Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Sex Chromosomes: The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6: A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Chromosomes, Fungal: Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Chromosomes, Human, 6-12 and X: The medium-sized, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group C in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 and the X chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Pairing: The alignment of CHROMOSOMES at homologous sequences.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Chromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, 1-3: The large, metacentric human chromosomes, called group A in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 1, 2, and 3.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Chromosomes, Human, 16-18: The short, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group E in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 16, 17, and 18.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Artificial, Yeast: Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.Chromosomes, Human, 13-15: The medium-sized, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group D in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 13, 14, and 15.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Chromosome Breakage: A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.Chromosomes, Human, 21-22 and Y: The short, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group G in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 21 and 22 and the Y chromosome.Ring Chromosomes: Aberrant chromosomes with no ends, i.e., circular.Chromosome Inversion: An aberration in which a chromosomal segment is deleted and reinserted in the same place but turned 180 degrees from its original orientation, so that the gene sequence for the segment is reversed with respect to that of the rest of the chromosome.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Chromosome Positioning: The mechanisms of eukaryotic CELLS that place or keep the CHROMOSOMES in a particular SUBNUCLEAR SPACE.Chromosomes, Human, 4-5: The large, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group B in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 4 and 5.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.X Chromosome Inactivation: A dosage compensation process occurring at an early embryonic stage in mammalian development whereby, at random, one X CHROMOSOME of the pair is repressed in the somatic cells of females.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Chromosomes, Insect: Structures within the CELL NUCLEUS of insect cells containing DNA.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Hybrid Cells: Any cell, other than a ZYGOTE, that contains elements (such as NUCLEI and CYTOPLASM) from two or more different cells, usually produced by artificial CELL FUSION.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Chromosome Structures: Structures which are contained in or part of CHROMOSOMES.Chromosomes, Human, 19-20: The short, metacentric human chromosomes, called group F in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 19 and 20.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Nondisjunction, Genetic: The failure of homologous CHROMOSOMES or CHROMATIDS to segregate during MITOSIS or MEIOSIS with the result that one daughter cell has both of a pair of parental chromosomes or chromatids and the other has none.Kinetochores: Large multiprotein complexes that bind the centromeres of the chromosomes to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in the cell cycle.Chromosomes, Artificial, Human: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, all elements, such as a REPLICATION ORIGIN; TELOMERE; and CENTROMERE, required for successful replication, propagation to and maintainance in progeny human cells. In addition, they are constructed to carry other sequences for analysis or gene transfer.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Chromosome Walking: A technique with which an unknown region of a chromosome can be explored. It is generally used to isolate a locus of interest for which no probe is available but that is known to be linked to a gene which has been identified and cloned. A fragment containing a known gene is selected and used as a probe to identify other overlapping fragments which contain the same gene. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments can then be characterized. This process continues for the length of the chromosome.Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Chromosomal Instability: An increased tendency to acquire CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS when various processes involved in chromosome replication, repair, or segregation are dysfunctional.Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.Chromosome Fragility: Susceptibility of chromosomes to breakage leading to translocation; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; SEQUENCE DELETION; or other CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE related aberrations.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Chromosome Duplication: An aberration in which an extra chromosome or a chromosomal segment is made.DNA, Satellite: Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Diploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented twice. Symbol: 2N or 2X.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Mosaicism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.Chromatids: Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Abnormalities, MultiplePolyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Polytene Chromosomes: Extra large CHROMOSOMES, each consisting of many identical copies of a chromosome lying next to each other in parallel.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Gene Dosage: The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.Interphase: The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).Prophase: The first phase of cell nucleus division, in which the CHROMOSOMES become visible, the CELL NUCLEUS starts to lose its identity, the SPINDLE APPARATUS appears, and the CENTRIOLES migrate toward opposite poles.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Genes, X-Linked: Genes that are located on the X CHROMOSOME.Karyotype: The full set of CHROMOSOMES presented as a systematized array of METAPHASE chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single CELL NUCLEUS arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the CENTROMERE. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cosmids: Plasmids containing at least one cos (cohesive-end site) of PHAGE LAMBDA. They are used as cloning vehicles.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Chromosome Fragile Sites: Specific loci that show up during KARYOTYPING as a gap (an uncondensed stretch in closer views) on a CHROMATID arm after culturing cells under specific conditions. These sites are associated with an increase in CHROMOSOME FRAGILITY. They are classified as common or rare, and by the specific culture conditions under which they develop. Fragile site loci are named by the letters "FRA" followed by a designation for the specific chromosome, and a letter which refers to which fragile site of that chromosome (e.g. FRAXA refers to fragile site A on the X chromosome. It is a rare, folic acid-sensitive fragile site associated with FRAGILE X SYNDROME.)Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Monosomy: The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.Spermatocytes: Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.Sex Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal sex chromosome constitution (SEX CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS), in which there is extra or missing sex chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment).Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Sequence Tagged Sites: Short tracts of DNA sequence that are used as landmarks in GENOME mapping. In most instances, 200 to 500 base pairs of sequence define a Sequence Tagged Site (STS) that is operationally unique in the human genome (i.e., can be specifically detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the presence of all other genomic sequences). The overwhelming advantage of STSs over mapping landmarks defined in other ways is that the means of testing for the presence of a particular STS can be completely described as information in a database.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Philadelphia Chromosome: An aberrant form of human CHROMOSOME 22 characterized by translocation of the distal end of chromosome 9 from 9q34, to the long arm of chromosome 22 at 22q11. It is present in the bone marrow cells of 80 to 90 per cent of patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE).Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Chromosomes, Archaeal: Structures within the nucleus of archaeal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Contig Mapping: Overlapping of cloned or sequenced DNA to construct a continuous region of a gene, chromosome or genome.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Chromosome Breakpoints: The locations in specific DNA sequences where CHROMOSOME BREAKS have occurred.Ploidies: The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.Haploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented once. Symbol: N.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Genetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Sex Chromatin: In the interphase nucleus, a condensed mass of chromatin representing an inactivated X chromosome. Each X CHROMOSOME, in excess of one, forms sex chromatin (Barr body) in the mammalian nucleus. (from King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Genomic Imprinting: The variable phenotypic expression of a GENE depending on whether it is of paternal or maternal origin, which is a function of the DNA METHYLATION pattern. Imprinted regions are observed to be more methylated and less transcriptionally active. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Gene Amplification: A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.Genes, Lethal: Genes whose loss of function or gain of function MUTATION leads to the death of the carrier prior to maturity. They may be essential genes (GENES, ESSENTIAL) required for viability, or genes which cause a block of function of an essential gene at a time when the essential gene function is required for viability.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Sister Chromatid Exchange: An exchange of segments between the sister chromatids of a chromosome, either between the sister chromatids of a meiotic tetrad or between the sister chromatids of a duplicated somatic chromosome. Its frequency is increased by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and other mutagenic agents and is particularly high in BLOOM SYNDROME.Pachytene Stage: The stage in the first meiotic prophase, following ZYGOTENE STAGE, when CROSSING OVER between homologous CHROMOSOMES begins.Chromosomes, Artificial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, elements such as a REPLICATION ORIGIN; TELOMERE; and CENTROMERE, that are required for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance in progeny cells. In addition, they are constructed to carry other sequences for analysis or gene transfer.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Genes, Y-Linked: Genes that are located on the Y CHROMOSOME.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Euchromatin: Chromosome regions that are loosely packaged and more accessible to RNA polymerases than HETEROCHROMATIN. These regions also stain differentially in CHROMOSOME BANDING preparations.Sex Determination Processes: The mechanisms by which the SEX of an individual's GONADS are fixed.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Aurora Kinases: A family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. They are involved in many aspects of cell division, including centrosome duplication, SPINDLE APPARATUS formation, chromosome alignment, attachment to the spindle, checkpoint activation, and CYTOKINESIS.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Meiotic Prophase I: The prophase of the first division of MEIOSIS (in which homologous CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION occurs). It is divided into five stages: leptonema, zygonema, PACHYNEMA, diplonema, and diakinesis.Turner Syndrome: A syndrome of defective gonadal development in phenotypic females associated with the karyotype 45,X (or 45,XO). Patients generally are of short stature with undifferentiated GONADS (streak gonads), SEXUAL INFANTILISM, HYPOGONADISM, webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus, elevated GONADOTROPINS, decreased ESTRADIOL level in blood, and CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS. NOONAN SYNDROME (also called Pseudo-Turner Syndrome and Male Turner Syndrome) resembles this disorder; however, it occurs in males and females with a normal karyotype and is inherited as an autosomal dominant.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Radiation Hybrid Mapping: A method for ordering genetic loci along CHROMOSOMES. The method involves fusing irradiated donor cells with host cells from another species. Following cell fusion, fragments of DNA from the irradiated cells become integrated into the chromosomes of the host cells. Molecular probing of DNA obtained from the fused cells is used to determine if two or more genetic loci are located within the same fragment of donor cell DNA.Genetic Heterogeneity: The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

*  Chromosome x: Human Genomics: Collection: Supplement: Nature

Human Genome Collection. Chromosome x. The X chromosome both unites and divides the sexes: everyone has it, but whereas men ... A gene from the region of the human X inactivation centre is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome. Brown, C.J. ... The X factor. Dawson, E. et al.. The sequence of the 'feminine' X chromosome is a prime hunting ground for geneticists ... The physical maps for sequencing human chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10, 13, 20 and X Bentley, D. R. et al. ...

*  Rapid Evolution of Genes on the Human X-chromosome - eLS - Kvikstad - Wiley Online Library

Owing to sex chromosome-specific modes of natural selection, genes on the human X-chromosome are evolving rapidly in comparison ... including evolutionary history and genomic features of the X-chromosome. Furthermore, genes on the X are distributed in a ... Finally, the function and expression of each X-linked gene may play a role in determining its evolutionary rate. ...

*  Which is bigger and by how much, the mouse X chromosome or the humans'?

Subject: Which is bigger and by how much, the mouse X chromosome or the humans'?. Date: Fri Nov 30 10:58:24 2007. Posted by ... Re: Which is bigger and by how much, the mouse X chromosome or the humans'? Current Queue , Current Queue for Genetics , ...

*  Pan troglodytes chromosome X clone RP43-041A20 map human ortholog p11. - Nucleotide - NCBI

Pan troglodytes chromosome X clone RP43-041A20 map human ortholog p11.3, complete sequence. GenBank: AC148447.3 ...

*  Erosion of X Chromosome Inactivation in Human Pluripotent Cells Initiates with Coating and Depends on a Specific...

Erosion of X Chromosome Inactivation in Human Pluripotent Cells Initiates with Coating and Depends on a Specific ... XCI erosion in human pluripotent cells is related to a pluripotency-specific epigenomic landscape on the inactive X chromosome ... MYC Controls Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Fate Decisions through Regulation of Metabolic Flux ... MYC Controls Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Fate Decisions through Regulation of Metabolic Flux ...

*  Additional deletion in sex-determining region of human Y chromosome resolves paradox of X,t(Y;22) female. What makes a man a...

Additional deletion in sex-determining region of human Y chromosome resolves paradox of X,t(Y;22) female. What makes a man a ... Additional deletion in sex-determining region of human Y chromosome resolves paradox of X,t(Y;22) female. Article Abstract:. ... Studies with men who had two X chromosomes and only a segment of the Y chromosome allowed the identification of a sequence of ... known as interval 1A on the Y chromosome. There are males who have inherited two X chromosomes, which would normally make them ...

*  Template:Gene-X-stub - Wikipedia

This article on a gene on the human X chromosome and/or its associated protein is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding ... Category:human chromosome X gene stubs (population: 285). General information. This is a stub template. A brief explanation of ... This template is used to identify a stub on a gene on the human X chromosome and/or its associated protein. It uses {{asbox}}, ... Gene-X-stub}}. produces the message shown at the beginning, and adds the article to the following category:. * ...

*  TPLC - Total Product Life Cycle

dna-probe kit, human chromosome x and y, bmt engraftment. Regulation Description. Tumor-associated antigen immunological test ... X/Y DNA probe kit is intended to detect alpha satellite sequences in the centromere of chromosome (Chr) X and satellite III DNA ... It is indicated for use as an adjunct to standard cytogenetic analysis for identifying and enumerating Chr X and Y via FISH in ... in diagnostic testing or screening for constitutional X and Y Chr aneuploidies.. ...

*  Abstracts - 4th World Conference on PCDH19

PCDH19 is on the human X-chromosome. Heterozygous females are affected, while hemizygous males are not, contradicting normal X- ... EFMR is due to mutations in the X-chromosome gene PCDH19 and is underpinned by cellular mosaicism due to X-chromosome ... It is caused by a variety of loss of function mutations in an X-chromosome gene, Protocadherin19 (PCDH19), with 100s of cases ... Mutations in the PCDH19 gene on chromosome X (Xp22.1) cause a female-limited epilepsy (PCDH19 Female Epilepsy, PCDH19-FE) that ...

*  CTAG1A - Cancer/testis antigen 1 - Homo sapiens (Human) - CTAG1A gene & protein

Human chromosome X. Human chromosome X: entries, gene names and cross-references to MIM ... x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class=" ... x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class=" ... Homo sapiens (Human). ,p>This subsection of the 'Names and taxonomy' section shows the unique identifier assigned by the ,span ...

*  X chromosome - Stock Image C002/7487 - Science Photo Library

The chromosomes carry the genes, therefore they carry the heredity and are the essential elements of the cell nucleus. - Stock ... Caption: Human x chromosome. The chromosomes carry the genes, therefore they carry the heredity and are the essential elements ... Keywords: artwork, chromosome, dna, genetics, health, inheritance, medicine, normal, plain background, science, sciences, sex ... chromosome, x chromosome Licence fees: A licence fee will be charged for any media (low or high resolution) used in your ...

*  NKAPP1 - Putative uncharacterized protein CXorf42 - Homo sapiens (Human) - NKAPP1 gene & protein

Human chromosome X. Human chromosome X: entries, gene names and cross-references to MIM ... x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class=" ... Homo sapiens (Human). ,p>This subsection of the 'Names and taxonomy' section shows the unique identifier assigned by the ,span ... CX042_HUMAN. ,p>This subsection of the 'Entry information' section provides one or more accession number(s). These are stable ...

*  P2RY4 - Wikipedia

2005). «The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.». Nature. 434 (7031): 325-37. PMC 2665286. PMID 15772651. doi:10.1038/ ... doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12050.x !CS1 manut: Nomes múltiplos: lista de autores (link) Kim SG, Soltysiak KA, Gao ZG; et al ... 2003). «Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.». Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci ... link) !CS1 manut: Nomes múltiplos: lista de autores (link) Burrell HE, Bowler WB, Gallagher JA, Sharpe GR (2003). «Human ...

*  THE EVOLUTION OF XY RECOMBINATION: SEXUALLY ANTAGONISTIC SELECTION VERSUS DELETERIOUS MUTATION LOAD - Grossen - 2012 -...

Four evolutionary strata on the human X chromosome. Science 286:964-967. *CrossRef , ... Chimpanzee and human Y chromosomes are remarkably divergent in structure and gene content. Nature 463:536-539. *CrossRef , ... The W, X, Y and Z of sex-chromosome dosage compensation. Trends Genet. 25:226-233. *CrossRef , ... The shift from accumulation to elimination occurred at lower s values for the X than for the Y chromosome (Fig. 4B), due to the ...

*  Similar articles for PubMed (Select 12897772) - PubMed - NCBI

A worldwide phylogeography for the human X chromosome.. Santos-Lopes SS, Pereira RW, Wilson IJ, Pena SD. ... Statistical properties of the variation at linked microsatellite loci: implications for the history of human Y chromosomes. ... Seeing the wood for the trees: a minimal reference phylogeny for the human Y chromosome. ... Toward a consensus on SNP and STR mutation rates on the human Y-chromosome. ...

*  Valproic acid and lamotrigine treatment during pregnancy. The risk of chromosomal abnormality.

Chromosome Aberrations / chemically induced*. Chromosomes, Human, X / drug effects*. Cleft Palate / chemically induced, ... The molecular analysis of parents revealed that extra X chromosome was inherited from the mother. In this case whether the ... Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Karyotyping. Pedigree. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Complications / drug therapy*. Prenatal Exposure ...

*  SATL1 Gene - GeneCards | SATL1 Protein | SATL1 Antibody

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. (PMID: 15772651) Ross M.T. … Bentley D.R. (Nature 2005) 3 4 64 ... The GeneCards human gene database index: 1 2 3 5 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Chromosome:. X. Start:. 85,092,286 bp from pter. End:. 85,116,178 bp from pter. Size:. 23,893 bases. Orientation:. Minus strand ... Q86VE3-SATL1_HUMAN. Recommended name:. Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase-like protein 1 Protein Accession:. Q86VE3. ...

*  ZNF41 Gene - GeneCards | ZNF41 Protein | ZNF41 Antibody

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. (PMID: 15772651) Ross M.T. … Bentley D.R. (Nature 2005) 3 4 64 ... The GeneCards human gene database index: 1 2 3 5 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Isolation and expression analysis of a human zinc finger gene (ZNF41) located on the short arm of the X chromosome. (PMID: ... Chromosome:. X. Start:. 47,444,779 bp from pter. End:. 47,483,234 bp from pter. Size:. 38,456 bases. Orientation:. Minus strand ...

*  TMSB15A Gene - GeneCards | TB15A Protein | TB15A Antibody

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. (PMID: 15772651) Ross M.T. … Bentley D.R. (Nature 2005) 3 4 64 ... The GeneCards human gene database index: 1 2 3 5 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Chromosome:. X. Start:. 102,513,676 bp from pter. End:. 102,516,784 bp from pter. Size:. 3,109 bases. Orientation:. Minus ... P0CG34-TB15A_HUMAN. Recommended name:. Thymosin beta-15A Protein Accession:. P0CG34. Secondary Accessions: *A8K614 ...

*  STAG2 Gene - GeneCards | STAG2 Protein | STAG2 Antibody

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. (PMID: 15772651) Ross M.T. … Bentley D.R. (Nature 2005) 3 4 64 ... The GeneCards human gene database index: 1 2 3 5 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Chromosome. Chromosome, centromere. Note=Associates with chromatin. Before prophase it is scattered along chromosome arms. ... Chromosome:. X. Start:. 123,960,212 bp from pter. End:. 124,422,664 bp from pter. Size:. 462,453 bases. Orientation:. Plus ...

*  RPL36A Gene - GeneCards | RL36A Protein | RL36A Antibody

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. (PMID: 15772651) Ross M.T. … Bentley D.R. (Nature 2005) 3 4 64 ... The GeneCards human gene database index: 1 2 3 5 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Chromosome:. X. Start:. 101,390,824 bp from pter. End:. 101,396,154 bp from pter. Size:. 5,331 bases. Orientation:. Plus strand ... P83881-RL36A_HUMAN. Recommended name:. 60S ribosomal protein L36a Protein Accession:. P83881. Secondary Accessions: *P09896 ...

*  Armadillo Repeat Containing, X-Linked 1 (ARMCX1) Antibodies

Human Arm protein lost in epithelial cancers, on chromosome X 1 (ALEX1) gene is transcriptionally regulated by CREB (show CREB1 ... ARM protein lost in epithelial cancers on chromosome X 1 , arm protein lost in epithelial cancers, X chromosome, 1 , armadillo ... More Antibodies against Armadillo Repeat Containing, X-Linked 1 Interaction Partners. Human Armadillo Repeat Containing, X- ... armadillo repeat containing, X-linked 1 , Armadillo repeat-containing X-linked protein 1 , armadillo repeat-containing X-linked ...

*  B-Cell Receptor-Associated Protein 31 (BCAP31) Antikörper

The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. ... in Nature 2005 (PubMed) ... Human B-Cell Receptor-Associated Protein 31 (BCAP31) Interaktionspartner * Data characterized the biochemical properties of ... Transfected human respiratory syncytial virus SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down ... Human Polyclonal BCAP31 Primary Antibody für ELISA, WB - ABIN249495 : Adachi, Schamel, Kim, Watanabe, Becker, Nielsen, Reth: ...

*  Extensions to Mendelian Genetics by Eric Friberg on Prezi

The white eye mutation is on the fruit fly X chromosome. The X chromosome in humans has many genes. The Y chromosome has very ... X-Linked Recessive. X-Linked Dominant. Y-Linked. Most common sex-linked inheritance pattern in humans.. Tend to show up in ... Mapping of Y-Chromosome mutations informs our understanding of historical human migration.. Refers to any heritable trait that ... Even less common than X-linked Dominant (the Y chromosome has almost no genes on it).. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Due to an ...

*  Autoimmunity

Human X chromosome encodes approximately 7% of the total microRNAs identified. Recent studies have implicated over expression ... role-of-x-chromosome-encoded-mirnas-in-autoimmunity-suppressing-the-suppressor-2161-1149.1000118.pdfRole of skewed X ... www.omicsonline.org/role-of-x-chromosome-encoded-mirnas-in-autoimmunity-suppressing-the-suppressor-2161-1149.1000118.pdf ... X-linked miRNA mediated post transcriptional suppression of immunosuppressive genes is an open area of study with potential to ...

Premature chromosome condensation: Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) occurs in eukaryotic organisms when mitotic cells fuse with interphase cells. Chromatin, a substance that contains genetic material such as DNA, is normally found in a loose bundle inside a cell's nucleus.Chromosome regionsSmith–Fineman–Myers syndrome: Smith–Fineman–Myers syndrome (SFMS1), also called X-linked mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome 1 (MRXHF1), Carpenter–Waziri syndrome, Chudley–Lowry syndrome, SFMS, Holmes–Gang syndrome and Juberg–Marsidi syndrome (JMS), is a rare X-linked recessive congenital disorder that causes birth defects. This syndrome was named after 3 men, Richard D.Genetic imbalance: Genetic imbalance is to describe situation when the genome of a cell or organism has more copies of some genes than other genes due to chromosomal rearrangements or aneuploidy.Circular bacterial chromosome: A circular bacterial chromosome is a bacterial chromosome in the form of a molecule of circular DNA. Unlike the linear DNA of most eukaryotes, typical bacterial chromosomes are circular.Immortal DNA strand hypothesis: The immortal DNA strand hypothesis was proposed in 1975 by John Cairns as a mechanism for adult stem cells to minimize mutations in their genomes.Cairns, J.Transient neonatal diabetes mellitusGenetic linkage: Genetic linkage is the tendency of alleles that are located close together on a chromosome to be inherited together during the meiosis phase of sexual reproduction. Genes whose loci are nearer to each other are less likely to be separated onto different chromatids during chromosomal crossover, and are therefore said to be genetically linked.Ring chromosome: A ring chromosome is a chromosome whose arms have fused together to form a ring. Ring chromosomes were first discovered by Lilian Vaughan Morgan in 1926.John Payne ToddColes PhillipsSymmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.CentromereOncogene: An oncogene is a gene that has the potential to cause cancer.Wilbur, Beth, editor.CP 55,940Metaphase: Metaphase (from the Greek μετά, "adjacent" and φάσις, "stage") is a stage of mitosis in the eukaryotic cell cycle in which chromosomes are at their second-most condensed and coiled stage (they are at their most condensed in anaphase. These chromosomes, carrying genetic information, align in the equator of the cell before being separated into each of the two daughter cells.Bookmarking: Bookmarking (also "gene bookmarking" or "mitotic bookmarking") refers to a potential mechanism of transmission of gene expression programs through cell division.Recombination (cosmology): In cosmology, recombination refers to the epoch at which charged electrons and protons first became bound to form electrically neutral hydrogen atoms.Note that the term recombination is a misnomer, considering that it represents the first time that electrically neutral hydrogen formed.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Pedigree chart: A pedigree chart is a diagram that shows the occurrence and appearance or phenotypes of a particular gene or organism and its ancestors from one generation to the next,pedigree chart Genealogy Glossary - About.com, a part of The New York Times Company.Microsatellite: A microsatellite is a tract of repetitive DNA in which certain DNA motifs (ranging in length from 2–5 base pairs) are repeated, typically 5-50 times. Microsatellites occur at thousands of locations in the human genome and they are notable for their high mutation rate and high diversity in the population.Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.Infinite alleles model: The infinite alleles model is a mathematical model for calculating genetic mutations. The Japanese geneticist Motoo Kimura and American geneticist James F.Ligation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Trisomy 9Kinetochore: The kinetochore is the protein structure on chromatids where the spindle fibers attach during cell division to pull sister chromatids apart.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.Telomere: A telomere is a region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome, which protects the end of the chromosome from deterioration or from fusion with neighboring chromosomes. Its name is derived from the Greek nouns telos (τέλος) 'end' and merοs (μέρος, root: μερ-) 'part.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Ogre (2008 film): Ogre is a 2008 American television horror film directed by Steven R. Monroe.Chromo shadow domain: In molecular biology, the chromo shadow domain is a protein domain which is distantly related to the chromodomain. It is always found in association with a chromodomain.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Spindle apparatus: In cell biology, the spindle apparatus refers to the subcellular structure of eukaryotic cells that separates chromosomes between daughter cells during cell division. It is also referred to as the mitotic spindle during mitosis, a process that produces genetically identical daughter cells, or the meiotic spindle during meiosis, a process that produces gametes with half the number of chromosomes of the parent cell.Satellite DNA: Satellite DNA consists of very large arrays of tandemly repeating, non-coding DNA. Satellite DNA is the main component of functional centromeres, and form the main structural constituent of heterochromatin.Thermal cycler

(1/1094) ARX, a novel Prd-class-homeobox gene highly expressed in the telencephalon, is mutated in X-linked mental retardation.

Investigation of a critical region for an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) locus led us to identify a novel Aristaless related homeobox gene (ARX ). Inherited and de novo ARX mutations, including missense mutations and in frame duplications/insertions leading to expansions of polyalanine tracts in ARX, were found in nine familial and one sporadic case of MR. In contrast to other genes involved in XLMR, ARX expression is specific to the telencephalon and ventral thalamus. Notably there is an absence of expression in the cerebellum throughout development and also in adult. The absence of detectable brain malformations in patients suggests that ARX may have an essential role, in mature neurons, required for the development of cognitive abilities.  (+info)

(2/1094) Chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men with asthenoteratozoospermia.

Research over the past few years has clearly demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosome abnormalities in their sperm. These studies have been further corroborated by an increased frequency of chromosome abnormalities in newborns and fetuses from pregnancies established by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Most studies have considered men with any type of infertility. However, it is possible that some types of infertility have an increased risk of sperm chromosome abnormalities, whereas others do not. We studied 10 men with a specific type of infertility, asthenozoospermia (poor motility), by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis to determine whether they had an increased frequency of disomy for chromosomes 13, 21, XX, YY, and XY, as well as diploidy. The patients ranged in age from 28 to 42 yr (mean 34.1 yr); they were compared with 18 normal control donors whose ages ranged from 23 to 58 yr (mean 35.6 yr). A total of 201 416 sperm were analyzed in the men with asthenozoospermia, with a minimum of 10 000 sperm analyzed per chromosome probe per donor. There was a significant increase in the frequency of disomy in men with asthenozoospermia compared with controls for chromosomes 13 and XX. Thus, this study indicates that infertile men with poorly motile sperm but normal concentration have a significantly increased frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities.  (+info)

(3/1094) MOUSE (Mitochondrial and Other Useful SEquences) a compilation of population genetic markers.

Mitochondrial and Other Useful SEquences (MOUSE) is an integrated and comprehensive compilation of mtDNA from hypervariable regions I and II and of the low recombining nuclear loci Xq13.3 from about 11 200 humans and great apes, whose geographic and if applicable, linguistic classification is stored with their aligned sequences and publication details. The goal is to provide population geneticists and genetic epidemiologists with a comprehensive and user friendly repository of sequences and population information that is usually dispersed in a variety of other sources. AVAILABILITY: http://www.gen-epi.de/mouse. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Documentation and detailed information on population subgroups is available on the homepage: http://www.gen-epi.de/mouse  (+info)

(4/1094) Bipolar disorder susceptibility region on Xq24-q27.1 in Finnish families.

Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a common disorder characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression. The genetic background of BPD remains undefined, although several putative loci predisposing to BPD have been identified. We have earlier reported significant evidence of linkage for BPD to chromosome Xq24-q27.1 in an extended pedigree from the late settlement region of the genetically isolated population of Finland. Further, we established a distinct chromosomal haplotype covering a 19 cM region on Xq24-q27.1 co-segregating with the disorder. Here, we have further analyzed this X-chromosomal region using a denser marker map and monitored X-chromosomal haplotypes in a study sample of 41 Finnish bipolar families. Only a fraction of the families provided any evidence of linkage to this region, suggesting that a relatively rare gene predisposing to BPD is enriched in this linked pedigree. The genome-wide scan for BPD predisposing loci in this large pedigree indicated that this particular X-chromosomal region provides the best evidence of linkage genome-wide, suggesting an X-chromosomal gene with a major role for the genetic predisposition of BPD in this family.  (+info)

(5/1094) Sperm aneuploidy rates in younger and older men.

BACKGROUND: In order to assess the possible risk of chromosomal abnormalities in offspring from older fathers, we investigated the effects of age on the frequency of chromosomal aneuploidy rates of human sperm. METHODS AND RESULTS: Semen samples were collected from 15 men aged <30 years (24.8 +/- 2.4 years) and from eight men aged >60 years (65.3 +/- 3.9 years) from the general population. No significant differences in ejaculate volume, sperm concentration and sperm morphology were found, whereas sperm motility was significantly lower in older men (P = 0.002). For the hormone values, only FSH was significantly elevated in the older men (P = 0.004). Multicolour fluorescence in-situ hybridization was used to determine the aneuploidy frequencies of two autosomes (9 and 18); and of both sex chromosomes using directly labelled satellite DNA probes on decondensed sperm nuclei. A minimum of 8000 sperm per donor and >330 000 sperm in total were evaluated. The disomy rates per analysed chromosomes were 0.1-2.3% in younger men and 0.1-1.8% in older men. The aneuploidy rate determined for both sex chromosomes and for the autosomes 9 and 18 were not significantly different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that men of advanced age still wanting to become fathers do not have a significantly higher risk of procreating offspring with chromosomal abnormalities compared with younger men.  (+info)

(6/1094) Meta-analysis of genotype-phenotype correlation in X-linked Alport syndrome: impact on clinical counselling.

BACKGROUND: Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary nephropathy characterized by progressive renal failure, hearing loss and ocular lesions. Numerous mutations of the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV collagen have been described, establishing the molecular cause of AS. The goal of the present study was to identify the genotype-phenotype correlations that are helpful in clinical counseling. COL4A5-mutations (n=267) in males were analysed including 23 German Alport families. METHODS: Exons of the COL4A5 gene were PCR-amplified and screened by Southern blot, direct sequencing or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Phenotypes were obtained by questionnaires or extracted from 44 publications in the literature. Data were analysed by Kaplan-Meier statistics, chi(2) and Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: Genotype-phenotype data for 23 German Alport families are reported. Analysis of these data and of mutations published in the literature showed the type of mutation being a significant predictor of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) age. The patients' renal phenotypes could be grouped into three cohorts: (1) large rearrangements, frame shift, nonsense, and splice donor mutations had a mean ESRF age of 19.8+/-5.7 years; (2) non-glycine- or 3' glycine-missense mutations, in-frame deletions/insertions and splice acceptor mutations had a mean ESRF age of 25.7+/-7.2 years and fewer extrarenal symptoms; (3) 5' glycine substitutions had an even later onset of ESRF at 30.1+/-7.2 years. Glycine-substitutions occurred less commonly de novo than all other mutations (5.5% vs 13.9%). However, due to the evolutionary advantage of their moderate phenotype, they were the most common mutations. The intrafamilial phenotype of an individual mutation was found to be very consistent with regards to the manifestation of deafness, lenticonus and the time point of onset of ESRF. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of the mutation adds significant information about the progress of renal and extrarenal disease in males with X-linked AS. We suggest that the considerable prognostic relevance of a patient's genotype should be included in the classification of the Alport phenotype.  (+info)

(7/1094) Low frequency of MECP2 mutations in mentally retarded males.

A high frequency of mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene has recently been reported in males with nonspecific X-linked mental retardation. The results of this previous study suggested that the frequency of MECP2 mutations in the mentally retarded population was comparable to that of CGG expansions in FMR1. In view of these data, we performed MECP2 mutation analysis in a cohort of 475 mentally retarded males who were negative for FMR1 CGG repeat expansion. Five novel changes, detected in seven patients, were predicted to change the MECP2 coding sequence. Except for one, these changes were not found in a control population. While this result appeared to suggest a high mutation rate, this conclusion was not supported by segregation studies. Indeed, three of the five changes could be traced in unaffected male family members. For another change, segregation analysis in the family was not possible. Only one mutation, a frameshift created by a deletion of two bases, was found to be de novo. This study clearly shows the importance of segregation analysis for low frequency mutations, in order to distinguish them from rare polymorphisms. The true frequency of MECP2 mutations in the mentally retarded has probably been overestimated. Based on our data, the frequency of MECP2 mutations in mentally retarded males is 0.2% (1/475).  (+info)

(8/1094) Species-specific subcellular localization of RPGR and RPGRIP isoforms: implications for the phenotypic variability of congenital retinopathies among species.

The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) is encoded by the X-linked RP3 locus, which upon genetic lesions leads to neurodegeneration of photoreceptors and blindness. The findings that RPGR specifically and directly interacts in vivo and in vitro with retina-specific RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP) and that human mutations in RPGR uncouple its interaction with RPGRIP provided the first clue for the retina-specific pathogenesis of X-linked RP3. Recently, mutations in RPGRIP were found to lead to the retinal dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis. However, mouse models null for RPGR had, surprisingly, a very mild phenotype compared with those observed in XlRP3-affected humans and dogs. Moreover, recent reports are seemingly in disagreement on the localization of RPGR and RPGRIP in photoreceptors. These discrepancies were compounded with the finding of RPGR mutations leading exclusively to X-linked cone dystrophy. To resolve these discrepancies and to gain further insight into the pathology associated with RPGR- and RPGRIP-allied retinopathies, we now show, using several isoform-specific antibodies, that RPGR and RPGRIP isoforms are distributed and co-localized at restricted foci throughout the outer segments of human and bovine, but not mice rod photoreceptors. In humans, they also localize in cone outer segments. RPGRIP is also expressed in other neurons such as amacrine cells. Thus, the data lend support to the existence of species-specific subcellular processes governing the function and/or organization of the photoreceptor outer segment as reflected by the species-specific localization of RPGR and RPGRIP protein isoforms in this compartment, and provide a rationale for the disparity of phenotypes among species and in the human.  (+info)



second X chromosome

  • Maleness in humans is caused by the presence of the Y chromosome not by the lack of a second X chromosome. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • More recently, the inherent sexual inequalities in effects of sex chromosome genes have also been implicated as contributors in animal models of cardiovascular diseases, especially a deleterious effect of the second X chromosome found in females but not in males. (ahajournals.org)

abnormalities

  • Obvious from studying sex chomosome abnormalities such as Klinefelter syndrome (causes XXY males) and Turner syndrome (causes X females). (getrevising.co.uk)

Autosomal

  • Rice 1996 ), the initial step in the life of a sex chromosome is set by an autosomal mutation (or gene duplication) that interacts with the sex-determining cascade, such that heterozygotes develop into one sex (e.g. (wiley.com)

genes

  • Other genes are present on the sex chromosomes than sex determinants. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • A chromosome is a structure that contains your genes. (nyhq.org)
  • Recombination arrest between X and Y chromosomes, driven by sexually antagonistic genes, is expected to induce their progressive differentiation. (wiley.com)

Autosomes

  • Autosomes can also suffer nondisjuction at meiosis which gives rise to aneuploidy where the chromosome number is not an exact multiple of the haploid number. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The first 22 pairs of chromosomes are called "autosomes," which are the body chromosomes. (nyhq.org)

females

  • Normal development requires a balanced set of chromosomes but the X chromosome is present twice in females and only once in males. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Females have two "X" chromosomes, while males have one "X" and one "Y" chromosome. (nyhq.org)

karyotype

  • Chromosomes are arranged in order of size and the position of the centromer to give the karyotype or chromosome complement of the individual. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • A picture of all 46 chromosomes, in their pairs, is called a karyotype. (nyhq.org)

disorders

  • Incidence of sex chromosome disorders is high. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The physiological and developmental disorders caused are more severe than for sex chromosomes. (getrevising.co.uk)

organism

  • Polyploids are organism with more than one complete set of chromosomes e.g triploids (3n) and tetraploids (4n). (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Sex chromosomes determine the sex of an organism. (novapublishers.com)

meiosis

  • At meiosis in a female the two X chromosomes form a bivalent and separate as an autosome. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • At meiosis in the male the X and Y chromosome pair at a short pseudoautosomal region common to the tips of the chromosome. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • In humans, chromosomes that fail to experience crossovers (or exchanges) are error-prone, more likely than exchange chromosomes to mis-segregate in meiosis. (omicsonline.org)
  • MAD1 and MAD2 act in a surveillance mechanism that mediates a metaphase delay in response to nonexchange chromosomes, whereas MAD3 acts as a crucial meiotic timer, mediating a prophase delay in every meiosis. (omicsonline.org)

mechanisms

  • We used a yeast model to investigate the mechanisms that partition nonexchange chromosomes. (omicsonline.org)
  • Hormonal and sex chromosome mechanisms interact in the sex-specific control of certain diseases, sometimes by opposing the action of the other. (ahajournals.org)

gene

  • The Y chromosome actively diverts the undifferentiated gonad in the developing embryo there is evidence of a testis-determining gene. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • SRY (which stands for sex-determining region Y gene) is found on the Y chromosome. (novapublishers.com)
  • Most XX men who lack a Y chromosome do still have a copy of the SRY gene on one of their X chromosomes (moved there by chromosomal translocation). (novapublishers.com)

deleterious

  • The shift between the domains of elimination and accumulation occurs at much lower selection coefficients for the Y than for the X. In the absence of dosage compensation, mildly deleterious mutations accumulating on the Y depress male fitness, thereby providing incentives for XY recombination. (wiley.com)

mechanism

  • A dosage compensation mechanism operates to inactivate one of the X chromosomes in female cells. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Our results support the "fountain of youth" as a plausible mechanism to account for the maintenance of sex-chromosome homomorphy. (wiley.com)

determine

  • The 23rd pair of chromosomes are known as the "sex chromosomes," because they determine whether someone will be born male or female. (nyhq.org)

pair

  • Humans have 46 chromosomes but males have two that are not a pair. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • You inherit half of your chromosomes (one member of each pair) from your biological mother, and the other half (the matching member of each pair) from your biological father. (nyhq.org)
  • Scientists have numbered the chromosome pairs from 1 to 22, with the 23rd pair labeled as X's or Y's, depending on the structure. (nyhq.org)

cell

  • Human chromosomes are located inside the nucleus of the cell. (nyhq.org)
  • The usual number of chromosomes inside every cell of your body is 46 total chromosomes, or 23 pairs. (nyhq.org)
  • A human somatic cell has two sex chromosomes: XY in male and XX in female. (novapublishers.com)
  • A human germ cell has one sex chromosome: X or Y in a sperm and X in an egg. (novapublishers.com)

cause

  • Errors in meiotic chromosome segregation are the leading cause of spontaneous abortions and birth defects. (omicsonline.org)

models

  • These findings suggest plausible models for the basis of errant meiotic segregation in humans. (omicsonline.org)

copy

  • Trisomy is the appearance of three copies of a particular chromosome and monosomy is when there is only one copy of a particular chromosome. (getrevising.co.uk)

pattern

  • They show a criss-cross pattern through generations similar to the transmission of sex chromosomes. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • However, in contrast to birds and mammals (which display the predicted pattern), most cold-blooded vertebrates have homomorphic sex chromosomes. (wiley.com)

region

  • This nonrecombining sex-determining region (SDR) might later expand along the chromosome, as additional sexually antagonistic mutations appear ( Rice 1996 ). (wiley.com)

sexual

  • However, because the remainder of the Y chromosome is missing they frequently do not develop secondary sexual characteristics in the usual way. (novapublishers.com)