaves the choice to chance. For ...
*  Naturalistic decision-making - Wikipedia
Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, that has built on the NDM tradition. Decision researchers had conducted experiments ... "Putting naturalistic decision making into the adaptive toolbox" (PDF). Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. 14 (5): 381-383. ... The naturalistic decision making (NDM) framework emerged as a means of studying how people make decisions and perform ... Tactical Decision Making Under Stress) project initiated by the Navy following the USS Vincennes shoot-down decision. These ...
*  Consensus decision-making - Wikipedia
As a decision-making process, consensus decision-making aims to be: Agreement Seeking: A consensus decision-making process ... Consensus decision-making is a group decision-making process in which group members develop, and agree to support a decision in ... Consensus decision-making is an alternative to commonly practiced group decision-making processes. Robert's Rules of Order, for ... It is used to describe both the decision and the process of reaching a decision. Consensus decision-making is thus concerned ...
*  Robust decision-making - Wikipedia
... an R package for multiobjective robust decision making sdtoolkit, scenario discovery toolkit for robust decision-making. ... Robust decision-making (RDM) is an iterative decision analytic framework that aims to help identify potential robust strategies ... In addition, RDM can be used to facilitate group decision-making in contentious situations where parties to the decision have ... "Improving the contribution of climate model information to decision making: the value and demands of robust decision frameworks ...
*  Multiscale decision-making - Wikipedia
Multiscale decision theory builds upon decision theory and multiscale mathematics. Multiscale decision theory can model and ... Distributed Decision Making, Springer, 2003. ISBN 3-540-40201-2 Wernz, C., Multiscale Decision-Making: Bridging Temporal and ... Multiscale decision-making, also referred to as multiscale decision theory (MSDT), is an approach in operations research that ... "Decision Strategies and Design of Agent Interactions in Hierarchical Manufacturing Systems". Journal of Manufacturing Systems. ...
*  Decision-making software - Wikipedia
... usually multi-criteria decision-making, and so is often referred to as "decision analysis" or "multi-criteria decision-making" ... "decision-making software". Some decision support systems include a DM software component. DM software can assist decision- ... Decision-making software (DM software) comprises computer applications that are used to help individuals and organisations make ... "at various stages of the decision-making process, including problem exploration and formulation, identification of decision ...
*  Medical decision-making - Wikipedia
Medical decision-making may refer to: Decision-making, a cognitive process for selecting a course of action, in the context of ... health or medical diagnosis and treatment Medical Decision Making (journal), a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes ...
*  Dynamic decision-making - Wikipedia
This generic decision making process is assumed to apply to any dynamic decision making situation, when decisions are made from ... Dynamic decision-making (DDM) is interdependent decision-making that takes place in an environment that changes over time ... Gonzalez, C. (2005). Decision support for real-time dynamic decision making tasks. Organizational Behavior & Human Decision ... Research in dynamic decision-making is mostly laboratory-based and uses computer simulation microworld tools (i.e., Decision ...
*  Decision Making Tools
We develop a number of tools to ensure that you can make an informed decision in order to purchase the most fuel-efficient ... Use this tool to select and compare different makes and models and rank the fuel efficiency of vehicles sold in Canada.. ... Compare the fuel efficiency of different makes and models in the Compare Vehicles web tool.. ...
*  Social decision making - Wikipedia
Social decision making is the basis for a meaningful and productive workplace. It makes sure everyone can share their input and ... Social decision making is a new concept for making business decisions. Studies find that half of all business decisions fail ... Moreover, it creates transparency in decision making also when it comes to learning from unintended consequences or errors. ... Social decision making structures information sharing and creates early buy in and accountability for decisions. It captures ...

The Final Decision: The Final Decision is an episode from season 1 of the animated TV series X-Men Animated Series.Value of control: The value of control is a quantitative measure of the value of controlling the outcome of an uncertainty variable. Decision analysis provides a means for calculating the value of both perfect and imperfect control.Computer Support Services: Computer Support Services, Inc., or CSSI, is an multi-national company providing technology solutions and professional services.Recursive partitioning: Recursive partitioning is a statistical method for multivariable analysis. Recursive partitioning creates a decision tree that strives to correctly classify members of the population by splitting it into sub-populations based on several dichotomous independent variables. The process is termed recursive because each sub-population may in turn be split an indefinite number of times until the splitting process terminates after a particular stopping criterion is reached.Clinical decision support system: A clinical decision support system (CDSS) is a health information technology system that is designed to provide physicians and other health professionals with clinical decision support (CDS), that is, assistance with clinical decision-making tasks. A working definition has been proposed by Robert Hayward of the Centre for Health Evidence: "Clinical Decision Support systems link health observations with health knowledge to influence health choices by clinicians for improved health care".Loss function: In mathematical optimization, statistics, decision theory and machine learning, a loss function or cost function is a function that maps an event or values of one or more variables onto a real number intuitively representing some "cost" associated with the event. An optimization problem seeks to minimize a loss function.Patient participation: Patient participation, also called shared decision-making, is a process in which both the patient and physician contribute to the medical decision-making process. Under this operating system, health care providers explain treatments and alternatives to patients in order to provide the necessary resources for patients to choose the treatment option that most closely aligns with their unique cultural and personal beliefs.Senorita Stakes: The Senorita Stakes is an American flat Thoroughbred horse race for three-year-old fillies once held annually at Hollywood Park Racetrack in Inglewood, California.Model risk: In finance, model risk is the risk of loss resulting from using models to make decisions, initially and frequently referring to valuing financial securities. However model risk is more and more prevalent in industries other than financial securities valuation, such as consumer credit score, real-time probability prediction of a fraudulent credit card transaction to the probability of air flight passenger being a terrorist.Reward system: The reward system is a group of neural structures that are critically involved in mediating the effects of reinforcement. A reward is an appetitive stimulus given to a human or some other animal to alter its behavior.History of communication studies: Various aspects of communication have been the subject of study since ancient times, and the approach eventually developed into the academic discipline known today as communication studies.Gambler's conceit: Gambler’s conceit is the fallacy described by behavioral economist David J. Ewing, where a gambler believes they will be able to stop a risky behavior while still engaging in it.Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment: MOLST is an acronym for Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. The MOLST Program is an initiative to facilitate end-of-life medical decision-making in New York State, Massachusetts, Ohio and Maryland, that involves use of the MOLST form.Motivations for joining the Special OlympicsLarge Combustion Plant Directive: The Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD, 2001/80/EC) is a European Union directive which requires member states of the European Union to legislatively limit flue gas emissions from combustion plant having thermal capacity of 50 MW or greater. The directive applies to fossil-fuel power stations, and other large thermal plant such as petroleum refineries and steelworks.Bestbets: BestBETS (Best Evidence Topic Reports) is a system designed by emergency physicians at Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK. It was conceived as a way of allowing busy clinicians to solve real clinical problems using published evidence.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.NeuroeconomicsMark Siegler: Mark Siegler (born June 20, 1941) is an American physician who specializes in internal medicine. He is the Lindy Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Chicago.Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur: Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur (August 30, 1837 – January 12, 1880) was the wife of the 21st President of the United States, Chester A. Arthur I.Chronic care: Chronic care refers to medical care which addresses pre-existing or long term illness, as opposed to acute care which is concerned with short term or severe illness of brief duration. Chronic medical conditions include asthma, diabetes, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, congestive heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, hypertension and depression.Adaptive comparative judgement: Adaptive Comparative Judgement is a technique borrowed from psychophysics which is able to generate reliable results for educational assessment - as such it is an alternative to traditional exam script marking. In the approach judges are presented with pairs of student work and are then asked to choose which is better, one or the other.Samuel Bard (physician): Samuel Bard (April 1, 1742 – May 24, 1821) was an American physician. He founded the first medical school in New York.Never Come UndoneOnline patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Essex School of discourse analysis: The Essex School constitutes a variety of discourse analysis, one that combines theoretical sophistication – mainly due to its reliance on the post-structuralist and psychoanalytic traditions and, in particular, on the work of Lacan, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, etc. – with analytical precision, since it focuses predominantly on an in-depth analysis of political discourses in late modernity.Wills Sainte Claire: Wills Sainte Claire was an automobile brand manufactured by the C. H.National Clinical Guideline CentreVon Neumann regular ring: In mathematics, a von Neumann regular ring is a ring R such that for every a in R there exists an x in R such that . To avoid the possible confusion with the regular rings and regular local rings of commutative algebra (which are unrelated notions), von Neumann regular rings are also called absolutely flat rings, because these rings are characterized by the fact that every left module is flat.Voluntary euthanasia: Voluntary euthanasia is the practice of ending a life in a painless manner. Voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) have been the focus of great controversy in recent years.Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) is a statistic used in cost-effectiveness analysis to summarise the cost-effectiveness of a health care intervention. It is defined by the difference in cost between two possible interventions, divided by the difference in their effect.Clonal Selection Algorithm: In artificial immune systems, Clonal selection algorithms are a class of algorithms inspired by the clonal selection theory of acquired immunity that explains how B and T lymphocytes improve their response to antigens over time called affinity maturation. These algorithms focus on the Darwinian attributes of the theory where selection is inspired by the affinity of antigen-antibody interactions, reproduction is inspired by cell division, and variation is inspired by somatic hypermutation.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingNils Wogram: Nils Wogram (born November 7, 1972 in Braunschweig, Germany) is a jazz trombonist, composer and bandleader. He counts as one of the most important jazz musicians in Europe.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Immaculate perception: The expression immaculate perception has been used in various senses by various philosophers.Negative probability: The probability of the outcome of an experiment is never negative, but quasiprobability distributions can be defined that allow a negative probability for some events. These distributions may apply to unobservable events or conditional probabilities.Cognitive skill: Cognitive functioning is a term referring to a human’s ability to process to (thoughts) that should not deplete on a large scale in healthy individuals. Cognition mainly refers to things like memory, the ability to learn new information, speech, understanding of written material.HyperintensityHealth policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Video tape tracking: In a video tape recorder, tracking is a calibration adjustment which ensures that the spinning playback head is properly aligned with the helical scan signal written onto the tape.Vague setDocument-centric collaboration: Document-centric collaboration is a new approach to working together on projects online which puts the document and its contents at the centre of the process.Bio Base EuropeBarratt WaughMorality and religion: Morality and religion is the relationship between religious views and morals. Many religions have value frameworks regarding personal behavior meant to guide adherents in determining between right and wrong.Swadeshi Jagaran Manch: The Swadeshi Jagaran Manch or SJM is an economic wing of Sangh Parivar that again took the tool of Swadeshi advocated in India before its independence to destabilize the British Empire. SJM took to the promotion of Swadeshi (indigenous) industries and culture as a dote against LPG.Libertarian perspectives on political alliances: Libertarian perspectives on political alliances vary greatly, with controversies among libertarians as to which alliances are acceptable or useful to the movement.Internet organizations: This is a list of Internet organizations, or organizations that play or played a key role in the evolution of the Internet by developing recommendations, standards, and technology; deploying infrastructure and services; and addressing other major issues.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Reproductive life plan: A reproductive life plan is a plan for whether, when and how to have children. It includes personal goals, and states how to achieve them.Archie MorrisMcCloskey critique: The McCloskey critique refers to a critique of post-1940s "official modernist" methodology in economics, inherited from logical positivism in philosophy. The critique maintains that the methodology neglects how economics can be done, is done, and should be done to advance the subject.Global Health Delivery Project

(1/7635) The identification of agreed criteria for referral following the dental inspection of children in the school setting.

AIM: To clarify the function of the school based dental inspection. OBJECTIVE: For representatives of the Community Dental Service, General Dental Service and Hospital Dental Service to identify an agreed set of criteria for the referral of children following school dental inspection. DESIGN: Qualitative research methodology used to establish a consensus for the inclusion of referral criteria following dental screening. SETTING: Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, England. MATERIALS: A Delphi technique was used to establish a consensus amongst the study participants on the inclusion of nine possible criteria for referral following dental screening. All participants scored each criterion in the range 1-9, with a score of 1 indicating that referral of individuals with the condition should definitely not take place, and a score of 9 indicating referral should definitely take place. Referral criteria were accepted only if they achieved a group median score of 7 or more, with an interquartile range of three scale points, with the lower value being no less than 7. RESULTS: Four of the nine possible criteria met the agreed group standard for inclusion: 'Sepsis', 'Caries in the secondary dentition', 'Overjet > 10 mm', and 'Registered & caries in the permanent dentition'. CONCLUSION: It is possible to agree clear criteria for the referral of children following the school dental inspection.  (+info)

(2/7635) The effect of race and sex on physicians' recommendations for cardiac catheterization.

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have reported differences in the use of cardiovascular procedures according to the race and sex of the patient. Whether the differences stem from differences in the recommendations of physicians remains uncertain. METHODS: We developed a computerized survey instrument to assess physicians' recommendations for managing chest pain. Actors portrayed patients with particular characteristics in scripted interviews about their symptoms. A total of 720 physicians at two national meetings of organizations of primary care physicians participated in the survey. Each physician viewed a recorded interview and was given other data about a hypothetical patient. He or she then made recommendations about that patient's care. We used multivariate logistic-regression analysis to assess the effects of the race and sex of the patients on treatment recommendations, while controlling for the physicians' assessment of the probability of coronary artery disease as well as for the age of the patient, the level of coronary risk, the type of chest pain, and the results of an exercise stress test. RESULTS: The physicians' mean (+/-SD) estimates of the probability of coronary artery disease were lower for women (probability, 64.1+/-19.3 percent, vs. 69.2+/-18.2 percent for men; P<0.001), younger patients (63.8+/-19.5 percent for patients who were 55 years old, vs. 69.5+/-17.9 percent for patients who were 70 years old; P<0.001), and patients with nonanginal pain (58.3+/-19.0 percent, vs. 64.4+/-18.3 percent for patients with possible angina and 77.1+/-14.0 percent for those with definite angina; P=0.001). Logistic-regression analysis indicated that women (odds ratio, 0.60; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.4 to 0.9; P=0.02) and blacks (odds ratio, 0.60; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.4 to 0.9; P=0.02) were less likely to be referred for cardiac catheterization than men and whites, respectively. Analysis of race-sex interactions showed that black women were significantly less likely to be referred for catheterization than white men (odds ratio, 0.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.2 to 0.7; P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the race and sex of a patient independently influence how physicians manage chest pain.  (+info)

(3/7635) Slippery slopes in flat countries--a response.

In response to the paper by Keown and Jochemsen in which the latest empirical data concerning euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands is discussed, this paper discusses three points. The use of euthanasia in cases in which palliative care was a viable alternative may be taken as proof of a slippery slope. However, it could also be interpreted as an indication of a shift towards more autonomy-based end-of-life decisions. The cases of non-voluntary euthanasia are a serious problem in the Netherlands and they are only rarely justifiable. However, they do not prove the existence of a slippery slope. Persuading the physician to bring euthanasia cases to the knowledge of the authorities is a problem of any euthanasia policy. The Dutch notification procedure has recently been changed to reduce the underreporting of cases. However, many questions remain.  (+info)

(4/7635) Conditions required for a law on active voluntary euthanasia: a survey of nurses' opinions in the Australian Capital Territory.

OBJECTIVES: To ascertain which conditions nurses believe should be in a law allowing active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). DESIGN: Survey questionnaire posted to registered nurses (RNs). SETTING: Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of 1996, when active voluntary euthanasia was legal in the Northern Territory. SURVEY SAMPLE: A random sample of 2,000 RNs, representing 54 per cent of the RN population in the ACT. MAIN MEASURES: Two methods were used to look at nurses' opinions. The first involved four vignettes which varied in terms of critical characteristics of each patient who was requesting help to die. The respondents were asked if the law should be changed to allow any of these requests. There was also a checklist of conditions, most of which have commonly been included in Australian proposed laws on AVE. The respondents chose those which they believed should apply in a law on AVE. RESULTS: The response rate was 61%. Support for a change in the law to allow AVE was 38% for a young man with AIDS, 39% for an elderly man with early stage Alzheimer's disease, 44% for a young woman who had become quadriplegic and 71% for a middle-aged woman with metastases from breast cancer. The conditions most strongly supported in any future AVE law were: "second doctor's opinion", "cooling off period", "unbearable protracted suffering", "patient fully informed about illness and treatment" and "terminally ill". There was only minority support for "not suffering from treatable depression", "administer the fatal dose themselves" and "over a certain age". CONCLUSION: Given the lack of support for some conditions included in proposed AVE laws, there needs to be further debate about the conditions required in any future AVE bills.  (+info)

(5/7635) Patient removals from general practitioner lists in Northern Ireland: 1987-1996.

BACKGROUND: Being struck off a general practitioner's list is a major event for patients and a subject for much media attention. However, it has not hitherto received much research attention. AIMS: To quantify the numbers of patients removed at doctors' request in Northern Ireland between 1987 and 1996. To describe the characteristics of those removed and to determine if the rate of removal has increased. METHODS: This is a descriptive epidemiological study involving a secondary data analysis of records held by the Central Services Agency. RESULTS: Six thousand five hundred and seventy-eight new patients were removed at general practitioner (GP) request between 1987 and 1996. This equated to 3920 removal decisions, a rate of 2.43 per 10,000 person-years. The very young and young adults had the highest rates of removal; most of the young being removed as part of a family. Ten point six per cent of removed patients had a repeat removal, and 16.3% of first removal decisions required an assignment to another practice. Family removals have decreased and individual removals have increased over the 10 years. Disadvantaged and densely populated areas with high population turnover were associated with higher rates of removal, though heterogeneity is evident between general practitioners serving similar areas. Compared to the period 1987 to 1991, removal rates for the years 1992 to 1993 were reduced by 20.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) for rate ratio (RR) 0.73-0.87), and those for the years 1994 to 1996 increased by 8% (95% CI = 1.01-1.16). The greatest increase was in the over-75 years age group (standardized RR = 1.60; 95% CI = 1.57-1.62). CONCLUSIONS: Removals are relatively rare events for both patients and practices, though they have been increasing in recent years. Further research is needed to understand the processes that culminate in a removal.  (+info)

(6/7635) Dissociable deficits in the decision-making cognition of chronic amphetamine abusers, opiate abusers, patients with focal damage to prefrontal cortex, and tryptophan-depleted normal volunteers: evidence for monoaminergic mechanisms.

We used a novel computerized decision-making task to compare the decision-making behavior of chronic amphetamine abusers, chronic opiate abusers, and patients with focal lesions of orbital prefrontal cortex (PFC) or dorsolateral/medial PFC. We also assessed the effects of reducing central 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity using a tryptophan-depleting amino acid drink in normal volunteers. Chronic amphetamine abusers showed suboptimal decisions (correlated with years of abuse), and deliberated for significantly longer before making their choices. The opiate abusers exhibited only the second of these behavioral changes. Importantly, both sub-optimal choices and increased deliberation times were evident in the patients with damage to orbitofrontal PFC but not other sectors of PFC. Qualitatively, the performance of the subjects with lowered plasma tryptophan was similar to that associated with amphetamine abuse, consistent with recent reports of depleted 5-HT in the orbital regions of PFC of methamphetamine abusers. Overall, these data suggest that chronic amphetamine abusers show similar decision-making deficits to those seen after focal damage to orbitofrontal PFC. These deficits may reflect altered neuromodulation of the orbitofrontal PFC and interconnected limbic-striatal systems by both the ascending 5-HT and mesocortical dopamine (DA) projections.  (+info)

(7/7635) When to consider radiation therapy for your patient.

Radiation therapy can be an effective treatment modality for both malignant and benign disease. While radiation can be given as primary treatment, it may also be used pre- or postoperatively, with or without other forms of therapy. Radiation therapy is often curative but is sometimes palliative. There are many methods of delivering radiation effectively. Often, patients tolerate irradiation well without significant complications, and organ function is preserved. To ensure that all patients with cancer have the opportunity to consider all treatment options, family physicians should be aware of the usefulness of radiation therapy.  (+info)

(8/7635) Safer sex strategies for women: the hierarchical model in methadone treatment clinics.

Women clients of a methadone maintenance treatment clinic were targeted for an intervention aimed to reduce unsafe sex. The hierarchical model was the basis of the single intervention session, tested among 63 volunteers. This model requires the educator to discuss and demonstrate a full range of barriers that women might use for protection, ranking these in the order of their known efficacy. The model stresses that no one should go without protection. Two objections, both untested, have been voiced against the model. One is that, because of its complexity, women will have difficulty comprehending the message. The second is that, by demonstrating alternative strategies to the male condom, the educator is offering women a way out from persisting with the male condom, so that instead they will use an easier, but less effective, method of protection. The present research aimed at testing both objections in a high-risk and disadvantaged group of women. By comparing before and after performance on a knowledge test, it was established that, at least among these women, the complex message was well understood. By comparing baseline and follow-up reports of barriers used by sexually active women before and after intervention, a reduction in reports of unsafe sexual encounters was demonstrated. The reduction could be attributed directly to adoption of the female condom. Although some women who had used male condoms previously adopted the female condom, most of those who did so had not used the male condom previously. Since neither theoretical objection to the hierarchical model is sustained in this population, fresh weight is given to emphasizing choice of barriers, especially to women who are at high risk and relatively disempowered. As experience with the female condom grows and its unfamiliarity decreases, it would seem appropriate to encourage women who do not succeed with the male condom to try to use the female condom, over which they have more control.  (+info)

  • approach
  • Dominance-based rough set approach (DRSA) Aggregated indices randomization method (AIRM) Nonstructural fuzzy decision support system (NSFDSS) Grey relational analysis (GRA) Superiority and inferiority ranking method (SIR method) Potentially all pairwise rankings of all possible alternatives (PAPRIKA) Value analysis (VA) A key role in this quest is played by the study of rank reversals in decision making. (
  • The traditional decision analytic approach follows what has been called a predict-then-act approach that first characterizes uncertainty about the future, and then uses this characterization to rank the desirability of alternative decision options. (
  • Multiscale decision-making, also referred to as multiscale decision theory (MSDT), is an approach in operations research that combines game theory, multi-agent influence diagrams, in particular dependency graphs, and Markov decision processes to solve multiscale challenges in sociotechnical systems. (
  • Zhang, H., Wernz, C., Slonim A.D. (2015) Aligning Incentives in Health Care: A Multiscale Decision Theory Approach. (
  • Thus
  • A growing body of evidence suggests that our preferences are constructed for each novel occurrence of a situation and thus are not as stringent as previously thought. (
  • Memory is not an event that occurs in isolation, but is integrated and thus influenced by the goals of the decision-maker, the questions posed, and an infinite amount of internal and external factors. (
  • organizations
  • MIT Professor Thomas W. Malone explains that "decentralization has three general benefits: encourages motivation and creativity allows many minds to work simultaneously on the same problem accommodates flexibility and individualization Decentralized decision-making, Malone says, tends to create less rigidity and flatter hierarchies in organizations. (
  • Kathryn Rost,"Effective Group Decision Making in Organizations: Field Test of the Vigilant Interaction Theory", February 1992 Randy Hirokawa, ["Effective Group Decision Making in Organizations Field Test of Vigilant Interaction Theory"], Management Communication Quarterly, 1992 Oetzel, John G. (1995), "Intercultural small groups: An effective decision-making theory", in Wiseman, Richard L (ed. (
  • humans
  • The basis of this technique is that humans are more capable of making relative judgments than absolute judgments. (
  • Humans are believed to have stable preferences that follow the rules of continuity and precision, and so we will make consistent choices regardless of the influence of any internal or external factors. (
  • organization
  • Researchers have found that PDM may positively impact the following: Job satisfaction Organizational commitment Perceived organizational support Organizational citizenship behavior Labor-management relations Job performance and organizational performance Organizational profits By sharing decision-making with other employees, participants may eventually achieve organization objectives that influence them (Brenda, 2001). (
  • Model
  • Multiscale decision theory can model and analyze complex decision-making networks that exhibit multiscale phenomena. (
  • This cyclic model allows the pilot to make a critical decision and follow up with series of events to produce the best possible resolution. (
  • The preferences-as-memory (PAM) framework is a model that maps the role of memory in decision-making. (
  • Then, it explores three safeguards to help you avoid model-building problems. (
  • The economic theory of fertility choice builds predominantly on the unitary model of the household, in which there is a single household utility function and potential intra-household disagreement is abstracted from. (
  • Part 1: Review each situation (there are FIVE scenarios within the activity) and identify the applicable decision concept (you may select from any theory, principle, model, etc. from our learning in Unit 2) that you believe to be present. (
  • Above, we have discussed about decision making model that is highly crucial for the survival of the business in the long run as it greatly assists in formulating strategy and policy. (
  • explanation about various applications of decision making model is to be discussed. (
  • Context
  • Intuition in the context of decision-making is defined as a "non-sequential information-processing mode. (
  • Some definitions of intuition in the context of decision-making point to the importance of recognizing cues and patterns in one's environment and then using them to improve one's problem solving. (
  • Negotiation
  • Developed in the 1990s by John G. Oetzel it focuses on decision-making within groups integrating also the Vigilant Interaction Theory (Hirokawa and Rost) as well as the Face Negotiation Theory by Ting-Toomey. (
  • problem
  • Decision-making can be regarded as a problem-solving activity terminated by a solution deemed to be optimal, or at least satisfactory. (
  • Research about decision-making is also published under the label problem solving , in particular in European psychological research . (
  • But what if Google's biggest problem isn't a lack of flexibility or the speed of its decision-making , but a fundamental cultural inability to create new lines of business that can keep the company growing? (
  • Excessive information affects problem processing and tasking, which affects decision-making. (
  • Such power-sharing arrangements may entail various employee involvement schemes resulting in co-determination of working conditions, problem solving, and decision-making" (Locke & Schweiger, 1979). (
  • This structuring of the decision problem is a key feature of RDM. (
  • Multiscale decision theory is related to: Multiscale modeling Decision analysis Cooperative distributed problem solving Decentralized decision making Multiscale Mathematics Initiative: A Roadmap Wernz, C. (
  • Before using a software, it is necessary to have a sound knowledge of the adopted methodology and of the decision problem at hand. (
  • Software portal Collaborative decision-making software List of concept- and mind-mapping software Project management software Strategic planning software Dyer, JS (1973), "A time-sharing computer program for the solution of the multiple criteria problem", Management Science, 19: 1379-83. (
  • According to the theory the quality of the final decision is based on 1)analysis of the problem/ situation 2) establishment of goals and objectives 3)evaluation of positive and negative qualities of the available choices. (
  • A problem arises, however, if their poor decision making continues. (
  • Methods
  • A wide variety of concepts, methods, and tools have been developed to address decision challenges that confront a large degree of uncertainty. (
  • Similar themes have emerged from the literatures on scenario planning, robust control, imprecise probability, and info-gap decision theory and methods. (
  • Robust decision-making (RDM) is a particular set of methods and tools developed over the last decade, primarily by researchers associated with the RAND Corporation, designed to support decision-making and policy analysis under conditions of deep uncertainty. (
  • paradigm
  • In this book, international leadership expert Dr. Charles A. Moody, Jr. has integrated decades of research, training, consulting, and experience into the development of a new and innovative decision-making paradigm: The 720° Snapshot. (
  • collaborative
  • Delphi method This method is a structured communication technique for groups, originally developed for collaborative forecasting but also used for policy-making. (
  • Collaborative: Participants contribute to a shared proposal and shape it into a decision that meets the concerns of all group members as much as possible. (
  • Laboratory
  • The NDM framework focuses on cognitive functions such as decision making, sensemaking, situational awareness, planning - which emerge in natural settings and take forms that are not easily replicated in the laboratory. (
  • The Multiscale Decision Making Laboratory at Virginia Tech directed by Dr. Christian Wernz is working at the forefront of MSDT theory and applications. (
  • Research in dynamic decision-making is mostly laboratory-based and uses computer simulation microworld tools (i.e. (
  • Evaluation
  • It captures the entire lifecycle of a decision from an initial question to collaboration that seeks the best solution, execution and evaluation. (
  • participation
  • From the administrative viewpoint, participation can build public support for activities. (
  • International conventions stress the importance of equitable access and participation of women and men in decision-making as a necessary condition for women's interests to be taken into account. (
  • alternative
  • The traditional subjective utility framework ranks alternative decision options contingent on best estimate probability distributions. (
  • people
  • Instead of beginning with formal models of decision making, they began by conducting field research to try to discover the strategies people used. (
  • When people need to make a decision, they can quickly match the situation to the patterns they have learned and experienced in the past. (
  • Individuals use intuition and more deliberative decision-making styles interchangeably, but there has been some evidence that people tend to gravitate to one or the other style more naturally. (
  • The hierarchal structure of the memory system is a construct of elaborate categories that people create to classify objects. (
  • With the assistance of such a decision making by the people, I was able to arrive at this conclusion. (
  • I wrote this Ebook to help people not to make the same mistake as many of us do. (
  • strategies
  • Robust decision-making (RDM) is an iterative decision analytic framework that aims to help identify potential robust strategies, characterize the vulnerabilities of such strategies, and evaluate the tradeoffs among them. (
  • Often, these more robust options represent adaptive decision strategies designed to evolve over time in response to new information. (
  • help
  • Care managers are familiar with the services available in your community and will help you make a plan. (
  • They can also help you make medical or therapy appointments. (
  • Managers
  • When upper management delegates decision-making responsibilities, there also exist wider spans of control among managers, creating a more lateral flow of information. (
  • Care managers may make referrals to adult day care programs, or arrange for assistive equipment to be installed in your home. (
  • individuals
  • This leads to the assumption that the more equal members in their groups are and the more committed individuals are to their group and to the decision the more effective the outcome will be. (
  • influence
  • CHICAGO , July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Draftfcb, one of the world's leading marketing communications agencies, announced today further steps to enhance its ability to influence consumer behavior by launching the Draftfcb Institute of Decision Making. (
  • Students will identify factors that influence decision making. (
  • situation
  • It is most important to create as much options as possible since there will be a larger pool of options to choose the most appropriate solution to the situation. (