Camellia sinensis: Camellia sinensis L. (formerly Thea sinensis) is an evergreen Asiatic shrub of the THEACEAE family. The infusion of leaves of this plant is used as Oriental TEA which contains CAFFEINE; THEOPHYLLINE; and epigallocatechin gallate.Camellia: A plant genus in the family THEACEAE, order THEALES best known for CAMELLIA SINENSIS which is the source of Oriental TEA.Tea: The infusion of leaves of CAMELLIA SINENSIS (formerly Thea sinensis) as a beverage, the familiar Asian tea, which contains CATECHIN (especially epigallocatechin gallate) and CAFFEINE.Catechin: An antioxidant flavonoid, occurring especially in woody plants as both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (cis) forms.Clonorchis sinensis: A species of trematode flukes of the family Opisthorchidae. Many authorities consider this genus belonging to Opisthorchis. It is common in China and other Asiatic countries. Snails and fish are the intermediate hosts.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Polyphenols: A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.Saponins: A type of glycoside widely distributed in plants. Each consists of a sapogenin as the aglycone moiety, and a sugar. The sapogenin may be a steroid or a triterpene and the sugar may be glucose, galactose, a pentose, or a methylpentose.Spectrometry, Mass, Fast Atom Bombardment: A mass spectrometric technique that is used for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules, such as glycoalkaloids, glycoproteins, polysaccharides, and peptides. Positive and negative fast atom bombardment spectra are recorded on a mass spectrometer fitted with an atom gun with xenon as the customary beam. The mass spectra obtained contain molecular weight recognition as well as sequence information.Angelica sinensis: A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is the source of dong quai.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)TriterpenesClonorchiasis: Infection of the biliary passages with CLONORCHIS SINENSIS, also called Opisthorchis sinensis. It may lead to inflammation of the biliary tract, proliferation of biliary epithelium, progressive portal fibrosis, and sometimes bile duct carcinoma. Extension to the liver may lead to fatty changes and cirrhosis. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Eriobotrya: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE that is the source of an edible fruit. Members contain TRITERPENES.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Cordyceps: A genus of ascomycetous fungi (ASCOMYCOTA), family Clavicipitaceae, order HYPOCREALES, that grows by infecting insect larvae or mature insects with spores that germinate often before the cocoon is formed.Caffeine: A methylxanthine naturally occurring in some beverages and also used as a pharmacological agent. Caffeine's most notable pharmacological effect is as a central nervous system stimulant, increasing alertness and producing agitation. It also relaxes SMOOTH MUSCLE, stimulates CARDIAC MUSCLE, stimulates DIURESIS, and appears to be useful in the treatment of some types of headache. Several cellular actions of caffeine have been observed, but it is not entirely clear how each contributes to its pharmacological profile. Among the most important are inhibition of cyclic nucleotide PHOSPHODIESTERASES, antagonism of ADENOSINE RECEPTORS, and modulation of intracellular calcium handling.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.

*  Camellia Sinensis - Natural WellbeingNatural Wellbeing

Camellia Sinensis Description Carmellia sinensis is one of the main ingredients in the production of Chinese tea. This plant is ... Camellia Sinensis Description Carmellia sinensis is one of the main ingredients in the production of Chinese tea. This plant is ... Camellia Sinensis. Veterinarian Reviewed on January 9, 2012 by Paulina Nelega, RH. Posted in Uncategorized ... The term sinensis for Carmellia sinensis means Chinese in Latin. The name Carmellia was derived from the Latin name of Rev, ...
naturalwellbeing.com/learning-center/Camellia_Sinensis/

*  Toksisitas Ekstrak Air Teh Hitam (Camellia Sinensis (L.) Kuntze) Produk X Dibandingkan Terhadap Larva Artemia Salina Leach -...

Toksisitas Ekstrak Air Teh Hitam (Camellia Sinensis (L.) Kuntze) Produk X Dibandingkan Terhadap Larva Artemia Salina Leach ... Telah dilakukan penelitian toksisitas ekstrak air teh hijau dan teh hitam (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze) produk "X" dengan ... Halim, Claresta (2011) Toksisitas Ekstrak Air Teh Hitam (Camellia Sinensis (L.) Kuntze) Produk X Dibandingkan Terhadap Larva ...
repository.ubaya.ac.id/12920/

*  Steepster - Tai Ping Hou Kui from Camellia Sinensis reviewed by PhilP | July 27, 2013

PhilP drank Tai Ping Hou Kui by Camellia Sinensis 2 tasting notes ...
https://steepster.com/PhilP/posts/185143

*  Camellia Sinensis 'Official' Oolong Tea Topic - TeaChat

NEW! Official Oolong Tea Vendor Guide for Camellia Sinensis.com Consider this a perennial topic for Oolong teas from Camellia ... Camellia Sinensis was nominated and confirmed for our TeaVendor Guide under the Oolong Tea category. If you would like to ... Camellia Sinensis 'Official' Oolong Tea Topic. Comprehensive member driven guide to vendors of all teas. ... Camellia Sinensis 'Official' Oolong Tea Topic. by Chip » Jan 20th, '10, 11:38 ...
https://teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=60&t=12014

*  Steepster - Da Hong Pao 1997 from Camellia Sinensis reviewed by Jim Marks | September 22, 2012

Jim Marks drank Da Hong Pao 1997 by Camellia Sinensis 368 tasting notes ...
https://steepster.com/jimmarks/posts/131063

*  GREEN TEA (Camellia sinensis) - ORAL side effects, medical uses, and drug interactions.

Read more about the prescription drug GREEN TEA (Camellia sinensis) - ORAL. ... Camellia sinensis) - ORAL, includes side effects, drug interactions, recommended dosages, and storage information. ... green tea (camellia sinensis) - oral. GENERIC NAME: GREEN TEA (Camellia sinensis) - ORAL Medication Uses , How To Use , Side ... home / green tea (camellia sinensis)-oral index / green tea (camellia sinensis) - oral drug monograph ...
medicinenet.com/green_tea_camellia_sinensis-oral/article.htm

*  Browse Products Containing: CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) EXTRACT || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG

Beyond providing Skin Deep® as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED™ mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWG's strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products' ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more , Legal Disclaimer ...
ewg.org/skindeep/browse.php?comp_id=3614&ingred06=701024&order=webscore_DESC&showmore=products&atatime=10

*  NOPR: Molecular characterization of <i>Pestalotiopsis</i> spp. associated with tea (<i>Camellia sinensis</i>) in southern...

The genus Pestalotiopsis is second most important fungal pathogen causing grey blight disease in tea plant (Camellia sinensis ... associated with tea (Camellia sinensis) in southern India using RAPD and ISSR markers. ...
nopr.niscair.res.in/handle/123456789/6142

*  Camellia Sinensis - In Pursuit of Tea

Camellia Sinensis. The tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is an evergreen shrub which in the wild, can reach tree-like heights. On ... Cultivation of the plant Camellia sinensis var. sinensis began around 4,000 years ago in Sichuan Province, China, then spread ... All tea hails from the same Camellia sinensis plant; the five different types of tea-white, green, oolong, black, pu-erh-are ... In Assam, the native Camellia sinensis var. assamica was also discovered, which is the second major variety of the tea plant. ...
https://inpursuitoftea.com/camellia-sinensis

*  Food Sci. Technol - vol.30 suppl.1

Brazilian green tea (Camellia sinensis var assamica): effect of infusion time, mode of packaging and preparation on the ...
scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_issuetoc&pid=0101-206120100005&lng=es&nrm=iso

*  Chemical Constituents of Camellia Sinensis

To see the chemistry explanation i can say that is will more important to know Chemical Constituents of Camellia Sinensis work ...
theteahorsecaravan.com/2013/05/chemical-constituents-of-camellia.html

*  Browse Products Containing: CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) EXTRACT || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG

Products containing CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) EXTRACT made by company: Montana Emu Ranch Company ...
ewg.org/skindeep/browse.php?comp_id=2231&ingred06=701024

*  Browse Products Containing: CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) EXTRACT || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG

Products containing CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) EXTRACT made by brand: Yes To Cucumbers ...
ewg.org/skindeep/browse.php?brand_id=5102&ingred06=701024

*  Camellia sinensis Ameliorates the Efficacy of Last Line Antibiotics Against Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli. | Sigma...

Camellia sinensis Ameliorates the Efficacy of Last Line Antibiotics Against Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli.. [Pallavi ... Aquo-ethanolic extract of Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A), standardized using Fourier transform infrared analysis, was found ...
sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/26620305

*  Camellia sinensis image

Camellia sinensis. Click on image to zoom in. © Hugh and Carol Nourse, 2007 Email full-size image and text title. Camellia ... IM/I_GABG/0000/640/Camellia_sinensis,I_GABG92.jpg. width=640 x height=426 pixels; size=114819 bytes Discover Life , Top Updated ... identification and distribution of Camellia sinensis image ...
discoverlife.org/mp/20p?see=I_GABG92&res=640

*  Camellia Sinensis Tea by Nerada - Steepster

Reviews and information for Camellia Sinensis tea from Nerada on Steepster, a community of tea lovers. ... 2010 Autumn 'Yong De Cha Hua' Camellia Sinensis Assamica Tea Flower. Yunnan Sourcing 2014 Yi Shan White Tea and Camellia Flower ... Tea Oil Camellia. Treasure Green Tea Company 77 ... 2015 Spring Yi Shan White Tea and Camellia Flower Cake. Yunnan ...
https://steepster.com/teas/nerada/4241-camellia-sinensis

*  Steepster - Green Teas from camellia-sinensis.com

A list of Green teas from camellia-sinensis.com on Steepster, a community for tea lovers. ... Green Teas from camellia-sinensis.com. Listed alphabetically. There aren't any teas that match that criteria yet.. Are we ...
https://steepster.com/teas/camellia-sinensis-dot-com?sort=alphabetical&green=on

*  Browse Products Containing: CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) LEAF EXTRACT || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG

Products containing CAMELLIA SINENSIS (GREEN TEA) LEAF EXTRACT made by company: Solay Wellness ...
ewg.org/skindeep/browse.php?comp_id=2850&ingred06=701026

*  Biology, Geography & Health Research: Section 7

Nagarajah, S.; Ratasooriya, G. B., 1977: Studies with anti transpirants on tea camellia sinensis ...
https://eurekamag.com/research/006/?shared=email&msg=fail?shared=email&msg=fail

*  Travel notes from the Third Lady Camellia Sinensis - Tea Punk Teas

Lady Camellia Sinensis. The Third, to be exact. A lady of mystery, adventure, tea, and civility. ...
teapunkteas.com/travel-notes/what-the-queen-wants

*  Natural Foods General Store Condition Center

Green tea: Green tea is made from the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, an evergreen shrub. Research indicates that green tea ... Dong quai: Dong Quai (Angelica sinensis), also known as Chinese angelica, has been used for thousands of years in traditional ...
naturalfoodsgeneralstore.com/promog/ConditionCenter.asp?ConditionID=35&StoreID=72282E13C95F42DE9427E1FB887610F0

*  BOTANIKA: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica - 57 (2), 2012

Camellia brevistyla (1) Camellia inusitata (1) Camellia sinensis (1) Cameroon (1) Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (1) Campanula ... Litchi chinensis (1) literatura (140) literature (5) Lithophragma (1) Lithops (2) Litsea (1) littaea (1) Liu (1) live (1) ... Incarvillea sinensis (1) incomplete (1) incorporating (1) index (1) India (2) Indie (19) indirect (1) Indochina (1) Indonesia ( ... Aquilaria sinensis (1) Arabidopsis (1) Arabis soyeri ssp. soyeri (1) Aracaceae (1) Araceae (2) Arachis hypogaea (2) ...
hoya-polska.blogspot.com/2012/11/acta-palaeontologica-polonica-57-2-2012.html

*  FLORA MALAYSIANA Ver 1.0 - 0-menu-d.htm 1997 - 2002

Camellia sinensis. Canaga odorata. Canagium odoratum. Catharanthus roseus. Cerbera odollam. Cestrum nocturnum. Chrysanthemun ... Hibiscus rosa-sinensis -Red. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis -bud. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis -Orange. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis -hybrid. ... Rosa chinensis viridiflora. Rosa odorata. Rosa sp.. Rosa sp.. Roupellia grata. Sambacus javanica. Scablosa cochinchinensis. ...
members.tripod.com/flora_my-da/0-menu-d.htm

*  Prevención del Cáncer (Reduciendo el Riesgo) | Wesley Medical Center

Tanto el té verde como el té negro provienen de la planta del té llamada Camellia sinensis, la cual ha sido cultivada en China ... Hancke JL, Burgos RA, Ahumada F. Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. Fitoterapia. 1999;70:451 - 471. ...
https://wesleymc.com/hl/?/32264/cáncer/sp

*  Restore Conditioner (12 oz) - Eniva

Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Agave Americana Leaf/Stem Extract, Camellia Sinensis (Chamomile) Leaf Extract, ...
eniva.com/restore-conditioner-12-oz/

Sinecatechins: Sinecatechins (USAN, trade names Veregen and Polyphenon E) is a specific water extract of green tea leaves from Camellia sinensis that is the active ingredient in an ointment approved by the FDA in 2006 as a botanical drug to treat genital warts.Masters KP New Drug Reviews: Sinecatechins (Veregen) for External Genital and Perianal Warts.Theaceae: Theaceae is a family of flowering plants, composed of shrubs and trees, including the camellias. It can be described as having from seven to 40 genera, depending on the source and the method of circumscription used.Green tea extractEpigallocatechin gallateClonorchis sinensis: Clonorchis sinensis, the Chinese liver fluke, is a human liver fluke in the class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes. This parasite lives in the liver of humans, and is found mainly in the common bile duct and gall bladder, feeding on bile.PhytomedicineCalendic acidHealth effects of natural phenols and polyphenols: Because of the large structural diversity and extensive metabolism of dietary polyphenols, it is difficult to determine their fate in vivo and assert specific health effects. Although many are speculated to be part of the health-promoting effects of consuming fruits and vegetables, no evidence exists to date that dietary polyphenols actually provide health benefits.Triterpenoid saponin: Triterpenoid saponins are triterpenes which belong to the group of saponin compounds. Triterpenes are a type of terpene containing 30 carbon atoms.Fast atom bombardment: Fast atom bombardment (FAB) is an ionization technique used in mass spectrometry in which a beam of high energy atoms strikes a surface to create ions. It was developed by Michael Barber at the University of Manchester.Torreyanic acidOrange Peel (horse): Orange Peel was a Thoroughbred stallion that had a significant influence on the breeding of sport horses.AlkylphenolCanna Leaf Roller: Cannas are largely free of pests, but in the USA plants sometimes fall victim the Canna Leaf Roller, which can actually be two different insects. Larva of the Brazilian skipper butterfly (Calpodes ethlius), also known as the Larger Canna Leaf Roller, cut the leaves and roll them over to live inside while pupating and eating the leaf.Hopanoids: Hopanoids are natural pentacyclic compounds (containing five rings) based on the chemical structure of hopane. The first known triterpenoid of the class, hydroxyhopanone, was isolated by two chemists at The National Gallery, London working on the chemistry of dammar gum, a natural resin used as a varnish for paintings.ClonorchiasisJardins ethnobotaniques de la Gardie: The Jardins ethnobotaniques de la Gardie (English translation: Ethnobotanical gardens of Gardie) are botanical gardens located in a former schoolyard at the Pont d'avène, Rousson, Gard, Languedoc-Roussillon, France. They are open daily except Monday in July and August, and weekend afternoons in May, June, and September; an admission fee is charged.Glycoside: In chemistry, a glycoside is a molecule in which a sugar is bound to another functional group via a glycosidic bond. Glycosides play numerous important roles in living organisms.College of Practitioners of PhytotherapyMedicinal plants of the American West: Many plants that grow in the American West have use in traditional and herbal medicine.Cordyceps subsessilis: Cordyceps subsessilis is a rare ascomycete fungus that is a pathogen of scarab beetles.CaffeineSpin–lattice relaxation in the rotating frame: Spin–lattice relaxation in the rotating frame is the mechanism by which Mxy, the transverse component of the magnetization vector, exponentially decays towards its equilibrium value of zero, under the influence of a radio frequency (RF) field in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is characterized by the spin–lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame, T1ρ.Trolox

(1/234) Diurnal variation of photosynthesis and photoinhibition in tea: effects of irradiance and nitrogen supply during growth in the field.

Diurnal changes in the rate of photosynthesis (A) of mature tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) bushes grown at high elevation in the field in Sri Lanka, were related to environmental conditions. Bushes were either unshaded, receiving 100% of incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), moderately shaded, (65% PAR) or heavily shaded (30% PAR). These treatments were combined with nitrogen fertilizer applications of 0, 360 and 720 kg ha(-1) year(-1). When recently fully expanded leaves were measured under the growing conditions on bright, clear days from dawn to dusk, A was greatest in the morning with increasing radiation between approximately 8 h and 10 h. Stomatal conductances (g(s)) and substomatal carbon dioxide concentrations (C(i)) were then large, leaf temperatures (T(L)) cool, and saturated water vapour deficits (VPD) small. However, as the irradiance, T(L) and VPD increased towards midday, A, g(s), photochemical quenching, and C(i) decreased, and non-photochemical quenching increased. In the late afternoon, irradiance, T(L) and VPD fell, but despite the relatively large increase in g(s) and C(i), A remained low; however, it recovered overnight. The zero-N treatment decreased total-N content of leaves by 50% and A by c. 20% (not significant). Leaves of unshaded plants receiving least N had significantly (P<0.05) smaller A and greater total sugar content than shaded but with abundant N, A and sugars did not differ between shade treatments. Analysis of the responses of A to environment in the morning compared to the afternoon, and of chlorophyll fluorescence, suggests that A was photoinhibited as a consequence of greatly increased PAR, whilst decreasing g(s) (related to changes in PAR, VPD and T(L)) caused C(i) to fall. End-product inhibition of A is not consistent with decreased C(i). Inhibition of A as a result of photoinhibition was minimized, but not eliminated, by abundant N. Interactions between factors regulating A in tea are discussed.  (+info)

(2/234) Inhibition of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein activity by green tea polyphenols.

Many beneficial proprieties have been associated with polyphenols from green tea, such as chemopreventive, anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic and antioxidant actions. In this study, we investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and their principal catechins on the function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype of cancer cells. GTPs (30 microg/ml) inhibit the photolabeling of P-gp by 75% and increase the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (R-123) 3-fold in the multidrug-resistant cell line CH(R)C5, indicating that GTPs interact with P-gp and inhibit its transport activity. Moreover, the modulation of P-gp transport by GTPs was a reversible process. Among the catechins present in GTPs, EGCG, ECG and CG are responsible for inhibiting P-gp. In addition, EGCG potentiates the cytotoxicity of vinblastine (VBL) in CH(R)C5 cells. The inhibitory effect of EGCG on P-gp was also observed in human Caco-2 cells, which form an intestinal epithelial-like monolayer. Our results indicate that, in addition to their anti-cancer properties, GTPs and more particularly EGCG inhibit the binding and efflux of drugs by P-gp. Thus, GTPs or EGCG might be potential agents for modulating the bioavailability of P-gp substrates at the intestine and the multidrug resistance phenotype associated with expression of this transporter in cancer cells.  (+info)

(3/234) Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate inhibits MMP-2 secretion and MT1-MMP-driven migration in glioblastoma cells.

We have recently shown that green tea polyphenols, and especially (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCg), acted as potent inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase activities as well as of proMMP-2 activation (M. Demeule, M. Brossard, M. Page, D. Gingras, R. Beliveau, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1478 (2000)). In the present work, we sought to examine the involvement of MT1-MMP in the EGCg-induced inhibition of proMMP-2 activation. The incubation of U-87 glioblastoma cells in the presence of concanavalin A or cytochalasin D, two potent activators of MT1-MMP, resulted in proMMP-2 activation that was correlated with the cell surface proteolytic processing of MT1-MMP to its inactive 43 kDa form. Addition of EGCg strongly inhibited the MT1-MMP-dependent proMMP-2 activation. The inhibitory effect of EGCg on MT1-MMP was also demonstrated by the down-regulation of MT1-MMP transcript levels and by the inhibition of MT1-MMP-driven cell migration of transfected COS-7 cells. These observations suggest that this catechin may act at both the MT1-MMP gene and protein expression levels. In addition, treatment of cells with non-cytotoxic doses of EGCg significantly reduced the amount of secreted proMMP-2, and led to a concomitant increase in intracellular levels of that protein. This effect was similar to that observed using well-characterized secretion inhibitors such as brefeldin A and manumycin, suggesting that EGCg could also potentially act on intracellular secretory pathways. Taken together, these results indicate that EGCg targets multiple MMP-mediated cellular events in cancer cells and provides a new mechanism for the anticancer properties of that molecule.  (+info)

(4/234) Determination of mercury in biological tissues by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with an in-situ concentration technique.

A method has been described for the determination of total mercury by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) using an in-situ concentration technique with a Pd-Zr coating and a chemical modifier. The characteristic mass, which gives an integrated absorbance of 0.0044 s, was found to be 42 pg and an absolute detection limit (3sigma) of 33 pg was obtained with the proposed modifier. The total mercury values in standard reference materials, including Mussel (GBW08571), Bovine liver (GBW08306), Peach leaf (GBW08501) and Tea leaf (GBW080001), were determined using the proposed method, and the results were consistent with reference values. The method had been successfully applied to the determination of mercury in biological tissue samples with a recovery range of 94-105%.  (+info)

(5/234) Activity-guided fractionation of green tea extract with antiproliferative activity against human stomach cancer cells.

Epidemiological studies have suggested that the consumption of green tea provides protection against stomach cancer. Fractionation of green tea extract, guided by antiproliferative activity against human stomach cancer (MK-1) cells, has resulted in the isolation of six active flavan-3-ols, epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), gallocatechin (GC), epicatechin gallate (ECg), gallocatechin gallate (GCg), together with inactive glycosides of kaempferol and quercetin. Among the six active flavan-3-ols, EGCg and GCg showed the highest activity, EGC, GC, ECg followed next, and the activity of EC was lowest. These data suggest that the presence of the three adjacent hydroxyl groups (pyrogallol or galloyl group) in the molecule would be a key factor for enhancing the activity. Since reactive oxygen species play an important role in cell death induction, radical scavenging activity was evaluated using the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical. The order of scavenging activity was ECg > or = EGCg > or = EGC > or = GC > or = EC. The compounds having a galloyl moiety showed more potent activity. The contribution of the pyrogallol moiety in the B-ring to the scavenging activity seemed to be less than that of the galloyl moiety.  (+info)

(6/234) Indonesian medicinal plants. XXV. Cancer cell invasion inhibitory effects of chemical constituents in the parasitic plant Scurrula atropurpurea (Loranthaceae).

Six fatty acids (1-6), two xanthines (7, 8), two flavonol glycosides (9, 10), one monoterpene glucoside (11), one lignan glycoside (12), and four flavanes (13-16) were clarified by a bioassay-guided separation as chemical constituents of Scurrula atropurpurea (Loranthaceae), a parasitic plant of the tea plant Thea sinensis (Theaceae). Among these constituents, it was found that the alkynic fatty acid octadeca-8,10,12-triynoic acid (6) exhibits a more potent inhibitory effect on cancer cell invasion in vitro than flavanes [(+)-catechin (13), (-)-epicatechin (14), (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate (15) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (16)].  (+info)

(7/234) A phase II trial of green tea in the treatment of patients with androgen independent metastatic prostate carcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Recent laboratory and epidemiologic studies have suggested that green tea has antitumor effects in patients with prostate carcinoma. This Phase II trial explored green tea's antineoplastic effects in patients with androgen independent prostate carcinoma. METHODS: This study, which was conducted by the North Central Cancer Treatment Group, evaluated 42 patients who were asymptomatic and had manifested, progressive prostate specific antigen (PSA) elevation with hormone therapy. Continued use of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist was permitted; however, patients were ineligible if they had received other treatments for their disease in the preceding 4 weeks or if they had received a long-acting antiandrogen therapy in the preceding 6 weeks. Patients were instructed to take 6 grams of green tea per day orally in 6 divided doses. Each dose contained 100 calories and 46 mg of caffeine. Patients were monitored monthly for response and toxicity. RESULTS: Tumor response, defined as a decline >/= 50% in the baseline PSA value, occurred in a single patient, or 2% of the cohort (95% confidence interval, 1-14%). This one response was not sustained beyond 2 months. At the end of the first month, the median change in the PSA value from baseline for the cohort increased by 43%. Green tea toxicity, usually Grade 1 or 2, occurred in 69% of patients and included nausea, emesis, insomnia, fatigue, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and confusion. However, six episodes of Grade 3 toxicity and one episode of Grade 4 toxicity also occurred, with the latter manifesting as severe confusion. CONCLUSIONS: Green tea carries limited antineoplastic activity, as defined by a decline in PSA levels, among patients with androgen independent prostate carcinoma.  (+info)

(8/234) Hydroxysulochrin, a tea pollen growth inhibitor from the fungus Aureobasidium sp.

A new plant growth regulator, hydroxysulochrin (1), together with sulochrin (2) was isolated from the culture filtrate of Aureobasidium sp. grown on a malt extract medium. The structures of 1 and 2 were established by spectroscopic methods. 1 and 2 inhibited tea pollen tube growth by 41% and 36% of the control value at a concentration of 100 mg/l, respectively. However, 1 and 2 showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of lettuce seedlings from 0.1 mg/l to 100 mg/l.  (+info)



Teas


  • In ancient China, the Carmellia sinensis was used to make therapeutic teas which are used to remedy gastric illnesses, to invigorate the body and strengthen the immune system. (naturalwellbeing.com)
  • Teas made from Carmellia sinensis are also used to invigorate the immune system and to improve respiratory conditions like asthma and dry hacking cough. (naturalwellbeing.com)
  • Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners advice drinking Carmellia sinensis teas to treat angina pectoris, peripheral vascular diseases and coronary artery diseases. (naturalwellbeing.com)
  • Teas that are made from Carmellia sinensis are safe and may be taken by pregnant women and even by young children. (naturalwellbeing.com)
  • Consider this a perennial topic for Oolong teas from Camellia Sinensis to discuss and review. (teachat.com)

green


  • Carmellia sinensis, in the green tea variety, is also known to be effective in reducing bad breath. (naturalwellbeing.com)

plant


  • In modern times, Carmellia sinensis was considered indispensable in the tea industry with most of the tea varieties derived from this particular plant. (naturalwellbeing.com)
  • The tea plant, Camellia sinensis , is an evergreen shrub which in the wild, can reach tree-like heights. (inpursuitoftea.com)
  • Tea's unique combination of caffeine and the rare amino acid theanine-found in only one other plant besides Camellia sinensis-yield a drink that is both envigorating and relaxing. (inpursuitoftea.com)
  • The genus Pestalotiopsis is second most important fungal pathogen causing grey blight disease in tea plant ( Camellia sinensis ). (niscair.res.in)

main


  • Carmellia sinensis is one of the main ingredients in the production of Chinese tea. (naturalwellbeing.com)

variety


  • the sinensis variety, which has small leaves, is better suited to higher elevations and a tougher climate. (inpursuitoftea.com)

Chinese


leaves