Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Principal Component Analysis: Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique: Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.Discriminant Analysis: A statistical analytic technique used with discrete dependent variables, concerned with separating sets of observed values and allocating new values. It is sometimes used instead of regression analysis.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Cluster Headache: A primary headache disorder that is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral PAIN which is orbital, supraorbital, temporal or in any combination of these sites, lasting 15-180 min. occurring 1 to 8 times a day. The attacks are associated with one or more of the following, all of which are ipsilateral: conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, facial SWEATING, eyelid EDEMA, and miosis. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Iron-Sulfur Proteins: A group of proteins possessing only the iron-sulfur complex as the prosthetic group. These proteins participate in all major pathways of electron transport: photosynthesis, respiration, hydroxylation and bacterial hydrogen and nitrogen fixation.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Classification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Dental Fissures: Deep grooves or clefts in the surface of teeth equivalent to class 1 cavities in Black's classification of dental caries.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Spatio-Temporal Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties and include the dimension of time in the analysis.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Electrophoresis, Starch Gel: Electrophoresis in which a starch gel (a mixture of amylose and amylopectin) is used as the diffusion medium.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Genetic Structures: The biological objects that contain genetic information and that are involved in transmitting genetically encoded traits from one organism to another.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.BrazilPolymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Topography, Medical: The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Microarray Analysis: The simultaneous analysis, on a microchip, of multiple samples or targets arranged in an array format.Catastrophization: Cognitive and emotional processes encompassing magnification of pain-related stimuli, feelings of helplessness, and a generally pessimistic orientation.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Protein Array Analysis: Ligand-binding assays that measure protein-protein, protein-small molecule, or protein-nucleic acid interactions using a very large set of capturing molecules, i.e., those attached separately on a solid support, to measure the presence or interaction of target molecules in the sample.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Proteomics: The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Molecular Typing: Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Chorda Tympani Nerve: A branch of the facial (7th cranial) nerve which passes through the middle ear and continues through the petrotympanic fissure. The chorda tympani nerve carries taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and conveys parasympathetic efferents to the salivary glands.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Proteome: The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Microdissection: The performance of dissections with the aid of a microscope.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.United StatesDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.ItalyProtein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Ferredoxins: Iron-containing proteins that transfer electrons, usually at a low potential, to flavoproteins; the iron is not present as in heme. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Fibromyalgia: A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.

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... and analysed using the simulated prospective analysis for real-time cluster detection included in the WHONET-SaTScan software. ... The WHONET-SaTScan identified 71 statistically significant clusters, some involving pathogens carrying multiple resistance ... and analysed using the simulated prospective analysis for real-time cluster detection included in the WHONET-SaTScan software. ... Clustering of antimicrobial resistance outbreaks across bacterial species in the intensive care unit. Clin Infect Dis. 2013;57( ...

*  Cluster analysis - Wikipedia

Hard clustering: each object belongs to a cluster or not. *Soft clustering (also: fuzzy clustering): each object belongs to ... Main category: Cluster analysis algorithms. Clustering algorithms can be categorized based on their cluster model, as listed ... Cluster tendencyEdit. To measure cluster tendency is to measure to what degree clusters exist in the data to be clustered, and ... Overlapping clustering (also: alternative clustering, multi-view clustering): objects may belong to more than one cluster; ...

*  Cluster analysis by binary morphology - IEEE Journals & Magazine

An approach to unsupervised pattern classification that is based on the use of mathematical morphology operations is developed. The way a set of multidimen

*  Cluster analysis - Wikipedia

Subspace models: in biclustering (also known as co-clustering or two-mode-clustering), clusters are modeled with both cluster ... Cluster analysis or clustering is the task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a ... alternative clustering, multi-view clustering): objects may belong to more than one cluster; usually involving hard clusters ... each object belongs to a cluster or not Soft clustering (also: fuzzy clustering): each object belongs to each cluster to a ...

*  Algorithms for Cluster Analysis

1983 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, 1983, 134-139 p.Conference paper, Published ...

*  'cluster analysis' Protocols and Video...

... cluster analysis' include 'Large-scale Reconstructions and Independent, Unbiased Clustering Based on Morphological Metrics to ... Comprehensive Workflow for the Genome-wide Identification and Expression Meta-analysis of the ATL E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Gene ... Generation of Native Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing Libraries for Nucleosome Density Analysis', 'Measuring mRNA ... Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. ...

*  A NONPARAMETRIC VALLEY-SEEKING TECHNIQUE FOR CLUSTER ANALYSIS. - Bell Labs

The problem of clustering multivariate observations is viewed as the replacement of a set of vectors with a set of labels and ... A general criterion for clustering is derived as a measure of representation error. Some special cases are derived by ...

*  Data mining in telecommunications: case study of cluster analysis. - Free Online Library

Engineering and manufacturing Clustering (Computers) Research Methods Telecommunication Information management ... case study of cluster analysis.(Case study) by 'Annals of DAAAM & Proceedings'; ... 1. Average values of the variables from individual clusters Cluster 1 Cluster 2 Cluster 3 Cluster 4 Coefficient of the revenue ... A cluster analysis was performed in four clusters, whereby the two previously mentioned variables were omitted. Cluster 1 ...

*  Graph Estimation and Cluster Analysis in High Dimensions

In addition, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering, a recent proposal for cluster analysis, which involves ... For cluster analysis, we propose a novel methodology for partitioning both observations and features into groups simultaneously ... We consider the areas of graph estimation and cluster analysis, which are often used to construct gene expression network and ...

*  Conduct and Interpret a Cluster Analysis<...

The Cluster Analysis is an explorative analysis that tries to identify structures within the data. Cluster analysis is also ... Conduct and Interpret a Cluster Analysis. What is the Cluster Analysis?. Cluster analysis is an exploratory analysis that tries ... In SPSS Cluster Analyses can be found in Analyze/Classify…. SPSS offers three methods for the cluster analysis: K-Means Cluster ... Directory of Statistical Analyses**Cluster Analysis*Conduct and Interpret a Cluster Analysis ...

*  EconPapers: An Application of Clustering Analysis to International Private Indebtedness

This paper presents a procedure for clustering analysis that combines Kohone's Self organizing Feature Map (SOFM) and ... An Application of Clustering Analysis to International Private Indebtedness. Monteiro Andre, Carneiro Dionisio and Carlos ... Abstract: This paper presents a procedure for clustering analysis that combines Kohone's Self organizing Feature Map (SOFM) and ... The idea is to cluster the data in two stages: run SOFM and then minimize the segmentation dispersion. The advantages of ...

*  Troll detection : A comparative study in detecting troll farms on Twitter using cluster analysis

Troll detection: A comparative study in detecting troll farms on Twitter using cluster analysis. Engelin, Martin KTH, School of ... The purpose of this research is to test whether clustering algorithmscan be used to detect troll farms in social networks. ... the results and the implementations of the K-means as well as the DBSCAN algorithm we have concluded that clusteranalysis can ... that spread disinformation online via fake personas.The research involves a comparative study of two different clustering algo- ...

*  Use of cluster analysis to describe desaturator phenotypes in COPD: co | COPD

... of the clinical value of cluster analysis. This knowledge could lead to pharmacological treatment and other interventions ... Use of cluster analysis to describe desaturator phenotypes in COPD: correlations between pulmonary function tests and nocturnal ... Use of cluster analysis to describe desaturator phenotypes in COPD: correlations between pulmonary function tests and nocturnal ... of the clinical value of cluster analysis. This knowledge could lead to pharmacological treatment and other interventions ...

*  IJMS | Free Full-Text | CytoCluster: A Cytoscape Plugin for Cluster Analysis and Visualization of Biological Networks

Users can select different clustering algorithms according to their requirements. The main function of these six clustering ... Here we present CytoCluster, a cytoscape plugin integrating six clustering algorithms, HC-PIN (Hierarchical Clustering ... CytoCluster can be easily expanded, so that more clustering algorithms and functions can be added to this plugin. Since it was ... Furthermore, the visualization of clustering results is crucial to display the structure of biological networks. ...

*  JMSE | Free Full-Text | Spatial and Temporal Clustering Analysis of Extreme Wave Events around the UK Coastline

... their temporal clustering and return levels. The presented spatial and temporal analysis framework for extreme wave events can ... Here, an event-based analysis approach, across multiple sites, has been used to assess the spatial footprint and temporal ... clustering of extreme storm-wave events around the coast of the United Kingdom (UK). The correlated spatial and temporal ... Spatial and Temporal Clustering Analysis of Extreme Wave Events around the UK Coastline. Victor Malagon Santos 1,2,* , Ivan D. ...

*  Subtypes of clinical presentations in malingerers of posttraumatic stress disorder: An MMPI-2 cluster analysis - University of...

Cluster analysis. Combat-determined posttraumatic stress disorder. Content Scales. Demographic variables. Follow-up studies. ... Subtypes of clinical presentations in malingerers of posttraumatic stress disorder: An MMPI-2 cluster analysis. Assessment, 8(1 ...

*  A Cluster Analysis of Drug Use and Sexual HIV Risks and Their Correlates in a Sample of African-American Crack Cocaine Smokers...

A Cluster Analysis of Drug Use and Sexual HIV Risks and Their Correlates in a Sample of African-American Crack Cocaine Smokers ... Cluster analysis revealed three distinct HIV risk groups: *The largest group, which was also the highest risk group, was ... crack cocaine smokers into homogenous HIV drug use and sexual risk groups using a two-step multivariate cluster analysis.. The ...

*  Cyberbullying Among High School Students: Cluster Analysis of Sex and Age Differences and the Level of Parental Monitoring:...

Cluster Analysis of Sex and Age Differences and the Level of Parental Monitoring: 10.4018/ijcbpl.2011010103: Bullying, a ... A cluster analysis revealed four distinct groups of students who were "highly involved both as bully and victim," "more victim ... Cyberbullying Among High School Students: Cluster Analysis of Sex and Age Differences and the Level of Parental Monitoring. ... "Cyberbullying Among High School Students: Cluster Analysis of Sex and Age Differences and the Level of Parental Monitoring." ...

*  Profiling the target audience of a social marketing campaign: a cluster analysis approach - Strathprints

marketing campaign, social, cluster analysis, Marketing. Distribution of products. Subjects:. Social Sciences , Commerce , ... Profiling the target audience of a social marketing campaign: a cluster analysis approach ... a cluster analysis approach. In: To be assertained, 1900-01-01. Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from ...

*  Using a novel approach to cluster analysis to gain new valuable insights into software-project risk management - IEEE...

This work presents a method that provides organizations and their project managers with a better understanding of the implications of the risks that softwa

*  Abstract 3423: Immunohistochemical expression and cluster analysis of mesenchymal and neural stem cell-associated proteins in...

The scores were then imported into Partek Genomic Suite Software, for statistical analyses, cluster analysis, and ... Abstract 3423: Immunohistochemical expression and cluster analysis of mesenchymal and neural stem cell-associated proteins in ... Abstract 3423: Immunohistochemical expression and cluster analysis of mesenchymal and neural stem cell-associated proteins in ... Abstract 3423: Immunohistochemical expression and cluster analysis of mesenchymal and neural stem cell-associated proteins in ...

*  Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Concentration Data from Thousands of Groundwater Wells Using a Density-Based Cluster...

... of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Concentration Data from Thousands of Groundwater Wells Using a Density-Based Cluster Analysis ... Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Concentration Data from Thousands of Groundwater Wells Using a Density-Based Cluster ... Analysis Approach. 2017-10-13T04:15:49Z (GMT) by Walt McNab A meta-analysis of historic groundwater chlorinated hydrocarbon ...

*  Cluster Analysis and Manager Selection

With the displacement of the single, balanced pension fund manager by multiple specialty managers, control of total portfolio diversification has passed largely into the hands of the plan sponsor. The sponsor's allocation of plan assets to managers having different investment

*  PowerPoint Presentation Shapes - Cluster Analysis Diagram

Save time by downloading this ready to use Cluster Analysis Diagram template. ... This template consists of 7 slides on which are hand drawn illustrations of cluster analysis diagrams. Download our fully ... This PowerPoint presentation template features hand drawn images of cluster analysis diagram. Use this template in your ... These 7 slide templates can be customized by adding to the clusters or deleting some clusters. Hand drawn slides have an appeal ...

*  Biosynthetic Genome Sequence and Functional Cluster Analysis

... In 2014, we were approached by a leading biotech company looking ... Identification of unknown clusters coding for additional and hitherto unexploited natural products within the strain. ... Key information on the biosynthetic gene clusters coding for the products of interest and related compounds. ... to generate and analyse sequence data for two biosynthetic clusters that were of interest to their discovery efforts. ...

ParaHox: The ParaHox gene cluster is an array of homeobox genes (involved in morphogenesis, the regulation of patterns of anatomical development) from the Gsx, Xlox (Pdx) and Cdx gene families.Gene signature: A gene signature is a group of genes in a cell whose combined expression patternItadani H, Mizuarai S, Kotani H. Can systems biology understand pathway activation?Cellular microarray: A cellular microarray is a laboratory tool that allows for the multiplex interrogation of living cells on the surface of a solid support. The support, sometimes called a "chip", is spotted with varying materials, such as antibodies, proteins, or lipids, which can interact with the cells, leading to their capture on specific spots.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.RV coefficient: In statistics, the RV coefficientColes PhillipsRAPD: RAPD (pronounced "rapid") stands for 'Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA'. It is a type of PCR reaction, but the segments of DNA that are amplified are random.Modified Maddrey's discriminant function: The modified Maddrey's discriminant function) was originally described by Maddrey and Boitnott to predict prognosis in alcoholic hepatitis. It is calculated by a simple formula:Genetic variation: right|thumbGeographical cluster: A geographical cluster is a localised anomaly, usually an excess of something given the distribution or variation of something else. Often it is considered as an incidence rate that is unusual in that there is more of some variable than might be expected.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Clonal Selection Algorithm: In artificial immune systems, Clonal selection algorithms are a class of algorithms inspired by the clonal selection theory of acquired immunity that explains how B and T lymphocytes improve their response to antigens over time called affinity maturation. These algorithms focus on the Darwinian attributes of the theory where selection is inspired by the affinity of antigen-antibody interactions, reproduction is inspired by cell division, and variation is inspired by somatic hypermutation.Flushing (physiology)Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis protein family: In molecular biology, the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis protein family of includes proteins involved in biogenesis of Fe-S clusters (iron-sulfur cluster insertion protein, Fe/S biogenesis protein). This family includes IscA, HesB, YadR and YfhF-like proteins.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Health geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.Thermal cyclerMac OS X Server 1.0Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Amplified fragment length polymorphismPSI Protein Classifier: PSI Protein Classifier is a program generalizing the results of both successive and independent iterations of the PSI-BLAST program. PSI Protein Classifier determines belonging of the found by PSI-BLAST proteins to the known families.CS-BLASTInverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.Glossary of scientific names: A glossary of the meaning of scientific names of living things, viruses and prions .Microsatellite: A microsatellite is a tract of repetitive DNA in which certain DNA motifs (ranging in length from 2–5 base pairs) are repeated, typically 5-50 times. Microsatellites occur at thousands of locations in the human genome and they are notable for their high mutation rate and high diversity in the population.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingWormsgrabenPulsenet: PulseNet is a network run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which brings together public health and food regulatory agency laboratories around the United States.http://www.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Molecular evolution: Molecular evolution is a change in the sequence composition of cellular molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins across generations. The field of molecular evolution uses principles of evolutionary biology and population genetics to explain patterns in these changes.Sequence clustering: In bioinformatics, sequence clustering algorithms attempt to group biological sequences that are somehow related. The sequences can be either of genomic, "transcriptomic" (ESTs) or protein origin.Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis: Amplified rDNA (Ribosomal DNA) Restriction Analysis is the extension of the technique of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) to the gene encoding the small (16s) ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The technique involves an enzymatic amplification using primers directed at the conserved regions at the ends of the 16s gene, followed by digestion using tetracutter Restriction enzymes.Genetic structure: Genetic structure refers to any pattern in the genetic makeup of individuals within a population.Interval boundary element method: Interval boundary element method is classical boundary element method with the interval parameters.
Layout of the Port of Tianjin: The Port of Tianjin is divided into nine areas: the three core (“Tianjin Xingang”) areas of Beijiang, Nanjiang, and Dongjiang around the Xingang fairway; the Haihe area along the river; the Beitang port area around the Beitangkou estuary; the Dagukou port area in the estuary of the Haihe River; and three areas under construction (Hanggu, Gaoshaling, Nangang).University of CampinasGene polymorphismRegularized canonical correlation analysis: Regularized canonical correlation analysis is a way of using ridge regression to solve the singularity problem in the cross-covariance matrices of canonical correlation analysis. By converting \operatorname{cov}(X, X) and \operatorname{cov}(Y, Y) into \operatorname{cov}(X, X) + \lambda I_X and \operatorname{cov}(Y, Y) + \lambda I_Y, it ensures that the above matrices will have reliable inverses.Ligation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis: Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA ) is a method employed for the genetic analysis of particular microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria, that takes advantage of the polymorphism of tandemly repeated DNA sequences. A "VNTR" is a "variable-number tandem repeat".Exogenous bacteria: Exogenous bacteria are microorganisms introduced to closed biological systems from the external world. They exist in aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as the atmosphere.Hyperparameter: In Bayesian statistics, a hyperparameter is a parameter of a prior distribution; the term is used to distinguish them from parameters of the model for the underlying system under analysis.List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.Extracellular: In cell biology, molecular biology and related fields, the word extracellular (or sometimes extracellular space) means "outside the cell". This space is usually taken to be outside the plasma membranes, and occupied by fluid.List of geographic information systems software: GIS software encompasses a broad range of applications which involve the use of a combination of digital maps and georeferenced data. GIS software can be sorted into different categories.Reaction coordinateEukaryotic transcription: Eukaryotic transcription is the elaborate process that eukaryotic cells use to copy genetic information stored in DNA into units of RNA replica. Gene transcription occurs in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.Solution precursor plasma spray: Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) is a thermal spray process where a feedstock solution is heated and then deposited onto a substrate. Basic properties of the process are fundamentally similar to other plasma spraying processes.Chromosome regionsSilent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Peptide microarray: A peptide microarray (also commonly known as peptide chip or peptide epitope microarray) is a collection of peptides displayed on a solid surface, usually a glass or plastic chip. Peptide chips are used by scientists in biology, medicine and pharmacology to study binding properties and functionality and kinetics of protein-protein interactions in general.Proteomics Standards Initiative: The Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) is a working group of Human Proteome Organization. It aims to define data standards for proteomics in order to facilitate data comparison, exchange and verification.Fruit snack: A fruit snack is a processed food eaten as a snack in the United States. Fruit snacks are very similar to gummi candies.Transfer-messenger RNA: Transfer-messenger RNA (abbreviated tmRNA, also known as 10Sa RNA and by its genetic name SsrA) is a bacterial RNA molecule with dual tRNA-like and messenger RNA-like properties. The tmRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein complex (tmRNP) together with Small Protein B (SmpB), Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), and ribosomal protein S1.Gemmatimonadetes: The Gemmatimonadetes are a family of bacteria, given their own phylum (Gemmatimonadetes). This bacterium makes up about 2% of soil bacterial communities and has been identified as one of the top nine phyla found in soils; yet, there are currently only six cultured isolates.Library (biology): In molecular biology, a library is a collection of DNA fragments that is stored and propagated in a population of micro-organisms through the process of molecular cloning. There are different types of DNA libraries, including cDNA libraries (formed from reverse-transcribed RNA), genomic libraries (formed from genomic DNA) and randomized mutant libraries (formed by de novo gene synthesis where alternative nucleotides or codons are incorporated).Chorda tympani: The chorda tympani is a branch of the facial nerve that originates from the taste buds in the front of the tongue, runs through the middle ear, and carries taste messages to the brain. It joins the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) inside the facial canal, at the level where the facial nerve exits the skull via the petrotympanic fissure.De novo transcriptome assembly: De novo transcriptome assembly is the method of creating a transcriptome without the aid of a reference genome.Mature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Matrix model: == Mathematics and physics ==

(1/16506) Ringo, Doty, Demeter and Simard, Cerebral Cortex 1994;4:331-343: a proof of the need for the spatial clustering of interneuronal connections to enhance cortical computation.

It has been argued that an important principle driving the organization of the cerebral cortex towards local processing has been the need to decrease time lost to interneuronal conduction delay. In this paper, I show for a simplified model of the cerebral cortex, using analytical means, that if interneuronal conduction time increases proportional to interneuronal distance, then the only way to increase the numbers of synaptic events occurring in a fixed finite time period is to spatially cluster interneuronal connections.  (+info)

(2/16506) Cluster survey evaluation of coverage and risk factors for failure to be immunized during the 1995 National Immunization Days in Egypt.

BACKGROUND: In 1995, Egypt continued to experience endemic wild poliovirus transmission despite achieving high routine immunization coverage with at least three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV3) and implementing National Immunization Days (NIDs) annually for several years. METHODS: Parents of 4188 children in 3216 households throughout Egypt were surveyed after the second round of the 1995 NIDs. RESULTS: Nationwide, 74% of children are estimated to have received both NID doses, 17% one NID dose, and 9% neither NID dose. Previously unimmunized (47%) or partially immunized (64%) children were less likely to receive two NID doses of OPV than were fully immunized children (76%) (P < 0.001). Other risk factors nationwide for failure to receive NID OPV included distance from residence to nearest NID site >10 minute walk (P < 0.001), not being informed about the NID at least one day in advance (P < 0.001), and residing in a household which does not watch television (P < 0.001). Based on these findings, subsequent NIDs in Egypt were modified to improve coverage, which has resulted in a marked decrease in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis in Egypt. CONCLUSIONS: In selected situations, surveys can provide important information that is useful for planning future NIDs.  (+info)

(3/16506) Clusters of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia: analysis of person-to-person transmission by genotyping.

Genotyping at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon was performed on isolates of P. carinii sp. f. hominis from three clusters of P. carinii pneumonia among eight patients with haematological malignancies and six with HIV infection. Nine different ITS sequence types of P. carinii sp. f. hominis were identified in the samples from the patients with haematological malignancies, suggesting that this cluster of cases of P. carinii pneumonia was unlikely to have resulted from nosocomial transmission. A common ITS sequence type was observed in two of the patients with haematological malignancies who shared a hospital room, and also in two of the patients with HIV infection who had prolonged close contact on the ward. In contrast, different ITS sequence types were detected in samples from an HIV-infected homosexual couple who shared the same household. These data suggest that person-to-person transmission of P. carinii sp. f. hominis may occur from infected to susceptible immunosuppressed patients with close contact within hospital environments. However direct transmission between patients did not account for the majority of cases within the clusters, suggesting that person-to-person transmission of P. carinii sp. f. hominis infection may be a relatively infrequent event and does not constitute the major route of transmission in man.  (+info)

(4/16506) Influence of sampling on estimates of clustering and recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived from DNA fingerprinting techniques.

The availability of DNA fingerprinting techniques for Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to attempts to estimate the extent of recent transmission in populations, using the assumption that groups of tuberculosis patients with identical isolates ("clusters") are likely to reflect recently acquired infections. It is never possible to include all cases of tuberculosis in a given population in a study, and the proportion of isolates found to be clustered will depend on the completeness of the sampling. Using stochastic simulation models based on real and hypothetical populations, the authors demonstrate the influence of incomplete sampling on the estimates of clustering obtained. The results show that as the sampling fraction increases, the proportion of isolates identified as clustered also increases and the variance of the estimated proportion clustered decreases. Cluster size is also important: the underestimation of clustering for any given sampling fraction is greater, and the variability in the results obtained is larger, for populations with small clusters than for those with the same number of individuals arranged in large clusters. A considerable amount of caution should be used in interpreting the results of studies on clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates, particularly when sampling fractions are small.  (+info)

(5/16506) Newly recognized focus of La Crosse encephalitis in Tennessee.

La Crosse virus is a mosquito-borne arbovirus that causes encephalitis in children. Only nine cases were reported in Tennessee during the 33-year period from 1964-1996. We investigated a cluster of La Crosse encephalitis cases in eastern Tennessee in 1997. Medical records of all suspected cases of La Crosse virus infection at a pediatric referral hospital were reviewed, and surveillance was enhanced in the region. Previous unreported cases were identified by surveying 20 hospitals in the surrounding 16 counties. Mosquito eggs were collected from five sites. Ten cases of La Crosse encephalitis were serologically confirmed. None of the patients had been discharged from hospitals in the region with diagnosed La Crosse encephalitis in the preceding 5 years. Aedes triseriatus and Aedes albopictus were collected at the case sites; none of the mosquitos had detectable La Crosse virus. This cluster may represent an extension of a recently identified endemic focus of La Crosse virus infection in West Virginia.  (+info)

(6/16506) Hierarchical cluster analysis applied to workers' exposures in fiberglass insulation manufacturing.

The objectives of this study were to explore the application of cluster analysis to the characterization of multiple exposures in industrial hygiene practice and to compare exposure groupings based on the result from cluster analysis with that based on non-measurement-based approaches commonly used in epidemiology. Cluster analysis was performed for 37 workers simultaneously exposed to three agents (endotoxin, phenolic compounds and formaldehyde) in fiberglass insulation manufacturing. Different clustering algorithms, including complete-linkage (or farthest-neighbor), single-linkage (or nearest-neighbor), group-average and model-based clustering approaches, were used to construct the tree structures from which clusters can be formed. Differences were observed between the exposure clusters constructed by these different clustering algorithms. When contrasting the exposure classification based on tree structures with that based on non-measurement-based information, the results indicate that the exposure clusters identified from the tree structures had little in common with the classification results from either the traditional exposure zone or the work group classification approach. In terms of the defining homogeneous exposure groups or from the standpoint of health risk, some toxicological normalization in the components of the exposure vector appears to be required in order to form meaningful exposure groupings from cluster analysis. Finally, it remains important to see if the lack of correspondence between exposure groups based on epidemiological classification and measurement data is a peculiarity of the data or a more general problem in multivariate exposure analysis.  (+info)

(7/16506) A taxonomy of health networks and systems: bringing order out of chaos.

OBJECTIVE: To use existing theory and data for empirical development of a taxonomy that identifies clusters of organizations sharing common strategic/structural features. DATA SOURCES: Data from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association Annual Surveys, which provide extensive data on hospital involvement in hospital-led health networks and systems. STUDY DESIGN: Theories of organization behavior and industrial organization economics were used to identify three strategic/structural dimensions: differentiation, which refers to the number of different products/services along a healthcare continuum; integration, which refers to mechanisms used to achieve unity of effort across organizational components; and centralization, which relates to the extent to which activities take place at centralized versus dispersed locations. These dimensions were applied to three components of the health service/product continuum: hospital services, physician arrangements, and provider-based insurance activities. DATA EXTRACTION METHODS: We identified 295 health systems and 274 health networks across the United States in 1994, and 297 health systems and 306 health networks in 1995 using AHA data. Empirical measures aggregated individual hospital data to the health network and system level. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a reliable, internally valid, and stable four-cluster solution for health networks and a five-cluster solution for health systems. We found that differentiation and centralization were particularly important in distinguishing unique clusters of organizations. High differentiation typically occurred with low centralization, which suggests that a broader scope of activity is more difficult to centrally coordinate. Integration was also important, but we found that health networks and systems typically engaged in both ownership-based and contractual-based integration or they were not integrated at all. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we were able to classify approximately 70 percent of hospital-led health networks and 90 percent of hospital-led health systems into well-defined organizational clusters. Given the widespread perception that organizational change in healthcare has been chaotic, our research suggests that important and meaningful similarities exist across many evolving organizations. The resulting taxonomy provides a new lexicon for researchers, policymakers, and healthcare executives for characterizing key strategic and structural features of evolving organizations. The taxonomy also provides a framework for future inquiry about the relationships between organizational strategy, structure, and performance, and for assessing policy issues, such as Medicare Provider Sponsored Organizations, antitrust, and insurance regulation.  (+info)

(8/16506) Double blind, cluster randomised trial of low dose supplementation with vitamin A or beta carotene on mortality related to pregnancy in Nepal. The NNIPS-2 Study Group.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact on mortality related to pregnancy of supplementing women of reproductive age each week with a recommended dietary allowance of vitamin A, either preformed or as beta carotene. DESIGN: Double blind, cluster randomised, placebo controlled field trial. SETTING: Rural southeast central plains of Nepal (Sarlahi district). SUBJECTS: 44 646 married women, of whom 20 119 became pregnant 22 189 times. INTERVENTION: 270 wards randomised to 3 groups of 90 each for women to receive weekly a single oral supplement of placebo, vitamin A (7000 micrograms retinol equivalents) or beta carotene (42 mg, or 7000 micrograms retinol equivalents) for over 31/2 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All cause mortality in women during pregnancy up to 12 weeks post partum (pregnancy related mortality) and mortality during pregnancy to 6 weeks postpartum, excluding deaths apparently related to injury (maternal mortality). RESULTS: Mortality related to pregnancy in the placebo, vitamin A, and beta carotene groups was 704, 426, and 361 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies, yielding relative risks (95% confidence intervals) of 0. 60 (0.37 to 0.97) and 0.51 (0.30 to 0.86). This represented reductions of 40% (P<0.04) and 49% (P<0.01) among those who received vitamin A and beta carotene. Combined, vitamin A or beta carotene lowered mortality by 44% (0.56 (0.37 to 0.84), P<0.005) and reduced the maternal mortality ratio from 645 to 385 deaths per 100 000 live births, or by 40% (P<0.02). Differences in cause of death could not be reliably distinguished between supplemented and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: Supplementation of women with either vitamin A or beta carotene at recommended dietary amounts during childbearing years can lower mortality related to pregnancy in rural, undernourished populations of south Asia.  (+info)



hierarchical

  • Typical cluster models include: Connectivity models: for example, hierarchical clustering builds models based on distance connectivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • K-Means Cluster , Hierarchical Cluster , and Two-Step Cluster . (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Hierarchical cluster is the most common method. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Two-step cluster analysis identifies groupings by running pre-clustering first and then by running hierarchical methods. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Because it uses a quick cluster algorithm upfront, it can handle large data sets that would take a long time to compute with hierarchical cluster methods. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • The hierarchical cluster analysis follows three basic steps: 1) calculate the distances, 2) link the clusters, and 3) choose a solution by selecting the right number of clusters. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Here we present CytoCluster, a cytoscape plugin integrating six clustering algorithms, HC-PIN (Hierarchical Clustering algorithm in Protein Interaction Networks), OH-PIN (identifying Overlapping and Hierarchical modules in Protein Interaction Networks), IPCA (Identifying Protein Complex Algorithm), ClusterONE (Clustering with Overlapping Neighborhood Expansion), DCU (Detecting Complexes based on Uncertain graph model), IPC-MCE (Identifying Protein Complexes based on Maximal Complex Extension), and BinGO (the Biological networks Gene Ontology) function. (mdpi.com)
  • In statistics, single-linkage clustering is one of several methods of hierarchical clustering. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complete-linkage clustering is one of several methods of agglomerative hierarchical clustering. (wikipedia.org)

multivariate

  • Distribution models: clusters are modeled using statistical distributions, such as multivariate normal distributions used by the expectation-maximization algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The problem of clustering multivariate observations is viewed as the replacement of a set of vectors with a set of labels and representative vectors. (bell-labs.com)
  • In this cross-sectional study, the researchers sought to classify a sample of HIV-positive African-American crack cocaine smokers into homogenous HIV drug use and sexual risk groups using a two-step multivariate cluster analysis. (thebody.com)
  • He worked for the Brain Research Laboratories (New York University) developing neurometric systems based on the multivariate statistical analysis of electroencephalographic signals (EEG). (wikipedia.org)

implementing a different linkage

  • In the naive algorithm for agglomerative clustering, implementing a different linkage scheme may be accomplished simply by using a different formula to calculate inter-cluster distances in the algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternative linkage schemes include single linkage and average linkage clustering - implementing a different linkage in the naive algorithm is simply a matter of using a different formula to calculate inter-cluster distances in the initial computation of the proximity matrix and in step 4 of the above algorithm. (wikipedia.org)

Algorithms

  • It can be achieved by various algorithms that differ significantly in their notion of what constitutes a cluster and how to efficiently find them. (wikipedia.org)
  • The notion of a "cluster" cannot be precisely defined, which is one of the reasons why there are so many clustering algorithms. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, different researchers employ different cluster models, and for each of these cluster models again different algorithms can be given. (wikipedia.org)
  • The notion of a cluster, as found by different algorithms, varies significantly in its properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Understanding these "cluster models" is key to understanding the differences between the various algorithms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Users can select different clustering algorithms according to their requirements. (mdpi.com)
  • The main function of these six clustering algorithms is to detect protein complexes or functional modules. (mdpi.com)
  • CytoCluster can be easily expanded, so that more clustering algorithms and functions can be added to this plugin. (mdpi.com)
  • In bioinformatics, sequence clustering algorithms attempt to group biological sequences that are somehow related. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some clustering algorithms use single-linkage clustering, constructing a transitive closure of sequences with a similarity over a particular threshold. (wikipedia.org)

linkage schemes include

  • Alternative linkage schemes include complete linkage clustering, average linkage clustering, and Ward's method. (wikipedia.org)

homogenous groups

  • The cluster analysis is conducted with the aim of assigning data points (sequences) into reasonably homogenous groups (clusters). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The researcher then may use cluster analysis to identify homogenous groups of customers that have similar needs and attitudes. (statisticssolutions.com)

agglomerative

  • It is based on grouping clusters in bottom-up fashion (agglomerative clustering), at each step combining two clusters that contain the closest pair of elements not yet belonging to the same cluster as each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the beginning of the agglomerative clustering process, each element is in a cluster of its own. (wikipedia.org)
  • The definition of 'shortest distance' is what differentiates between the different agglomerative clustering methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following algorithm is an agglomerative scheme that erases rows and columns in a proximity matrix as old clusters are merged into new ones. (wikipedia.org)

naive algorithm

  • The naive algorithm for single linkage clustering is essentially the same as Kruskal's algorithm for minimum spanning trees. (wikipedia.org)

algorithm represents

  • Centroid models: for example, the k-means algorithm represents each cluster by a single mean vector. (wikipedia.org)
  • The slink algorithm represents a clustering on a set of n {\displaystyle n} numbered items by two functions. (wikipedia.org)

slink

  • In May 1976, D. Defays proposed an optimally efficient algorithm of only complexity O ( n 2 ) {\displaystyle O(n^{2})} known as CLINK (published 1977) inspired by the similar algorithm SLINK for single-linkage clustering. (wikipedia.org)

bioinformatics

drawback

  • A drawback of this method is that it tends to produce long thin clusters in which nearby elements of the same cluster have small distances, but elements at opposite ends of a cluster may be much farther from each other than two elements of other clusters. (wikipedia.org)
  • X {\displaystyle X} and Y {\displaystyle Y} are two sets of elements (clusters) Complete linkage clustering avoids a drawback of the alternative single linkage method - the so-called chaining phenomenon, where clusters formed via single linkage clustering may be forced together due to single elements being close to each other, even though many of the elements in each cluster may be very distant to each other. (wikipedia.org)

detect

  • The purpose of this research is to test whether clustering algorithmscan be used to detect troll farms in social networks. (diva-portal.org)
  • By comparing the results and the implementations of the K-means as well as the DBSCAN algorithm we have concluded that clusteranalysis can be used to detect troll farms and that DBSCAN is bettersuited for this particular problem compared to K-means. (diva-portal.org)
  • Instead, a cluster analysis algorithm may be able to detect the micro clusters formed by these patterns. (wikipedia.org)

plumes

  • A meta-analysis of historic groundwater chlorinated hydrocarbon plume data from approximately 17,000 monitoring wells across California, represented in the state's publically-accessible Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) database, was conducted with the assistance of a machine learning approach, density (DBSCAN), that divided the data into individual sites and plumes. (figshare.com)
  • The resulting motion forms small clusters of small plumes right above the core-mantle boundary that combine to form larger plumes and then contribute to superplumes. (wikipedia.org)

dataset

  • The objective of conducting a cluster analysis is to discover if members of the dataset can be classified as pertaining to one of a small number of types. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Troll farms are profes-sional organizations that spread disinformation online via fake personas.The research involves a comparative study of two different clustering algo-rithms and a dataset of Twitter users and posts that includes a fabricatedtroll farm. (diva-portal.org)

schemes

  • This paper presents a procedure for clustering analysis that combines Kohone's Self organizing Feature Map (SOFM) and statistical schemes. (repec.org)

essentially

  • A "clustering" is essentially a set of such clusters, usually containing all objects in the data set. (wikipedia.org)

outlier

  • The 2013/14 storm season was an outlier regarding the number of wave events, their temporal clustering and return levels. (mdpi.com)
  • Cluster analysis-based outlier detection. (wikipedia.org)

sequences

  • For EST data, clustering is important to group sequences originating from the same gene before the ESTs are assembled to reconstruct the original mRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sequence clustering is often used to make a non-redundant set of representative sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • contains all predicted genes from eleven virus families organized into ortholog groups by BLASTP similarity Skipredudant EMBOSS tool to remove redundant sequences from a set PISCES: A Protein Sequence Culling Server RDB90 UniRef: A non-redundant UniProt sequence database Uniclust: A clustered UniProtKB sequences at the level of 90%, 50% and 30% pairwise sequence identity. (wikipedia.org)

exploratory

  • Cluster analysis is an exploratory analysis that tries to identify structures within the data. (statisticssolutions.com)

neural networks

  • Neural models: the most well known unsupervised neural network is the self-organizing map and these models can usually be characterized as similar to one or more of the above models, and including subspace models when neural networks implement a form of Principal Component Analysis or Independent Component Analysis. (wikipedia.org)

displaystyle

  • These functions are both determined by finding the smallest cluster C {\displaystyle C} that contains both item i {\displaystyle i} and at least one larger-numbered item. (wikipedia.org)

pairs

  • Find the most similar pair of clusters in the current clustering, say pair (r), (s), according to d[(r),(s)] = min d[(i),(j)] where the minimum is over all pairs of clusters in the current clustering. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in single linkage clustering, the order in which clusters are formed is important, while for minimum spanning trees what matters is the set of pairs of points that form distances chosen by the algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Starcode: a fast sequence clustering algorithm based on exact all-pairs search. (wikipedia.org)
  • In complete-linkage clustering, the link between two clusters contains all element pairs, and the distance between clusters equals the distance between those two elements (one in each cluster) that are farthest away from each other. (wikipedia.org)

observations

  • We consider the areas of graph estimation and cluster analysis, which are often used to construct gene expression network and to partition the observations or features into subgroups, respectively. (washington.edu)
  • For cluster analysis, we propose a novel methodology for partitioning both observations and features into groups simultaneously, which we refer to as sparse biclustering. (washington.edu)
  • A cluster analysis can group those observations into a series of clusters and help build a taxonomy of groups and subgroups of similar plants. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Other techniques you might want to try in order to identify similar groups of observations are Q-analysis , multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) , and latent class analysis . (statisticssolutions.com)
  • In the dialog box Statistics… we can specify whether we want to output the proximity matrix (these are the distances calculated in the first step of the analysis) and the predicted cluster membership of the cases in our observations. (statisticssolutions.com)

distances

  • Popular notions of clusters include groups with small distances between cluster members, dense areas of the data space, intervals or particular statistical distributions. (wikipedia.org)

protein

  • Nowadays, cluster analysis of biological networks has become one of the most important approaches to identifying functional modules as well as predicting protein complexes and network biomarkers. (mdpi.com)
  • Sequence clusters are often synonymous with (but not identical to) protein families. (wikipedia.org)

objective

  • Clustering can therefore be formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cluster analysis as such is not an automatic task, but an iterative process of knowledge discovery or interactive multi-objective optimization that involves trial and failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boundaries of these features appear fairly consistent across models when applying objective k-means clustering. (wikipedia.org)

consistent

  • The procedure outperformed others clustering techniques in the job of identifying consistent groups of countries from the economic and statistical viewpoints. (repec.org)
  • No consistent separation of the different subgroups was seen in the second cluster of tumors. (aacrjournals.org)

binary

  • The different cluster analysis methods that SPSS offers can handle binary, nominal, ordinal, and scale (interval or ratio) data. (statisticssolutions.com)

approach

  • Here, an event-based analysis approach, across multiple sites, has been used to assess the spatial footprint and temporal clustering of extreme storm-wave events around the coast of the United Kingdom (UK). (mdpi.com)

groups

  • Cluster analysis or clustering is the task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cluster analysis can then identify groups of patients that have similar symptoms. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • A cluster analysis then may identify what homogeneous groups exist among students (for example, high achievers in all subjects, or students that excel in certain subjects but fail in others). (statisticssolutions.com)
  • A cluster analysis revealed four distinct groups of students who were "highly involved both as bully and victim," "more victim than bully," "more bully than victim," or "least involved. (igi-global.com)
  • The resultant Euclidean clustering divided the tumors into two major groups. (aacrjournals.org)

different

  • This is useful to test different models with a different assumed number of clusters. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Since it was created in July 2013, CytoCluster has been downloaded more than 9700 times in the Cytoscape App store and has already been applied to the analysis of different biological networks. (mdpi.com)

https

  • The python 2.7 script used to extract and process the data can be found at https://github.com/NumericalEnvironmental/VOC_Plume_Meta-analysis_with_Python. (figshare.com)

tends

  • Complete linkage tends to find compact clusters of approximately equal diameters. (wikipedia.org)

Protocols

  • where he developed experimental protocols, conducted data analysis, as well as designed and built low noise instrumentation for a variety of psycho physiological and physical experiments. (wikipedia.org)

involves

  • In addition, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering, a recent proposal for cluster analysis, which involves solving a convex optimization problem. (washington.edu)

symptoms

  • Some have proposed to group symptoms into clusters or into one general functional somatic disorder given the finding of correlations between symptoms and underlying etiologies. (wikipedia.org)

biological

  • Furthermore, the visualization of clustering results is crucial to display the structure of biological networks. (mdpi.com)
  • Li M, Li D, Tang Y, Wu F, Wang J. CytoCluster: A Cytoscape Plugin for Cluster Analysis and Visualization of Biological Networks. (mdpi.com)

data

  • The appropriate clustering algorithm and parameter settings (including parameters such as the distance function to use, a density threshold or the number of expected clusters) depend on the individual data set and intended use of the results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Density models: for example, DBSCAN and OPTICS defines clusters as connected dense regions in the data space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data mining in telecommunications: case study of cluster analysis. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The researcher must be able to interpret the cluster analysis based on their understanding of the data to determine if the results produced by the analysis are actually meaningful. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • K-means cluster is a method to quickly cluster large data sets. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • Two-step clustering can handle scale and ordinal data in the same model, and it automatically selects the number of clusters. (statisticssolutions.com)
  • The idea is to cluster the data in two stages: run SOFM and then minimize the segmentation dispersion. (repec.org)
  • The presented spatial and temporal analysis framework for extreme wave events can be applied to any coastal region with sufficient observational data and highlights the importance of developing statistical tools to accurately predict such processes. (mdpi.com)

therefore

  • Therefore, the result of such an analysis could not be easily interpreted and generalized. (thefreelibrary.com)

single

  • In single-linkage clustering, the distance between two clusters is determined by a single element pair, namely those two elements (one in each cluster) that are closest to each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Merge clusters (r) and (s) into a single cluster to form the next clustering m. (wikipedia.org)

similar

  • Besides the term clustering, there are a number of terms with similar meanings, including automatic classification, numerical taxonomy, botryology (from Greek βότρυς "grape") and typological analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • it can cluster variables together in a manner somewhat similar to factor analysis. (statisticssolutions.com)

method

  • The method is also known as nearest neighbour clustering. (wikipedia.org)

often

  • Cluster analysis is often used in conjunction with other analyses (such as discriminant analysis). (statisticssolutions.com)

representative

  • if a sequence is not matched then it becomes the representative sequence for a new cluster. (wikipedia.org)
  • Determining a representative tertiary structure for each sequence cluster is the aim of many structural genomics initiatives. (wikipedia.org)

determine

  • The main task in the cluster analysis is to determine how many clusters are to be used (Cattrell, 1998). (thefreelibrary.com)

found

  • In SPSS Cluster Analyses can be found in Analyze/Classify… . (statisticssolutions.com)
  • No significant differences were found between cluster membership and the degree of parental monitoring. (igi-global.com)

Level

  • n − 1) and L(k) is the level of the kth clustering. (wikipedia.org)
  • The algorithm is composed of the following steps: Begin with the disjoint clustering having level L(0) = 0 and sequence number m = 0. (wikipedia.org)
  • Set the level of this clustering to L(m) = d[(r),(s)] Update the proximity matrix, D, by deleting the rows and columns corresponding to clusters (r) and (s) and adding a row and column corresponding to the newly formed cluster. (wikipedia.org)

select

However

  • However, a decision needs to be made on how many clusters will be used. (thefreelibrary.com)

models

  • Subspace models: in biclustering (also known as co-clustering or two-mode-clustering), clusters are modeled with both cluster members and relevant attributes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Graph-based models: a clique, that is, a subset of nodes in a graph such that every two nodes in the subset are connected by an edge can be considered as a prototypical form of cluster. (wikipedia.org)
  • It generates a series of models with cluster solutions from 1 (all cases in one cluster) to n (each case is an individual cluster). (statisticssolutions.com)

general

  • Cluster analysis itself is not one specific algorithm, but the general task to be solved. (wikipedia.org)
  • A general criterion for clustering is derived as a measure of representation error. (bell-labs.com)

useful

  • If the number of clusters is too low, the dissimilarity within each cluster will be high and such clusters could not produce new and useful information. (thefreelibrary.com)

complete

  • Relaxations of the complete connectivity requirement (a fraction of the edges can be missing) are known as quasi-cliques, as in the HCS clustering algorithm. (wikipedia.org)