Cat-Scratch Disease: A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.Bartonella henselae: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY). This organism can also be a cause of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Bartonella: A genus of gram-negative bacteria characteristically appearing in chains of several segmenting organisms. It occurs in man and arthropod vectors and is found only in the Andes region of South America. This genus is the etiologic agent of human bartonellosis. The genus Rochalimaea, once considered a separate genus, has recently been combined with the genus Bartonella as a result of high levels of relatedness in 16S rRNA sequence data and DNA hybridization data.Splenic DiseasesBartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Retinitis: Inflammation of the RETINA. It is rarely limited to the retina, but is commonly associated with diseases of the choroid (CHORIORETINITIS) and of the OPTIC DISK (neuroretinitis).Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.

*  NewYork-Presbyterian Queens - Cat Scratch Disease
Cat Scratch Disease. What is cat scratch disease?. Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection ... Treatment for cat scratch disease. Specific treatment for cat scratch disease will be determined by your doctor based on the ... What are the symptoms of cat scratch disease?. The following are the most common symptoms of cat scratch disease. However, each ... Rubbing the eyes after petting a cat's fur can also spread cat scratch disease. Young kittens younger than 1 year of age are ...
  http://www.nyhq.org/diw/Content.asp?PageID=DIW000821&More=OTH
*  This Bassett High sophomore beat cancer - and now her school is celebrating her for it
After some prodding, they told her father that Alexus had cat-scratch disease. Amadeo Rodriguez pushed back on that diagnosis ... Along with their pink ribbons, her classmates wore green ones representing awareness of the disease. ... and there had been no time in the preceding weeks when Alexus could have been scratched by one. ...
  http://www.sgvtribune.com/2017/11/26/this-bassett-high-sophomore-beat-cancer-and-now-her-school-is-celebrating-her-for-it/
*  Parotid mass due to cat scratch disease - PETROGIANNOPOULOS - 2006 - International Journal of Clinical Practice - Wiley Online...
Cat scratch disease (CSD), due to Bartonella henselae, is a self-limited chronic lymphadenopathy. A previously healthy 22-year- ... Parotid mass due to cat scratch disease. Authors. *. C. PETROGIANNOPOULOS,. * Second Department of Medicine, Red Cross Hospital ... Rabindra Pratap Singh, Khalid Abdel-Galil, Matthew Harbottle, Martin R. Telfer, Parotid gland disease in childhood: diagnosis ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1742-1241.2005.00657.x/full
*  cat scratch fever [Lymphedema People]
What is cat scratch disease?. Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Most people with ... How can I find more information about cat scratch disease?. Cat-Scratch Disease in Children-Texas, September 2000-August 2001. ... Treating cat-scratch disease (lymphoreticulosis). Symptoms of cat-scratch disease . Incubation period lasts from 3 to 20 days. ... Extractions: Cat-scratch disease (benign lymphoreticulosis) Â- infectious disease associated with a history of scratches, bites ...
  http://lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=cat_scratch_fever
*  Cat Scratch Disease
What are the possible outcomes of cat scratch disease?. Cat scratch disease is a self-limited disease that resolves without ... What causes this disease and how frequent is it?. Cat scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, a fastidious, slow- ... How can cat scratch disease be prevented?. Prevention of CSD includes elimination of cat fleas from cats and avoidance of ... Are you sure your patient has cat scratch disease? What are the typical findings for this disease?. The most common clinical ...
  http://www.psychiatryadvisor.com/pediatrics/cat-scratch-disease/article/624667/
*  Cat Scratch Disease in Humans - Pets
... commonly called cat scratch fever, is an infection caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium carried in the saliva of infected ... Doctors often diagnose cat scratch disease if you have a cat scratch or bite along with swollen lymph nodes, but some ... Cat scratch disease, commonly called cat scratch fever, is an infection caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium carried in ... Center for the Disease Control and Prevention: Cat Scratch Disease. *Texas A&M University Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical ...
  https://pets.thenest.com/cat-scratch-disease-humans-10463.html
*  Cat Vet Clinic - FAQ
Cat-scratch disease, also called bartonellosis, is by far the most common zoonotic disease associated with cats. Cat-scratch ... Avoiding scratches and bites, controlling fleas, and keeping cats indoors all reduce the risk of cat-scratch disease. ... People with cat-scratch disease usually have swollen lymph nodes, especially around the head, neck, and upper limbs. They may ... Fleas may also serve as vectors for cat-scratch and other zoonotic diseases. Flea-infested cats may become infected with ...
  http://catvetclinic.com/faq
*  Bengal Cat Forums • View topic - Cat Scratch Disease?
Has anyone ever had Cat scratch disease or cat scratch fever? BB scratched my upper arm about 2 weeks ago , last week I had a ... even a minor scratch as soon as it happens but previously working as a nurse noticed these symptoms as cat scratch disease ... He died from this cat scratch believe it or not because he was so stubborn and stupid. I know this to be true because he was my ... You have resurrected a topic that is 4 years old! Any time you have a deep scratch from a cat, you want to clean it with soap ...
  http://www.bengalcatforums.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=190060
*  cat diseases from fleas • Cat Care
Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is a common and usually harmless infectious disease induced by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. It ...
  http://howtotakecareofacat.com/cat-health/cat-diseases-from-fleas/
*  CSD skin test
The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help diagnose CSD. The test is no longer used today. There are better ... Results for cat, cat scratch disease skin test, csd, csd skin test, disease ... Bartonella, including cat-scratch disease. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles ... The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help diagnose CSD. ...
  https://www.baptistjax.com/health-library/test/csd-skin-test
*  All About Cats: Cat Scratch Disease - My Cat Just Scratched Me, What Do I Do?
... cat scratch disease occurs when the person was scratched or bitten by his cat. The cat itself does not catch cat scratch ... Cat scratch disease is also known as cat scratch fever. This disease strikes people who are infected by the Bartonella henselae ... Cat Scratch Disease - My Cat Just Scratched Me, What Do I Do? ... As you can see, cat scratch disease is not a big deal. As long ... Are you still worried about cat scratch disease? Click here to learn more ways to stop cat scratching. ...
  http://aa-cats.blogspot.com/2013/08/cat-scratch-disease-my-cat-just.html
*  Cat Scratch Disease
The bacteria are passed from a cat to a human after the cat licks its paws then scratches human skin. ... Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection carried in cat saliva. ... Cat Scratch Disease. What is cat scratch disease?. Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection ... What causes cat scratch disease?. Cat scratch disease is caused by a bacterium carried in the cat saliva. The bacteria are ...
  http://healthsource.sw.org/Library/Encyclopedia/85,P00821
*  Cat-Scratch Disease - familydoctor.org
It's caused by bacteria in cat saliva. It's usually not severe. ... disease is an infection you can get after a cat scratches, ... Cat-scratch disease is an infection you can get after a cat scratches, bites, or licks you. It is caused by bacteria in cat ... Tags: Bartonella Henselae, Cat scratch disease, cat scratch fever, CSD, disease transmitted by pets ... Cat-scratch disease is also called cat-scratch fever. It is not a severe illness in healthy people. But it can be a problem for ...
  https://familydoctor.org/condition/cat-scratch-disease/
*  CAT SCRATCH DISEASE
... (CSD) is caused by Bartonella henselae, a gram-negative bacterium. As the name ... Of the true zoonoses, a few diseases account for most of the questions: cat scratch disease, larva migrans, rabies, and ... CAT SCRATCH DISEASE. Michael G. Groves, DVM, MPH, PhD, DACVPM (Epidemiol), Professor and Department Head, Department of ... Flea bites may well be the means of cat-to-cat transmission of B. henselae. Experimental studies have shown that the cat flea ...
  http://maxshouse.com/Cat_Scratch_Disease.htm
*  Cat Scratch Disease (Bartonella henselae Infection)
... Commonly abbreviated as CSD, Cat Scratch Disease is an infectious disease ... To prevent CSD, cat owners should be careful not to get scratched and bitten by cats, especially when they are still kittens. ... It is impossible to tell whether or not a cat can spread the disease to their owner. ... If you experience a wound from a cat, wash the wounds thoroughly with soap and water. Avoid coming in contact with your cat if ...
  http://www.medic8.com/infectious-diseases/catscratch-disease.htm
*  Cat Scratch Disease - Health Encyclopedia - University of Rochester Medical Center
Cat Scratch Disease. What is cat scratch disease?. Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection ... What causes cat scratch disease?. Cat scratch disease is caused by a bacterium carried in the cat saliva. The bacteria are ... What are the symptoms of cat scratch disease?. These are the most common symptoms of cat scratch disease:. *A cat bite or ... Key points about cat scratch fever. *Cat scratch disease is an infection caused by a bacterium in cat saliva. ...
  https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=85&ContentID=P00821&redir=urmc.rochester.edu
*  Cat-scratch disease | Health Encyclopedia | FloridaHealthFinder.gov
CSD; Cat-scratch fever; Bartonellosis. Causes. Cat-scratch disease is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. The disease ... Cat-scratch disease is an infection with bartonella bacteria that is believed to be transmitted by cat scratches, cat bites, or ... If you have swollen lymph nodes and a scratch or bite from a cat, your health care provider may suspect cat-scratch disease. ... To prevent cat-scratch disease:. *Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after playing with your cat. Especially wash ...
  http://www.floridahealthfinder.gov/healthencyclopedia/Health%20Illustrated%20Encyclopedia/1/001614.aspx
*  What is cat scratch disease?
Cat Scratch Disease. Cat scratch disease is also called 'cat scratch fever,' and it is a real disease that you can get from ... Does declawing stop my cat from giving me cat scratch disease?. No. It is in the cat itself, so you could still get it, and a ... Fleas transmit it from cat to cat - but at this time it is thought that they can't transmit it to people. However, the disease ... First of all, even most people who get scratched don't get it. Second, this is not a disease that you get multiple times. No ...
  http://fleascontrol.com/cat-scratch-disease.htm
*  Cat Scratch Disease - The Bartonella hensalae Virus
... to humans when a cat that is infected with the Bartonella hensalae virus passes that virus through a bite or scratch. ... Cat scratch disease is transmitted to humans when a cat that is infected with the Bartonella hensalae virus passes that virus ... There is no evidence that a human can get cat scratch disease by being bitten by a flea that has also bitten an infected cat. ... There is no need to destroy a cat that has the bacteria that causes cat scratch disease. Even if someone in your home has been ...
  https://www.professorshouse.com/cat-scratch-disease/
*  Cat Scratch Disease - The Clinical Advisor
What are the possible outcomes of cat scratch disease?. Cat scratch disease is a self-limited disease that resolves without ... What causes this disease and how frequent is it?. Cat scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, a fastidious, slow- ... How can cat scratch disease be prevented?. Prevention of CSD includes elimination of cat fleas from cats and avoidance of ... Are you sure your patient has cat scratch disease? What are the typical findings for this disease?. The most common clinical ...
  http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/pediatrics/cat-scratch-disease/article/624663/
*  Testing & Diagnosis for Cat Scratch Disease | Boston Children's Hospital
Learn more about Cat Scratch Disease testing and diagnosis from experts at Boston Children's, ranked best Children's Hospital ...
  http://www.childrenshospital.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions/cat-scratch-disease/testing-and-diagnosis
*  Cat Scratch Disease Presenting as Breast Cancer: A Report of an Unusual Case
A. M. Margileth, "Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of cat scratch disease," Current Infectious Disease Reports, vol. ... Benign lymphoreticulosis (cat scratch disease, CSD) is a zoonotic disease from Bartonella henselae, which usually manifests as ... "Cat-scratch disease presenting as a breast mass," Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 36, no. 6-7, pp. 494-495, ... B. B. Chomel, "Cat-scratch disease," OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 136-150, 2000. View at Google ...
  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/crionm/2013/507504/
*  Cat Scratch Disease (Bartonella henselae) - Minnesota Dept. of Health
Cat Scratch Disease (Bartonella henselae). Cat scratch disease (CSD), also called cat scratch fever, is a bacterial infection ... About Cat Scratch Disease. CSD facts including how the disease is spread, common symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention ... Cat Scratch Disease. *Cat Scratch Disease Home. *About Cat Scratch Disease. Related Topics. *Reporting Cat Scratch Disease ... Reporting Cat Scratch Disease (Infection Caused by Bartonella spp.) Healthcare providers and clinical laboratories are required ...
  http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/bartonella/
*  Cat-scratch disease - causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com
... which is also called subacute regional lymphadenitis or catscratch fever, is characterized as a bacterial infection that a ... ... Known side effects of cat-scratch disease. One thing you would first notice on a person that has a cat-scratch disease is a ... Food items or nutrients that may prevent cat-scratch disease. There are around a dozen treatments for cat-scratch disease. ... Treatments, management plans for cat-scratch disease. Physicians diagnose cat-scratch disease depending on a child's history of ...
  https://naturalpedia.com/cat-scratch-disease-causes-side-effects-and-treatments-at-naturalpedia-com.html
*  Articles about West Nile Virus - tribunedigital-glendalenews-press
"We thought it was the cat jumping down from the tree or carport," Andrus said Tuesday. "We thought, 'That was really weird to ... A mosquito sample collected in Glendale tested positive for West Nile virus, making it the first sign of the disease in the ... The woman suffered minor scratches to her knees and elbows, Lorenz said. ... A mosquito sample collected in Glendale tested positive for West Nile virus, making it the first sign of the disease in the ...
  http://articles.glendalenewspress.com/keyword/west-nile-virus

(1/178) Cat-scratch disease with paravertebral mass and osteomyelitis.

The case of a 9-year-old girl with cat-scratch disease (CSD) complicated by development of a paravertebral mass and osteomyelitis is presented. Following multiple scratches and inguinal lymphadenopathy, she developed back pain, and imaging demonstrated a paravertebral mass with evidence of osteomyelitis involving vertebra T9. The diagnosis was made on the basis of detection of Bartonella henselae by use of molecular techniques on an aspirate from the vertebral column and supportive serology for infection with B. henselae. Eleven other cases of this unusual manifestation associated with CSD have been reported in the literature and are reviewed. The patient was treated with gentamicin, followed by rifampicin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, orally and made a favorable recovery over 7 months. This is comparable with other case reports, regardless of the choice of antibiotic therapy. CSD in immunocompetent hosts is not always self-limiting, and tissues beyond the lymph nodes can be involved.  (+info)

(2/178) Detection of Bartonella henselae DNA by two different PCR assays and determination of the genotypes of strains involved in histologically defined cat scratch disease.

Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a common cause of subacute regional lymphadenopathy, not only in children but also in adults. Serological and molecular studies demonstrated that Bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent in most cases of CSD. Amplification of B. henselae DNA in affected tissue and detection of antibodies to B. henselae are the two mainstays in the laboratory diagnosis of CSD. We designed a retrospective study and investigated formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 60 patients (25 female, 35 male) with histologically suspected CSD by PCR amplification. The sensitivities of two different PCR assays were compared. The first primer pair amplified a 296-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene in 36 of the 60 samples, corresponding to a sensitivity of 60%. The second primer pair amplified a 414-bp fragment of the htrA gene in 26 of the 60 lymph nodes, corresponding to a sensitivity of 43.3%. Bartonella DNA could be detected in a total of 39 (65%) of the 60 lymph nodes investigated. However, histopathologic findings are typical but not specific for CSD and cannot be considered as a "gold standard" for diagnosis of CSD. The sensitivity of the PCR assays increased from 65 to 87% if two criteria (histology and serology) were used in combination for diagnosis of CSD. Two genotypes (I and II) of B. henselae are described as being involved in CSD. Genotype I was found in 23 (59%) and genotype II was found in 9 (23%) of the 39 PCR-positive lymph nodes. Seven (18%) lymph nodes were negative in both type-specific PCR assays. Thirty (50%) of our 60 patients were younger than 20 years old (15 were younger than 10 years), 20 (33%) were between 21 and 40 years old, and 10 (17%) patients were between 41 and 84 years old. Our data suggest that detection of Bartonella DNA in patients' samples might confirm the histologically suspected diagnosis of CSD.  (+info)

(3/178) Clinical and pathologic evaluation of chronic Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae infection in cats.

Human Bartonella infections result in diverse medical presentations, whereas many cats appear to tolerate chronic bacteremia without obvious clinical abnormalities. Eighteen specific-pathogen-free cats were inoculated with Bartonella henselae- and/or Bartonella clarridgeiae-infected cat blood and monitored for 454 days. Relapsing bacteremia did not correlate with changes in protein profiles or differences in antigenic protein recognition. Intradermal skin testing did not induce a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to cat scratch disease skin test antigen. Thirteen cats were euthanatized at the end of the study. Despite persistent infection, clinical signs were minimal and gross necropsy results were unremarkable. Histopathology revealed peripheral lymph node hyperplasia (in all of the 13 cats), splenic follicular hyperplasia (in 9 cats), lymphocytic cholangitis/pericholangitis (in 9 cats), lymphocytic hepatitis (in 6 cats), lymphoplasmacytic myocarditis (in 8 cats), and interstitial lymphocytic nephritis (in 4 cats). Structures suggestive of Bartonella were visualized in some Warthin-Starry stained sections, and Bartonella DNA was amplified from the lymph node (from 6 of the 13 cats), liver (from 11 cats) heart (from 8 cats), kidney (from 9 cats), lung (from 2 cats), and brain (from 9 cats). This study indicates that B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae can induce chronic infection following blood transfusion in specific-pathogen-free cats and that Bartonella DNA can be detected in blood, brain, lymph node, myocardium, liver, and kidney tissues of both blood culture-positive cats and blood culture-negative cats. Detection of histologic changes in these cats supports a potential etiologic role for Bartonella species in several idiopathic disease processes in cats.  (+info)

(4/178) Culture of Bartonella quintana and Bartonella henselae from human samples: a 5-year experience (1993 to 1998).

Bartonella quintana and Bartonella henselae are fastidious gram-negative bacteria responsible for bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever, cat scratch disease, and endocarditis. During a 5-year period, we received 2,043 samples for culture of Bartonella sp. We found Bartonella sp. to be the etiologic agent in 38 cases of endocarditis, 78 cases of cat scratch disease, 16 cases of bacteremia in homeless people, and 7 cases of bacillary angiomatosis. We correlated the results of positive cultures with the clinical form of the disease, type of sample, culture procedure, PCR-based genomic detection, and antibody determination. Seventy-two isolates of B. quintana and nine isolates of B. henselae from 43 patients were obtained. Sixty-three of the B. quintana isolates and two of the B. henselae isolates, obtained from patients with no prior antibiotic therapy, were stably subcultured. The sensitivity of culture was low when compared with that of PCR-based detection methods in valves of patients with endocarditis (44 and 81%, respectively), skin biopsy samples of patients with bacillary angiomatosis (43 and 100%, respectively), and lymph nodes of cat scratch disease (13 and 30%, respectively). Serological diagnosis was also more sensitive in cases of endocarditis (97%) and cat scratch disease (90%). Among endocarditis patients, the sensitivity of the shell vial culture assay was 28% when inoculated with blood samples and 44% when inoculated with valvular biopsy samples, and the sensitivity of both was significantly higher than that of culture on agar (5% for blood [P = 0.045] and 4% for valve biopsy samples [P < 0.0005]). The most efficient culture procedure was the subculture of blood culture broth into shell vials (sensitivity, 71%). For patients with endocarditis, previous antibiotic therapy significantly affected results of blood culture; no patient who had been administered antibiotics yielded a positive blood culture, whereas 80% of patients with no previous antibiotic therapy yielded positive blood cultures (P = 0.0006). Previous antibiotic therapy did not, however, prevent isolation of Bartonella sp. from cardiac valves but did prevent the establishment of strains, as none of the 15 isolates from treated patients could be successfully subcultured. For the diagnosis of B. quintana bacteremia in homeless people, the efficiency of systematic subculture of blood culture broth onto agar was higher than that of direct blood plating (respective sensitivities, 98 and 10% [P < 10(-7)]). Nevertheless, both procedures are complementary, since when used together their sensitivity reached 100%. All homeless people with positive blood cultures had negative serology. The isolation rate of B. henselae from PCR-positive lymph nodes, in patients with cat scratch disease, was significantly lower than that from valves of endocarditis patients and skin biopsy samples from bacillary angiomatosis patients (13 and 33%, respectively [P = 0.084]). In cases of bacillary angiomatosis for which an agent was identified to species level, the isolation rate of B. henselae was lower than the isolation rate of B. quintana (28 and 64%, respectively [P = 0.003]). If culture is to be considered an efficient tool for the diagnosis of several Bartonella-related diseases, methodologies need to be improved, notably for the recovery of B. henselae from lymph nodes of patients with cat scratch disease.  (+info)

(5/178) Acute clinical disease in cats following infection with a pathogenic strain of Bartonella henselae (LSU16).

Bartonella henselae is the causative agent of human cat scratch disease as well as several serious sequelae of infections, including bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis. Conflicting reports describe the pathogenesis of B. henselae in the cat. In this study, we characterized a strain of B. henselae termed LSU16. This strain was isolated on rabbit blood agar from a naturally infected 10-month-old female cat during a recurrent episode of bacteremia. The bacterial species was confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Nine cats were infected intradermally with 5 x 10(7) CFU of LSU16, and clinical signs, antibody responses, and bacteremia were monitored. All nine cats developed raised, erythematous areas at the site of inoculation within 72 h postinoculation; the swelling peaked at 14 days postinfection and was not palpable by 28 days postinfection. Fever developed in all nine cats between 6 and 16 days postinfection and lasted for 1 to 8 days. Between 6 and 16 days postinfection, all nine cats experienced lethargy which persisted 5 to 18 days. Seven of nine cats were bacteremic by day 7, and all nine cats had become bacteremic by 14 days postinfection. Bacteremia peaked at 14 to 28 days postinfection in all cats. In six of the nine infected cats, bacterial numbers reached nondetectable levels during the 7th week postinfection; however, a single animal maintained bacteremia to 18 weeks postinfection. All nine cats developed strong antibody responses to B. henselae, as determined by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subsequently, three naive cats were injected intradermally with blood from cats infected with LSU16 from a pure culture, and five naive cats were injected with feces from fleas which had been feeding on cats infected with a pure culture of LSU16. These cats developed signs similar to those described in the previous experiment and were euthanized at 5 weeks postinfection. We conclude that B. henselae LSU16 is a virulent strain of B. henselae in cats and propose that the virulence of B. henselae in cats is strain dependent.  (+info)

(6/178) Presumed ocular bartonellosis.

BACKGROUND: The spectrum of diseases caused by Bartonella henselae continues to expand and ocular involvement during this infection is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. METHODS: The clinical features and visual prognosis for 13 patients with intraocular inflammatory disease and laboratory evidence of bartonellosis were investigated. There were nine patients with neuroretinitis and four with panuveitis with positive antibody titres against B henselae determined by an enzyme immunoassay (IgG exceeding 1:900 and/or IgM exceeding 1:250). RESULTS: Positive IgG levels were found for eight patients and positive IgM levels for five. Despite animal exposure of 10 patients, only two (IgG positive) cases had systemic symptoms consistent with the diagnosis of cat scratch disease. Pathological fluorescein leakage of the optic disc was observed in all affected eyes. At 6 months' follow up, 3/18 (17%) affected eyes had a visual acuity of less than 20/100, owing to optic disc atrophy and cystoid macular oedema. 12 patients (17 eyes) were treated with antibiotics; visual acuity improved two or more Snellen lines for 9/17 (53%) eyes. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility of B henselae infection should be considered in patients with neuroretinitis and panuveitis (especially in cases with associated optic nerve involvement) even in the absence of systemic symptoms typical for cat scratch disease.  (+info)

(7/178) Identification of Bartonella-specific immunodominant antigens recognized by the feline humoral immune system.

The seroreactivities of both naturally and experimentally infected cats to Bartonella henselae was examined. Serum samples collected weekly from nine cats experimentally infected with B. henselae LSU16 were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis. The magnitude and isotype of the antibody response were investigated by ELISA. Western blot analysis allowed the identification of at least 24 Bartonella-specific antigens recognized by the cats during infection. Antibody titers to specific antigens, as determined by Western blot analysis, ranged from 10 to 640 and varied among the different antibody-antigen interactions. Absorption of sera from an experimentally infected cat, using whole cells and cell lysates of various Bartonella species and other bacteria that commonly colonize cats, supported the identification of those Bartonella-specific antigens recognized by the experimentally infected cats. Furthermore, a number of possible species- and type-specific antigens were identified. Finally, sera obtained from cats at local animal shelters were screened for the presence of antibodies directed against the Bartonella-specific bands identified in the experimentally infected cats. A number of Bartonella-specific antigens have been identified to which strong antibody responses are generated in both experimentally and naturally infected cats, some of which may be useful in diagnosing species- and/or type-specific infections. In addition, the results from these experiments will lead to the development of monoclonal antibodies targeted against those genus-, species-, and type-specific antigens.  (+info)

(8/178) Characterization of Bartonella henselae-specific immunity in BALB/c mice.

BALB/c mice were inoculated with Bartonella henselae by both systemic and mucosal routes. Culture analysis of tissues from mice infected intraperitoneally with a high dose of B. henselae yielded positive results 24 hr after infection. However, culture analysis of blood taken between 6 hr and 7 days after infection from groups receiving live B. henselae were negative. Following intraperitoneal infection, B. henselae was detected by polymerase chain reaction in liver and mesenteric lymph nodes by 6 hr and up to 7 days after infection in liver, kidney and spleen tissue. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of serum samples collected as early as 13 days after infection indicated humoral immune responses to B. henselae. Specific humoral responses remained through week 6. Analysis of faecal samples revealed induction of B. henselae-specific immunoglobulin A by day 28 after infection. In addition, B. henselae-specific cellular responses were indicated by a positive delayed-type hypersensitivity and a T helper 1 (Th1) (CD4+ T cell)-type cytokine response following in vitro stimulation of splenocytes. The significance and implications of these data in relation to B. henselae infections are discussed.  (+info)



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  • The patient's health history and the physical exam combined help the doctor know if your cat is healthy or if something may be wrong. (catvetclinic.com)