Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27: A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that coordinates the activation of CYCLIN and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES during the CELL CYCLE. It interacts with active CYCLIN D complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 in proliferating cells, while in arrested cells it binds and inhibits CYCLIN E complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2.Cyclin D: A cyclin subtype that is specific for CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 6. Unlike most cyclins, cyclin D expression is not cyclical, but rather it is expressed in response to proliferative signals. Cyclin D may therefore play a role in cellular responses to mitogenic signals.Cyclins: A large family of regulatory proteins that function as accessory subunits to a variety of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. They generally function as ENZYME ACTIVATORS that drive the CELL CYCLE through transitions between phases. A subset of cyclins may also function as transcriptional regulators.Cyclin D1: Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.Cyclin-Dependent Kinases: Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4: Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is a key regulator of G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It partners with CYCLIN D to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. CDK4 activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21: A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.Cyclin D2: A cyclin D subtype which is regulated by GATA4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D2 in granulosa cell proliferation and gonadal development.G1 Phase: The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.Retinoblastoma Protein: Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1A protein, the SV40 T antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.Cyclin B1: A cyclin B subtype that colocalizes with MICROTUBULES during INTERPHASE and is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE.Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen: Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Cyclin B: A cyclin subtype that is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE. It stimulates the G2/M phase transition by activating CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Cyclin E: A 50-kDa protein that complexes with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2 in the late G1 phase of the cell cycle.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.S Phase: Phase of the CELL CYCLE following G1 and preceding G2 when the entire DNA content of the nucleus is replicated. It is achieved by bidirectional replication at multiple sites along each chromosome.E2F1 Transcription Factor: An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A and activates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis. E2F1 is involved in DNA REPAIR and APOPTOSIS.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2: A key regulator of CELL CYCLE progression. It partners with CYCLIN E to regulate entry into S PHASE and also interacts with CYCLIN A to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. Its activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P27 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P21.Cyclin D3: A broadly expressed type D cyclin. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D3 in LYMPHOCYTE development.Cyclin A: A cyclin subtype that has specificity for CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2. It plays a role in progression of the CELL CYCLE through G1/S and G2/M phase transitions.CDC2 Protein Kinase: Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.CDC2-CDC28 Kinases: A family of cell cycle-dependent kinases that are related in structure to CDC28 PROTEIN KINASE; S CEREVISIAE; and the CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE found in mammalian species.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cell Cycle Checkpoints: Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression through the CELL CYCLE. They ensure that the cell has completed, in the correct order and without mistakes, all the processes required to replicate the GENOME and CYTOPLASM, and divide them equally between two daughter cells. If cells sense they have not completed these processes or that the environment does not have the nutrients and growth hormones in place to proceed, then the cells are restrained (or "arrested") until the processes are completed and growth conditions are suitable.E2F Transcription Factors: A family of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that control expression of a variety of GENES involved in CELL CYCLE regulation. E2F transcription factors typically form heterodimeric complexes with TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DP1 or transcription factor DP2, and they have N-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains. E2F transcription factors can act as mediators of transcriptional repression or transcriptional activation.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Microtubule-Associated Proteins: High molecular weight proteins found in the MICROTUBULES of the cytoskeletal system. Under certain conditions they are required for TUBULIN assembly into the microtubules and stabilize the assembled microtubules.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16: A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Menstrual Cycle: The period from onset of one menstrual bleeding (MENSTRUATION) to the next in an ovulating woman or female primate. The menstrual cycle is regulated by endocrine interactions of the HYPOTHALAMUS; the PITUITARY GLAND; the ovaries; and the genital tract. The menstrual cycle is divided by OVULATION into two phases. Based on the endocrine status of the OVARY, there is a FOLLICULAR PHASE and a LUTEAL PHASE. Based on the response in the ENDOMETRIUM, the menstrual cycle is divided into a proliferative and a secretory phase.G2 Phase: The period of the CELL CYCLE following DNA synthesis (S PHASE) and preceding M PHASE (cell division phase). The CHROMOSOMES are tetraploid in this point.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.cis-trans-Isomerases: Enzymes that catalyze the rearrangement of geometry about double bonds. EC 5.2.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.G2 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints: CELL CYCLE regulatory signaling systems that are triggered by DNA DAMAGE or lack of nutrients during G2 PHASE. When triggered they restrain cells transitioning from G2 phase to M PHASE.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.G0 Phase: A quiescent state of cells during G1 PHASE.G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints: Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression of the CELL CYCLE through the G1 PHASE and allow transition to S PHASE when the cells are ready to undergo DNA REPLICATION. DNA DAMAGE, or the deficiencies in specific cellular components or nutrients may cause the cells to halt before progressing through G1 phase.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Genes, cdc: Genes that code for proteins that regulate the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. These genes form a regulatory network that culminates in the onset of MITOSIS by activating the p34cdc2 protein (PROTEIN P34CDC2).DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Interphase: The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Estrous Cycle: The period of cyclic physiological and behavior changes in non-primate female mammals that exhibit ESTRUS. The estrous cycle generally consists of 4 or 5 distinct periods corresponding to the endocrine status (PROESTRUS; ESTRUS; METESTRUS; DIESTRUS; and ANESTRUS).cdc25 Phosphatases: A subclass of dual specificity phosphatases that play a role in the progression of the CELL CYCLE. They dephosphorylate and activate CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Citric Acid Cycle: A series of oxidative reactions in the breakdown of acetyl units derived from GLUCOSE; FATTY ACIDS; or AMINO ACIDS by means of tricarboxylic acid intermediates. The end products are CARBON DIOXIDE, water, and energy in the form of phosphate bonds.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Bromodeoxyuridine: A nucleoside that substitutes for thymidine in DNA and thus acts as an antimetabolite. It causes breaks in chromosomes and has been proposed as an antiviral and antineoplastic agent. It has been given orphan drug status for use in the treatment of primary brain tumors.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints: Cell regulatory signaling system that controls progression through S PHASE and stabilizes the replication forks during conditions that could affect the fidelity of DNA REPLICATION, such as DNA DAMAGE or depletion of nucleotide pools.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Proteins: A group of cell cycle proteins that negatively regulate the activity of CYCLIN/CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE complexes. They inhibit CELL CYCLE progression and help control CELL PROLIFERATION following GENOTOXIC STRESS as well as during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Schizosaccharomyces: A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Schizosaccharomycetaceae, order Schizosaccharomycetales.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Herpesvirus 4, Human: The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.M Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints: The cellular signaling system that halts the progression of cells through MITOSIS or MEIOSIS if a defect that will affect CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION is detected.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Hydroxyurea: An antineoplastic agent that inhibits DNA synthesis through the inhibition of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Caulobacter crescentus: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that consist of slender vibroid cells.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6: Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 associates with CYCLIN D and phosphorylates RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN during G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It helps regulate the transition to S PHASE and its kinase activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P18.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Transcription Factor DP1: A transcription factor that possesses DNA-binding and E2F-binding domains but lacks a transcriptional activation domain. It is a binding partner for E2F TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and enhances the DNA binding and transactivation function of the DP-E2F complex.Mimosine: 3-Hydroxy-4-oxo-1(4H)-pyridinealanine. An antineoplastic alanine-substituted pyridine derivative isolated from Leucena glauca.Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes: Complexes of enzymes that catalyze the covalent attachment of UBIQUITIN to other proteins by forming a peptide bond between the C-terminal GLYCINE of UBIQUITIN and the alpha-amino groups of LYSINE residues in the protein. The complexes play an important role in mediating the selective-degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins. The complex of enzymes can be broken down into three components that involve activation of ubiquitin (UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYMES), conjugation of ubiquitin to the ligase complex (UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES), and ligation of ubiquitin to the substrate protein (UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES).RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 1: A ubiquitously expressed regulatory protein that contains a retinoblastoma protein binding domain and an AT-rich interactive domain. The protein may play a role in recruiting HISTONE DEACETYLASES to the site of RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN-containing transcriptional repressor complexes.Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome: An E3 ubiquitin ligase primarily involved in regulation of the metaphase-to-anaphase transition during MITOSIS through ubiquitination of specific CELL CYCLE PROTEINS. Enzyme activity is tightly regulated through subunits and cofactors, which modulate activation, inhibition, and substrate specificity. The anaphase-promoting complex, or APC-C, is also involved in tissue differentiation in the PLACENTA, CRYSTALLINE LENS, and SKELETAL MUSCLE, and in regulation of postmitotic NEURONAL PLASTICITY and excitability.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Centrosome: The cell center, consisting of a pair of CENTRIOLES surrounded by a cloud of amorphous material called the pericentriolar region. During interphase, the centrosome nucleates microtubule outgrowth. The centrosome duplicates and, during mitosis, separates to form the two poles of the mitotic spindle (MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS).Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc: Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the c-myc genes. They are normally involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Elevated and deregulated (constitutive) expression of c-myc proteins can cause tumorigenesis.Nocodazole: Nocodazole is an antineoplastic agent which exerts its effect by depolymerizing microtubules.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.3T3 Cells: Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.Cyclin A2: A widely-expressed cyclin A subtype that functions during the G1/S and G2/M transitions of the CELL CYCLE.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.CDC28 Protein Kinase, S cerevisiae: A protein kinase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC28 gene and required for progression from the G1 PHASE to the S PHASE in the CELL CYCLE.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins: A group of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES which activate critical signaling cascades in double strand breaks, APOPTOSIS, and GENOTOXIC STRESS such as ionizing ultraviolet A light, thereby acting as a DNA damage sensor. These proteins play a role in a wide range of signaling mechanisms in cell cycle control.Checkpoint Kinase 2: Enzyme activated in response to DNA DAMAGE involved in cell cycle arrest. The gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 22 at position 12.1. In humans it is encoded by the CHEK2 gene.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Caulobacter: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod- or vibroid-shaped or fusiform bacteria that commonly produce a stalk. They are found in fresh water and soil and divide by binary transverse fission.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins: A family of structurally-related proteins that were originally identified by their ability to complex with cyclin proteins (CYCLINS). They share a common domain that binds specifically to F-BOX MOTIFS. They take part in SKP CULLIN F-BOX PROTEIN LIGASES, where they can bind to a variety of F-BOX PROTEINS.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Cell Aging: The decrease in the cell's ability to proliferate with the passing of time. Each cell is programmed for a certain number of cell divisions and at the end of that time proliferation halts. The cell enters a quiescent state after which it experiences CELL DEATH via the process of APOPTOSIS.Gamma Rays: Penetrating, high-energy electromagnetic radiation emitted from atomic nuclei during NUCLEAR DECAY. The range of wavelengths of emitted radiation is between 0.1 - 100 pm which overlaps the shorter, more energetic hard X-RAYS wavelengths. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.ThymidineNeoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Aphidicolin: An antiviral antibiotic produced by Cephalosporium aphidicola and other fungi. It inhibits the growth of eukaryotic cells and certain animal viruses by selectively inhibiting the cellular replication of DNA polymerase II or the viral-induced DNA polymerases. The drug may be useful for controlling excessive cell proliferation in patients with cancer, psoriasis or other dermatitis with little or no adverse effect upon non-multiplying cells.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p57: A potent inhibitor of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES in G1 PHASE and S PHASE. In humans, aberrant expression of p57 is associated with various NEOPLASMS as well as with BECKWITH-WIEDEMANN SYNDROME.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Retinoblastoma-Like Protein p107: A negative regulator of the CELL CYCLE that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. It contains a conserved pocket region that binds E2F4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR and interacts with viral ONCOPROTEINS such as POLYOMAVIRUS TUMOR ANTIGENS; ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS; and PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 PROTEINS.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Retinoblastoma-Like Protein p130: A negative regulator of the CELL CYCLE that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. RBL2 contains a conserved pocket region that binds E2F4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR and E2F5 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR. RBL2 also interacts with viral ONCOPROTEINS such as POLYOMAVIRUS TUMOR ANTIGENS; ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS; and PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 PROTEINS.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2: Membrane proteins encoded by the BCL-2 GENES and serving as potent inhibitors of cell death by APOPTOSIS. The proteins are found on mitochondrial, microsomal, and NUCLEAR MEMBRANE sites within many cell types. Overexpression of bcl-2 proteins, due to a translocation of the gene, is associated with follicular lymphoma.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Cyclin G: A cyclin subtype that is found associated with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 5; cyclin G associated kinase, and PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Growth Inhibitors: Endogenous or exogenous substances which inhibit the normal growth of human and animal cells or micro-organisms, as distinguished from those affecting plant growth (= PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS).Genes, p53: Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.HCT116 Cells: Human COLORECTAL CARCINOMA cell line.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex: A large multisubunit complex that plays an important role in the degradation of most of the cytosolic and nuclear proteins in eukaryotic cells. It contains a 700-kDa catalytic sub-complex and two 700-kDa regulatory sub-complexes. The complex digests ubiquitinated proteins and protein activated via ornithine decarboxylase antizyme.Tubulin: A microtubule subunit protein found in large quantities in mammalian brain. It has also been isolated from SPERM FLAGELLUM; CILIA; and other sources. Structurally, the protein is a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 120,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.8S. It binds to COLCHICINE; VINCRISTINE; and VINBLASTINE.Kinetin: A furanyl adenine found in PLANTS and FUNGI. It has plant growth regulation effects.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Cell Line, Transformed: Eukaryotic cell line obtained in a quiescent or stationary phase which undergoes conversion to a state of unregulated growth in culture, resembling an in vitro tumor. It occurs spontaneously or through interaction with viruses, oncogenes, radiation, or drugs/chemicals.Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases: A diverse class of enzymes that interact with UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES and ubiquitination-specific protein substrates. Each member of this enzyme group has its own distinct specificity for a substrate and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Ubiquitin-protein ligases exist as both monomeric proteins multiprotein complexes.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Gene Knockdown Techniques: The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2: An E3 UBIQUITIN LIGASE that interacts with and inhibits TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53. Its ability to ubiquitinate p53 is regulated by TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.E2F2 Transcription Factor: An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A. E2F2 activates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit cell production of DNA or RNA.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Oncogene Proteins: Proteins coded by oncogenes. They include proteins resulting from the fusion of an oncogene and another gene (ONCOGENE PROTEINS, FUSION).Mitotic Index: An expression of the number of mitoses found in a stated number of cells.Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Geminin: Geminin inhibits DNA replication by preventing the incorporation of MCM complex into pre-replication complex. It is absent during G1 phase of the CELL CYCLE and accumulates through S, G2,and M phases. It is degraded at the metaphase-anaphase transition by the ANAPHASE-PROMOTING COMPLEX-CYCLOSOME.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Cell Growth Processes: Processes required for CELL ENLARGEMENT and CELL PROLIFERATION.Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.PhosphoproteinsEpithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Cyclin A1: A cyclin A subtype primarily found in male GERM CELLS. It may play a role in the passage of SPERMATOCYTES into meiosis I.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.

*  CDC20B - Cell division cycle protein 20 homolog B - Homo sapiens (Human) - CDC20B gene & protein

Cell division cycle protein 20 homolog BAdd BLAST. 519. Proteomic databases. PaxDb, a database of protein abundance averages ... Cluster: Cell division cycle protein 20 homolog B. 31. Q86Y33-3. F7GV04. UPI000036D148. UPI0002746305. UPI00027F8351. ... Cluster: Cell division cycle protein 20 homolog B. 125. Q86Y33-3. F7GV04. UPI00027F8351. UPI000036D148. UPI0005F3B731. ... sp,Q86Y33,CD20B_HUMAN Cell division cycle protein 20 homolog B OS=Homo sapiens GN=CDC20B PE=1 SV=3 ...

*  Expression of Cell-Cycle-regulated Proteins pRb2/p130, p107, p27kip1, p53, mdm-2, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) in Prostatic Gland...

... et al Expression of cell-cycle-associated proteins pRB2/p130 and p27/Kip1 in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas. Hum. Pathol., 32: ... which is involved in cell cycle control and cell differentiation. The RB protein is mutated or absent in a variety of human ... Expression of Cell-Cycle-regulated Proteins pRb2/p130, p107, p27kip1, p53, mdm-2, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) in Prostatic Gland ... Expression of Cell-Cycle-regulated Proteins pRb2/p130, p107, p27kip1, p53, mdm-2, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) in Prostatic Gland ...

*  Cell cycle regulatory protein | definition of Cell cycle regulatory protein by Medical dictionary

Cell cycle regulatory protein explanation free. What is Cell cycle regulatory protein? Meaning of Cell cycle regulatory protein ... Looking for online definition of Cell cycle regulatory protein in the Medical Dictionary? ... The results suggest that maslinic acid induces G1 cell cycle arrest with induction of Gl phase cell cycle regulatory proteins ... Differential effects of cell cycle regulatory protein [p21.. 4A, wild type cells exhibited increased expression of the cell ...

*  Cell cycle checkpoint protein RAD1

Component of the 9-1-1 cell-cycle checkpoint response complex that plays a major role in DNA repair. The 9-1-1 complex is ... This gene encodes a component of a heterotrimeric cell cycle checkpoint complex, known as the 9-1-1 complex, that is activated ... The DNA binding domain (DBD) within the hLigI catalytic fragment interacts with both PCNA and the heterotrimeric cell-cycle ... to stop cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage or incomplete DNA replication. The 9-1-1 complex is recruited by RAD17 ...

*  Cell-cycle-dependent association of protein phosphatase 1 and focal adhesion kinase | Biochemical Journal

Cell-cycle-dependent association of protein phosphatase 1 and focal adhesion kinase. Marco FRESU, Mariarita BIANCHI, J. Thomas ... Cell-cycle-dependent association of protein phosphatase 1 and focal adhesion kinase ... Cell-cycle-dependent association of protein phosphatase 1 and focal adhesion kinase ... Cell-cycle-dependent association of protein phosphatase 1 and focal adhesion kinase ...

*  Compensatory Stabilization of RIIβ Protein, Cell Cycle Deregulation, and Growth Arrest in Colon and Prostate Carcinoma Cells by...

B, cell cycle analysis. In an attempt to synchronize a homogeneous cell population at a particular cell cycle phase, untreated ... Cell Cycle Analysis of LS-174T Cells.. Fixed cells were treated with 1 mg/ml RNase (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO) for 30 ... Compensatory Stabilization of RIIβ Protein, Cell Cycle Deregulation, and Growth Arrest in Colon and Prostate Carcinoma Cells by ... Compensatory Stabilization of RIIβ Protein, Cell Cycle Deregulation, and Growth Arrest in Colon and Prostate Carcinoma Cells by ...

*  Cell division cycle-associated protein 2

This gene encodes a targeting subunit of the cell-cycle associated protein, protein phosphatase 1, with a role in targeting ... and might be associated with OSCC progression by preventing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis.. ... These two proteins comprise a phosphatase complex that is involved in nuclear envelope reformation and regulation of the DNA ... The encoded protein may also play a role in cancer progression. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants. [ ...

*  LAP2α-binding protein LINT-25 is a novel chromatin-associated protein involved in cell cycle exit | Journal of Cell Science

LINT-25 protein levels change during the cell cycle of proliferating cells. (A) BJ1 cells at different phases of the cell cycle ... Despite the cell cycle-inhibiting activity of LAP2α, the protein is highly expressed in proliferating cells, but it is ... LINT-25 protein levels were upregulated during G1 phase in proliferating cells and upon cell cycle exit in quiescence, ... Again, we detected a decrease of LINT-25 protein level upon exit from the cell cycle block, while LAP2α protein levels remained ...

*  Irradiation-induced protein inactivation reveals Golgi enzyme cycling to cell periphery | Journal of Cell Science

Irradiation-induced protein inactivation reveals Golgi enzyme cycling to cell periphery Message Subject (Your Name) has sent ... 2001). The GM130 and GRASP65 Golgi proteins cycle through and define a subdomain of the intermediate compartment. Nat. Cell ... 2001). Evidence that the entire Golgi apparatus cycles in interphase HeLa cells: sensitivity of Golgi matrix proteins to an ER ... 1989). Rapid redistribution of Golgi proteins into the ER in cells treated with brefeldin A: evidence for membrane cycling from ...

*  Control of fingertip forces in young and older adults pressing against fixed low- and high-friction surfaces.

Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Female. Fingers / physiology*. Friction / physiology*. Hand Strength / physiology. Humans. ... 0/Autoantigens; 0/Cell Cycle Proteins; 0/PCM1 protein, human Comments/Corrections. ...

*  Three-dimensional cell growth confers radioresistance by chromatin density modification.

... and tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. To evaluate the role of chromatin ... Cell shape and architecture are determined by cell-extracellular matrix interactions and have profound effects on cellular ... Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism, pathology. Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Cell Shape. ... 0/Cell Cycle Proteins; 0/Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0/DNA-Binding Proteins; 0/Euchromatin; 0/Heterochromatin; 0/ ...

*  Three proteins required for early steps in the protein secretory pathway also affect nuclear envelope structure and cell cycle...

A general defect in protein secretion is not sufficient to cause a cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. If the cell cycle arrest ... protein glycosylation affects cell cycle progression and a number of genes required for protein glycosylation have cell cycle ... This cell cycle block is not due simply to a proliferation of ER membrane or to an inability to secrete proteins from the cell ... Three proteins required for early steps in the protein secretory pathway also affect nuclear envelope structure and cell cycle ...

*  Reimagining Alzheimer's Disease-An Age-Based Hypothesis | Journal of Neuroscience

1998) Ectopic cell cycle proteins predict the sites of neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease brain. J Neurosci 18:2801- ... Cell cycle proteins are activated (Wu et al., 2000), reactive oxygen species are produced (Keller et al., 1999; Fuller et al., ... The at-risk neurons reexpress cell cycle proteins (Vincent et al., 1996, 1997; Arendt et al., 1996; McShea et al., 1997; Busser ... 2006) Ectopic cell cycle events link human Alzheimer's disease and amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse models. J ...

*  Plus it

1998) Ectopic cell cycle proteins predict the sites of neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease brain. J Neurosci 18:2801- ... Cell cycle proteins are activated (Wu et al., 2000), reactive oxygen species are produced (Keller et al., 1999; Fuller et al., ... The at-risk neurons reexpress cell cycle proteins (Vincent et al., 1996, 1997; Arendt et al., 1996; McShea et al., 1997; Busser ... 2006) Ectopic cell cycle events link human Alzheimer's disease and amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse models. J ...

*  Cancers | Free Full-Text | BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress | HTML

... suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. ... Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence ... Yu, X.; Baer, R. Nuclear localization and cell cycle-specific expression of CtIP, a protein that associates with the BRCA1 ... demonstrated that BRCA1 polyubiquitinates G2/M cell cycle proteins including cyclin B and Cdc25C and targets these proteins to ...

*  JFB | Free Full-Text | Tissue Engineering of Corneal Endothelium | HTML

Fluorescein microscopy one month after surgery showed numerous DiI-labelled cells on the posterior corneal surface in the DSAEK ... Frozen sections showed a monolayer of DiI-labelled cells on Descemet's membrane. These findings indicate that cultured adult ... Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) do not replicate after wounding. Therefore, corneal endothelial deficiency can result ... Cell cycle protein expression and proliferative status in human corneal cells. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996, 37, 645-655 ...

*  ANAPC16 Gene - GeneCards | APC16 Protein | APC16 Antibody

Protein Coding), Anaphase Promoting Complex Subunit 16, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and ... APC-Cdc20 mediated degradation of cell cycle proteins prior to satisfation of the cell cycle checkpoint ... a cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls progression through mitosis and the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The ... a cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls progression through mitosis and the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The ...

*  CDC25A

Cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A). Target Class. Pathway. Family. Cell Cycle Protein. Official Symbol. CDC25A. Species ... cell division cycle 25 homolog A (S. cerevisiae); cell division cycle 25 homolog A (S. pombe); cell division cycle 25A; dual ... Cell Cycle Protein ? DiscoveRx offers cell-based assays that target other members of this gene family or functional group. ... Human Primary Cell Screening. *BioMAP Primary Cell Screening Platform. Enzyme Fragment Complementation. *Cell-Based EFC Assay ...

*  Could a New Down Syndrome Mouse Model Also Be Useful for Alzheimer Research? | ALZFORUM

Or you could begin by immunostaining for upregulation of cell cycle proteins that are upregulated in AD. ... Rachael, which cells are going into cell cycle? Could you give us more info regarding cell cycle entry and AD? ... AD Cell Cycle Reentry-Early Rather Than Late 16 Apr 2003. * Linking APP with Cell Cycle Reentry and Apoptosis-One Kinase Does ... recent live discussion on the relationship between cell cycle and DNA repair, and earlier live discussion on cell cycle reentry ...

*  PSMA3 Gene - GeneCards | PSA3 Protein | PSA3 Antibody

Protein Coding), Proteasome Subunit Alpha 3, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. ... APC-Cdc20 mediated degradation of cell cycle proteins prior to satisfation of the cell cycle checkpoint ... Integrated Proteomics: protein expression in normal tissues and cell lines from ProteomicsDB, PaxDb, MaxQB, and MOPED for PSMA3 ... Protein Symbol:. P25788-PSA3_HUMAN. Recommended name:. Proteasome subunit alpha type-3 Protein Accession:. P25788. Secondary ...

*  JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols

These results indicate that NPR-C activation by C-ANP4-23 attenuates the enhanced levels of cell cycle proteins through the ... Although cell cycle kinetics tend to vary according to cell type, the distribution of cells amongst the four stages of the cell ... cells rejoin the cell cycle in unison. Treatment of the test agent following release from the cell cycle blocking chemical ... Cell cycle division is an integral part of growth and reproduction and deregulation of key cell cycle components have been ...

*  Changes in extreme cold tolerance, membrane composition and cardiac transcriptome during the first day of thermal acclimation...

... structural and cytoskeleton proteins (4%; Table 1), cell cycle proteins (5%; Table 1), amino acid metabolism (4%; Table 1) - ... RNA binding proteins, small nuclear RNA-assocated proteins and mRNA splicing proteins such as crooked neck-like protein ( ... Genes for cuticular and extracellular proteins such as cell wall protein DAN4, chitin binding peritrophin-A and -48, ... protein disulfide isomerases and protein kinases (supplementary material Table S1). The set of unique genes for protein ...

*  CiteSeerX - Search Results - Analysis of Cellular Proliferation and Survival Signaling by Using Two Ligand/Receptor Systems...

The Retinoblastoma Protein and Cell-Cycle Control by Robert A. Weinberg - Cell , 1995 ... operates in the midst of the cell cycle clock appara-tus. Its main role is to act as a signal transducer connecting the cell ... operates in the midst of the cell cycle clock appara-tus. Its main role is to act as a signal transducer connecting the cell ... cycle clock with the transcriptional machinery. In this role, pRB allows the clock to control the expression of b ..." ...

*  WikiGenes - Database [Publication Type]

Cell. Biol. (1991) [Pubmed]. *An ATPase domain common to prokaryotic cell cycle proteins, sugar kinases, actin, and hsp70 heat ... Cell. Biol. (1992) [Pubmed]. *Identification and characterization of golgin-84, a novel Golgi integral membrane protein with a ... as well as the prokaryotic cell cycle proteins MreB, FtsA, and StbA [23]. ... Data base analysis of protein expression patterns during T-cell ontogeny and activation. Hanash, S.M., Strahler, J.R., Chan, Y ...

*  Time-dependent induction of connected cells by overexpr | Open-i

Time-dependent induction of connected cells by overexpression of cdc5ΔN. (A) Strain KLY1083 expressing three copies of GAL1- ... Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism*. *Cell Division/genetics/physiology*. *Cytoskeletal Proteins*. *Fungal Proteins/chemistry/ ... The number of cells at time 0 was 1.2 × 106 cells/ml with an OD600 of 0.05. The resulting cell number and OD600 at each time ... The number of cells at time 0 was 1.2 × 106 cells/ml with an OD600 of 0.05. The resulting cell number and OD600 at each time ...

Start point (yeast): The Start checkpoint is a major cell cycle checkpoint in yeast. The Start checkpoint ensures irreversible cell-cycle entry even if conditions later become unfavorable.Cyclin: Cyclins are a family of proteins that control the progression of cells through the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) enzymes.Cyclin D/Cdk4: The Cyclin D/Cdk4 complex is a multi-protein structure consisting of the proteins Cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase 4, or Cdk4, a serine-threonine kinase. This complex is one of many cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes that are the "hearts of the cell-cycle control system" and govern the cell cycle and its progression.Cyclin-dependent kinase complex: A cyclin-dependent kinase complex (CDKC, cyclin-CDK) is a protein complex formed by the association of an inactive catalytic subunit of a protein kinase, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), with a regulatory subunit, cyclin.Malumbres M, Barbacid M.Pocket protein family: Pocket protein family consists of three proteins:MinC: The MinC protein is one of three proteins encoded by the minB operon and which is required to generate pole to pole oscillations prior to bacterial cell division as a means of specifying the midzone of the cell. This function is achieved by preventing the formation of the divisome Z-ring around the poles.Clb 5,6 (Cdk1): Clb5 and Clb6 are B-type, S-phase cyclins in yeast that assist in cell cycle regulation.Morgan, DO (2007) 'The Cell Cycle: Principles of Control, Oxford University Press Clb5 and Clb6 bind and activate Cdk1, and high levels of these cyclins are required for entering S-phase.Bookmarking: Bookmarking (also "gene bookmarking" or "mitotic bookmarking") refers to a potential mechanism of transmission of gene expression programs through cell division.Ki-67 (protein): Antigen KI-67 also known as Ki-67 or MKI67 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MKI67 gene (antigen identified by monoclonal antibody Ki-67).P53: Tumor protein p53, also known as p53, cellular tumor antigen p53 (UniProt name), phosphoprotein p53, tumor suppressor p53, antigen NY-CO-13, or transformation-related protein 53 (TRP53), is any isoform of a protein encoded by homologous genes in various organisms, such as TP53 (humans) and Trp53 (mice). This homolog (originally thought to be, and often spoken of as, a single protein) is crucial in multicellular organisms, where it prevents cancer formation, thus, functions as a tumor suppressor.Hyperphosphorylation: Hyperphosphorylation occurs when a biochemical with multiple phosphorylation sites is fully saturated. Hyperphosphorylation is one of the signalling mechanisms used by the cell to regulate mitosis.Serine/threonine-specific protein kinaseDNA-binding proteinFlow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1: POU domain, class 1, transcription factor 1 (Pit1, growth hormone factor 1), also known as POU1F1, is a transcription factor for growth hormone.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingMature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.HSD2 neurons: HSD2 neurons are a small group of neurons in the brainstem which are uniquely sensitive to the mineralocorticosteroid hormone aldosterone, through expression of HSD11B2. They are located within the caudal medulla oblongata, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS).Coles PhillipsSunda (asura): A mythological character from the great epic Mahabharata, Sunda (सुन्‍द) was an asura prince and the brother of Upasunda. Their father was Jambha.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.DNA re-replication: DNA re-replication (or simply rereplication) is an undesirable and possibly fatal occurrence in eukaryotic cells in which the genome is replicated more than once per cell cycle. Rereplication is believed to lead to genomic instability and has been implicated in the pathologies of a variety of human cancers.Proximity ligation assay: Proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) is a technology that extends the capabilities of traditional immunoassays to include direct detection of proteins, protein interactions and modifications with high specificity and sensitivity. Protein targets can be readily detected and localized with single molecule resolution and objectively quantified in unmodified cells and tissues.G2-M DNA damage checkpoint: The G2-M DNA damage checkpoint is an important cell cycle checkpoint in eukaryotic organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. This checkpoint ensures that cells don't initiate mitosis before they have a chance to repair damaged DNA after replication.RNA transfection: RNA transfection is the process of deliberately introducing RNA into a living cell. RNA can be purified from cells after lysis or synthesized from free nucleotides either chemically, or enzymatically using an RNA polymerase to transcribe a DNA template.Estrous cycle: The estrous cycle (also oestrous cycle; derived from Latin oestrus and originally from Greek οἶστρος meaning sexual desire) comprises the recurring physiologic changes that are induced by reproductive hormones in most mammalian therian females. Estrous cycles start after sexual maturity in females and are interrupted by anestrous phases or pregnancies.Zuotin: Z-DNA binding protein 1, also known as Zuotin, is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast gene.Matrix model: == Mathematics and physics ==Eukaryotic transcription: Eukaryotic transcription is the elaborate process that eukaryotic cells use to copy genetic information stored in DNA into units of RNA replica. Gene transcription occurs in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.Reverse Krebs cycle: The reverse Krebs cycle (also known as the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, the reverse TCA cycle, or the reverse citric acid cycle)Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Kinome: In molecular biology, the kinome of an organism is the set of protein kinases in its genome. Kinases are enzymes that catalyze phosphorylation reactions (of amino acids) and fall into several groups and families, e.Dermal fibroblast: Dermal fibroblasts are cells within the dermis layer of skin which are responsible for generating connective tissue and allowing the skin to recover from injury. Using organelles (particularly the rough endoplasmic reticulum), dermal fibroblasts generate and maintain the connective tissue which unites separate cell layers.Antileukemic drug: Antileukemic drugs, anticancer drugs that are used to treat one or more types of leukemia, include:Schizosaccharomyces pombe: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also called "fission yeast", is a species of yeast used in traditional brewing and as a model organism in molecular and cell biology. It is a unicellular eukaryote, whose cells are rod-shaped.Histone octamer: A histone octamer is the eight protein complex found at the center of a nucleosome core particle. It consists of two copies of each of the four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4).Michael A. EpsteinGene signature: A gene signature is a group of genes in a cell whose combined expression patternItadani H, Mizuarai S, Kotani H. Can systems biology understand pathway activation?Hydroxyurea dermopathy

(1/19654) The Drosophila kismet gene is related to chromatin-remodeling factors and is required for both segmentation and segment identity.

The Drosophila kismet gene was identified in a screen for dominant suppressors of Polycomb, a repressor of homeotic genes. Here we show that kismet mutations suppress the Polycomb mutant phenotype by blocking the ectopic transcription of homeotic genes. Loss of zygotic kismet function causes homeotic transformations similar to those associated with loss-of-function mutations in the homeotic genes Sex combs reduced and Abdominal-B. kismet is also required for proper larval body segmentation. Loss of maternal kismet function causes segmentation defects similar to those caused by mutations in the pair-rule gene even-skipped. The kismet gene encodes several large nuclear proteins that are ubiquitously expressed along the anterior-posterior axis. The Kismet proteins contain a domain conserved in the trithorax group protein Brahma and related chromatin-remodeling factors, providing further evidence that alterations in chromatin structure are required to maintain the spatially restricted patterns of homeotic gene transcription.  (+info)

(2/19654) Deletion analysis of the Drosophila Inscuteable protein reveals domains for cortical localization and asymmetric localization.

The Drosophila Inscuteable protein acts as a key regulator of asymmetric cell division during the development of the nervous system [1] [2]. In neuroblasts, Inscuteable localizes into an apical cortical crescent during late interphase and most of mitosis. During mitosis, Inscuteable is required for the correct apical-basal orientation of the mitotic spindle and for the asymmetric segregation of the proteins Numb [3] [4] [5], Prospero [5] [6] [7] and Miranda [8] [9] into the basal daughter cell. When Inscuteable is ectopically expressed in epidermal cells, which normally orient their mitotic spindle parallel to the embryo surface, these cells reorient their mitotic spindle and divide perpendicularly to the surface [1]. Like the Inscuteable protein, the inscuteable RNA is asymmetrically localized [10]. We show here that inscuteable RNA localization is not required for Inscuteable protein localization. We found that a central 364 amino acid domain - the Inscuteable asymmetry domain - was necessary and sufficient for Inscuteable localization and function. Within this domain, a separate 100 amino acid region was required for asymmetric localization along the cortex, whereas a 158 amino acid region directed localization to the cell cortex. The same 158 amino acid fragment could localize asymmetrically when coexpressed with the full-length protein, however, and could bind to Inscuteable in vitro, suggesting that this domain may be involved in the self-association of Inscuteable in vivo.  (+info)

(3/19654) Activation of Src in human breast tumor cell lines: elevated levels of phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially recognizes the Src carboxy terminal negative regulatory tyrosine 530.

Elevated levels of Src kinase activity have been reported in a number of human cancers, including colon and breast cancer. We have analysed four human breast tumor cell lines that exhibit high levels of Src kinase activity, and have determined that these cell lines also exhibit a high level of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that recognizes the Src carboxy-terminal P-Tyr530 negative regulatory site. Total Src kinase activity in these cell lines is elevated as much as 30-fold over activity in normal control cells and specific activity is elevated as much as 5.6-fold. When the breast tumor cells were grown in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, Src kinase activity was reduced in all four breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase which could recognize the Tyr530 negative regulatory site. In fractionated cell extracts from the breast tumor cells, we found elevated levels of a membrane associated tyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially dephosphorylated a Src family carboxy-terminal phosphopeptide containing the regulatory tyrosine 530 site. Src was hypophosphorylated in vivo at tyrosine 530 in at least two of the tumor cell lines, further suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase in these cells. In preliminary immunoprecipitation and antibody depletion experiments, we were unable to correlate the major portion of this phosphatase activity with several known phosphatases.  (+info)

(4/19654) B-MYB transactivates its own promoter through SP1-binding sites.

B-MYB is an ubiquitous protein required for mammalian cell growth. In this report we show that B-MYB transactivates its own promoter through a 120 bp segment proximal to the transcription start site. The B-MYB-responsive element does not contain myb-binding sites and gel-shift analysis shows that SP1, but not B-MYB, protein contained in SAOS2 cell extracts binds to the 120 bp B-myb promoter fragment. B-MYB-dependent transactivation is cooperatively increased in the presence of SP1, but not SP3 overexpression. When the SP1 elements of the B-myb promoter are transferred in front of a heterologous promoter, an increased response to B-MYB results. In contrast, c-MYB, the prototype member of the Myb family, is not able to activate the luciferase construct containing the SP1 elements. With the use of an SP1-GAL4 fusion protein, we have determined that the cooperative activation occurs through the domain A of SP1. These observations suggest that B-MYB functions as a coactivator of SP1, and that diverse combinations of myb and SP1 sites may dictate the responsiveness of myb-target genes to the various members of the myb family.  (+info)

(5/19654) Comparative molecular genetic profiles of anaplastic astrocytomas/glioblastomas multiforme and their subsequent recurrences.

Malignant glial tumors (anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas multiforme) arise mostly either from the progression of low grade precursor lesions or rapidly in a de novo fashion and contain distinct genetic alterations. There is, however, a third subset of malignant gliomas in which genetic lesions remain to be identified. Following surgical resection, all gliomas appear to have an inherent tendency to recur. Comparative molecular analysis of ten primary malignant gliomas (three anaplastic astrocytomas and seven glioblastomas multiforme) with their recurrences identified two distinct subgroups of recurrent tumors. In one group, primary tumors harbored genetic aberrations frequently associated with linear progression or de novo formation pathways of glial tumorigenesis and maintained their genetic profiles upon recurrence. In the other subset with no detectable known genetic mutations at first presentation, the recurrent tumors sustained specific abnormalities associated with pathways of linear progression or de novo formation. These included loss of genes on chromosomes 17 and 10, mutations in the p53 gene, homozygous deletion of the DMBTA1 and p16 and/ or p15 genes and amplification and/or overexpression of CDK4 and alpha form of the PDGF receptor. Recurrent tumors from both groups also displayed an abnormal expression profile of the metalloproteinase, gel A, and its inhibitor, TIMP-2, consistent with their highly invasive behavior. Delineation of the molecular differences between malignant glioblastomas and their subsequent recurrences may have important implications for the development of rational clinical approaches for this neoplasm that remains refractory to existing therapeutic modalities.  (+info)

(6/19654) Evidence for F-actin-dependent and -independent mechanisms involved in assembly and stability of the medial actomyosin ring in fission yeast.

Cell division in a number of eukaryotes, including the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is achieved through a medially placed actomyosin-based contractile ring. Although several components of the actomyosin ring have been identified, the mechanisms regulating ring assembly are still not understood. Here, we show by biochemical and mutational studies that the S.pombe actomyosin ring component Cdc4p is a light chain associated with Myo2p, a myosin II heavy chain. Localization of Myo2p to the medial ring depended on Cdc4p function, whereas localization of Cdc4p at the division site was independent of Myo2p. Interestingly, the actin-binding and motor domains of Myo2p are not required for its accumulation at the division site although the motor activity of Myo2p is essential for assembly of a normal actomyosin ring. The initial assembly of Myo2p and Cdc4p at the division site requires a functional F-actin cytoskeleton. Once established, however, F-actin is not required for the maintenance of Cdc4p and Myo2p medial rings, suggesting that the attachment of Cdc4p and Myo2p to the division site involves proteins other than actin itself.  (+info)

(7/19654) The role of RBF in the introduction of G1 regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis.

The first appearance of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis, at cell cycle 17, is accompanied by the down-regulation of E2F-dependent transcription. Mutant alleles of rbf were generated and analyzed to determine the role of RBF in this process. Embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic RBF products show constitutive expression of PCNA and RNR2, two E2F-regulated genes, indicating that RBF is required for their transcriptional repression. Despite the ubiquitous expression of E2F target genes, most epidermal cells enter G1 normally. Rather than pausing in G1 until the appropriate time for cell cycle progression, many of these cells enter an ectopic S-phase. These results indicate that the repression of E2F target genes by RBF is necessary for the maintenance but not the initiation of a G1 phase. The phenotype of RBF-deficient embryos suggests that rbf has a function that is complementary to the roles of dacapo and fizzy-related in the introduction of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis.  (+info)

(8/19654) The amino-terminal C/H1 domain of CREB binding protein mediates zta transcriptional activation of latent Epstein-Barr virus.

Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is maintained as a nucleosome-covered episome that can be transcriptionally activated by overexpression of the viral immediate-early protein, Zta. We show here that reactivation of latent EBV by Zta can be significantly enhanced by coexpression of the cellular coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. A stable complex containing both Zta and CBP could be isolated from lytically stimulated, but not latently infected RAJI nuclear extracts. Zta-mediated viral reactivation and transcriptional activation were both significantly inhibited by coexpression of the E1A 12S protein but not by an N-terminal deletion mutation of E1A (E1ADelta2-36), which fails to bind CBP. Zta bound directly to two related cysteine- and histidine-rich domains of CBP, referred to as C/H1 and C/H3. These domains both interacted specifically with the transcriptional activation domain of Zta in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Interestingly, we found that the C/H3 domain was a potent dominant negative inhibitor of Zta transcriptional activation function. In contrast, an amino-terminal fragment containing the C/H1 domain was sufficient for coactivation of Zta transcription and viral reactivation function. Thus, CBP can stimulate the transcription of latent EBV in a histone acetyltransferase-independent manner mediated by the CBP amino-terminal C/H1-containing domain. We propose that CBP may regulate aspects of EBV latency and reactivation by integrating cellular signals mediated by competitive interactions between C/H1, C/H3, and the Zta activation domain.  (+info)



Recombinant Proteins

  • Abgent has over fifteen years of experience producing recombinant proteins in E. coli and mammalian cells (CHO and HEK293, etc), and we have added a powerful yeast expression platform to our menu of services. (abgent.com)

kinase

  • FAK displays consensus sequences for phosphorylation by cell division cycle kinase-2-cyclin B, and might be a PP1 substrate. (biochemj.org)
  • CKS1B (CDC28 Protein Kinase Regulatory Subunit 1B) is a Protein Coding gene. (genecards.org)
  • GO annotations related to this gene include kinase activity and cyclin-dependent protein serine/threonine kinase regulator activity . (genecards.org)
  • Moreover, treatment of VSMCs with BEC or L-OHNA, or knockdown of arginase I protein, arrested cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle and induced the expression of the cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, p21. (ahajournals.org)
  • Polo-like kinase 4 transcription is activated via CRE and NRF1 elements, repressed by DREAM through CDE/CHR sites and deregulated by HPV E7 protein. (jove.com)
  • Furthermore, Mcl-1-overexpressing cells had lower total Cdk1 kinase activity compared with parental cells, in both anti-Cdk1 and anti-cyclin B1 immunoprecipitates. (biochemj.org)
  • Two highly related isoforms in this family, PHLPP1 and PHLPP2, have been identified to serve as negative regulators of Akt and protein kinase C (PKC) by dephosphorylating the kinases directly. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Stable overexpression of either PHLPP isoform in colon cancer cells decreased the rate of cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to growth inhibition induced by the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, whereas knockdown of either PHLPP isoform by shRNA promoted the proliferation of DLD1 cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Small-molecule chemical library consisting of 3,280 compounds was screened to identify compounds that elicit properties identified for ATF2 peptide, including ( a ) sensitization of melanoma cells to apoptosis, ( b ) inhibition of ATF2 transcriptional activity, ( c ) activation of c-Jun NH 2 -terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun transcriptional activity, and ( d ) inhibition of melanoma growth and metastasis in mouse models. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Among the genetic changes commonly found in human melanomas are mutations in protein kinases of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, indicating that signal transduction pathways have been largely modified in this tumor type ( 3 , 4 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Up-regulation of protein kinase C and c-Jun NH 2 -terminal kinase (JNK) has also been observed in melanoma ( 14 - 16 ). (aacrjournals.org)

proliferation

  • The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the formation of vascular lesions, and is the major pathophysiologic mechanism responsible for the failure of interventional therapeutic approaches to treat occlusive vascular disorders, including vein bypass failure, transplant arteriosclerosis, and restenosis after balloon angioplasty. (ahajournals.org)
  • VSMC proliferation is preceded by increases in polyamine synthesis, whereas inhibition of polyamine formation blocks cell growth. (ahajournals.org)
  • Unlike normal cells and tissues that preferentially utilize circulating fatty acids derived from the diet, cancers synthesize fatty acids endogenously for membrane biosynthesis to sustain cell proliferation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and expression of FAS and cell cycle regulatory proteins were measured. (aacrjournals.org)
  • E 2 treatment stimulated cell proliferation, accelerated the G 0 /G 1 to S phase transition, and increased FAS and cyclin D1 expression. (aacrjournals.org)
  • In contrast, mithramycin treatment or Sp1 siRNA transfection inhibited cell proliferation, led to G 0 /G 1 cell cycle arrest, and decreased FAS and cyclin D1 expression. (aacrjournals.org)
  • We have also shown that inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoric acid (TOFA), a known inhibitor of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), decreased cell proliferation, caused G 0 /G 1 cell cycle arrest, and suppressed the expression of Sp1 and cyclin D1. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Stat3/Cdc25a-dependent cell proliferation promotes embryonic axis extension during zebrafish gastrulation. (nih.gov)
  • Overexpression of human Mcl-1 in a murine myeloid progenitor cell line resulted in a lower rate of proliferation. (biochemj.org)
  • Serving as a major regulator downstream of PI3K, Akt promotes tumor growth by promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis ( Manning & Cantley, 2007 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

mitosis

  • However, progressively more PP1 activity was assayed in FAK-immunoprecipitates obtained from cells released from mitosis. (biochemj.org)
  • The results suggest that FAK dephosphorylation by PP1δ occurs in cells released from mitosis, and confirmed the specific association of PP1δ, as detected previously in adherent cells. (biochemj.org)
  • Component of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls progression through mitosis and the G1 phase of the cell cycle. (genecards.org)
  • Increasing β-catenin/Wnt3A activity levels drive mechanical strain-induced cell cycle progression through mitosis. (nih.gov)

Genes

  • Genes that regulate cell cycle progression often contain such promoter sequences, and Sp1 is critical for their expression. (aacrjournals.org)
  • A growing number of genetic and epigenetic changes in melanomas affect genes associated with melanocyte development and maintenance, cell cycle control, resistance to apoptosis, and angiogenic and metastatic capacity. (aacrjournals.org)
  • To identify molecular targets for colorectal cancer therapy, we tested small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against 97 genes whose expression was elevated in human colorectal cancer tissues for the ability to promote apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells (HT-29 cells). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

Apoptosis

  • Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukaemia-1) is a Bcl-2 family member with short-term pro-survival functions but whose other functions, demonstrated by embryonic lethality of knockout mice, do not involve apoptosis. (biochemj.org)
  • The antiapoptotic proteins, such as Bcl2 and the transcription factors activating transcription factor (ATF) 1, AP1, and ATF2, also cooperate in conferring resistance to apoptosis and metastatic capacity on melanoma ( 24 - 26 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • The results indicate that the downregulation of PSMA7 (proteasome subunit, α-type, 7) and RAN (ras-related nuclear protein) most efficiently induced apoptosis of HT-29 cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Thus, silencing of PSMA7 and RAN induces cancer cells to undergo apoptosis, and PSMA7 and RAN might be promising new molecular targets for drug and RNA interference-based therapeutics against colorectal cancer. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

antiapoptotic

  • 17 The BH3-domain of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins is required for the antiapoptotic function. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

antibodies

  • Immunofluorescence studies with protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) isoforms-specific antibodies detected PP1δ, but not α or γ1, at focal adhesions. (biochemj.org)
  • Check out links to articles that cite our custom service antibodies, peptides, and proteins in major peer-reviewed journals, organized by research category. (abgent.com)
  • Crown antibodies pass additional stringent quality requirements, including extended control sets, uniform results against multiple biologically relevant cell lines and tissues, and function in multiple applications. (abgent.com)

p130

  • A positive correlation between p27 and pRb2/p130 levels expressed, in normal and cancer counterparts in the same sample, as the difference between cytoplasmic and nuclear protein concentrations ( P = 0.045) was found. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Interestingly, one specimen in which we also found a high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia showed the progressive loss of pRb2/p130 from normal prostatic cells to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia cells, suggesting that in prostatic cancer, lack of expression of the tumor suppressor gene pRb2/p130 could be involved in the progression of the disease, from an early stage. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Multivariate analysis showed that pRb2/p130 and p107 may be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of prostate cancers, and that the expression of the retinoblastoma-related protein pRb2/p130 along with Ki-67 (MIB-1), expressed as differences between cytoplasmic and nuclear concentrations, could be considered new parameters to be evaluated in discriminating patients at a higher risk for prostate cancer. (aacrjournals.org)

tumor

  • pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, operates in the midst of the cell cycle clock appara-tus. (psu.edu)
  • Moreover, re-expression of either PHLPP isoform in HCT116 cells inhibited tumor growth in vivo . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Modifications were also recorded in matrix metalloproteinase, proteases associated with tumor cell metastatic capacity ( 20 - 22 ), and chaperones such as HSP90 ( 23 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • A tumor is characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells, which invade adjacent normal tissue and spread to other organs, a process that causes death. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

cdk2

  • Other G 1 cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk2, cdk4 and cyclin E were unaffected by these various treatments. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Other regulatory components that are modified in melanoma include cell cycle regulatory proteins, such as cyclin-dependent kinases ( CDKN2A ) CDK2 , p16/CDK/pRb , and cyclin D1 ( 17 - 19 ). (aacrjournals.org)

regulatory

  • The promoter region of FAS also has Sp1 binding sites, and Sp1 together with sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) has been shown to regulate FAS expression in hepatocytes. (aacrjournals.org)
  • In the present study, we show a cell-cycle-regulatory role of Mcl-1 involving a shortened form of the Mcl-1 polypeptide, primarily localized to the nucleus, which we call snMcl-1. (biochemj.org)

degradation

  • The APC/C complex acts by mediating ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of target proteins: it mainly mediates the formation of Lys-11-linked polyubiquitin chains and, to a lower extent, the formation of Lys-48- and Lys-63-linked polyubiquitin chains. (genecards.org)
  • Human TRIB2 Oscillates during the Cell Cycle and Promotes Ubiquitination and Degradation of CDC25C. (nih.gov)

overexpression

  • In addition, we demonstrated that the PHLPP-mediated growth inhibition in colon cancer cells was largely rescued by overexpression of a constitutively active Akt. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

Gene

  • ANAPC16 (Anaphase Promoting Complex Subunit 16) is a Protein Coding gene. (genecards.org)
  • DiscoveRx offers cell-based assays that target other members of this gene family or functional group. (discoverx.com)
  • At least two transcript variants have been identified for this gene, and it appears that only one of them encodes a protein. (genecards.org)
  • The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes. (jove.com)
  • The forkhead transcription factor FOXM1 controls cell cycle-dependent gene expression through an atypical chromatin binding mechanism. (jove.com)
  • The central role of CDE/CHR promoter elements in the regulation of cell cycle-dependent gene transcription. (jove.com)

regulates

  • Here, we hypothesize that Sp1 coordinately regulates FAS and cell cycle progression in estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Our results indicate that Sp1 coordinately regulates the expression of FAS and cyclin D1 in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that Sp1 is involved in synchronizing fatty acid synthesis with cell cycle progression. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The matrix protein Tiggrin regulates plasmatocyte maturation in Drosophila larva. (nih.gov)

phosphatase

  • In fact, FAK immunoprecipitated from metabolically-labelled mitotic HeLa cells without tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors was phosphorylated on Ser only and was dephosphorylated in vitro by purified muscle PP1, with loss of phospho-Ser. (biochemj.org)
  • FAK obtained from cells at 1.5h was Ser-phosphorylated, and underwent dephosphorylation during in vitro incubation, with loss of phospho-Ser, indicating the presence of active FAK-bound phosphatase. (biochemj.org)
  • For example, a growing fraction of melanomas is recognized as carrying an inactive form of PTEN, a protein phosphatase implicated in the regulation of AKT signaling pathways and their downstream mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6 effectors ( 12 , 13 ). (aacrjournals.org)

subunit

  • CKS1B protein binds to the catalytic subunit of the cyclin dependent kinases and is essential for their biological function. (genecards.org)

phosphorylation

  • Among its related pathways are CDK-mediated phosphorylation and removal of Cdc6 and Cell Cycle, Mitotic . (genecards.org)
  • Phosphorylation of Akt is required for the activation of the enzyme following activation of PI3K, whereas phosphorylation of PKC does not control the enzyme activity directly rather it is constitutive and necessary for maintaining the stability of the protein ( Newton, 2003 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Since the activity and the total protein expression of Akt and PKC are controlled by phosphorylation, dephosphorylation leads to effective signaling termination by either inactivating the enzyme directly or by decreasing the functional lifetime of the protein. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

pathways

  • Among its related pathways are Cell cycle Role of SCF complex in cell cycle regulation and Pathways in cancer . (genecards.org)
  • In colorectal tumors, some signal transduction pathways drive abnormal cell growth. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

HeLa

  • No PP1 was associated with FAK immunoprecipitated from mitotic HeLa cells. (biochemj.org)
  • The CKS1B mRNA is found to be expressed in different patterns through the cell cycle in HeLa cells, which reflects a specialized role for the encoded protein. (genecards.org)

anaphase

  • SOLO and SMC1 colocalize to meiotic centromeres from early prophase I until anaphase II in wild-type males, but both proteins disappear prematurely at anaphase I in mutants for mei-S332, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the cohesin protector protein shugoshin. (nih.gov)

Biol

Molecular

  • With state-of-the art molecular biology and protein biochemistry labs, we work with our clients to rapidly evaluate in parallel to identify the optimal expression system for candidate proteins. (abgent.com)
  • 3 Multiple molecular alterations are involved in a transformation from a normal cell into a cancerous cell and a progression from a pre-cancerous lesion to malignant tumors. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

mitotic

  • The associated activity was maximal at 2h from the mitotic release (when 85-90% of the cells remained round) and decreased to basal level by 8h (when cells were all polygonal). (biochemj.org)

novel protein

  • We describe a novel protein, sisters on the loose (SOLO), which is essential for meiotic cohesion in Drosophila. (nih.gov)
  • Recently, a family of novel protein phosphatases, namely PHLPP, have been identified as the phosphatases for Akt and PKC. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

inhibition

  • Given the important role of Cdk1 in progression through G2 and M phases, it is probable that the inhibition of Cdk1 activity accounts for the inhibitory effect of Mcl-1 on cell growth. (biochemj.org)

Diseases

  • Diseases associated with CKS1B include Clear Cell Adenofibroma . (genecards.org)

Drosophila

  • SOLO: a meiotic protein required for centromere cohesion, coorientation, and SMC1 localization in Drosophila melanogaster. (nih.gov)
  • A population of G2-arrested cells are selected as sensory organ precursors for the interommatidial bristles of the Drosophila eye. (nih.gov)

HUMAN

  • Derivatives of CSL were identified as potent inducers of cell death in mouse and human melanomas. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Additionally, one of the hallmarks of human carcinogenesis is the breakdown of cell apoptotic machinery. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

tissues

  • PSMA7 and RAN were highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines compared with normal colon tissues. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

transcriptional

  • Its main role is to act as a signal transducer connecting the cell cycle clock with the transcriptional machinery. (psu.edu)

Furthermore

regulate

  • Based on previous studies, to up-regulate Sp1 activity we treated MCF-7 cells with 100 nM 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) for 48 h. (aacrjournals.org)
  • To down-regulate Sp1 activity, we treated the cells for 48 h with 0.025 or 0.05 nM mithramycin, a known inhibitor of Sp1, or we transfected the cells with Sp1 siRNA, then maintained them for 72 h. (aacrjournals.org)

preferentially

  • 6-9 Interestingly, VSMCs and endothelial cells possess arginase activity yet preferentially express different arginase isoforms: VSMCs exclusively express arginase I, whereas endothelial cells predominantly express arginase II. (ahajournals.org)

family

  • PHLPP ( PH domain L eucine-rich-repeats P rotein P hosphatase) represents a family of novel Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

phase of the cell cycle

  • CDC25A is required for progression from G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle. (discoverx.com)

expression

  • Expression of the different proteins in normal and pathological specimens was evaluated by the Wilcoxon test. (aacrjournals.org)
  • A matrix of correlation (Spearman coefficient) was used to evaluate the possible association in expression among the different proteins. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Logistic regression analysis was used to test the multivariable prognostic value of the levels of protein expression for the probability of disease development. (aacrjournals.org)

efficiently

  • Two compounds, celastrol (CSL) and acetyl isogambogic acid, could, within a low micromolar range, efficiently elicit cell death in melanoma cells. (aacrjournals.org)

activity

  • Methods and Results- Balloon injury of rat carotid arteries resulted in a sustained increase in arginase activity in the vessel wall and the induction of arginase I protein in both the media and neointima of injured vessels. (ahajournals.org)
  • Substantial arginase I protein and arginase activity was also detected in rat cultured aortic VSMCs. (ahajournals.org)
  • 18-20 Interestingly, we previously reported that VSMCs possess arginase activity and postulated a physiological role for arginase in augmenting cell growth by optimizing polyamine synthesis in these cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • Similar to the ATF2 peptide, both compounds require JNK activity for their ability to inhibit melanoma cell viability. (aacrjournals.org)

mutant

  • Retardation in cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1 and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. (jove.com)

different

  • This study showed that all of the proteins but mdm-2 were expressed at a different rate in normal and pathological prostate specimens. (aacrjournals.org)

growth