Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.BulgariaHealth Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.United StatesSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Great BritainWomen's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It was initially established to investigate the broad aspects of human development as a means of understanding developmental disabilities, including mental retardation, and the events that occur during pregnancy. It now conducts and supports research on all stages of human development. It was established in 1962.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.EnglandOral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Aid to Families with Dependent Children: Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.IndiaOutcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)LondonFees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.BrazilInfant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)

*  Securing a Healthy Future: The Commonwealth Fund State Scorecard on Child Health System Performance, 2011 - The Commonwealth...

Iowa contracts with private health plans to provide covered services to children enrolled in the hawk-i program, with little or ... Iowa also has expansive policies in place to ensure children have health care coverage. The State Children's Health Insurance ... investing in child health has long been a high priority for federal and state policy. This State Scorecard on Child Health ... Children's access to care, health care quality, and health outcomes vary widely across states. The Scorecard findings show that ...
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*  Signal Transduction in Child Health: Closing the Gap Between Clinical and Basic Research | Science Signaling

A report on the third NICHe Conference, "New Inroads to Child Health-Child Health and Signal Transduction," Varberg, Sweden, 21 ... The NICHe (New Inroads to Child Health) Conference series focuses on future directions in child health, by bringing together ... Thus, understanding the mechanisms of disease onset and progression in children is vital not only for child health, but for ... Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.. *. 4Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Meyer Children's ...
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*  Find a CMHO Centre in Your Community - Children's Mental Health Ontario

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*  Family & Children's Service of Ithaca | Planned Giving

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*  Centre for Community Child Health : Consultancy

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*  Find a CMHO Centre in Your Community - Children's Mental Health Ontario

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*  TN. Department of Children's Services Volunteer Opportunities - VolunteerMatch

Department of Children's Services volunteering opportunities at VolunteerMatch! ... a Children's Services Sergeant, three Children's Services Corporals, seven Children's Services. ... Department of Children's Services TN. Department of Children's Services Mission Statement. The mission of the O & A Center is ... HEALTH ASSESSMENT. § EPSD & T medical screening. § Dental evaluation § Other medical services, as needed. ...
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*  Children'S Healthcare Of Atlanta Perioperative Tech - PRN - Egleston in Atlanta, GA

Function: Allied Health - Surgical Services. Overview:. Children's Healthcare of Atlanta has been 100 percent dedicated to kids ... Children's offers access to more than 60 pediatric specialties and programs and is ranked among the top children's hospitals in ... With 3 hospitals, 27 neighborhood locations and a total of 622 beds, Children's is the largest healthcare provider for children ... A not-for-profit organization, Children's is dedicated to making kids better today and healthier tomorrow. ...
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*  Child Health Services-Dental Program Volunteer Opportunities - VolunteerMatch

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*  Is Your Child Sick | Pediatric Online Children's Health Information | San Diego, CA | Sea Breeze Pediatrics

Live Agent Answering Service, Digital Answering Service, Medical Answering Service and Pediatric Answering Service. ... Scalp Hematoma. The most common cause of a lump on the head is a scalp hematoma (goose egg). In a child under 2 years of age ... And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.. Disclaimer: This information ... When we make our technology or services available to business partners, we will not share with them any more consumer ...
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*  Find a CMHO Centre in Your Community - Children's Mental Health Ontario

Huron House Boys Home (Youth Services of Lambton County Inc.) Main Location ... The State of Mental Health Care in Ontario. *Improving Mental Health Care for Children and Youth*CMHO's Latest Work*Annual ... The State of Mental Health Care in Ontario. *Improving Mental Health Care for Children and Youth*CMHO's Latest Work*Annual ... To find a Children's Mental Health Centre near you, click here.. If you are in a crisis, please call 911 or go to your nearest ...
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*  Maternal and child health services for all families

... services is provided in the Andrews Labor Government's 2016/17 Victorian Budget. Minister ... A record investment in Victorian Maternal and Child Health (MCH) ... Maternal and child health services for all families. Posted by ... 130 million to continue providing high-quality maternal and child health services and meet the needs of a growing population ... A record investment in Victorian Maternal and Child Health (MCH) services is provided in the Andrews Labor Government's 2016/17 ...
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*  Centre for Community Child Health : About us

... the organisation of clinical services, professional practice with children and families, and community development ... Established in 1994, the Centre for Community Child Health at The Royal Children's Hospital and the Murdoch Children's Research ... improve health and development outcomes for all Australian children. *advance equitable health and development outcomes for our ... At the Centre for Community Child Health, we want the best possible outcomes for children, families and communities. We know ...
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*  Parenting and Child Health - Services - Multicultural

All Child and Family Health Services are free and statewide. They are provided by qualified nurses, medical staff, social ... If clients have difficulty speaking English, and would like the assistance of an interpreter, Child and Family Health Services ... For some cultural groups, such as Sudanese and Vietnamese families, Child and Family Health Services employs bi-lingual ... The Women's and Children's Health Network works closely with other agencies to ensure new arrival families are aware of what ...
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*  Children's Health | Presbyterian Healthcare Services

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*  Parenting and Child Health - Services - Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening

The Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program (UNHS) is a statewide service coordinated by the Women's and Children's Health ... The Child and Family Health nurse will refer the child to the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program for further ... If a pass results is not obtained in one or both ears, a second AABR will be offered by your local Child and Family Health ... working with service partners to maintain and improve service delivery. *providing education, training and ongoing development ...
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*  Ascent Children's Health Service - 1 on bigsight

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*  Children's Health & Pediatric Services NYC | Mount Sinai - New York

... with personalized treatment plans designed to meet your child's specific needs. ... Pediatricians at the Mount Sinai Health System, located throughout New York City, offer family-centered care, ... Adolescent Health We offer comprehensive, integrated medical and mental health services and prevention education for ages 10 to ... The Mount Sinai Health System offers family-centered care, with personalized treatment plans designed to meet your child's ...
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*  Children's Health & Resource Fair - Family Services Greater Vancouver

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fsgv.ca/whats-new/childrens-health-resource-fair/

*  New Zealand's Maternity and Child Health Services: Preconception to 6 years | Ministry of Health NZ

Chart showing the core publicly funded health services available to New Zealand families from preconception to six years of age ... Home > Our work > Life stages > Child health > New Zealand's Maternity and Child Health Services: Preconception to 6 years ... Services may be funded directly by the Ministry of Health or funded through DHBs or PHOs. While most universal and targeted ... This chart shows the core publicly funded health services available to New Zealand families from preconception to six years of ...
health.govt.nz/our-work/life-stages/child-health/new-zealands-maternity-and-child-health-services-preconception-6-years

*  Wimmera municipalities investigate sharing maternal, child health services | The Wimmera Mail-Times

WIMMERA municipalities are investigating a proposal for shared relieving maternal and child health services. ... environmental health services and maternal and child health," he said.. Horsham-based maternal and child-health nurse Virginia ... Wimmera municipalities investigate sharing maternal, child health services EMMA D'AGOSTINO. 11 Jul 2014, 1 a.m. ... WIMMERA municipalities are investigating a proposal for shared relieving maternal and child health services. ...
mailtimes.com.au/story/2410985/wimmera-municipalities-investigate-sharing-maternal-child-health-services/?src=rss

*  Teen Health Services - Children's National Health System

... mental health, and other health concerns important for adolescents. ... Children's National provides outreach and education to DC-area teens on sexual health, ... Copyright Children's National Health System 2017 Children's National Health System, based in Washington, DC, is Magnet® ... Our health educators are available to lead on-site, interactive workshops at local schools, houses of worship, and youth ...
https://childrensnational.org/advocacy-and-outreach/in-the-community/other-community-programs/teen-health-services

*  Related Care Services - Children's National Health System

Pediatric specialists at Children's National work closely to ensure an integrated approach to caring for each child and family. ... Copyright Children's National Health System 2017 Children's National Health System, based in Washington, DC, is Magnet® ... The Neurobehavior Program is a subspecialty service of Children's Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine, which ... To treat your child's epilepsy, our program offers a complete range of individualized care plans - from minimally invasive ...
https://childrensnational.org/departments/epilepsy-neurophysiology-and-critical-care-neurology/related-care-services

*  Related Care Services - Children's National Health System

Pediatric specialists at Children's National work closely to ensure an integrated approach to caring for each child and family. ... Copyright Children's National Health System 2017 Children's National Health System, based in Washington, DC, is Magnet® ... The pediatric heart experts at Children's National in Washington, DC, provide advanced care for unborn babies, children and ... the Children's National top-ranked team assists in coordinating every service you and your baby need, including consultations, ...
https://childrensnational.org/departments/critical-care-medicine/related-care-services

*  Is the Hepatitis Vaccine Safe? My Story | What to Expect

... vaccinate my child or not? The side effects range from none to death. A child's death or other serious side effects is a ... I can't say with confidence which type of hepatitis infected me since my health records are long gone; however, chances are it ... use information about your visits to this Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services ... When she's not writing, she loves to cook and chase after her two kids who help her admire the small everyday things that make ...
https://whattoexpect.com/wom/toddler/is-the-hepatitis-vaccine-safe--my-story.aspx

Maternal Health Task ForceHinduism in Bulgaria: Hinduism is a minor religion in Bulgaria.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Global Health Delivery ProjectPublic Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Comprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Society for Education Action and Research in Community Health: Searching}}Health policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Halfdan T. MahlerLifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Community mental health service: Community mental health services (CMHS), also known as Community Mental Health Teams (CMHT) in the United Kingdom, support or treat people with mental disorders (mental illness or mental health difficulties) in a domiciliary setting, instead of a psychiatric hospital (asylum). The array of community mental health services vary depending on the country in which the services are provided.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Basic Occupational Health Services: The Basic Occupational Health Services are an application of the primary health care principles in the sector of occupational health. Primary health care definition can be found in the World Health Organization Alma Ata declaration from the year 1978 as the “essential health care based on practical scientifically sound and socially accepted methods, (…) it is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work (…)”.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.United States Public Health ServiceAging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Jennifer Lippincott-SchwartzBehavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Parent structure: In IUPAC nomenclature, a parent structure, parent compound, parent name or simply parent is the denotation for a compound consisting of an unbranched chain of skeletal atoms (not necessarily carbon), or consisting of an unsubstituted monocyclic or polycyclic ring system.Mental disorderRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board: The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) is a non-profit tribal advisory organization in Portland, Oregon, run and organized by participating tribes. It was established in 1972 to focus on four areas as they pertain to the health of Native people: health promotion and disease prevention, legislative and policy analysis, training and technical assistance, and surveillance and research.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Standard evaluation frameworkMuskoka Initiative: The Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health is a funding initiative announced at the 36th G8 summit which commits member nations to collectively spend an additional $5 billion between 2010 and 2015 to accelerate progress toward the achievement of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, the reduction of maternal, infant and child mortality in developing countries. A second summit on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health was held in Toronto from May 28-30, 2014 in follow-up to the original 36th G8 summit.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Sharon Regional Health System: Sharon Regional Health System is a profit health care service provider based in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Its main hospital is located in Sharon; additionally, the health system operates schools of nursing and radiography; a comprehensive pain management center across the street from its main hospital; clinics in nearby Mercer, Greenville, Hermitage, and Brookfield, Ohio; and Sharon Regional Medical Park in Hermitage.British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases: The British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases is a system of diagnostic codes used for pediatrics.Mothers TalkResource leak: In computer science, a resource leak is a particular type of resource consumption by a computer program where the program does not release resources it has acquired. This condition is normally the result of a bug in a program.Minati SenWHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Mallow General Hospital: Mallow General Hospital is a public hospital located in Mallow, County Cork, Ireland.http://www.Healthy community design: Healthy community design is planning and designing communities that make it easier for people to live healthy lives. Healthy community design offers important benefits:

(1/1477) Screening for congenital heart malformation in child health centres.

BACKGROUND: Although screening for congenital heart malformations is part of the child health care programme in several countries, there are very few published evaluations of these activities. This report is concerned with the evaluation of this screening at the Dutch Child Health Centres (CHC). METHODS: All consecutive patients, aged between 32 days and 4 years, presented at the Sophia Children's Hospital Rotterdam throughout a period of 2 years, with a congenital heart malformation were included in this study. Paediatric cardiologists established whether or not these patients were diagnosed after haemodynamic complications had already developed (diagnosed 'too late'). Parents and CHC-physicians were interviewed in order to establish the screening and detection history. Test properties were established for all patients with a congenital heart malformation (n = 290), intended effects of screening were established in patients with clinically significant malformations (n = 82). RESULTS: The sensitivity of the actual screening programme was 0.57 (95% CI : 0.51-0.62), the specificity 0.985 (95% CI : 0.981-0.990) and the predictive value of a positive test result 0.13 (95% CI: 0.10-0.19). Sensitivity in a subpopulation of patients adequately screened was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74-0.96). Adequately screened patients were less likely to be diagnosed 'too late' than inadequately screened patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.04-1.05). The actual risk of being diagnosed 'too late' in the study-population (48%) was only slightly less than the estimated risk for patients not exposed to CHC-screening (58%, 95% CI: 43%-72%). Adequately screened patients however were at considerably less risk (17%, 95% CI: 4%-48%). CONCLUSION: Screening for congenital heart malformations in CHC contributes to the timely detection of these disorders. The actual yield, however, is far from optimal, and the screening programme should be improved.  (+info)

(2/1477) Developmental and paediatric care of the pre-school child.

Through an Upjohn Travelling Fellowship I visited 27 experts in childcare and sought their opinions on the privileges, possibilities, and problems in organising developmental and paediatric care for pre-school children in the United Kingdom.The role of the general practitioner was seen by many of the experts clearly. How he is to play it is shrouded in uncertainty. Research is urgently needed both on the tools of surveillance and on the different methods of arranging care.  (+info)

(3/1477) Health needs of preschool children.

An epidemiological study of disease in a geographically identified population of 250 children is reported. 22% had not seen their general practitioner (GP) at all in the past year, while 20% had seen him four times or more. The vast majority of these visits were because of an infective illness; and developmental and behavioural problems were rarely presented to GPs. 53% of children had not been to hospital since birth, but 11% had been at least four times. Respiratory infections and middle ear disease were the commonest illness reported, and nearly 3% had an infected or discharging ear at the time of examination. 15% of 3 year olds had speech and language problems. 18% of children over 2 years were thought by the examiners to have a behavioural problem, half being assessed as mild, the remainder as moderate or severe.  (+info)

(4/1477) Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist to screen for psychosocial problems in pediatric primary care: a national feasibility study.

BACKGROUND: Routine use of a brief psychosocial screening instrument has been proposed as a means of improving recognition, management, and referral of children's psychosocial morbidity in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of routine psychosocial screening using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) in pediatrics by using a brief version of the checklist in a large sample representative of the full range of pediatric practice settings in the United States and Canada. We evaluated large-scale screening and the performance of the PSC in detecting psychosocial problems by (1) determining whether the prevalence of psychosocial dysfunction identified by the PSC was consistent with findings in previous, smaller samples; (2) assessing whether the prevalence of positive PSC screening scores varied by population subgroups; and (3) determining whether the PSC was completed by a significant proportion of parents from all subgroups and settings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one thousand sixty-five children between the ages of 4 and 15 years were seen in 2 large primary care networks: the Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network and the Pediatric Research in Office Settings network, involving 395 pediatric and family practice clinicians in 44 states, Puerto Rico, and 4 Canadian provinces. Parents were asked to complete a brief questionnaire that included demographic information, history of mental health services, the 35-item PSC, and the number of pediatric visits within the past 6 months. RESULTS: The overall prevalence rates of psychosocial dysfunction as measured by the PSC in school-aged and preschool-aged pediatric outpatients (13% and 10%, respectively) were nearly identical to the rates that had been reported in several smaller samples (12%-14% among school-aged children and 7%-14% among preschoolers). Consistent with previous findings, children from low-income families were twice as likely to be scored as dysfunctional on the PSC than were children from higher-income families. Similarly, children from single-parent as opposed to those from 2-parent families and children with a past history of mental health services showed an elevated risk of psychosocial impairment. The current study was the first to demonstrate a 50% increase in risk of impairment for male children. The overall rate of completed forms was 97%, well within an acceptable range, and at least 94% of the parents in each sociodemographic subgroup completed the PSC form. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the PSC offers an approach to the recognition of psychosocial dysfunction that is sufficiently consistent across groups and locales to become part of comprehensive pediatric care in virtually all outpatient settings. In addition to its clinical utility, the consistency and widespread acceptability of the PSC make it well suited for the next generation of pediatric mental health services research, which can address whether earlier recognition of and intervention for psychosocial problems in pediatrics will lead to cost-effective outcomes.  (+info)

(5/1477) Challenges in securing access to care for children.

Congressional approval of Title XXI of the Social Security Act, which created the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), is a significant public effort to expand health insurance to children. Experience with the Medicaid program suggests that eligibility does not guarantee children's enrollment or their access to needed services. This paper develops an analytic framework and presents potential indicators to evaluate CHIP's performance and its impact on access, defined broadly to include access to health insurance and access to health services. It also presents options for moving beyond minimal monitoring to an evaluation strategy that would help to improve program outcomes. The policy considerations associated with such a strategy are also discussed.  (+info)

(6/1477) Lot quality assurance sampling for monitoring immunization programmes: cost-efficient or quick and dirty?

In recent years Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS), a method derived from production-line industry, has been advocated as an efficient means to evaluate the coverage rates achieved by child immunization programmes. This paper examines the assumptions on which LQAS is based and the effect that these assumptions have on its utility as a management tool. It shows that the attractively low sample sizes used in LQAS are achieved at the expense of specificity unless unrealistic assumptions are made about the distribution of coverage rates amongst the immunization programmes to which the method is applied. Although it is a very sensitive test and its negative predictive value is probably high in most settings, its specificity and positive predictive value are likely to be low. The implications of these strengths and weaknesses with regard to management decision-making are discussed.  (+info)

(7/1477) Paediatric home care in Tower Hamlets: a working partnership with parents.

OBJECTIVES: To describe the first two years of a paediatric home care service. DESIGN: Observational cross sectional study, 1989-91. SETTING: One inner London health district. PATIENTS: 611 children referred to the service; 50 children selected from those referred during the first year, whose parents were interviewed and whose general practitioners were invited to complete a questionnaire. MAIN MEASURES: Description and costs of service; views of parents and general practitioners of selected sample of children. RESULTS: In its second year the team received 303 referrals and made 4004 visits at a salary cost of 98000 pounds, an average of 323 pounds/referral and 24 pounds/visit. This represented a referral rate of 3.2% (258/7939) of inpatient episodes from the main referring hospital between 1 December 1989 and 30 November 1990. Of all referrals to the service, 343(56%) came from hospital inpatient wards. The service was used by disadvantaged and ethnic minority families. The children's parents (in 28(61%) families) and the home care team did a wide range of nursing tasks in the home. Parents of 47(94%) children sampled agreed to be interviewed, and those of 43(91%) found the service useful; guidance and support were most commonly appreciated (33, 70%). Parents of 25(53%) children said that hospital stay or attendance had been reduced or avoided. Parents and general practitioners disagreed on clinical responsibility in 10 children, and communication was a problem for some general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: The service enabled children to receive advanced nursing care at home. Clinical responsibility should be agreed between parents and professionals at referral.  (+info)

(8/1477) Sending parents outpatient letters about their children: parents' and general practitioners' views.

Parents' cooperation is essential to ensuring implementation of effective healthcare management of children, and complete openness should exist between paediatricians and parents. One method of achieving this is to send parents a copy of the outpatient letter to the general practitioner (GP) after the child's outpatient consultation. To determine the views of parents and GPs a pilot survey was conducted in two general children's outpatient clinics in hospitals in Newcastle upon Tyne. In March and April 1991 a postal questionnaire was sent to 57 parents of children attending the clinics, and a similar questionnaire to their GPs to elicit, respectively, parents' understanding of the letter and perception of its helpfulness, and GPs' views on the value of sending the letters to parents. Completed questionnaires were received from 34(60%) parents and 47(82%) GPs; 26(45%) respondents were matched pairs. 27(79%) parents said they understood all of the letter, 19(56%) that it helped their understanding, 32(94%) felt it was a good idea, and 31(91%) made positive comments. In all, 29(61%) GPs favoured the idea and six (13%) did not. Eleven (23%) said they would be concerned if this became routine practice, and 20(74%) of the 27 providing comments were doubtful or negative; several considered that they should communicate information to parents. The views in the matched pairs were dissimilar: parents were universally in favour whereas many GPs had reservations. The authors concluded that sending the letters improved parents' satisfaction with communication, and they recommend that paediatricians consider adopting this practice.  (+info)



Women's and Children's Health Network


  • The Women's and Children's Health Network works closely with other agencies to ensure new arrival families are aware of what support is available and how to access services. (cyh.com)
  • The Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program (UNHS) is a statewide service coordinated by the Women's and Children's Health Network in South Australia. (cyh.com)

maternal and child-health nurse


  • Horsham-based maternal and child-health nurse Virginia Butcher said she and her colleagues had long seen a need to improve nurse relieving arrangements. (mailtimes.com.au)
  • The funding means all Victorian families can continue to have access to a highly qualified maternal and child health nurse, who provides support for a child's health, learning and development, from birth until they go to school. (theindianweekly.com.au)

Children's National Health System


  • Children's National Health System, based in Washington, DC, is Magnet ® designated and is consistently ranked among the top pediatric hospitals. (childrensnational.org)
  • Washington, DC - Children's National Health System honored prominent local government officials, business executives, community leaders, and organizations for their advocacy on behalf of children's health, at a private event at the hospital on December 7. (childrensnational.org)
  • The event brings together members of the Children's National Health System governing boards, auxiliary boards, faculty, and management. (childrensnational.org)
  • Children's National Health System, based in Washington, DC, has been serving the nation's children since 1870. (childrensnational.org)

infants


  • The Dental Program is a health promotion and disease prevention program serving infants, children, and teens of San Mateo County. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Pediatrics is a primary care specialty focused on the physical, mental, and social health and well being of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. (phs.org)
  • Pediatric ear, nose and throat (ENT) is a specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and medical treatment of the ear, nose, throat, and related structures of the head and neck in infants, children, and adolescents. (phs.org)
  • Pediatric endocrinology is a specialty concerned with the endocrine systems of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. (phs.org)
  • Pediatric gastroenterology is a specialty devoted to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver as they affect infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. (phs.org)
  • The specialty of pediatric hematology/oncology is devoted to the therapy and treatment of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults with a wide range of congenital and acquired blood disorders and cancers. (phs.org)
  • Pediatric neurology is a specialty focused on caring for infants, children, and adolescents with diseases of the brain and nervous system. (phs.org)
  • The pediatric surgery specialty provides comprehensive care by board-certified pediatric surgeons specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of elective and urgent surgical problems in infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. (phs.org)
  • To provide best practice in newborn hearing screening through a specialised statewide service, ensuring all infants with significant permanent hearing loss are identified and actively involved in family focused intervention. (cyh.com)
  • While an infant hearing screening program was operating in Victoria from 1992, this program focused on providing detection and intervention strategies for high risk infants before the age of one year, rather than universal hearing screening services at birth. (cyh.com)
  • Our flagship facility, Kravis Children's Hospital at Mount Sinai provides state-of-the-art diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care to infants, children, and adolescents. (mountsinai.org)

nurse


  • If a pass results is not obtained in one or both ears, a second AABR will be offered by your local Child and Family Health Nurse. (cyh.com)
  • The Child and Family Health nurse will refer the child to the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program for further assessment. (cyh.com)

prevention


  • We offer comprehensive, integrated medical and mental health services and prevention education for ages 10 to 22. (mountsinai.org)
  • Through our clinics and out in the community, our Adolescent Prevention Education Programs (APEP) help teens get the knowledge and life skills they need to live healthy lives.The programs also help our community partners and other health professionals learn to communicate with and serve youth more effectively. (childrensnational.org)
  • This includes targeted prevention, early intervention, short- and long-term counselling and therapy, and intensive services such as residential care. (kidsmentalhealth.ca)
  • A resource to assist Maternal and Child Health Nurses in their health promotion, prevention, early detection and intervention role. (dhsv.org.au)

pediatric


  • Learn more about our pediatric services and find an experienced physician and clinic near you. (phs.org)
  • The Pediatric Chronic Care Clinic works with children who have chronic or complex medical problems and often need to see a variety of specialists. (phs.org)
  • In addition, our alliance with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia gives children in the New York metropolitan area access to an unprecedented scope of pediatric services from pediatric oncology and cardiac care to fetal medicine. (mountsinai.org)
  • The pediatric heart experts at Children's National in Washington, DC, provide advanced care for unborn babies, children and young adults with heart conditions. (childrensnational.org)
  • Designated a Leapfrog Group Top Hospital and a two-time recipient of Magnet® status, this pediatric academic health system offers expert care through a convenient, community-based primary care network and specialty outpatient centers. (childrensnational.org)
  • Children's National is recognized for its expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as a strong voice for children through advocacy at the local, regional and national levels. (childrensnational.org)

outcomes


  • The Maternal and Child Health Service plays a critical role in promoting healthy outcomes for children, including oral health. (dhsv.org.au)
  • DHS is focusing on strategies to reduce disparities in service access and outcomes for racial and ethnic populations. (mn.gov)

statewide


  • All Child and Family Health Services are free and statewide. (cyh.com)

Victorian


  • Healthy Families, Healthy Smiles is a Dental Health Services Victoria initiative aimed at improving the oral health of Victorian children aged 0-3 years and pregnant women. (dhsv.org.au)
  • A record investment in Victorian Maternal and Child Health (MCH) services is provided in the Andrews Labor Government's 2016/17 Victorian Budget. (theindianweekly.com.au)
  • It noted the critical role of MCH services in identifying and responding to family violence as they see every Victorian family after the birth of a child. (theindianweekly.com.au)

families


  • For some cultural groups, such as Sudanese and Vietnamese families, Child and Family Health Services employs bi-lingual community educators who can work directly with families in their own language and in culturally appropriate ways. (cyh.com)
  • Learn more about the Children's Center at Presbyterian, New Mexico's trusted resource for comprehensive, specialized health care for children and their families. (phs.org)
  • This chart shows the core publicly funded health services available to New Zealand families from preconception to six years of age. (health.govt.nz)
  • While most universal and targeted services are accessible to eligible families free of charge, some services incur co-payments or fees. (health.govt.nz)
  • Targeted (including specialist) services are generally accessed by families following assessment and referral from a universal service provider, although some services such as hospital emergency departments are also accessed by families directly. (health.govt.nz)
  • CMHO's nearly 100 member organizations operate in every region of the province, providing treatment and support to children, youth and families. (kidsmentalhealth.ca)
  • Mayor Bowser praised Children's commitment to caring for the health and well-being of Washington, DC families. (childrensnational.org)
  • Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos announced an investment of $133 million. (theindianweekly.com.au)
  • Enhanced MCH services will continue, specifically targeting families at risk of family violence, social isolation and mental health issues. (theindianweekly.com.au)
  • The new service will involve MCH nurses working with social workers and other professionals so that the right help will come as soon as families need it. (theindianweekly.com.au)
  • The Budget includes $1.6 million to work with Aboriginal communities to design more culturally responsive and high-quality MCH services and intensive in-home support for Aboriginal families. (theindianweekly.com.au)

maternity


  • Western Australia was the first Australian state to trial universal newborn hearing screening, gradually introducing screening services across maternity hospitals in Perth in 2000. (cyh.com)
  • These universal (available to everybody) and targeted services (based on need) are delivered by a wide range of providers, including GPs and other primary care practitioners, lead maternity carers, well child nurses, kaiawhina, screeners, public health nurses and hospital based clinicians. (health.govt.nz)

ORGANIZATION


  • Please note that our organization does not directly provide mental health services. (kidsmentalhealth.ca)

initiative


  • The Budget also includes $32.3 million for the development of a new, intensive in-home early childhood support service, implementing a key Roadmap initiative. (theindianweekly.com.au)

educators


  • Our health educators are available to lead on-site, interactive workshops at local schools, houses of worship, and youth service agencies. (childrensnational.org)

Minister


  • A National Newborn Hearing Screening Committee was formed in 2004 to lobby the Commonwealth Government for permanent newborn hearing screening programs to be implemented across Australia, and in the same year the South Australian Minister for Health announced that the UNHS Program would be permanently funded and implemented across the state by the end of 2005. (cyh.com)

System


  • The Mount Sinai Health System offers family-centered care, with personalized treatment plans designed to meet your child's specific needs. (mountsinai.org)
  • We provide individualized, family-centered care to children with a wide range of endocrine system needs. (mountsinai.org)
  • Also recognized were two Children's National employees with 50 and 55 years of service, respectively, as well as a number of recently retired physicians long associated with the health system. (childrensnational.org)
  • This comes in addition to key initiatives outlined in the Roadmap for Reform, announced earlier this month as a significant overhaul of the child protection system and in response to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Family Violence. (theindianweekly.com.au)

intervention


  • If the baby is found to have a hearing loss, they will be referred to the appropriate specialist and intervention services. (cyh.com)

provide


  • We provide multidisciplinary care to children with complex developmental-behavioral disorders. (mountsinai.org)
  • We provide effective, life-saving treatment to children with blood diseases and other types of cancer. (mountsinai.org)
  • If the region's councils can work together to jointly provide a service, that will work a lot better than if we individually try to provide them. (mailtimes.com.au)

Program


  • Would you recommend Child Health Services-Dental Program? (volunteermatch.org)
  • This program helps teens develop the life skills to responsibly manage everything from their health to their relationships to their money. (childrensnational.org)
  • The Neurobehavior Program is a subspecialty service of Children's Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine, which focuses upon evaluation and management of behavioral effects associated with neurologic illness. (childrensnational.org)
  • The Neuromuscular Medicine Program leverages the expertise of a multidisciplinary teams, cutting-edge research and innovative technologies to care for a spectrum of neuromuscular conditions affecting children from infancy to age 21. (childrensnational.org)
  • The program also provides parenting support and referrals to other services. (theindianweekly.com.au)

access


  • These social and economic disadvantages can adversely affect certain cultures or communities and result in gaps for children being able to access mental health care and realize successful results. (mn.gov)

Emergency


  • Whether your infant has arrived prematurely or has a critical illness, the Children's National top-ranked team assists in coordinating every service you and your baby need, including consultations, assessments, emergency treatments and continuing care. (childrensnational.org)

care for children


  • We specialize in family-centered care for children with kidney disease, high blood pressure, urinary tract infections, and related conditions. (mountsinai.org)

Resources


  • Community resources: health, literacy, child emotional and social development, school information and information on childcare. (fsgv.ca)
  • The information below provides an overview of some of the programs and resources available to maternal and child health nurses to support their work in promoting good oral health in early childhood. (dhsv.org.au)

available


  • If clients have difficulty speaking English, and would like the assistance of an interpreter, Child and Family Health Services is able to ensure one is available, free of charge. (cyh.com)
  • With preventive and sick care available on an outpatient or inpatient basis, we are available 24 hours a day for you and your child. (mountsinai.org)

Teen Health


  • TASA members educate their peers, parents, and health professionals about HIV, sexuality, violence, and other important teen health concerns through interactive workshops. (childrensnational.org)

find


  • How can you find reliable, accurate health information? (phs.org)
  • To find a Children's Mental Health Centre near you, click here . (kidsmentalhealth.ca)

Learn


  • Select a children's health service below to learn more about how Presbyterian can help connect you to the physicians, nurses, providers, centers, clinics, and hospitals you need. (phs.org)
  • Come learn about preparing your child for school. (fsgv.ca)

practice


  • It is part of the Commonwealth Healthy Kids Check, and is included in the RACGP Guidelines for Clinical Preventative Activities in GP Practice as part of the general physical examination of children. (dhsv.org.au)

Supports


  • Supports delivery of the oral health components of the Key Ages and Stages framework. (dhsv.org.au)
  • The Minnesota Department of Human Services ("Department") supports the use of "People First" language. (mn.gov)

education


  • We believe health education for teens can be critical not only in helping them make responsible decisions about their health, but in smoothing their transition into adulthood. (childrensnational.org)

mental health


  • This includes overcoming the barriers causing disparities in the accessibility, affordability, availability, cultural appropriateness and quality of mental health services. (mn.gov)
  • Stigma, cultural differences, income and insurance issues, as well as other reasons, lessen the likelihood that some children and youth will receive the care needed for their mental health concerns. (mn.gov)

conditions


  • We diagnose and treat children with all kinds of serious or recurrent infections and related conditions, from Lyme disease to tuberculosis to HIV. (mountsinai.org)

directly


  • Services may be funded directly by the Ministry of Health or funded through DHBs or PHOs. (health.govt.nz)

manage


  • Presbyterian's secure online patient and member portal makes it easy for you to manage your health, and your family's health. (phs.org)
  • We manage common and complex disorders in children, from ear infections to hearing loss. (mountsinai.org)

checks


  • In the first few weeks of life your baby will have several routine health checks. (cyh.com)

wide range


  • Our expert practitioners are highly skilled in diagnosing and treating a wide range of digestive and liver disorders that affect children. (mountsinai.org)