Campylobacter: A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.Campylobacter jejuni: A species of bacteria that resemble small tightly coiled spirals. Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and enteritis in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs, and other animals.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Campylobacter fetus: A species of bacteria present in man and many kinds of animals and birds, often causing infertility and/or abortion.Campylobacter coli: A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of swine, poultry, and man. It may be pathogenic.Campylobacter lari: A species of thermophilic CAMPYLOBACTER found in healthy seagulls and causing ENTERITIS in humans.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Campylobacter rectus: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from cases of human PERIODONTITIS. It is a microaerophile, capable of respiring with OXYGEN.Flagellin: A protein with a molecular weight of 40,000 isolated from bacterial flagella. At appropriate pH and salt concentration, three flagellin monomers can spontaneously reaggregate to form structures which appear identical to intact flagella.Guillain-Barre Syndrome: An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. Demyelination occurs in peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process is often preceded by a viral or bacterial infection, surgery, immunization, lymphoma, or exposure to toxins. Common clinical manifestations include progressive weakness, loss of sensation, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Weakness of respiratory muscles and autonomic dysfunction may occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1312-1314)DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Poultry Products: Food products manufactured from poultry.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Arcobacter: A genus of gram-negative, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacteria isolated from water and associated with diarrhea in humans and animals.Polyradiculoneuropathy: Diseases characterized by injury or dysfunction involving multiple peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process may primarily affect myelin or nerve axons. Two of the more common demyelinating forms are acute inflammatory polyradiculopathy (GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME) and POLYRADICULONEUROPATHY, CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY DEMYELINATING. Polyradiculoneuritis refers to inflammation of multiple peripheral nerves and spinal nerve roots.Campylobacter hyointestinalis: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from the INTESTINES of PIGS with proliferative ENTERITIS. It is also found in CATTLE and in CRICETINAE and can cause enteritis in humans.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Campylobacter upsaliensis: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from DOGS; CATS; and humans.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Cloaca: A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Hippurates: Salts and esters of hippuric acid.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Erythromycin: A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Campylobacter sputorum: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER comprised of three biovars based on their reaction to CATALASE and UREASE. They have been isolated from humans, CATTLE, and SHEEP.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Multilocus Sequence Typing: Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.Miller Fisher Syndrome: A variant of the GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME characterized by the acute onset of oculomotor dysfunction, ataxia, and loss of deep tendon reflexes with relative sparing of strength in the extremities and trunk. The ataxia is produced by peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction and not by cerebellar injury. Facial weakness and sensory loss may also occur. The process is mediated by autoantibodies directed against a component of myelin found in peripheral nerves. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1313; Neurology 1987 Sep;37(9):1493-8)Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Helicobacter: A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans. It has been associated with PEPTIC ULCER.Abortion, Septic: Any type of abortion, induced or spontaneous, that is associated with infection of the UTERUS and its appendages. It is characterized by FEVER, uterine tenderness, and foul discharge.RNA, Ribosomal, 23S: Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Bacteroidaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria found primarily in the intestinal tracts and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Its organisms are sometimes pathogenic.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Nalidixic Acid: A synthetic 1,8-naphthyridine antimicrobial agent with a limited bacteriocidal spectrum. It is an inhibitor of the A subunit of bacterial DNA GYRASE.Fluoroquinolones: A group of QUINOLONES with at least one fluorine atom and a piperazinyl group.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Gastritis: Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Molecular Mimicry: The structure of one molecule that imitates or simulates the structure of a different molecule.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Shigella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that ferments sugar without gas production. Its organisms are intestinal pathogens of man and other primates and cause bacillary dysentery (DYSENTERY, BACILLARY).Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.

*  Banham Poultry and Akeso Biomedical Partner to Reduce Foodborne Illness due to Campylobacter

Banham Poultry and Akeso Biomedical today announced a partnership focused on controlling Campylobacter ... We still don't know the source of Campylobacter, which is what makes it so difficult to control. This feed additive could give ... The partnership will seek to significantly reduce the levels of Campylobacter in chickens raised on the farm as part of an ... "We are delighted to partner with Banham Poultry to develop our Fe3C technology for the reduction of Campylobacter in poultry,' ...
prweb.com/releases/banhamandakesopartnerto/fightcampylobacter2015/prweb12906780.htm

*  Campylobacter pyloridis degrades mucin and undermines gastric mucosal integrity. - PubMed - NCBI

Campylobacter pyloridis degrades mucin and undermines gastric mucosal integrity.. Slomiany BL, Bilski J, Sarosiek J, Murty VL, ... The role of Campylobacter pyloridis, a spiral bacteria associated with gastritis and peptic ulcers in weakening the mucus ...
https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3579908

*  Campylobacter hominis Lawson et al. ATCC ® BAA-381D-5™

Genomic DNA from Campylobacter hominis strain LMG 19568 TypeStrain=True Application: ... Campylobacter hominis Lawson et al. (ATCC® BAA-381D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from Campylobacter hominis strain LMG ... Campylobacter hominis Lawson et al. ATCC® BAA-381D-5™ dried Total DNA: At least 5 µg in 1X TE buffer. OD260/OD280: 1.6 to 2.1 ... Genomic DNA from Campylobacter hominis strain LMG 19568 [ATCC® BAA-381™] Biosafety Level 1 Biosafety classification is based on ...
https://atcc.org/en/Global/Products/1/4/3/7/BAA-381D-5.aspx

*  mericon Campylobacter spp Kit - QIAGEN Online Shop

For real-time PCR detection of Campylobacter subspecies in food or animal feed ... The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is for real-time PCR-based detection of Campylobacter species in food, animal feed, and ... The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is designed for the target-specific detection of Campylobacter species DNA in food, animal ... The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is for the specific detection of several Campylobacter species in enrichment cultures of food ...
https://qiagen.com/dk/shop/detection-solutions/food-safety/mericon-campylobacter-spp-kit/

*  KEGG PATHWAY: D-Alanine metabolism - Campylobacter curvus

D-Alanine metabolism - Campylobacter curvus [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , User data mapping ...
genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?ccv00473 CCV52592_1152

*  Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain

jejuni ATCC ® 43446D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni Strain MK104 TypeStrain=False ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain ATCC® 43446D-5™ dried Total DNA: At least 5 µg in 1X TE ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain (ATCC® 43446D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain (ATCC® 43446™) Add to ...
https://atcc.org/Products/All/43446D-5.aspx?slp=1?p=1&rel={0}

*  Campylobacter rectus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. ATCC ® 33238D

Genomic DNA from Campylobacter rectus strain FDC 371 (ATCC ® 33238™) TypeStrain=True Application: ... Campylobacter rectus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. (ATCC® 33238D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from Campylobacter ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : L04317 Campylobacter rectus, complete 16S ribosomal RNA. Nucleotide (GenBank) : AB001876 Campylobacter ... Campylobacter rectus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. ATCC® 33238D-5™ freeze-dried At least 5 µg in 1X TE buffer ...
https://atcc.org/Products/All/33238D-5.aspx?slp=1

*  RCSB PDB - 4IYL: 30S ribosomal protein S15 from Campylobacter jejuni Structure Summary Page

30S ribosomal protein S15 from Campylobacter jejuni ... Campylobacter jejuni Gene Name(s): rpsO Cj0884 Metabolic ...
rcsb.org/pdb/explore/explore.do?structureId=4IYL

*  Campylobacter curvus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. ATCC ® BAA-14

Campylobacter curvus ATCC ® BAA-1459™ Designation: RM 4077 TypeStrain=False Application: ... Campylobacter curvus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. (ATCC® BAA-1459™) Strain Designations: RM 4077 [525.92, cc8, NR-438] / ... Campylobacter curvus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. ATCC® BAA-1459™ freeze-dried ... Campylobacter curvus (Tanner et al.) Vandamme et al. (ATCC® BAA-1459D-5™) ...
https://atcc.org/en/Products/Cells_and_Microorganisms/By_Focus_Area/Comparative_Genome_Sequencing/BAA-1459.aspx

*  Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni serotype O:6 (strain 81116 / NCTC 11828)

Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni NCTC 11828. › Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni str. 81116. › Campylobacter jejuni subsp. ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni serotype O:6 (strain 81116 / NCTC 11828). Taxonomy navigation. › Campylobacter jejuni subsp ... Taxonomy - Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni serotype O:6 (strain 81116 / NCTC 11828) Basket 0 ...
uniprot.org/taxonomy/407148

*  Frontiers | Campylobacter concisus - A New Player in Intestinal Disease | Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology

Over the last decade Campylobacter concisus, a highly fastidious member of the Campylobacter genus has been described as an emergent pathogen of the human intestinal tract. Historically, C. concisus was associated with the human oral cavity and has been linked with periodontal lesions, including gingivitis and periodontitis, although currently its role as an oral pathogen remains contentious. Evidence to support the role of C. concisus in acute intestinal disease has come from studies that have detected or isolated C. concisus as sole pathogen in fecal samples from diarrheic patients. C. concisus has also been associated with chronic intestinal disease, its prevalence being significantly higher in children with newly diagnosed Crohn's disease and adults with ulcerative colitis than in controls. Further C. concisus has been isolated from biopsy specimens of patients with Crohn's disease. While such studies support the role of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, its ...
journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fcimb.2012.00004/full

*  Effect of climate and farm environment on Campylobacter spp. colonisation in Norwegian broiler flocks - DTU Orbit

Campylobacteriosis is the most frequently reported zoonosis in the EU. A recent report states that between 50% and 80% of the human campylobacteriosis cases could be attributed to broiler as a reservoir. The current study was conducted to investigate associations between the presence of Campylobacter spp. in Norwegian broiler flocks and factors related to the climate and the farm environment. Data from 18,488 broiler flocks from 623 different farms during 2002-2007 were included in the study. A logistic regression analysis was conducted where Campylobacter spp. status of a broiler flock at the time of slaughter was defined as the dependent variable and farm was modelled as a random effect. The following factors were found to increase the probability for a broiler flock to test positive for Campylobacter spp.: daily mean temperature above 6°C during the rearing period, private water supply, presence of other livestock farms ...
orbit.dtu.dk/en/publications/effect-of-climate-and-farm-environment-on-campylobacter-spp-colonisation-in-norwegian-broiler-flocks

*  campylobacter

In article ,942327930.89269 at marvin,, bgommez at hotmail.com says... , ,my thesis goes about Campylobacter spp. in food. ,Related to this subject I would like some information: , - A description of some methods to isolate and indicate Campylobacter spp. , - The price of your products , - The certificate-number , - And others, if possible. , ,I thank you in advance. ,, FWIW: Campy is fairly easy to work with. Relatively easy to isolate. I have my doubts about some of the conventional tests for differentiating the Campy species, and I have some concerns about one or two of the commercial products and their reliability. All in all though you should have little trouble working with these beasts. BTW, in initial identification... don't overlook the common Gram stain. Campy decolorizes exceptionally well, should be counter stained with Carbol Fuchsin, and has a characteristic appearance under the scope. If you get typical campy looking colonies on a differential/selective ...
bio.net/bionet/mm/microbio/1999-November/016865.html

*  Campylobacter Blog | Marler Clark Law Firm | Foodborne Campylobacteriosis

Campylobacter Blog is published by Bill Marler & covers food bacteria, foodborne illness, food safety & victims of campylobacter illness.
campylobacterboutique.marlersites.com

*  New US Guidelines to Prevent Campylobacter Released - The Poultry Site

US - Revised guidelines have been published by the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to assist poultry processors in controlling Salmonella and Campylobacter in raw food products and prevent cases of foodborne illness.
thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/36308/new-us-guidelines-to-prevent-campylobacter-released/

*  New Chair for Campylobacter Study Group - The Meat Site

UK - Richard Macdonald CBE has been named as the new Chair of the joint industry and government body focused on the reduction of campylobacter in chicken.
themeatsite.com/meatnews/26034/new-chair-for-campylobacter-study-group/

*  Air Products combat campylobacter with rapid chilling process - Food & Drink International

Air Products has bolstered its Freshline food processing portfolio with the addition of the SafeChill system aimed at combatting campylobacter.
fdiforum.net/mag/air-products-combat-campylobacter/

*  recomLine Campylobacter IgG Kit / 20 Det. - BioSell Solutions

Thank you for visiting bioSell Solutions Inc., we look forward to working with you to solve problems, in addition to provide excellent products and services. ...
biosellsolutions.com/product/recomline-campylobacter-igg-kit-20-det/

Campylobacter concisus: Campylobacter concisus is a Gram-negative, spiral, and microaerophilic bacteria. Motile, with either unipolar or bipolar flagella, the organisms have a characteristic spiral/corkscrew appearance and are oxidase-positive.Campylobacter jejuni: Campylobacter jejuni is a species of bacterium commonly found in animal feces. It is curved, helical-shaped, non-spore forming, Gram-negative, and microaerophilic.CampylobacteriosisCampylobacter coli: Campylobacter coli is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, non-endospore forming, S-shaped bacterial species within genus Campylobacter.Lansing M.Undecaprenyl-diphosphooligosaccharide-protein glycotransferase: Undecaprenyl-diphosphooligosaccharide-protein glycotransferase (, PglB) is an enzyme with system name tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenyl-diphosphooligosaccharide:protein-L-asparagine N-beta-D-oligosaccharidotransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionEnteritisChicken as biological research model: Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their eggs have been used extensively as research models throughout the history of biology. Today they continue to serve as an important model for normal human biology as well as pathological disease processes.British Poultry Standard: [Poultry Standard.png|thumb|right|The front cover of the 6th Edition of the British Poultry Standards.Campylobacter rectus: Campylobacter rectus is a species of Campylobacter. It is implicated as a pathogen in chronic periodontitis, which can induce bone loss.Georges Guillain: Georges Charles Guillain () (3 March 1876 - 29 June 1961) was a French neurologist born in Rouen.Jet aeratorsCongenital chloride diarrhea: Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD, also congenital chloridorrhea or Darrow Gamble syndrome) is a genetic disorder due to an autosomal recessive mutation on chromosome 7. The mutation is in downregulated-in-adenoma (DRA), a gene that encodes a membrane protein of intestinal cells.Plumping: Plumping, also referred to as “enhancing” or “injecting,” is a term that describes the process by which some poultry companies inject raw chicken meat with saltwater, chicken stock, seaweed extract or some combination thereof. The practice is most commonly used for fresh chicken and is also used in frozen poultry products,Buying this chicken?Viral gastroenteritis: Viral gastroenteritis (Gastro-Enter-eye,tiss),http://www.merriam-webster.PolyradiculoneuropathyFerric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs: The interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs is an ongoing process affecting the population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia. The current population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia is now probably higher than in the past.Resistome: The resistome is a proposed expression by Gerard D. Wright for the collection of all the antibiotic resistance genes and their precursors in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.List of foodborne illness outbreaks: This is a list of foodborne illness outbreaks. A foodborne illness may be from an infectious disease, heavy metals, chemical contamination, or from natural toxins, such as those found in poisonous mushrooms.White meat: White meat or light meat refers to the lighter-colored meat of poultry as contrasted with dark meat. In a more general sense, white meat may also refer to any lighter-colored meat, as contrasted with red meats like beef and some types of game.SAFE FOODSCecectomyBacitracinEagle's minimal essential medium: Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM) is a cell culture medium developed by Harry Eagle that can be used to maintain cells in tissue culture.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Erythromycin 3''-O-methyltransferase: Erythromycin 3-O-methyltransferase (, EryG) is an enzyme with system name S-adenosyl-L-methionine:erythromycin C 3-O-methyltransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionThermal cyclerBismuth sulfite agar: Bismuth sulfite agar is a type of agar media used to isolate Salmonella species. It uses glucose as a primary source of carbon.Pulsenet: PulseNet is a network run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which brings together public health and food regulatory agency laboratories around the United States.http://www.Replica plating: 350px|right|thumb|[[Negative selection (artificial selection)|Negative selection through replica plating to screen for ampicillin sensitive colonies]]Coles PhillipsOrbifloxacinCollege of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand: The College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, Anand was founded in 1964. It is a part of AAU, Anand, Gujarat, India.Flagellar motor switch: In molecular biology, the flagellar motor switch is a protein complex. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium it regulates the direction of flagellar rotation and hence controls swimming behaviour.Bickerstaff's encephalitisGround turkey: The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry published that ground turkey or minced Turkey is a mixture of dark and light turkey meat with remaining skin and visible fatWong, Michael K., Wong, Michael K.Beef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Amplified fragment length polymorphismColt Crag Reservoir: Colt Crag Reservoir is a relatively shallow reservoir in Northumberland, England adjacent to the A68 road, and north of Corbridge. The A68 road at this point runs along the course of Dere Street, a Roman road.Fecal coliform: A fecal coliform (British: faecal coliform) is a facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium. Coliform bacteria generally originate in the intestines of warm-blooded animals.Helicobacter pullorum: Helicobacter pullorum is a bacterium in the Helicobacteraceae family, Campylobacterales order. It was isolated from the liver, duodenum, and caecum of broiler and layer chickens, and from humans with gastroenteritis.Septic abortion: A septic abortion or septic miscarriage is a form of miscarriage that is associated with a serious uterine infection. The infection carries risk of spreading infection to other parts of the body and cause sepsis, a grave risk to the life of the woman.Four Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Leptotrichia buccalis: Leptotrichia buccalis is an anaerobic, gram-negative rod bacteria. It is a constituent of normal oral flora.Gentamicin protection assay: The gentamicin protection assay or survival assay or invasion assay is a method used in microbiology. It is used to quantify the ability of pathogenic bacteria to invade eukaryotic cells.ClinafloxacinNational Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==Virulence: Virulence is, by MeSH definition, the degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of parasites as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenicity of an organism - its ability to cause disease - is determined by its virulence factors.GastritisPowdered milk: Powdered milk or dried milk is a manufactured dairy product made by evaporating milk to dryness. One purpose of drying milk is to preserve it; milk powder has a far longer shelf life than liquid milk and does not need to be refrigerated, due to its low moisture content.Global microbial identifier: The genomic epidemiological database for global identification of microorganisms or global microbial identifier (GMI) is a platform for storing whole genome sequencing (WGS) data of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect and track-and-trace infectious disease outbreaks and emerging pathogens. The database holds two types of information: 1) genomic information of microorganisms, linked to, 2) metadata of those microorganism such as epidemiological details.ATC code S01: ==S01A Anti-infectives==Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis: Amplified rDNA (Ribosomal DNA) Restriction Analysis is the extension of the technique of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) to the gene encoding the small (16s) ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The technique involves an enzymatic amplification using primers directed at the conserved regions at the ends of the 16s gene, followed by digestion using tetracutter Restriction enzymes.Bird trapping: Bird trapping techniques to capture wild birds include a wide range of techniques that have their origins in the hunting of birds for food. While hunting for food does not require birds to be caught alive, some trapping techniques capture birds without harming them and are of use in ornithology research.Bologna sausageGijs Kuenen: Johannes Gijsbrecht Kuenen (born 9 December 1940, Heemstede) is a Dutch microbiologist who is professor emeritus at the Delft University of Technology and a visiting scientist at the University of Southern California. His research is influenced by, and a contribution to, the scientific tradition of the Delft School of Microbiology.Carte Jaune: The Carte Jaune or Yellow Card is an international certificate of vaccination (ICV). It is issued by the World Health Organisation.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli

(1/1058) A simple technique for mass cultivation of Campylobacter fetus.

Studies using 86 media for maximum growth of Campylobacter fetus for antigen production showed that a diphasic medium (solid base with liquid overlay) was most suitable. The solid base was double strength cystine heart agar. The liquid overlay was thioglycollate medium of Brewer (135-C) without agar. This medium yielded maximum growth of C. fetus in six days with good motility, less clumping and less filament formation than all other media tried.  (+info)

(2/1058) Detection of campylobacter in gastroenteritis: comparison of direct PCR assay of faecal samples with selective culture.

The prevalence of campylobacter gastroenteritis has been estimated by bacterial isolation using selective culture. However, there is evidence that certain species and strains are not recovered on selective agars. We have therefore compared direct PCR assays of faecal samples with campylobacter culture, and explored the potential of PCR for simultaneous detection and identification to the species level. Two hundred unselected faecal samples from cases of acute gastroenteritis were cultured on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar and subjected to DNA extraction and PCR assay. Culture on CCDA indicated that 16 of the 200 samples contained 'Campylobacter spp.'. By contrast, PCR assays detected campylobacters in 19 of the 200 samples, including 15 of the culture-positive samples, and further identified them as: C. jejuni (16), C. coli (2) and C. hyointestinalis (1). These results show that PCR offers a different perspective on the incidence and identity of campylobacters in human gastroenteritis.  (+info)

(3/1058) Presence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in sand from bathing beaches.

The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. in sand from non-EEC standard and EEC standard designated beaches in different locations in the UK and to assess if potentially pathogenic strains were present. Campylobacter spp. were detected in 82/182 (45%) of sand samples and Salmonella spp. in 10/182 (6%). Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 46/92 (50%) of samples from non-EEC standard beaches and 36/90 (40%) from EEC standard beaches. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was greater in wet sand from both types of beaches but, surprisingly, more than 30% of samples from dry sand also contained these organisms. The major pathogenic species C. jejuni and C. coli were more prevalent in sand from non-EEC standard beaches. In contrast, C. lari and urease positive thermophilic campylobacters, which are associated with seagulls and other migratory birds, were more prevalent in sand from EEC standard beaches. Campylobacter isolates were further characterized by biotyping and serotyping, which confirmed that strains known to be of types associated with human infections were frequently found in sand on bathing beaches.  (+info)

(4/1058) Clonality of Campylobacter sputorum bv. paraureolyticus determined by macrorestriction profiling and biotyping, and evidence for long-term persistent infection in cattle.

Eighteen strains of Campylobacter sputorum bv. paraureolyticus (isolated over a 12-month period from seven dairy cows contained in a single herd) were examined by resistotyping, and macrorestriction profiling using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The resistotypes of these strains were identical, although repeat testing indicated resistance to metronidazole was not a reliable trait for typing purposes. Five SmaI-derived genotypes were identified among the 18 strains. In 5 of 7 cows, isolates obtained from the same animal, but from different time periods, were genotypically indistinguishable, indicating persistence of infection. Macrorestriction profiles of 5 strains representing the 5 SmaI genotypes and 8 other strains of C. sputorum from various sources, were prepared using 4 endonucleases (SmaI, SalI, BamHI and KpnI). The only other strain of C. sputorum bv. paraureolyticus examined (a Canadian isolate from human faeces), was found to have a SmaI macrorestriction profile identical with one of the five clones isolated from the cattle. Moreover, SalI and BamHI profiles of all bv. paraureolyticus strains were similar, while digestion with KpnI was not observed. By contrast, the seven strains of C. sputorum bv. sputorum yielded various macrorestriction profiles with all the enzymes used, and features distinguishing the two biovars studied could be identified. This study indicates that C. sputorum can persist in cattle for at least 12 months and exhibits a clonal population genetic structure.  (+info)

(5/1058) Detection of cytolethal distending toxin activity and cdt genes in Campylobacter spp. isolated from chicken carcasses.

This study was designed to determine whether isolates from chicken carcasses, the primary source of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in human infections, commonly carry the cdt genes and also whether active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is produced by these isolates. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from all 91 fresh chicken carcasses purchased from local supermarkets. Campylobacter spp. were identified on the basis of both biochemical and PCR tests. Of the 105 isolates, 70 (67%) were identified as C. jejuni, and 35 (33%) were identified as C. coli. PCR tests amplified portions of the cdt genes from all 105 isolates. Restriction analysis of PCR products indicated that there appeared to be species-specific differences between the C. jejuni and C. coli cdt genes, but that the restriction patterns of the cdt genes within strains of the same species were almost invariant. Quantitation of active CDT levels produced by the isolates indicated that all C. jejuni strains except four (94%) had mean CDT titers greater than 100. Only one C. jejuni strain appeared to produce no active CDT. C. coli isolates produced little or no toxin. These results confirm the high rate of Campylobacter sp. contamination of fresh chicken carcasses and indicate that cdt genes may be universally present in C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from chicken carcasses.  (+info)

(6/1058) Cloning and characterization of two bistructural S-layer-RTX proteins from Campylobacter rectus.

Campylobacter rectus is an important periodontal pathogen in humans. A surface-layer (S-layer) protein and a cytotoxic activity have been characterized and are thought to be its major virulence factors. The cytotoxic activity was suggested to be due to a pore-forming protein toxin belonging to the RTX (repeats in the structural toxins) family. In the present work, two closely related genes, csxA and csxB (for C. rectus S-layer and RTX protein) were cloned from C. rectus and characterized. The Csx proteins appear to be bifunctional and possess two structurally different domains. The N-terminal part shows similarity with S-layer protein, especially SapA and SapB of C. fetus and Crs of C. rectus. The C-terminal part comprising most of CsxA and CsxB is a domain with 48 and 59 glycine-rich canonical nonapeptide repeats, respectively, arranged in three blocks. Purified recombinant Csx peptides bind Ca2+. These are characteristic traits of RTX toxin proteins. The S-layer and RTX domains of Csx are separated by a proline-rich stretch of 48 amino acids. All C. rectus isolates studied contained copies of either the csxA or csxB gene or both; csx genes were absent from all other Campylobacter and Helicobacter species examined. Serum of a patient with acute gingivitis showed a strong reaction to recombinant Csx protein on immunoblots.  (+info)

(7/1058) Different invasion phenotypes of Campylobacter isolates in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

The pathogenesis of campylobacter enteritis is not well understood, but invasion into and translocation across intestinal epithelial cells may be involved in the disease process, as demonstrated for a number of other enteric pathogens. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are not clearly defined for campylobacters. In this study, isolates were compared quantitatively in established assays with the enterocyte-like cell line, Caco-2, to determine the extent to which intracellular invasion contributes to translocation across epithelial cell monolayers, and whether isolates vary in this respect. Ten fresh Campylobacter isolates were compared and shown to differ in invasiveness by a factor of 10-fold by following their recovery from gentamicin-treated Caco-2 cells grown on nonpermeable tissue-culture wells. Four of these isolates with contrasting invasive ability were also shown to vary in their ability to translocate across Caco-2 cells grown on semipermeable Transwell inserts by a factor >10. However, translocation did not quantitatively correlate with the intracellular invasiveness of these isolates. Isolate no. 9752 was poorly invasive but had modest translocation ability, isolate no. 10392 was very invasive but did not translocate significantly and remained within the monolayer, isolate no. 9519 both translocated and invaded well, whereas, isolate no. 235 translocated very efficiently but was poorly invasive. Isolate no. 9519 also uniquely caused a transitory flattening of the Caco-2 cells and a possible drop in trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of the Transwell monolayers, whereas isolate no. 235 did not show these effects. Together these data demonstrate that there are significantly different 'invasion' phenotypes among Campylobacter strains involving different degrees of intracellular invasion, and either different rates of transcellular trafficking or, alternatively, paracellular trafficking.  (+info)

(8/1058) Rapid identification of thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter lari, and Campylobacter upsaliensis from various geographic locations by a GTPase-based PCR-reverse hybridization assay.

Recently, a gene from Campylobacter jejuni encoding a putative GTPase was identified. Based on two semiconserved GTP-binding sites encoded within this gene, PCR primers were selected that allow amplification of a 153-bp fragment from C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, and C. upsaliensis. Sequence analysis of these PCR products revealed consistent interspecies variation, which allowed the definition of species-specific probes for each of the four thermotolerant Campylobacter species. Multiple probes were used to develop a line probe assay (LiPA) that permits analysis of PCR products by a single reverse hybridization step. A total of 320 reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins were tested by the GTP-based PCR-LiPA. The PCR-LiPA is highly specific in comparison with conventional identification methods, including biochemical and whole-cell protein analyses. In conclusion, a simple method has been developed for rapid and highly specific identification of thermotolerant Campylobacter species.  (+info)



jejuni subsp


  • Campylobacter jejuni subsp. (atcc.org)
  • Genomic DNA from Campylobacter jejuni subsp. (atcc.org)
  • Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism - Campylobacter jejuni subsp. (genome.jp)

Salmonella


  • Campylobacter species are the second most frequent causative organisms of food-related diarrhea after Salmonella spp. (qiagen.com)
  • US - Revised guidelines have been published by the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to assist poultry processors in controlling Salmonella and Campylobacter in raw food products and prevent cases of foodborne illness. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • This updated document is the fourth edition of the "FSIS Compliance Guideline for Controlling Salmonella and Campylobacter in Raw Poultry" and is intended to offer poultry companies best practices for minimising pathogen levels and meeting FSIS' food safety requirements. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Campylobacter infections are, along with Salmonella infections, the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in humans worldwide ( 1 - 6 ). (cdc.gov)

poultry


  • Banham Poultry and Akeso Biomedical today announced a partnership focused on controlling Campylobacter infection of chickens. (prweb.com)
  • The partnership will aim to develop a feed additive for poultry using Akeso's Fe3C technology to reduce Campylobacter levels. (prweb.com)
  • We are delighted to partner with Banham Poultry to develop our Fe3C technology for the reduction of Campylobacter in poultry,' said Dr. Simon Williams, CEO. (prweb.com)
  • Campylobacteriosis is a significant enterocolitis of people frequently acquired through consumption of undercooked poultry meat contaminated with Campylobacter jejuni . (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Commercial poultry and free-living birds are natural reservoirs of the thermophilic campylobacters ( C jejuni , C coli , and C lari ) and other poorly defined species. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Campylobacter are part of normal enteric flora in animals (poultry, pigs, and cattle) and can be transmitted to humans through contaminated foods ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)

chickens


  • The partnership will seek to significantly reduce the levels of Campylobacter in chickens raised on the farm as part of an integrated approach. (prweb.com)
  • We describe isolates from human Campylobacter infection in the French population and the isolates' antimicrobial drug resistance patterns since 1986 and compare the trends with those of isolates from broiler chickens and pigs from 1999 to 2004. (cdc.gov)
  • Trends of Campylobacter antimicrobial drug resistance in human isolates were compared with those of isolates from broiler chickens and pigs between 1999 and 2004. (cdc.gov)
  • However this initiative could contribute substantially to reducing the overall level of infections, as has been seen in a similar drive to reduce Campylobacter contamination of chickens in New Zealand. (www.gov.uk)

infection


  • The Fe3C technology was discovered at the University of Nottingham by Dr. Mahdavi, and Professors Soultanas and Ala'Aldeen, and prevents the binding of Campylobacter to the chicken's GI tract and subsequent infection. (prweb.com)
  • Most chicks display no lesions associated with Campylobacter infection. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • A recent study on illness and death due to foodborne infections in France estimated an isolation rate of 27-37/100,000 persons/year for Campylobacter infection ( 7 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Public Health England ( PHE ) regularly reports outbreaks of Campylobacter infection linked to under-cooking of chicken livers used for preparing chicken liver pates and parfaits, particularly at weddings. (www.gov.uk)

isolates


  • In this article, we describe characteristics of human Campylobacter isolates in France and trends of antimicrobial resistance in such isolates from 1986 to 2004. (cdc.gov)

Pathogen


  • Campylobacter jejuni is an important foodborne pathogen and common cause of human gastroenteritis. (findaphd.com)

ribosomal


  • L04317 Campylobacter rectus, complete 16S ribosomal RNA. (atcc.org)

metabolism


  • 2012) Nutrient acquisition and metabolism by Campylobacter jejuni. (findaphd.com)

bacteria


  • The role of Campylobacter pyloridis, a spiral bacteria associated with gastritis and peptic ulcers in weakening the mucus component of gastric mucosal barrier was investigated. (nih.gov)
  • Public Health England (PHE) welcomes the initiatives from the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to reduce levels of campylobacter bacteria in chicken. (www.gov.uk)

bacterial


  • This project will combine the expertise of two laboratories (Linton - Campylobacter biology, Cavet - Metals in bacterial pathogens) to identify and characterise novel systems for acquisition and handling of metals by C. jejuni. (findaphd.com)

infections


  • Most Campylobacter enteric infections are self-limited and do not require antimicrobial drug treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • However, severe or long-lasting Campylobacter infections do occur and may justify antimicrobial drug therapy. (cdc.gov)
  • Resistance of Campylobacter to antimicrobial agents has increased substantially during the past 2 decades and has become a matter of concern in severe human Campylobacter infections ( 12 - 14 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Any initiative that helps to reduce the number of campylobacter infections in people is to be welcomed. (www.gov.uk)

isolation


  • Isolation of the organism is a function of surveillance and ability of laboratory personnel to culture and identify Campylobacter spp. (merckvetmanual.com)

sequence


  • AF167344 Campylobacter jejuni O:19 lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis locus, partial sequence. (atcc.org)

gene


  • The mericon Campylobacter spp assay performs optimally on the Rotor-Gene Q, but has also been validated for block thermal cyclers. (qiagen.com)
  • AB001876 Campylobacter rectus gene for S-layer protein, complete cds. (atcc.org)

species


  • The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is designed for the target-specific detection of Campylobacter species DNA in food, animal feed, and pharmaceutical products. (qiagen.com)
  • The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is for the specific detection of several Campylobacter species in enrichment cultures of food and animal feed samples. (qiagen.com)
  • The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is dedicated to qualitatively detect Campylobacter species in food and animal feed samples after enrichment. (qiagen.com)

laboratories


  • This was measured by swabbing the outside of packaging and taking samples of meat and processing these in the PHE Food, Water and Environment laboratories to measure the level of Campylobacter contamination present. (www.gov.uk)

food


  • The mericon Campylobacter spp Kit is intended for molecular biology applications in food, animal feed, and pharmaceutical product testing. (qiagen.com)

reduce levels


  • To reduce levels of Campylobacter, we need to take action throughout the supply chain. (prweb.com)

identify


  • This study sought to identify reasons why Campylobacter cases who were sent this questionnaire did not respond to the letter and to determine whether any of these cases were working in a high-risk occupation. (nih.gov)

cases


  • Are Campylobacter cases low risk for public health follow-up? (nih.gov)
  • Most Campylobacter cases are treated as low risk enterics (LRE) and receive a mailed letter from Toronto Public Health (TPH) with a questionnaire to gather basic risk information. (nih.gov)

solution


  • New class of feed additives promises unique solution to Campylobacter. (prweb.com)

important


  • The Fe3C technology shows significant promise for the reduction of Campylobacter, and becoming an important component of an integrated approach. (prweb.com)

project


  • ACFU01000000 Campylobacter rectus RM3267, whole genome shotgun sequencing project. (atcc.org)