Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Trypanosomiasis, Bovine: Infection in cattle caused by various species of trypanosomes.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Rhipicephalus: A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Theileriasis: Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseGoats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: A multifactorial disease of CATTLE resulting from complex interactions between environmental factors, host factors, and pathogens. The environmental factors act as stressors adversely affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM and other host defenses and enhancing transmission of infecting agents.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Enzootic Bovine Leukosis: A lymphoid neoplastic disease in cattle caused by the bovine leukemia virus. Enzootic bovine leukosis may take the form of lymphosarcoma, malignant lymphoma, or leukemia but the presence of malignant cells in the blood is not a consistent finding.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease: Acute disease of cattle caused by the bovine viral diarrhea viruses (DIARRHEA VIRUSES, BOVINE VIRAL). Often mouth ulcerations are the only sign but fever, diarrhea, drop in milk yield, and loss of appetite are also seen. Severity of clinical disease varies and is strain dependent. Outbreaks are characterized by low morbidity and high mortality.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Leukemia Virus, Bovine: The type species of DELTARETROVIRUS that causes a form of bovine lymphosarcoma (ENZOOTIC BOVINE LEUKOSIS) or persistent lymphocytosis.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Babesia bovis: A species of protozoa that is a cause of bovine babesiosis. Ticks of the genera Boophilus, Rhipicephalus, and IXODES are the chief vectors.Trypanosoma congolense: A species of Trypanosome hemoflagellates that is carried by tsetse flies and causes severe anemia in cattle. These parasites are also found in horses, sheep, goats, and camels.Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.Brucella abortus: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.Diarrhea Viruses, Bovine Viral: A group of viruses in the genus PESTIVIRUS, causing diarrhea, fever, oral ulcerations, hemorrhagic syndrome, and various necrotic lesions among cattle and other domestic animals. The two species (genotypes), BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 , exhibit antigenic and pathological differences. The historical designation, BVDV, consisted of both (then unrecognized) genotypes.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Theileria: A genus of tick-borne protozoa parasitic in the lymphocytes, erythrocytes, and endothelial cells of mammals. Its organisms multiply asexually and then invade erythrocytes, where they undergo no further reproduction until ingested by a transmitting tick.Rinderpest: A viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by MORBILLIVIRUS. It may be acute, subacute, or chronic with the major lesions characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the entire digestive tract. The disease was declared successfully eradicated worldwide in 2010.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Housing, AnimalMannheimia haemolytica: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria normally commensal in the flora of CATTLE and SHEEP. But under conditions of physical or PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS, it can cause MASTITIS in sheep and SHIPPING FEVER or ENZOOTIC CALF PNEUMONIA in cattle. Its former name was Pasteurella haemolytica.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Anaplasma: A genus of gram-negative bacteria whose organisms are obligate parasites of vertebrates. Species are transmitted by arthropod vectors with the host range limited to ruminants. Anaplasma marginale is the most pathogenic species and is the causative agent of severe bovine anaplasmosis.Abomasum: The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Festuca: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of fescue is also used with some other grasses.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.ArtiodactylaTheileria parva: A protozoan parasite that is the etiologic agent of East Coast fever (THEILERIASIS). Transmission is by ticks of the Physicephalus and Hyalomma genera.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Mastitis, Bovine: INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.Herpesvirus 1, Bovine: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS that causes INFECTIOUS BOVINE RHINOTRACHEITIS and other associated syndromes in CATTLE.Anaplasma marginale: A species of gram-negative bacteria and causative agent of severe bovine ANAPLASMOSIS. It is the most pathogenic of the ANAPLASMA species.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Pasteurellosis, Pneumonic: Bovine respiratory disease found in animals that have been shipped or exposed to CATTLE recently transported. The major agent responsible for the disease is MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA and less commonly, PASTEURELLA MULTOCIDA or HAEMOPHILUS SOMNUS. All three agents are normal inhabitants of the bovine nasal pharyngeal mucosa but not the LUNG. They are considered opportunistic pathogens following STRESS, PHYSIOLOGICAL and/or a viral infection. The resulting bacterial fibrinous BRONCHOPNEUMONIA is often fatal.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Pasteurella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PASTEURELLA.Bluetongue virus: The type species of ORBIVIRUS causing a serious disease in sheep, especially lambs. It may also infect wild ruminants and other domestic animals.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Monensin: An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Pneumonia, Atypical Interstitial, of Cattle: A cattle disease of uncertain cause, probably an allergic reaction.Ticks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Dystocia: Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Coronavirus, Bovine: A species of CORONAVIRUS infecting neonatal calves, presenting as acute diarrhea, and frequently leading to death.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.

*  Feral Cattle | Agweb.com

The feral cattle are descendants of cattle brought to the islands as early as the 1880s, possibly by Russian colonizers. Now, ... Feral Cattle. Dec 09, 2013. We have a three-word answer to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials who are seeking a solution ... Our editors spend some time roaming the web looking for stuff cattle people and others in agriculture might find useful or ... however, the Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking input on what to do with the cattle. Our suggestion is to offer permits to ...
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*  IVOMEC Plus Injectable Cattle Wormer | Jeffers Pet

IVOMEC Plus Injectable Cattle Wormer is the only wormer that kills more types of parasites in a single dose. This product is on ... Not approved for use in female dairy cattle of breeding age. 56-day slaughter withdrawal for cattle.. Same as Ivomec Injection ... IVOMEC Plus Injectable Cattle Wormer is the only wormer that kills more types of parasites in a single dose. This product is on ... IVOMEC Plus Injectable Cattle Wormer. Click here for Mail-In Rebate Voucher in .pdf form (downloadable & printable). ...
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*  Halfbakery: Aprion Cattle

Aprion Cattle. Cattle whose DNA which codes for prions has been removed.. (+2, -1) [vote for,. against] ... At most aprion cattle would be treated like all other cattle and destroyed, simply to avoid a feed back loop.. ... Although aprion cattle have many benefits, rendering their remains and feeding them back to cattle would be a political bomb ... Although aprion cattle have many benefits, rendering their remains and feeding them back to cattle would be a political bomb ...
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*  MLA: Weekly Cattle Summary - The Dairy Site

This report is a collection of weekly cattle price summaries from each Australian territory by Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA ... Fewer cattle. The two major South Australian cattle markets reported on by MLA's NLRS both offered 17% fewer cattle. This ... TheDairySite - Dairy Cattle Health, Welfare and Diseases News. 5m Publishing, Benchmark House, 8 Smithy Wood Drive, Sheffield, ... AUSTRALIA - This report is a collection of weekly cattle price summaries from each Australian territory by Meat & Livestock ...
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*  cattle | Santa Gertrudis - Students | Britannica...

In 1940 the Santa Gertrudis was recognized as the first new breed of cattle to be developed in the United States. The breed was ... Cattle in America. Beef Cattle. Angus. Brahman. Charolais. Hereford. Santa Gertrudis. In 1940 the Santa Gertrudis was ... recognized as the first new breed of cattle to be developed in the United States. The breed was developed at the King Ranch in ...
kids.britannica.com/students/article/cattle/273566/234105-toc

*  ORBi: Browsing ORBi

Taqi Growth Hormone Gene Polymorphism And Milk Production Traits In Holstein-Friesian Cattle. Falaki, M.; Sneyers, M.; Prandi, ... Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I and their plasma binding proteins in different cattle breeds.. Renaville, Robert ... One of the obstacles to progress in dairy cattle selection is that milk production traits are only expressed after the first ... One of the obstacles to progress in dairy cattle selection is that milk production traits are only expressed after the first ...
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*  Veterinary handbook for cattle, sheep and goats | Diseases

Avoid mixing of susceptible cattle from different origins particularly if the BVD status of these cattle is unknown. Deliberate ... abortions in pregnant cattle being exported and may also predispose cattle to other diseases, particularly respiratory disease ... Other transiently viraemic cattle will usually recover uneventfully after a week or so although there may be increased risk of ... BVD infection of pregnant cattle may result in abortion, delivery of normal and immune calves, and in some cases birth of ...
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*  NEW OPPORTUNITIES TO SYNCHRONIZE ESTRUS AND FACILITATE FIXED-TIME AI - ppt video online download

... beef cattle industry…… The current status of reproductive technology in the U.S. beef cattle industry…… ... 2 reproductive technology in the U.S. beef cattle industry……. The current status of reproductive technology in the U.S. beef ... 18 Effective Estrus Synchronization Programs for Beef Cattle. Facilitate AI & ET Reduce time required to detect estrus Cycling ... Unless efforts are taken to implement change in the U.S. beef cattle industry, the products of our research and technology may ...
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*  Basic Beef Production Guidelines

To raise beef cattle profitably, you must manage these resources to maximize returns. Below are some guidelines to make this ... p,Each beef cattle enterprise has different resources: land, labor, capital, feed and management. ... Breeds of Beef Cattle. Beef cattle are generally divided into two different groups: maternal breeds vs. terminal breeds. ... Each beef cattle enterprise has different resources: land, labor, capital, feed and management. To raise beef cattle profitably ...
https://extension.psu.edu/basic-beef-production-guidelines

*  Patent US6409738 - Castration tool and method - Google Patents

Accordingly, cattle growth is accelerated due to enhanced nutrition, reduction in disease and a reduction in the stress upon ... Moreover, the meat produced from the cattle processed using the present invention has superior cutability characteristics. ... the cattle. Furthermore, late castration of bulls (at approximately 5 to 14 months) is employed, wherein the tool of (c) ... An apparatus and method for use in raising cattle, and in particular bulls, wherein bulls are: (a) fed a particularly ...
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*  ZACTRAN® (gamithromycin) | Cattle Network

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: For use in cattle only. Do not treat cattle within 35 days of slaughter. Because a discard time ... and economics to manage BRD in your new-arrival cattle. Visit www.ZACTRAN.com for full prescribing information. ... in milk has not been established, do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, or in calves to be processed for ... IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: For use in cattle only. Do not treat cattle within 35 days of slaughter. Because a discard time ...
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*  6 Ways to Give Cattle Injections - wikiHow

Knowledge of how to give cattle injections or shots, be it sub-subcutaneously (SQ; under the skin), intramuscularly (IM; ... Work cattle as calmly and quietly as possible. This will cause less stress on you and the cattle when they go through the ... Watch out for cattle trying to jump over the gate into the crush after the other cattle, as this can cause problems. ... Do not yell, chase or beat the cattle, as this will more often cause cattle to become very agitated in the race and even in the ...
wikihow.com/Give-Cattle-Injections

*  How to control parasites in young cattle - FarmIreland.ie

Infection by parasites is one of the main reasons for the lack of thrive in young cattle at grass for their first grazing ... Adult cattle are less affected by these parasites. The exceptions are adult cattle that had no previous exposure to the ... If there are sheep on the farm, mixed grazing of cattle and sheep or alternative yearly grazing's with cattle and sheep can ... How to control parasites in young cattle. Parasite infections can badly affect growth rates in young cattle, writes Gordon ...
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*  Cattle Record equipment | agriculture-xprt.com

Results for cattle record equipment from DST, eCow, HeatWatch II and other leading brands. Compare and contact a supplier near ... Cattle Record equipment Related terms for "cattle record ": cattle equipment , beef cattle record equipment , cattle record ... Cattle Nutrient Monitoring. Background - The producer of a 'High Energy Liquid Feed' product for cattle is interested in ... Unistock Hydraulic Cattle Squeeze Crate. In recent years many customers have expressed their interest in the concept of a ...
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*  Angus Media

"Not vaccinating cattle is not a good idea for cattle health - especially as antibiotic use for treatment of sick cattle is ... A bigger beef cattle herd. A younger cow herd. In the face of declining cattle prices, these two facts can bring hope. Had it ... Although cattle producers can't alter the weather, there are management steps that can be taken to help maintain cattle health ... What does the future hold for the cattle-feeding segment of the beef industry? Where and how will cattle be fed? How will they ...
angus.org/Media/News/Default.aspx

*  Browsing Livestock Feeders' Day, 1960 by Title

The value of enzymes added to cattle rations  Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W. (Kansas ... finely ground pelleted sorghum grain in cattle rations  Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W. ( ... finely ground pelleted sorghum rain in cattle rations  Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W. ( ... Response of previously implanted cattle to oral diethylstilbestrol  Koch, B.A.; Smith, E.F.; Richardson, D.; Cox, R.F. (Kansas ...
krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/12126/browse?rpp=20&order=ASC&sort_by=1&etal=-1&type=title&starts_with=D

*  Research and Markets: Global Cattle Feed Market (With Overview on Ruminant Feed) to 2018 with Cargill Inc, ADM, Charoen...

... www.researchandmarkets.com/research/jltbtb/cattle_feed) has announced the addition of the 'Cattle Feed Market (With ...
businesswire.com/news/topix/20140714005587/en

*  How to Track Cattle | eHow

Some traditions have not changed, such as identifying the cattle and corralling cattle. Using satellites, computers and the GPS ... Years ago, tracking cattle was the job of cowboys on horseback. Now in a faster-moving world with much more technology, ... Some traditions have not changed, such as identifying the cattle and corralling cattle. Using satellites, computers and the GPS ... Turn your cattle loose in the direction you want them to graze. Being gregarious animals, they should stick together as a herd ...
ehow.com/how_8342417_track-cattle.html

*  Category:Moiled cattle - Wikimedia Commons

This category uses the term "cattle", (which is plural) instead of the colloquial term "cow", (singular) for reasons of clarity ... Note: A cow is an adult female cattle-beast (singular) that already has had a calf (or two, depending on regional usage).. ... Media in category "Moiled cattle". The following 8 files are in this category, out of 8 total. ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Moiled_cattle&oldid=76200694" ...
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Moiled_cattle

*  The Wretched Rite - Round Three - DSRS Darwin

... while she was getting the cattle to graze. Her father was injured in the fight as they wrangled several cattle, but Sara wasn't ... Her father owned a small ranch of up to 30 cattle at a time, and was the beef producer of the nearby town. They weren't rich, ... She hurt her leg in the fall and couldn't stand as the remaining men stole almost half of the cattle. She managed to get her ... They were constantly under risk of being targeted by cattle rustlers. Her father and brothers had to carry guns, but she ...
eagle-time.com/showthread.php?tid=687

*  Anti Bovine Interleukin-2 Antibody, clone AbD22297 | Bio-Rad Antibodies (formerly AbD Serotec)

Use of antigen-specific interleukin-2 to differentiate between cattle vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and cattle ...
https://bio-rad-antibodies.com/cow-bovine-il-2-antibody-abd22297-hca268.html

*  cattle - Wiktionary

cattle (countable and uncountable, plural cattle) (usually used as plural). *Domesticated bovine animals (cows, bulls, steers ... Occasionally "cattle" may be found in singular use:. *First I saw the mandible, which looked a bit like a strange-shaped cattle ... How many cattle?. There is no singular generic word for "cattle", apart from archaic neat. Gendered words such as "bull" and " ... For usage examples of this term, see Citations:cattle.. Synonyms[edit]. *(domesticated bovine animals): neat, Bos (scientific) ...
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cattle

*  Cattle

Adam gives names to all cattle, Moses 3:20 (Abr. 5:21). ... Cattle See also Animal; Beast; Herd; Ox. * Nephites raise ... Nephites gather cattle to defend themselves, 3 Ne. 3:22 (4:4). ...
https://lds.org/scriptures/triple-index/cattle?lang=eng&country=afe

*  Cattle

... husbandry. A cow being inspected for ticks; cattle are often restrained or confined in Cattle crushes when given medical ... beef cattle), milk (. dairy cattle), and hides. They are also used as draft animals and in certain sports. Some consider cattle ... Cattle raised for human consumption are called '. beef cattle'. Within the beef cattle industry in parts of the United States, ... It is estimated that there are 1.3 billion cattle in the world today.. Species of cattle. Cattle were originally identified by ...
cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/link-suggestion/wpcd_2008-09_augmented/wp/c/Cattle.htm

*  Cattle Town - Wikipedia

EN, ES) Cattle Town, in FilmAffinity. (EN) Cattle Town, in TV.com, CBS Interactive Inc. (EN) Cattle Town, in AFI Catalog of ... EN) Cattle Town, su Internet Movie Database, IMDb.com. (EN) Cattle Town, su AllMovie, All Media Network. (EN) Cattle Town, in ... EN) Cattle Town, su AllMovie, All Media Network. (EN) Cattle Town, in BFI Film & TV Database, British Film Institute.. ... Cattle Town è un film del 1952 diretto da Noel M. Smith. È un western statunitense a sfondo storico ambientato in Texas negli ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle_Town

Beef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Mycobacterium bovis: ATCC 19210College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand: The College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand was founded in 1964. It is a part of AAU, Anand, Gujarat, India.Dry matter: The dry matter (or otherwise known as dry weight) is a measurement of the mass of something when completely dried.Plant breedingBoran cattleWhite meat: White meat or light meat refers to the lighter-colored meat of poultry as contrasted with dark meat. In a more general sense, white meat may also refer to any lighter-colored meat, as contrasted with red meats like beef and some types of game.Jet aeratorsBuffalo burger: Buffalo burgers are hamburgers made with meat from the American bison (Bison bison), or water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the United Kingdom.Tropical theileriosis: Tropical theileriosis or Mediterranean theileriosis is a theileriosis of cattle from the Mediterranean and Middle East area, from Morocco to Western parts of India and China.Escherichia coli O121: Escherichia coli O121 is a serotype of Escherichia coli, a species of bacteria that lives in the lower intestines of mammals.http://www.List of poisonous plantsTransmissible spongiform encephalopathyWolverine and the X-Men (toyline): The Wolverine and the X-Men toyline is a 3¾" action figure line manufactured by Hasbro. It is a tie-in to the Wolverine and the X-Men animated series and was released alongside the Marvel Universe toyline and X-Men Origins: Wolverine toyline as part of Hasbro's new 3¾" figure initiative for Marvel Comics characters, although this line has a much more animated style than the other two lines.Tick infestation: A tick infestation is a condition where a tick acts as an ectoparasite.Corriedale: Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed, meaning they are used both in the production of wool and meat. The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New ZealandStock Types, The Land, North Richmond, c.Foot-and-mouth disease: (ILDS B08.820)Angora goat: The Angora goat () is a breed of domestic goat that is named after Ankara, Turkey, historically known as Angora. Angora goats produce the lustrous fibre known as mohair.Albert CalmettePowdered milk: Powdered milk or dried milk is a manufactured dairy product made by evaporating milk to dryness. One purpose of drying milk is to preserve it; milk powder has a far longer shelf life than liquid milk and does not need to be refrigerated, due to its low moisture content.Coccidiosis: Coccidiosis is a parasitic disease of the intestinal tract of animals caused by coccidian protozoa. The disease spreads from one animal to another by contact with infected feces or ingestion of infected tissue.Paddock: A paddock has two primary meanings in different parts of the English-speaking world. In Canada, the USA and UK, a paddock is a small enclosure used to keep horses.National Bison Range herd: The National Bison Range herd of American bison at the National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge in Flathead Valley of the U.S.Ruminant: Ruminants are mammals that are able to acquire nutrients from plant-based food by fermenting it in a specialized stomach prior to digestion, principally through microbial actions. The process typically requires the fermented ingesta (known as cud) to be regurgitated and chewed again.Anaplasmosis: Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by a rickettsial parasite of ruminants, Anaplasma spp. The microorganism is gram-negative and occurs in the red blood cells.Manure management: Manure management refers to capture, storage, treatment, and utilization of animal manures in an environmentally sustainable manner. It can be retained in various holding facilities.Bovine leukemia virus: Leucosis}}Babesia bovis: Babesia bovis is a single-celled protozoan parasite of cattle which occasionally infects humans. It is a member of the phylum Apicomplexa, which also includes the malaria parasite.Trypanosoma congolense: Trypanosoma congolense is a species of trypanosomes and is the major pathogen responsible for the disease nagana in cattle and other animals including sheep, pigs, goats, horses and camels, as well as laboratory mice. It is the most common cause of nagana in east Africa, but is also a major cause of nagana in west Africa.Bluetongue disease: Bluetongue disease is a-contagious, insect-borne, viral disease of ruminants, mainly sheep and more frequently cattle, goats, buffalo, deer, dromedaries, and antelope. It is caused by the Bluetongue virus (BTV).Bovine virus diarrhea: Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) or Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (UK English), and previously referred to as Bovine Virus Diarrhoea (BVD), is a significant economic disease of cattle which is endemic in the majority of countries throughout the world. The causative agent, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Pestivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae.New Mexico Livestock Board: The New Mexico Livestock Board regulates livestock health and livestock identification in New Mexico, in the United States. It was created in 1967 by the merger of the New Mexico Cattle Sanitary Board and the New Mexico Sheep Sanitary Board.Rinderpest: Rinderpest (also cattle plague or steppe murrain) was an infectious viral disease of cattle, domestic buffalo, and some other species of even-toed ungulates, including buffaloes, large antelope and deer, giraffes, wildebeests, and warthogs. The disease was characterized by fever, oral erosions, diarrhea, tenesmus, lymphoid necrosis, and high mortality.Four Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Deer farm: A deer farm is a fenced piece of land suitable for grazing that is populated with deer such as elk, moose, and even reindeer raised for the purpose of hunting tourism or as livestock. This practice is very different from the way such Arctic communities like the Laplanders migrate in open country with their herds of reindeer.Gestation crate: A gestation crate, also known as a sow stall, is a metal enclosure used in intensive pig farming, in which a female breeding pig (sow) may be kept during pregnancy and for most of her adult life.Wilson G.Colt Crag Reservoir: Colt Crag Reservoir is a relatively shallow reservoir in Northumberland, England adjacent to the A68 road, and north of Corbridge. The A68 road at this point runs along the course of Dere Street, a Roman road.United States Animal Identification Plan: United States Animal Identification Plan (USAIP) — Officials from approximately 70 animal industry organizations and government agencies have been working since early 2002 on a plan for a national system to identify that might follow food animals from birth to slaughter. The primary purpose is to trace animals back from slaughter through all premises within 48 hours of an animal disease outbreak, in order to determine the disease’s origin and to contain it quickly.General Mills monster-themed breakfast cerealsPRX-07034: PRX-07034 is a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist. It has cognition and memory-enhancing properties and potently decreases food intake and body weight in rodents.SilageAnaplasma: Anaplasma is a genus of rickettsiales bacteria.Abomasitis: Abomasitis (abomasal bloat) is a relatively rare ruminant disease characterized by inflammation of abomasum in young calves, lambs, and goat kids. It occurs with gastroenteritis but is seldom diagnosed as a separate condition, and its causes are as yet unknown.Festuca ovina: Sheep's fescue or sheep fescue (Festuca ovina) is a species of grass. It is sometimes also known by the common name Hard Fescue; however, that name may also be used to refer to Festuca longifolia.Indian Veterinary Research InstituteHippopotamus antiquus: Hippopotamus antiquus, sometimes called the European Hippopotamus, was a species of hippopotamus that ranged across Europe, becoming extinct some time before the last ice age at the end of the Pleistocene epoch. H.Theileria parva: Theileria parva is a parasitic protozoan, named in honour of Arnold Theiler, that causes East Coast fever (theileriosis) in cattle, a costly disease in Africa. The main vector for T.Genetic variation: right|thumbSouthern corn leaf blight: Southern corn leaf blight (SCLB) is a fungal disease of maize caused by the plant pathogen Bipolaris maydis (also known as Cochliobolus heterostrophus in its teleomorph state).Thermal cyclerMale lactation: Male lactation in zoology means production of milk from mammary glands in the presence of physiological stimuli connected with nursing infants. It is well documented in the Dayak fruit bat.BabesiosisCalifornia mastitis test: The California Mastitis Test (CMT) is a simple cow-side indicator of the somatic cell count of milk. It operates by disrupting the cell membrane of any cells present in the milk sample, allowing the DNA in those cells to react with the test reagent, forming a gel.Bovine herpesvirus 4: Bovine herpesvirus 4 is a member of the Herpesviridae family. It is part of the subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae and genus Rhadinovirus.Short-chain fatty acid: Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), also referred to as volatile fatty acids (VFAs),"Role of Volatile Fatty Acids in Development of the Cecal Microflora in Broiler Chickens during Growth" at asm.org are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail of less than six carbon atoms.PasteurellosisPrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Hoof boot: A hoof boot is a device made primarily of polyurethane and is designed to cover the hooves of a horse as an alternative to, and occasionally in addition to, horseshoes. Hoof boots can also be used as a protective device when the animal has a hoof injury that requires protection of the sole of the hoof, or to aid in the application of medication.The Unscrambler: The Unscrambler® X is a commercial software product for multivariate data analysis, used for calibration of multivariate data which is often in the application of analytical data such as near infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and development of predictive models for use in real-time spectroscopic analysis of materials. The software was originally developed in 1986 by Harald MartensHarald Martens, Terje Karstang, Tormod Næs (1987) Improved selectivity in spectroscopy by multivariate calibration Journal of Chemometrics 1(4):201-219 and later by CAMO Software.Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.Simon Carpenter: Dr. Simon Carpenter, Head of the Entomology and Modelling Group in the Vector-borne Diseases Programme at the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Institute for Animal Health’s Pirbright Laboratory in Woking, Surrey, is an entomologist who was awarded the first Rooker Prize in 2009 in recognition of his research on biting midges that transmit bluetongue virus (BTV), the causative agent of bluetongue disease, an important orbivirus disease of ruminants.Pacific ElectricColes PhillipsDNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.

(1/57984) Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas.

Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas.  (+info)

(2/57984) Induction of bovine polioencephalomalacia with a feeding system based on molasses and urea.

Polioencephalomalacia (PEM), a disease first described in the United States and related to intensive beef production, appeared in Cuba coincident with the use of a new, molasses-urea-based diet to fatten bulls. Because the only experimental means so far of reproducing PEM has been with amprolium, a structural analog of thiamin, the present study attempted to induce the disease using the molasses-urea-based diet. Six Holstein bulls (200-300 kg) were studied during consumption of three successive diets: 1) commercial molasses-urea-restricted forage diet of Cuban feedlots, 2) a period in which forage was gradually withdrawn and 3) a forage-free diet composed only of molasses, urea and fish meal. PEM was reproduced in this way. At ten-day intervals, blood concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and urea were measured, as well as when clinical signs of PEM appeared. The signs, clinical course and lesions of the experimentally induced disease were comparable to those of field cases. The biochemical results suggested a block in pyruvate oxidation as in PEM elsewhere in the world. No evidence existed of urea intoxication. In addition, brain and liver concentration of total thiamin from field cases and normal animals were found to be similar.  (+info)

(3/57984) Phagocytic acitivity of bovine leukocytes during pregnancy.

The phagocytic competence, measured as the total number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per mm3 which phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus, strain 321, in vitro, was determined in eight cows during complete pregnancies. Such leukocytes are referred to as "Active PMN'S". There was a gradual decline in the number of these cells from conception to a minimum between the 16th and 20th weeks of pregnancy, followed by a steady increase to the cessation of lactation when a marked drop occurred, after which there was an increase to a maximun during the second week prepartum. From this maximum there was a rapid decrease to an absolute minimum during the first week after parturition. From the second week postpartum there was a gradual increase to conception. The correlation coefficient (r) of number of active PMN'S with time before conception was -0.474 )p-0.01). There were significant differences (p=0.01) in numbers of active PMNS Among the eight cows. It was found that the cows fell into two groups, one whose members had, overall, significantly more active PMNs (p=0.001) than those in the second group. The between cow differences may have been due to 1) age, since the cows with the highest numbers of circulating active PMNs were younger than those in the other group of 2) the combined stress of pregnancy and lactation, as those cows which were both pregnant and milking had the lowest numbers of active PMNs.  (+info)

(4/57984) The indirect hemagglutination test for the detection of antibodies in cattle naturally infected mycoplasmas.

Stable mycoplasma antigens for the indirect hemagglutination test (IHA) were prepared employing glutaraldehyde treated sheep erythrocytes sensitized with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium antigens. Employing these antigens mycoplasma antibodies were detected in sera from cattle which had mastitic symptoms due to natural infection with either M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. A total of 200 cows from four herds were examined at varying intervals for the presence of M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and for the detection of antibody using growth inhibition and IHA tests. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 37 animals. Growth inhibiting antibody was detected from 56 of the 200 animals. In the IHA tests, antibody titer greater than or equal to 1:80 were detected in 148 animals, 76 of these having antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:160, while sera of 116 normal control animals had no growth inhibiting antibody and none had IHA antibody titers greater than 1:40. M. bovigenitalium was isolated from the milk of three of 26 animals in a fifth herd during an outbreak of mastitis. Growth inhibiting antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of ten of the 26 animals. However, the IHA test detected antibody titers of greater than or equal to 1:160 in 13 animals and of 1:80 in one of the 26 animals. To determine the specificity of the IHA tests, M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens were reacted with rabbit hyperimmune typing sera produced against 12 species of bovine mycoplasmatales. Homologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of 1:1280 and 1:2560 against M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium respectively, whereas heterologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of less than or equal to 1:20. Also eight type-specific bovine antisera were reacted with M agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens in homologous and heterologous tests. Homoogous reactions showed IHA antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:320, whereas heterologous reactions showed IHA titers of less than or equal to 1:20. This IHA test promises to be useful for the detection of bovine mycoplasma antibodies in sera from cattle infected with M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. Thes test is sensitive, reproducible and specific and the technique is relatively simple and rapid. The antigens were stable for at least seven months.  (+info)

(5/57984) Experimental production of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: comparison of serological and immunological responses using pili fractions of Moraxella bovis.

The effect of vaccinating cattle and mice on the development of keratoconjunctivitis was studied. Cattle were vaccinated with whole cells, disrupted cells and pili fractions of three strains of Moraxella bovis. Mice were vaccinated with pili fractions of three strains. The resistance of all vaccinated animals was challenged with virulent cultures of M. bovis. In an attempt to correlate the response seen after vaccination and challenge with a pili fraction of M. bovis, vaccinated cattle and mice were grouped on the basis of signs of disease manifested and compared on the basis of serological responses. Serum samples were tested for antibodies by a gel diffusion precipitin test. A greater number of the sera of resistant cattle had antibodies to the homologous pili antigen than those of vaccinated nonresistant cattle. Cattle vaccinated with disrupted cells were not resistant to infectious bovine kerato-conjuctivitis and their sera lacked antibodies against the pili antigens. Vaccinated mice were more resistant to infectious bovine kerato-conjuctivitis and their sera lacked antibodies against the pili antigens. Vaccinated mice were more resistant to challenge exposure by homologous than heterologous cultures. A greater number of the sera of resistant mice had antibodies to pili antigens than nonresistant mice.  (+info)

(6/57984) Lead and mercury residues in kidney and liver of Canadian slaughter animals.

Liver and kidney samples were collected from Canadian slaughter animals during the winter of 1973-1974. A total of 256 samples were analyzed for lead. Mean lead levels of 1.02 ppm in poultry liver, 1.04 ppm in bovine liver, 1.02 ppm in bovine kidney, 0.73 ppm in pork liver and 0.85 ppm in pork kidney were found. A total of 265 samples were analyzed for mercury. Mean mercury levels of 0.003 ppm in poultry liver, 0.007 ppm in bovine liver, 0.008 ppm in bovine kidney, 0.001 ppm in pork liver and 0.013 ppm in pork kidney were found. All levels detected were below the Canadian official tolerance of 2 ppm for lead and administrative tolerance of 0.5 ppm for mercury.  (+info)

(7/57984) Bovine mastitis in Ontario due to Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis.

Bovine mastitis caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis was first diagnosed in 16 of 55 cows in an Ontario herd in Feburary 1972. A total of 182 of 598 (30.4%) cows from 33 of 64 (51.5%) farms in widely separated areas of the province were culturally positive. Herd incidence varied from 15 to 40% with one closed herd having an incidence of 61%. Four herds were investigated culturally and serologically by the growth inhibition test for 15 months. In the acute phase the organism was present in the milk in extremely high numbers and could still be isolated from a few cows after eight to 12 months. The sera from 89.5% of the animals with clinical mycoplasma mastitis produced a zone of surface "film" and/or colony inhibition and some cows remained positive for six to 12 months. The disease was experimentally reproduced with a pure culture of the organism isolated from the milk of a cow from one of the herds.  (+info)

(8/57984) Some leptospira agglutinins detected in domestic animals in British Columbia.

During a period of six years 7,555 bovine sera, 421 canine sera, 251 porcine sera and 135 equine sera were tested for agglutinins to Leptospira interrogans serotypes canicola, grippotyphosa, hardjo, icterohemorrhagiae, pomona and sejroe. The bovine sera reacted predominantly with hardjo and/or sejroe at a rate of 15% compared to 3.5% with pomona. Breeding or abortion problems were associated with pomona but not with sejroe/hardjo agglutinins. The canine sera reacted to canicola (9.9%y and icterohemorrhagiae (5.4%), tcted predominantly with canicola (8.9%) and icterohemorrhagiae (8.1%).  (+info)



pathogens


  • Every year billions of dollars of loss is attributed to R.(B) microplus, mainly through loss of cattle due to pathogens transmitted such as Babesia and Anaplasma, but also through damage to hides from blood-feeding. (gla.ac.uk)

bovine


  • The resulting disease is part of the bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) and is considered as the most significant illness associated with feedlot cattle in the USA [ 5 ], and possibly worldwide. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Abattoir monitoring and trace-back systems are an appropriate method to control bovine tuberculosis, particularly in beef cattle. (vetsci.org)
  • In the present study, a trace-back system was applied to bovine tuberculosis outbreaks of Korean native Hanwoo beef cattle. (vetsci.org)
  • Bovine tuberculosis was detected in three index beef cattle during abattoir monitoring in Jeonbuk Province, Korea, and the original herds were traced back from each index cattle. (vetsci.org)
  • These results suggest that tracing back from the index cattle to the original herd is an effective method to control bovine tuberculosis in beef cattle. (vetsci.org)

high


  • At high altitudes (above 2120 m), cattle suffer from congestive heart failure (swainsonine influences the vascular system). (gc.ca)
  • The relationship of Oxytropis sericea (green and dry) and Astragalus lentiginosus with high mountain disease in cattle. (gc.ca)