Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Weight Loss: Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Fetal Weight: The weight of the FETUS in utero. It is usually estimated by various formulas based on measurements made during PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Diet, Reducing: A diet designed to cause an individual to lose weight.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Leptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Weight Reduction Programs: Services providing counseling and activities that help overweight individuals to attain a more healthy body weight.Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Anti-Obesity Agents: Agents that increase energy expenditure and weight loss by neural and chemical regulation. Beta-adrenergic agents and serotoninergic drugs have been experimentally used in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) to treat obesity.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Body Weights and Measures: Measurements of the height, weight, length, area, etc., of the human and animal body or its parts.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Litter Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by a viviparous animal.Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.Mice, Inbred C57BLSwine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Drinking: The consumption of liquids.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Rats, Inbred F344Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Ideal Body Weight: Expected weight of a healthy normal individual based on age, sex, and height. Thus, a malnourished person would weigh less than their ideal body weight.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Appetite Depressants: Agents that are used to suppress appetite.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Hypothalamus: Ventral part of the DIENCEPHALON extending from the region of the OPTIC CHIASM to the caudal border of the MAMMILLARY BODIES and forming the inferior and lateral walls of the THIRD VENTRICLE.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Thinness: A state of insufficient flesh on the body usually defined as having a body weight less than skeletal and physical standards. Depending on age, sex, and genetic background, a BODY MASS INDEX of less than 18.5 is considered as underweight.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Body Constitution: The physical characteristics of the body, including the mode of performance of functions, the activity of metabolic processes, the manner and degree of reactions to stimuli, and power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.TriglyceridesSex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Basal Metabolism: Heat production, or its measurement, of an organism at the lowest level of cell chemistry in an inactive, awake, fasting state. It may be determined directly by means of a calorimeter or indirectly by calculating the heat production from an analysis of the end products of oxidation within the organism or from the amount of oxygen utilized.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Hyperphagia: Ingestion of a greater than optimal quantity of food.Caloric Restriction: Reduction in caloric intake without reduction in adequate nutrition. In experimental animals, caloric restriction has been shown to extend lifespan and enhance other physiological variables.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Appetite: Natural recurring desire for food. Alterations may be induced by APPETITE DEPRESSANTS or APPETITE STIMULANTS.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Weight Lifting: A sport in which weights are lifted competitively or as an exercise.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level: The highest dosage administered that does not produce toxic effects.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Appetite Regulation: Physiologic mechanisms which regulate or control the appetite and food intake.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Ghrelin: A 28-amino acid, acylated, orexigenic peptide that is a ligand for GROWTH HORMONE SECRETAGOGUE RECEPTORS. Ghrelin is widely expressed but primarily in the stomach in the adults. Ghrelin acts centrally to stimulate growth hormone secretion and food intake, and peripherally to regulate energy homeostasis. Its large precursor protein, known as appetite-regulating hormone or motilin-related peptide, contains ghrelin and obestatin.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Mice, Obese: Mutant mice exhibiting a marked obesity coupled with overeating, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, marked insulin resistance, and infertility when in a homozygous state. They may be inbred or hybrid.Diet, Fat-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of fat with less than 30% of calories from all fats and less than 10% from saturated fat. Such a diet is used in control of HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. (From Bondy et al, Metabolic Control and Disease, 8th ed, pp468-70; Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Glucose Tolerance Test: A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cachexia: General ill health, malnutrition, and weight loss, usually associated with chronic disease.Receptors, Leptin: Cell surface receptors for obesity factor (LEPTIN), a hormone secreted by the WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Upon leptin-receptor interaction, the signal is mediated through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway to regulate food intake, energy balance and fat storage.Pregnancy, Animal: The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.Anorexia Nervosa: An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. Other features include excess fear of becoming OVERWEIGHT; BODY IMAGE disturbance; significant WEIGHT LOSS; refusal to maintain minimal normal weight; and AMENORRHEA. This disorder occurs most frequently in adolescent females. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Gastric Bypass: Surgical procedure in which the STOMACH is transected high on the body. The resulting small proximal gastric pouch is joined to any parts of the SMALL INTESTINE by an end-to-side SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS, depending on the amounts of intestinal surface being bypasses. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of MORBID OBESITY by limiting the size of functional STOMACH, food intake, and food absorption.Toxicity Tests, Chronic: Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of a long-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.Pro-Opiomelanocortin: A 30-kDa protein synthesized primarily in the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND and the HYPOTHALAMUS. It is also found in the skin and other peripheral tissues. Depending on species and tissues, POMC is cleaved by PROHORMONE CONVERTASES yielding various active peptides including ACTH; BETA-LIPOTROPIN; ENDORPHINS; MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING HORMONES; and others (GAMMA-LPH; CORTICOTROPIN-LIKE INTERMEDIATE LOBE PEPTIDE; N-terminal peptide of POMC or NPP).Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition.Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Body Surface Area: The two dimensional measure of the outer layer of the body.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Growth Hormone: A polypeptide that is secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin, stimulates mitosis, cell differentiation and cell growth. Species-specific growth hormones have been synthesized.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Calorimetry, Indirect: Calculation of the energy expenditure in the form of heat production of the whole body or individual organs based on respiratory gas exchange.Anorexia: The lack or loss of APPETITE accompanied by an aversion to food and the inability to eat. It is the defining characteristic of the disorder ANOREXIA NERVOSA.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)CyclobutanesMice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Toxicity Tests, Acute: Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of one-time, short-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.Agouti-Related Protein: A secreted protein of approximately 131 amino acids that is related to AGOUTI SIGNALING PROTEIN and is also an antagonist of MELANOCORTIN RECEPTOR activity. It is expressed primarily in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the ADRENAL GLAND. As a paracrine signaling molecule, AGRP is known to regulate food intake and body weight. Elevated AGRP has been associated with OBESITY.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Injections, Intraperitoneal: Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.Mice, Inbred ICRRabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Testosterone: A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Neuropeptide Y: A 36-amino acid peptide present in many organs and in many sympathetic noradrenergic neurons. It has vasoconstrictor and natriuretic activity and regulates local blood flow, glandular secretion, and smooth muscle activity. The peptide also stimulates feeding and drinking behavior and influences secretion of pituitary hormones.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Toxicity Tests: An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.Waist Circumference: The measurement around the body at the level of the ABDOMEN and just above the hip bone. The measurement is usually taken immediately after exhalation.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Weights and Measures: Measuring and weighing systems and processes.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Satiation: Full gratification of a need or desire followed by a state of relative insensitivity to that particular need or desire.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Ovariectomy: The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.Insulin-Like Growth Factor I: A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Skinfold Thickness: The measurement of subcutaneous fat located directly beneath the skin by grasping a fold of skin and subcutaneous fat between the thumb and forefinger and pulling it away from the underlying muscle tissue. The thickness of the double layer of skin and subcutaneous tissue is then read with a caliper. The five most frequently measured sites are the upper arm, below the scapula, above the hip bone, the abdomen, and the thigh. Its application is the determination of relative fatness, of changes in physical conditioning programs, and of the percentage of body fat in desirable body weight. (From McArdle, et al., Exercise Physiology, 2d ed, p496-8)Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Adiponectin: A 30-kDa COMPLEMENT C1Q-related protein, the most abundant gene product secreted by FAT CELLS of the white ADIPOSE TISSUE. Adiponectin modulates several physiological processes, such as metabolism of GLUCOSE and FATTY ACIDS, and immune responses. Decreased plasma adiponectin levels are associated with INSULIN RESISTANCE; TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS; OBESITY; and ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Peptide Hormones: Hormones synthesized from amino acids. They are distinguished from INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS in that their actions are systemic.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4: A melanocortin receptor subtype found primarily in BRAIN. It shows specificity for ALPHA-MSH; BETA-MSH and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Corticosterone: An adrenocortical steroid that has modest but significant activities as a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid. (From Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1437)Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Satiety Response: Behavioral response associated with the achieving of gratification.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Rats, Zucker: Two populations of Zucker rats have been cited in research--the "fatty" or obese and the lean. The "fatty" rat (Rattus norvegicus) appeared as a spontaneous mutant. The obese condition appears to be due to a single recessive gene.

*  Woman Body Sculpting And Weight Training stock video 130312128 | iStock

Download this Woman Body Sculpting And Weight Training video now. And search more of the web's best library of royalty-free ... Woman Body Sculpting and Weight Training - Stock video. .... Adult, Adults Only, Bicep, Exercising, Gym. ...
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*  Body Weight Exercise Routines | LIVESTRONG.COM

When it comes to fitness, your own bodyweight will suffice. And bodyweight workouts also... ... Cardio Body Weight Exercises. There are other exercises beside running that you can do with just your own bodyweight. Jumping ... Body Weight Exercise Routines by KAITLIN CONDON Last Updated: Sep 11, 2017. ... Upper Body Exercises. When it comes to an upper body workout, there isn't a more complete exercise than the pushup. The pushup ...
livestrong.com/article/276149-body-weight-exercise-routines/

*  BMI not a good measure of body weight | HealthCentral

Body Mass Index, or BMI, is often cited when determining if someone is at a ... Body Mass Index, or BMI, is often cited when determining if someone is at a "healthy" body weight. But researchers from the ... BMI not a good measure of body weight New test may detect ovarian cancer earlier Anorexia may be linked to brain size Beware of ... Sourced from: Live Science, BMI Not a Good Measure of Healthy Body Weight, Researchers Argue ...
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*  Chest Workouts Using Body Weight | LIVESTRONG.COM

Bend both of your arms at the same time, keep your arms close to your body and lower your body weight toward the ground; ... Exercising using your body weight as resistance can help you develop muscular strength and definition at home. The secret is to ... Bend both arms at the same time and lower your body weight toward the floor, stopping when your chest is about an inch off the ... Begin by lying down and supporting your body weight on the balls of your feet and your hands. Be sure that your hands are ...
livestrong.com/article/422274-chest-workouts-using-body-weight/

*  Alcohol consumption and body weight - French - 2009 - Health Economics - Wiley Online Library

French, M. T., Norton, E. C., Fang, H. and Maclean, J. C. (2010), Alcohol consumption and body weight. Health Econ., 19: 814- ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hec.1521/references?globalMessage=0&systemMessage=Wiley Online Library will be unavailable on Saturday 7th Oct from 03.00 EDT / 08:00 BST / 12:30 IST / 15.00 SGT to 08.00 EDT / 13.00 BST / 17:30 IST / 20.00 SGT and Sunday 8th Oct from 03.00 EDT / 08:00 BST / 12:30 IST / 15.00 SGT to 06.00 EDT / 11.00 BST / 15:30 IST / 18.00 SGT for essential maintenance. Apologies for the inconvenience caused

*  Body Cardio smart scale can measure weight and heart health - Business Insider

The truth is, however, there is much more to know than just body weight to determine one's health status. Body Cardio, a smart ... This scale reveals more than your weight - it can actually measure heart health. *Gene Kim and Rebecca Harrington ... It can provide a wide range of information about the users' body, so they could make better health decisions. ... A dermatologist explains why she uses body wash instead of bar soap ...
businessinsider.com/smart-scale-can-show-various-health-indicators-2016-11

*  ExRx.net • View topic - Body weight exercises, reps

I wonder if this could be a shoulder imbalance rather than chest/back? I really have been careful to balance chest & back, but for a long time the only shoulder work I did was military press, which mostly hits the front delts. Maybe my front delts are way stronger than my rears and that impacts these exercises ...
exrx.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=616&p=3664

*  Fitbit's Aria WiFi scale tracks weight, BMI and body fat percentage (hands-on)

Medical research studies have shown that monitoring body weight is an effective strategy to prevent weight gain, and people who ... circular display displaying weight and body fat percentage (you'll have to log into fitbit.com to see your body mass index, or ... During our hands-on demo here at CES, we also got a chance to see the weight, BMI and body fat percentage charts on Fitbit.com ... The Aria Wi-Fi Smart Scale tracks weight, BMI and body fat percentage, only instead of sending those nuggets to Twitter, it all ...
https://engadget.com/2012/01/09/fitbits-aria-wifi-scale-tracks-weight-bmi-and-body-fat-percent/

*  Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy - Bret Contreras

Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy is the authoritative resource for sculpting your physique without free weights, machines, ... Bodyweight Strength Training Poster: Upper Body £11.66. Bodyweight Strength Training Poster: Lower Body and Back £11.66. ... Bodyweight Strength Training Poster: Core and Whole Body £11.66. Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy Poster Series £29.16. ... If you want to learn the science and art of bodyweight training, there is no better resource than Bret's book, Bodyweight ...
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*  How to Tone Your Body Without Losing Weight | LIVESTRONG.COM

The healthiest and most efficient way to firm up flabby areas of the body is through nutrition and exercise. To tone up without ... You will have a much more toned body, and your body weight will be about the same as when you started the new routine. ... Eating foods high in protein and lifting weights three times a week will lead to a tighter body without any loss of weight. ... Use a high-quality weight bench set, dumbbells and an exercise ball (for working the core of the body). Start with light ...
livestrong.com/article/101230-tone-body-losing-weight/

*  How To Calculate Your Ideal Weight - Better Body

Calculate your perfect weight. If you are taller than 6 meters take the number from step 3 and add it to 170 lbs. This will be your ideal weight. So for a man who is 6 feet 2 inches tall the ideal weight 180 kg. If you are shorter than 6 meters take the number from Step 3 and subtract it from 170 lbs. This will be your ideal weight. So for a man who is 5 meters 10 inches tall the ideal weight is 160 kg.. Tips and Warnings. This formula for finding your ideal weight for a person of average medium build. A person with a more muscular build will have a slightly higher ideal weight while a naturally thin person will have a slightly lower ideal weight. Only a doctor can give you an exact ideal weight century after a physical examination. This formula is for an adult age 21 and older. This perfect weight formula should not be used for teenagers ...
better-body.biz/2017/03/09/how-to-calculate-your-ideal-weight/

*  Healthy Body Weight 3.0 Download page - Healthy Body Weight Shareware Download

Free download of Healthy Body Weight 3.0. Your healthy body weight is that weight at which you are strong and healthy. The slower you lose weight, the more likely you are losing fat and not muscle. If you have a high level of body fat, or you have never been able to successfully lose fat,
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*  What is a healthy body weight?

What is a healthy body weight? How is fat burned? if I am a 24 year old man 6ft tall,177lb and wonts to weigh 165 in 40 days what is the best way to do that ?.
https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/weight-management/what-is-a-healthy-body-weight-127311

*  RIO AMAZON SlimCaps - Healthy Body Weight - 120 x 500mg Vegicaps - UK Supplier

RIO AMAZON SlimCaps helps to maintain a healthy body weight. May help you feel more energetic and alert. Slimcaps are a blend of two popular South American herbs - Yerba Maté and Guaraná.
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*  Benefits Of The Ideal Weight Of A Person | Uber Articles

Once you ask the concern 'how much should I weigh' typically there's an arrow that suggests the BMI calculations which could be the standard way of measuring...
uberarticles.com/health-and-fitness/benefits-of-the-ideal-weight-of-a-person/

*  Lose Weight Through Thin Ice 2.0

Losing weight usually takes a lot of time. Other than time, putting in a conscious effort to lose weight can be very annoying. This is why making use of Thin
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*  3 Ways to Do Body Weight Back Exercises | LIVESTRONG.COM

When learning to do body weight back exercises for the lower back, it is important to remember that strengthening the lower abdomen is just as important as...
livestrong.com/article/9514-do-body-weight-back-exercises/

*  over weight

Without a doubt, one of the most important contributors to living a long healthy life is maintaining a healthy weight, especially when you consider the long list of health problems associated with obesity. When you strive to keep a healthy weight you receive a double benefit, not only preventing a whole range of obesity associated […]. ...
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*  Weight Lifting Workouts

Learn about 2 weight lifting workouts. One workout helps you gain strength and the second workout helps you gain muscle size fast.
getthisripped.com/exercise/weight-lifting-workouts/

Management of obesity: The main treatment for obesity consists of dieting and physical exercise. Diet programs may produce weight loss over the short term, but maintaining this weight loss is frequently difficult and often requires making exercise and a lower calorie diet a permanent part of an individual's lifestyle.Birth weight: Birth weight is the body weight of a baby at its birth.Definitions from Georgia Department of Public Health.Molar mass distribution: In linear polymers the individual polymer chains rarely have exactly the same degree of polymerization and molar mass, and there is always a distribution around an average value. The molar mass distribution (or molecular weight distribution) in a polymer describes the relationship between the number of moles of each polymer species (Ni) and the molar mass (Mi) of that species.Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.PRX-07034: PRX-07034 is a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist. It has cognition and memory-enhancing properties and potently decreases food intake and body weight in rodents.List of countries by food energy intake: Food consumption refers to the amount of food available for human consumption as estimated by the FAO Food Balance Sheets. However the actual food consumption may be lower than the quantity shown as food availability depending on the magnitude of wastage and losses of food in the household, e.Index of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.Low birth-weight paradox: The low birth-weight paradox is an apparently paradoxical observation relating to the birth weights and mortality rate of children born to tobacco smoking mothers. Low birth-weight children born to smoking mothers have a lower infant mortality rate than the low birth weight children of non-smokers.Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.Dieter Weichert: Dieter Weichert (born 1948) is a German mechanical engineer specialising in solid mechanics and polymer rheology. Since 1995 he is the Director of the Institute for General Mechanics of RWTH Aachen.Adipose tissue macrophages: Adipose tissue macrophages (abbr. ATMs) comprise tissue resident macrophages present in adipose tissue.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.LeptinTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingOverweight PoochLiver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GIAnti-obesity medication: Anti-obesity medication or weight loss drugs are all pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These drugs alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories.Concentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.Animal fatInsulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.Gross pathology: Gross pathology refers to macroscopic manifestations of disease in organs, tissues, and body cavities. The term is commonly used by anatomical pathologists to refer to diagnostically useful findings made during the gross examination portion of surgical specimen processing or an autopsy.Osmotic controlled-release oral delivery system: OROS (Osmotic [Controlled] Release Oral [Delivery] System) is a controlled release oral drug delivery system in the form of a tablet. The tablet has a rigid water-permeable jacket with one or more laser drilled small holes.PhytomedicineDry matter: The dry matter (or otherwise known as dry weight) is a measurement of the mass of something when completely dried.Protein toxicity: Protein toxicity with proteinuria can result in those with preexisting kidney disease, or those who have lost kidney function due to age.Deep litter: Deep litter is an animal housing system, based on the repeated spreading of straw or sawdust material in indoor booths. An initial layer of litter is spread for the animals to use for bedding material and to defecate in, and as the litter is soiled, new layers of litter are continuously added by the farmer.Subtherapeutic antibiotic use in swine: Antibiotics are commonly used in commercial swine production in the United States and around the world. They are used for disease treatment, disease prevention and control, and growth promotion.Wilson–Mikity syndromeBlood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.Plant breedingBeef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Gestational age: Gestational age (or menstrual age) is a measure of the age of a pregnancy where the origin is the woman's last normal menstrual period (LMP), or the corresponding age as estimated by other methods. Such methods include adding 14 days to a known duration since fertilization (as is possible in in vitro fertilization), or by obstetric ultrasonography.Lipid droplet: Lipid droplets, also referred to as lipid bodies, oil bodies or adiposomes, are lipid-rich cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids and are found largely in the adipose tissue.Mobilization and cellular uptake of stored fats and triacylglycerol (with Animation) They also serve as a reservoir for cholesterol and acyl-glycerols for membrane formation and maintenance.TiflorexHigh-intensity interval training: High-intensity interval training (HIIT), also called high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) or sprint interval training (SIT), is an enhanced form of interval training, an exercise strategy alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. HIIT is a form of cardiovascular exercise.Aortic pressure: Central aortic blood pressure (CAP or CASP) is the blood pressure at the root of aorta. Studies have shown the importance of central aortic pressure and its implications in assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment with respect to cardiovascular risk factors.TriglycerideKidney: The kidneys are bean-shaped organs that serve several essential regulatory roles in vertebrates. They remove excess organic molecules from the blood, and it is by this action that their best-known function is performed: the removal of waste products of metabolism.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Carbohydrate loading: Carbohydrate loading, commonly referred to as carb-loading or carbo-loading, is a strategy used by endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, to maximize the storage of glycogen (or energy) in the muscles and liver.http://www.Male lactation: Male lactation in zoology means production of milk from mammary glands in the presence of physiological stimuli connected with nursing infants. It is well documented in the Dayak fruit bat.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.CALERIE: CALERIE (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) is a trial currently underway in the U.S.Compensatory growth (organism): Compensatory growth, known as catch-up growth and compensatory gain, is an accelerated growth of an organism following a period of slowed development, particularly as a result of nutrient deprivation. The growth may be with respect to weight or length (or height in humans).Specific appetite: Specific appetite, also known as specific hunger, is a drive to eat foods with specific flavors or other characteristics.Reproductive toxicity: Reproductive toxicity is a hazard associated with some chemical substances, that they will interfere in some way with normal reproduction; such substances are called reprotoxic. It includes adverse effects on sexual function and fertility in adult males and females, as well as developmental toxicity in the offspring.Weightlifting at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 62 kg: The Men's Featherweight Weightlifting Event (– 62 kg) is the second men's weight class event at the weightlifting competition, limiting competitors to a maximum of 62 kilograms of body mass. The competition took place on 2000-09-17 in the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre and was the first weightlifting event to conclude at the 2000 Summer Olympics.Noel Derecki: Noel Christopher Derecki See Noel Derecki at the IMDb Movie Database (born December 12, 1968) in New York City, NY, USA is former child actor whose work in television, film, and the stage was primarily during the 1980s and 1990s. Noel was featured as one of the gang in the film Billy Bathgate (1991) and as musician Tony Vandelo in Heartbreak Hotel (1988).Myokine: A myokine is one of several hundred cytokines or other small proteins (~5–20 kDa) and proteoglycan peptides that are produced and released by muscle cells (myocytes) in response to muscular contractions.Bente Klarlund Pedersen , Thorbjörn C.Proteinogenic amino acid: Proteinogenic amino acids are amino acids that are precursors to proteins, and are incorporated into proteins cotranslationally — that is, during translation. There are 23 proteinogenic amino acids in prokaryotes (including N-Formylmethionine, mainly used to initiate protein synthesis and often removed afterward), but only 21 are encoded by the nuclear genes of eukaryotes.Lipotoxicity: Lipotoxicity is a metabolic syndrome that results from the accumulation of lipid intermediates in non-adipose tissue, leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The tissues normally affected include the kidneys, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.Outline of diabetes: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to diabetes:College of Practitioners of PhytotherapyCorriedale: Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed, meaning they are used both in the production of wool and meat. The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New ZealandStock Types, The Land, North Richmond, c.

(1/26303) Strongyle infections in ponies. II. Reinfection of treated animals.

Five of seven ponies whose strongyle worm burdens had previously been removed or markedly reduced by repeated thiabendazole treatments were reinfected with doses ranging from 100,000 to 500,000 small strongyle infective larvae. Reinfection of ponies resulted in the development of clinical signs characterized by abnormal feces, marked loss of weight and delayed shedding of winter hair coats. An abrupt increase in circulating eosinophils occurred during the first three weeks following reinfection. Patent infections developed in all ponies with worm eggs appearing in the feces from 12 to 15 weeks after receiving infective larvae. Worm egg outputs followed a cyclic pattern with approximately four to five peaks in egg output per year. There was an abrupt drop in the high worm egg counts in two untreated ponies approximately two and a half years after reinfection. No worms were recovered in the feces of these animals when they were subsequently treated, suggesting that a depletion in the number of inhibited larvae present in these ponies might have occurred.  (+info)

(2/26303) Decreased liver and lung drug-metabolizing activity in mice treated with Corynebacterium parvum.

Injections of killed suspensions of Corynebacterium parvum (i.p.) in young male mice were followed by time- and dose-dependent decreases in the drug-metabolizing activity of liver microsomes and lung homogenates. In vitro assays with model substrates [aminopyrine, aniline, p-nitroanisole, and benzo(a)pyrene] were used to quantitate drug-metabolizing activity. It is likely that such decreases in mixed function oxidases activity will act to significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of concurrently or subsequently administered drugs. The results provide a possible mechanism to explain several previously reported immunochemotherapeutic interactions.  (+info)

(3/26303) Pregnancy, body weight and human immunodeficiency virus infection in African women: a prospective cohort study in Kigali (Rwanda), 1992-1994. Pregnancy and HIV Study Group (EGE).

OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and body weight in African women during and after pregnancy. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was initiated at the Centre Hospitalier de Kigali in July 1992. Every woman seen at the antenatal clinic and with a gestational age of <28 weeks was offered HIV-1 antibody testing. Comparable numbers of HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIV-) women were recruited. At inclusion, socio-demographic characteristics and self-reported pre-pregnancy weight were recorded; height and weight were measured. Each woman enrolled had a monthly follow-up until 9 months after delivery, with a clinical examination including weighing. Three anthropometric indices were used to answer the study objectives: weight, body mass index (BMI), and pregnancy balance. RESULTS: As of April 1994, 101 HIV+ and 106 HIV- women were followed until 5 months after delivery. Weight and BMI during pregnancy were lower in HIV+ women than in HIV- women. After delivery, weight and BMI gains were significantly lower in HIV+ women. Until 5 months after delivery, the mean weight variation was -2.2 kg (standard deviation [SD] = 5.9 kg) in HIV+ women and +0.2 kg (SD = 6.6 kg) in HIV- women (P = 0.007) in comparison to pre-pregnancy weight. Comparisons of the slopes of the weight curves did not show statistical differences throughout the pregnancy, but it did during the post-partum period (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that HIV infection could impair nutritional status in pregnant women, especially during the post-partum period. Family planning and maternal and child health services including HIV testing and counselling, should consider a nutritional assessment and intervention programme targeted to HIV+ pregnant women.  (+info)

(4/26303) Gender-related differences in myocyte remodeling in progression to heart failure.

Gender-related differences responsible for the better prognosis of females with heart failure have not been clearly established. To address this issue, we investigated potential gender-related differences in myocyte remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats. Echocardiograms and myocyte growth were compared between males and females at compensated (2, 4, and 6 months) and decompensated (18 months in males and 24 months in females) stages of cardiac hypertrophy. Although left ventricular diastolic dimensions did not differ significantly between failing male and female rats, fractional shortening declined significantly only in failing males. Myocyte cross-sectional area did not change after 4 months of age in both genders, which is likely to be responsible for the absence of a change in left ventricular wall thickness during the progression to heart failure. Myocyte volume and cross-sectional area were significantly larger in males than females at 2, 4, and 6 months of age, although there were no significant differences at the failing stage. Reduced adaptive hypertrophic reserve was observed in males, which is likely to contribute to the higher morbidity and mortality of males with chronic heart failure.  (+info)

(5/26303) A sustained rat model for studying the long-lasting catabolic state of sepsis.

Most animal models of sepsis induced high mortality or early recovery and do not mimic the long-lasting catabolic state observed in patients. The purpose of this study is to develop a model of sepsis which reproduces these disorders, especially the long-lasting muscle wasting. This report summarizes our observations in a series of seven experiments using this model with rats to study the route of live Escherichia coli administration, dose of bacteria, reproducibility of the model, bacterial count in tissues, comparison of injection of live or dead bacteria, metabolic perturbations linked to infection, and potential role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in muscle wasting. After intravenous infection, animals were anorexic and the catabolic state was long-lasting: body weight loss for 2 to 3 days followed by a chronic wasting state for several days. Liver, spleen, lung protein content, and plasma concentration of alpha2-macroglobulin were increased 2 and 6 days after infection. At 6 days, muscle protein content was substantially (-40%) reduced. The plasma TNF-alpha level measured 1.5 h after infection correlated with body weight loss observed 9 days later. The inhibition of TNF-alpha secretion by administration of pentoxifylline 1 h before infection reduced muscle wasting and activation of proteolysis at day 2 and abolished them at day 6. This septic model mimics in rats the prolonged protein metabolism alterations and muscle atrophy characteristics of infected patients and thus is useful for studying the impact of nutritional support on outcome.  (+info)

(6/26303) Fish oil feeding delays influenza virus clearance and impairs production of interferon-gamma and virus-specific immunoglobulin A in the lungs of mice.

Ingestion of fish oil can suppress the inflammatory response to injury and may impair host resistance to infection. To investigate the effect of a diet containing fish oil on immunity to viral infection, 148 BALB/c mice were fed diets containing 3 g/100 g of sunflower oil with either 17 g/100 g of fish oil or beef tallow for 14 d before intranasal challenge with live influenza virus. At d 1 and d 5 after infection, the mice fed fish oil had higher lung viral load and lower body weight (P < 0.05). In addition to the greater viral load and weight loss at d 5 after infection, the fish oil group consumed less food (P < 0.05) while the beef tallow group was clearing the virus, had regained their preinfection weights and was returning to their preinfection food consumption. The fish oil group had impaired production of lung interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G and lung IgA-specific antibodies (all P < 0. 05) although lung IFN-alpha/beta and the relative proportions of bronchial lymph node CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes did not differ between groups after infection. The present study demonstrates a delay in virus clearance in mice fed fish oil associated with reduced IFN-gamma and antibody production and a greater weight loss and suppression of appetite following influenza virus infection. However, differences observed during the course of infection did not affect the ultimate outcome as both groups cleared the virus and returned to preinfection food consumption and body weight by d 7.  (+info)

(7/26303) Sodium requirement of adult cats for maintenance based on plasma aldosterone concentration.

The sodium requirement of adult cats for maintenance was determined using a randomized block design of eight dietary sodium treatments (0.1, 0.4, 0.5, 0.66, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 or 2.0 g Na/kg in a casein-lactalbumin-based purified diet) administered for periods of 4 wk. A total of 35 adult specific-pathogen-free domestic shorthaired cats (26 males and 9 females, 1.5-3 y of age) was given an equilibration diet (2 g Na/kg) for 14 d before assignment (or reassignment) to the treatments. A total of 12 cats (8 males, 4 females) was randomly assigned to the lowest six levels of sodium, and four cats to the highest two sodium levels. Cats consuming the diet containing 0.1 g Na/kg had significantly elevated aldosterone concentration in plasma, and packed cell volume. In addition, these cats exhibited anorexia, body weight loss, reduced urinary specific gravity and sodium excretion, and had a negative sodium balance. However, adult cats did not develop polydypsia and polyuria reported in sodium-deficient kittens. Cats given the diet containing 0.66 g Na/kg did not have an increased packed cell volume, but aldosterone concentration in the plasma was significantly elevated. However, cats given diets containing >/=0.8 g Na/kg had plasma aldosterone concentrations +info)

(8/26303) Natural sporting ability and predisposition to cardiovascular disorders.

We tested the hypothesis that people with a natural ability in 'power sports' (a presumed marker for predominance of type 2, glycolytic muscle fibres) might have increased risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to those with a natural ability in 'endurance sports' (as a marker for predominance of type 1, oxidative muscle fibres). We examined subsequent cardiovascular disorders retrospectively in 231 male former soldiers, aged 34-87 years, who had undergone a course in physical training in the Army School of Physical Training, Aldershot, UK, who assessed themselves as having natural ability in either power (n = 107) or endurance (n = 124) sports. The proportion with CHD, defined as angina and/or coronary angioplasty and/or coronary artery bypass graft and/or heart attack was 18.7% in the 'power group' vs. 9.7% in the 'endurance group' (difference: chi 2 = 3.9, p = 0.05). The proportions with CHD and/or risk factors rose to 39.3% in the 'power group' vs. 25.8% in the 'endurance group' (difference: chi 2 = 4.8, p = 0.03). Under logistic regression analysis, compared to the 'endurance group', the 'power group' had 2.2 (95% CI: 1.00-4.63) the risk of developing CHD, and 1.86 (95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 3.25) the risk of developing CHD and/or risk factors. Men with a natural ability in 'power sports' are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disorders, compared to men with a natural ability in 'endurance sports'. A predominance of type 2, glycolytic muscle fibres, presumably of genetic origin, may predispose to cardiovascular disorders.  (+info)



Free Ideal Body Weight Calculator


  • MB Free Ideal Body Weight Calculator is an interesting health software with a simple to use interface. (filetransit.com)

Exercises


  • Other bodyweight upper body exercises include triceps dips, pull-ups and chin-ups. (livestrong.com)
  • When you are looking to work your lower body look no farther than the squat or lunge exercises. (livestrong.com)
  • Both exercises target the entire lower body, engaging the glutes, hamstrings and quadriceps. (livestrong.com)
  • There are other exercises beside running that you can do with just your own bodyweight. (livestrong.com)
  • Plyometric training, also known as jump training, is an intense method of training that utilizes your bodyweight with jump exercises. (livestrong.com)
  • Bodyweight core exercises are well known. (livestrong.com)
  • Going far beyond standard pull-ups, push-ups, and squats, Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy presents 156 unique exercises that work every muscle in the body. (humankinetics.com)
  • Targeting all muscle zones and primary muscle regions-arms, chest, shoulders, back, core, thighs, glutes, and calves- Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy presents 156 of the most effective bodyweight exercises that can be performed anytime, anywhere. (humankinetics.com)
  • Weight -bearing aerobic exercises reduce the risk of osteoporosis. (brainmass.com)
  • body strength, for example, can be measured by various weight -lifting exercises. (brainmass.com)

Workouts


  • And bodyweight workouts also save money because you don't need a gym membership -- they're easy to do from the comfort of your own home. (livestrong.com)
  • Workouts, healthy recipes, and weight-loss tips delivered to your inbox. (popsugar.com)

percentage


  • The Aria Wi-Fi Smart Scale tracks weight, BMI and body fat percentage, only instead of sending those nuggets to Twitter, it all goes straight to Fitbit's own site. (engadget.com)
  • As far as designer scales go, the Aria sure is pretty, with its glass top and bright, circular display displaying weight and body fat percentage (you'll have to log into fitbit.com to see your body mass index, or BMI). (engadget.com)
  • During our hands-on demo here at CES, we also got a chance to see the weight, BMI and body fat percentage charts on Fitbit.com, which are every bit as cheerful and intuitive as the rest of the site. (engadget.com)
  • Because water is a percentage of your weight, you need more water if you have a larger body. (livestrong.com)

diet


  • decreasing term or excessive sustainable diet, as body fat intake is not healthy . (brainmass.com)

intake


  • Everybody's body is different, but general guidelines for water intake provide a reference by which you can determine whether you're getting enough. (livestrong.com)

weigh


  • Medical research studies have shown that monitoring body weight is an effective strategy to prevent weight gain, and people who weigh themselves once a day can lose up to twice the weight of those who don't do daily weigh ins. (engadget.com)

pound


  • Physiologist Sharon E. Griffin estimates that you need a half ounce of fluid per day for every pound of body weight. (livestrong.com)

Mass Index


  • Body Mass Index, or BMI, is often cited when determining if someone is at a "healthy" body weight. (healthcentral.com)

healthier


depends


  • She argues that no single number can represent a healthy weight because it depends on starting weight, genetics, gender and numerous other factors. (healthcentral.com)
  • Every system of the human body depends on water. (livestrong.com)

muscles


  • The website ExerciseGoals.com calls the tried and true pushup "the best upper body exercise to build strong arms, chest and shoulder muscles. (livestrong.com)
  • In depth yet practical, Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy takes you inside every exercise through stunning anatomical artwork that reveals primary muscles worked along with the relevant surrounding structures, including bones, ligaments, and tendons. (humankinetics.com)

Maintain


  • Muscle weighs more than fat, so focusing on muscle growth will not only make your body look and feel tighter but also will help you maintain your current weight. (livestrong.com)
  • This study also demonstrates that weight training can maintain (or increase) lean mass while dieting. (exrx.net)

shoulders


  • The pushup can be done in a variety of ways to target different muscle groups, but the traditional form alone is enough to target your entire body, from your shoulders and arms to your core. (livestrong.com)
  • Be sure that there is a straight line from your ankles to your shoulders and bend both arms to lower your body to the ground while continuing to press back to keep your feet on the wall. (livestrong.com)

equipment


  • With full-color anatomical illustrations, step-by-step instructions, and training advice, Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy is the authoritative resource for sculpting your physique without free weights, machines, or expensive equipment. (humankinetics.com)
  • Weights And Bars /Shop By Brand/Body Power /Shop By Brand/Body Power/Gym Equipment /Shop By Brand/Body Power/Special Offers /Shop By Brand/Body Power/Special Offers/SALE NOW ON! (fitness-superstore.co.uk)
  • Weights And Bars /Shop By Brand/Body Power/Gym Equipment/Weight Plates & Barbell Sets/Standard Weights & Bars/Standard Weight Sets /Shop By Brand/Body Power/Gym Equipment/Weight Plates & Barbell Sets/Standard Weights & Bars/Standard Weight Sets/Standard Iron Weight Sets Quality SOLID Spinlock Dumbbell/Barbell Set. (fitness-superstore.co.uk)

image


  • The right insula is also responsible for our perception of body image, which is distorted in people with anorexia. (healthcentral.com)

GENDER


  • The program is designed to calculate the ideal body weight of a person which is calculated based on the gender and height of the person. (filetransit.com)

Training


  • Whether you are just beginning your quest for a better body or simply seeking a proven approach for training at home, on the road, or on the go, Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy is a one-of-a-kind resource that you'll refer to again and again. (humankinetics.com)
  • He is the author of the bestselling book Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy (Human Kinetics, 2014) and coauthor of Strong Curves (Victory Belt, 2013). (humankinetics.com)
  • To tone up without losing weight, it's important to eat the right foods and focus on a weight-training program. (livestrong.com)
  • Begin a weight-training routine. (livestrong.com)
  • Always consult a doctor before beginning any type of weight-training program. (livestrong.com)
  • How Much Water Should I Drink for Weight Training? (livestrong.com)

muscle


  • Whether you're a beginner or advanced bodybuilder, a bodyweight exercise routine can be challenging and effective at building and toning muscle. (livestrong.com)
  • One of the main factors is that it does not really evaluate body type - it does not take into account fat, fat distribution or muscle mass that may be increasing a person's body weight. (healthcentral.com)
  • You can build muscle by lifting weights. (livestrong.com)
  • To build muscle efficiently, you should be consuming enough protein in grams each day to match your body weight in pounds. (livestrong.com)

make


  • It can provide a wide range of information about the users' body, so they could make better health decisions. (businessinsider.com)

Loss


  • Eating foods high in protein and lifting weights three times a week will lead to a tighter body without any loss of weight. (livestrong.com)
  • Jessica Simpson stepped out in Calabasas, Calif., yesterday flaunting her post-baby weight loss. (eonline.com)

healthy


Fitness


  • When it comes to fitness, your own bodyweight will suffice. (livestrong.com)
  • fsscart/index/add?product=16812&qty=1 £194.77 £9.74 http://www.fitness-superstore.co.uk/body-power-185kg-olympic-weight-set-1.html 16812 Body Power 185kg Olympic Weight Set 185.03 GBP OutOfStock The Bodypower Sports Olympic Set. (fitness-superstore.co.uk)

upper body


  • Pushups are a bodyweight exercise that target your upper body and core. (livestrong.com)
  • When it comes to an upper body workout, there isn't a more complete exercise than the pushup. (livestrong.com)

entire body


  • In only 20 minutes, you can work your entire body and rev your metabolism. (popsugar.com)

HEIGHT


  • BMI is calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by their height in meters, squared. (healthcentral.com)
  • The standards are set based on research and survey for appropriate height and weight. (123-free-download.com)

measure


  • But researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have published an article in the journal Science pointing out the problems with using BMI as a means to measure body weight. (healthcentral.com)
  • Because it's simple and can provide a reasonable measure of body fat. (healthcentral.com)

lower


  • Bend both arms at the same time and lower your body weight toward the floor, stopping when your chest is about an inch off the floor. (livestrong.com)
  • Lower your body as you would for a regular pushup, but instead of lowering yourself straight toward the ground, dive forward slightly with your head and chest so that they are moving forward while you lower your butt toward the ground. (livestrong.com)

core


  • From the traditional crunch to the plank, your bodyweight is the only resistance you need to create a strong core. (livestrong.com)
  • Use a high-quality weight bench set, dumbbells and an exercise ball (for working the core of the body). (livestrong.com)

percent


  • The Fitbit Aria Smart Scale can be set up in minutes and then easily taps into your Wi-Fi network to automatically upload your weight and percent (%) body fat information to Fitbit.com each time you step on the scale. (engadget.com)
  • As a general rule, do not exceed more than a 10 percent increase in weight from week to week. (livestrong.com)

parts


  • blood flow to all parts of your body . (brainmass.com)
  • Water is the medium for key biological functions in the human body and it transports waste and lubricates sensitive body parts such as the eyes and nose. (livestrong.com)

help


  • Exercising using your body weight as resistance can help you develop muscular strength and definition at home. (livestrong.com)

Lose


  • Lose Weight. (livestrong.com)
  • In another words, unless you lose loads of weight and go weeks or months without weighing in (and why would you if you were making progress? (engadget.com)
  • How Much Weight Will I Lose Working Out 6 Days a Week? (livestrong.com)

nutrition


  • The healthiest and most efficient way to firm up flabby areas of the body is through nutrition and exercise. (livestrong.com)

effective


  • The key to an effective bodyweight routine is to keep rest time short between sets -- so your heart rate stays elevated, increasing calories burned as well as improving cardiovascular health. (livestrong.com)

enough


  • use enough weight so that you can do no more than this number of reps. (livestrong.com)

increase


  • Increase the amount of weight you are lifting from week to week. (livestrong.com)

Begin


  • Begin by lying down and supporting your body weight on the balls of your feet and your hands. (livestrong.com)

arms


  • Lift your feet off the floor so that your body weight is supported by your arms. (livestrong.com)

alone


  • The group that weight trained and dieted lost more fat than the groups that either dieted or weight trained alone. (exrx.net)

properly


scale


  • Body Cardio, a smart digital scale, is created by Withings . (businessinsider.com)
  • The Aria Wi-Fi Smart Scale tracks weight, body fat %, and BMI over time and integrates with Fitbit's industry-leading online social and motivational tools. (engadget.com)