Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Feathers: Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.Charadriiformes: An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Psittaciformes: An order of BIRDS comprised of several families and more than 300 species. It includes COCKATOOS; PARROTS; PARAKEETS; macaws; and BUDGERIGARS.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Parrots: BIRDS of the large family Psittacidae, widely distributed in tropical regions and having a distinctive stout, curved hooked bill. The family includes LOVEBIRDS; AMAZON PARROTS; conures; PARAKEETS; and many other kinds of parrots.Anseriformes: An order of BIRDS comprising the waterfowl, particularly DUCKS; GEESE; swans; and screamers.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Raptors: BIRDS that hunt and kill other animals, especially higher vertebrates, for food. They include the FALCONIFORMES order, or diurnal birds of prey, comprised of EAGLES, falcons, HAWKS, and others, as well as the STRIGIFORMES order, or nocturnal birds of prey, which includes OWLS.Galliformes: An order of heavy-bodied, largely terrestrial BIRDS including pheasants, TURKEYS, grouse, QUAIL, and CHICKENS.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Finches: Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.Beak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Sparrows: The family Passeridae comprised of small, mainly brown and grey seed-eating birds with conical bills.GeeseDucksColumbidae: Family in the order COLUMBIFORMES, comprised of pigeons or doves. They are BIRDS with short legs, stout bodies, small heads, and slender bills. Some sources call the smaller species doves and the larger pigeons, but the names are interchangeable.Cloaca: A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.Bird Fancier's Lung: A form of alveolitis or pneumonitis due to an acquired hypersensitivity to inhaled avian antigens, usually proteins in the dust of bird feathers and droppings.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Crows: Common name for the largest birds in the order PASSERIFORMES, family Corvidae. These omnivorous black birds comprise most of the species in the genus Corvus, along with ravens and jackdaws (which are often also referred to as crows).Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Spheniscidae: The sole family in the order Sphenisciformes, comprised of 17 species of penguins in six genera. They are flightless seabirds of the Southern Hemisphere, highly adapted for marine life.Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Haemosporida: An order of heteroxenous protozoa in which the macrogamete and microgamont develop independently. A conoid is usually absent.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Palaeognathae: A superorder of large, mostly flightless birds, named for their distinctive PALATE morphology. It includes the orders Apterygiformes, Casuriiformes, Dinornithiformes, RHEIFORMES; STRUTHIONIFORMES and Tinamiformes.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Coturnix: A genus of BIRDS in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES, containing the common European and other Old World QUAIL.Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 1. The H5N1 subtype, frequently referred to as the bird flu virus, is endemic in wild birds and very contagious among both domestic (POULTRY) and wild birds. It does not usually infect humans, but some cases have been reported.Starlings: The family Sturnidae, in the order PASSERIFORMES. The starling family also includes mynahs and oxpeckers.Animals, ZooGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Homing Behavior: Instinctual patterns of activity related to a specific area including ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances using navigational clues such as those used in migration (ANIMAL MIGRATION).Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Canaries: Any of several Old World finches of the genus Serinus.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Strigiformes: An order of BIRDS with the common name owls characterized by strongly hooked beaks, sharp talons, large heads, forward facing eyes, and facial disks. While considered nocturnal RAPTORS, some owls do hunt by day.Alligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Cockatoos: Large crested BIRDS in the family Cacatuidae, found in Australia, New Guinea, and islands adjacent to the Philippines. The cockatiel (species Nymphicus hollandicus) is much smaller.Hawks: Common name for many members of the FALCONIFORMES order, family Accipitridae, generally smaller than EAGLES, and containing short, rounded wings and a long tail.Clutch Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by an oviparous or ovoviviparous animal.Parakeets: Common name for one of five species of small PARROTS, containing long tails.Molting: Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.WingSexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Psittacosis: Infection with CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), transmitted to humans by inhalation of dust-borne contaminated nasal secretions or excreta of infected BIRDS. This infection results in a febrile illness characterized by PNEUMONITIS and systemic manifestations.West Nile virus: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.West Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Proventriculus: A thin-walled, glandular stomach found in birds. It precedes the gizzard.Crop, Avian: A thin-walled distention of the alimentary tract protruding just outside the body cavity in the distal end of the neck (esophagus), used for the temporary storage of food and water.Bornaviridae: A family in the order MONONEGAVIRALES comprising one genus Bornavirus. This family has a unique form of mRNA processing: replication and transcription takes place in the nucleus.

*  Bird Problems - Bird Damage

... bird removal, bird problems, preventing bird damage and how to get rid of birds. Call the experts when you notice a bird ... Critter Control specializes in bird control, bird trapping, ... Why You Find Birds in the Attic, Birds in the Garage, Birds in ... How to Get Rid of Birds. A bird removal and bird trapping professional will know the best method of how to get rid of birds for ... Preventing bird problems is key to control bird damage and larger bird problems in the area. Many homeowners shoot at birds, ...
https://crittercontrol.com/services/birds/bird-problems.html

*  Hummingbird Facts: History, Habitats and Habits - Nature and Community - MOTHER EARTH NEWS

And then, of course, there's the little bird's obvious aerial agility. Hummers are among the fastest of all small birds ( ... The little bird cocked its head and looked me square in the eye, as if to say, "There. Now do you see me?" ... Few birds are as interesting to study and observe-or as easy to attract. Because they feed mostly on flower nectar and the ... The smallest bird in the U.S., a resident of the West's high-mountain coniferous forests, is the calliope hummingbird-less than ...
https://motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/hummingbird-facts-zmaz88jazgoe?slideshow=3

*  Tropical Birding Ethiopia tour report - March 2008

BIRD LIST. This list includes all the bird species that were recorded by one or both of us. Taxonomy and nomenclature follow: ... The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, Sixth Edition. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. If all of the birds we saw ... When searching for the bird in the middle of the plains it inhabits, you can see habitat that is inappropriate for the bird ... I almost ignored the bird, thinking it a large insect, but peered in the direction the bird had flown and quickly realized that ...
tropicalbirding.com/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/Africa/Ethiopia/TR_Ethiopia_March2008/TR_Ethiopia_March2008.htm

*  The four essential elements of habitat food, water, cover, space :: Documents

A bird's bill shape and size offer excellent clues to the bird's diet. The type of food that a bird selects depends on ... A bird's bill shape and size offer excellent clues to the bird's diet. The type of food that a bird selects depends on ... Good bird habitat must not only provide food, water, cover and space, but must be free from significant hazards. Birds face ... Good bird habitat must not only provide food, water, cover and space, but must be free from significant hazards. Birds face ...
digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/document/id/1426/rec/14

*  The Social Lives of Chinese Songbirds | Audubon

While walking their birds, a bird's owner will swing the cage back and forth like a pendulum, forcing the bird to get a bit of ... and many bird lovers are calling for a ban on pet bird sales to protect China's remaining wild birds. ... A bird that isn't taken out, bird owners say, will become depressed; it will not sing and will lose its feathers. ... there is no differentiation between wild-caught and captive-bred birds in bird markets, ...
audubon.org/news/the-social-lives-chinese-songbirds

*  Frequently Asked Questions | BIRDS in BACKYARDS

Why do some birds swoop? Having a bird swoop towards your head can be very scary. Birds generally swoop for one of 2 reasons - ... Birds are very good at hiding illness and so when we find a sick bird it usually means it is very sick. Sick birds often look; ... Often other birds will also attack an unwell bird.. If you do find a bird that is sick or injured, contact your local Wildlife ... A bird must be handled gently but firmly (and wear gloves where ever possible). For small birds, use one hand and hold the bird ...
birdsinbackyards.net/help/faq

*  Browse by Bird Family (taxonomy), All About Birds - Cornell Lab of Ornithology

All About Birds > Birding Basics > Bird Guide > Browse by Bird Family (taxonomy) ... Receive bird news, tips, and information about Lab projects.. The Cornell Lab will send you updates about birds, birding, and ... The taxonomic list follows the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition and supplements. ... Our database includes 584 of the more than 700 regularly occurring North American bird species. ...
https://allaboutbirds.org/guide/browse_tax/6/

*  This bird has flown: Unravelling the mysteries of bird migration | New Scientist

The epic seasonal voyages of migratory birds have long confounded scientists - now satellite tracking technology is revealing ... This bird has flown: Unravelling the mysteries of bird migration. The epic seasonal voyages of migratory birds have long ... How do birds navigate?. The senses that birds rely on to find their way largely remain mysterious. This is especially true for ... How do birds pick their route?. "Tracking is teaching us that different birds may follow very different routes, and they are ...
https://newscientist.com/article/mg23331180-500-this-bird-has-flown-unravelling-the-mysteries-of-bird-migration/?utm_campaign=RSS|NSNS&utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=RSS&campaign_id=RSS|NSNS-

*  Bird flu (avian influenza) Risk factors - Mayo Clinic

Most people who have developed symptoms of bird flu have had close contact with sick birds. In a few cases, bird flu has passed ... When bird flu does strike humans, it can be deadly.. In recent years, outbreaks of bird flu have occurred in Asia, Africa and ... Bird flu is caused by a type of influenza virus that rarely infects humans. More than a dozen types of bird flu have been ... Bird flu vaccine. The Food and Drug Administration has approved one vaccine to prevent infection with one strain of H5N1 bird ...
mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bird-flu/basics/risk-factors/CON-20030228?p=1

*  Tropical Bird Christmas Ornaments

For a warm and colorful feel, tropical birds, like parrots, toucans, and flamingos are sure to please! ... Birds live in trees, so add a few to your Christmas tree this year. ... The bird heard us yell "Patches!" a lot when the cat would try to jump up there. Soon, Pretty Bird (yes, that was his name) ... The Colorful National Bird of Honduras. Scarlet Macaw. The Scarlet Macaw must be one of the most colorful birds on the planet. ...
https://wizzley.com/tropical-bird-christmas-ornaments/

*  Video Surveillance of Nesting Birds - Edited by Christine Ann Ribic, Frank Richard Thompson III, Pamela Jo Pietz - Hardcover -...

Video Surveillance of Nesting Birds highlights the use of miniature video cameras and recording equipment yielding new ... Declining bird populations, especially those that breed in North American grasslands, have stimulated extensive research on ... important and some unanticipated insights into breeding bird biology, including previously undocumented observations of ... "Video Surveillance of Nesting Birds shatters earlier beliefs about how birds interact with nest predators. Much of what we ...
https://ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520273139

*  Avian flu strain found in Canadian duck - Health - Infectious diseases - Bird Flu | NBC News

As many as 65,000 birds at a poultry farm in the Fraser River Valley of British Columbia are to be slaughtered after a strain ... of bird flu was discovered in a duck there, according to reports published Sunday. ... Next story in Bird Flu 3 Hong Kong birds test positive for bird flu ... Up to 65,000 birds at farm to be killed as precaution; officials call for calm Below:. * * x Jump to discuss comments below ...
nbcnews.com/id/10128209/ns/health-infectious_diseases/

*  How to Care for Hummingbirds: 13 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow

... it is possible for a bird to die from stress). Gently pick the bird up. These birds are so fragile that picking them up as you ... If the eggs or babies have been abandoned, carefully extract the birds from their environment. Depending on the birds' age, it ... Contact your nearest Animal Rescue, or Bird Rescue and give them your situation. Explain what you have done for the birds or ... Place the bird on your hand, to make sure it is not injured more. Do not attempt to wash the bird; the air sacs will rupture if ...
https://wikihow.com/Care-for-Hummingbirds

*  Birds and Influenza H5N1 Virus Movement to and within North America

Vagrants and migratory birds are not likely interhemispheric introductory hosts; import of infected domestic or pet birds is ... Birds and Influenza H5N1 Virus Movement to and within North America. Rappole, John H.; Hubálek, Zdenek ... Birds could introduce HPAI H5N1 to the Western Hemisphere through migration, vagrancy, and importation by people. ... Birds and Influenza H5N1 Virus Movement to and within North America. Login ...
https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/875

*  Birds in the News 185 - Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Keywords: avian, avian zoonoses, birding, BirdNews, birds, Birds in the News, conservation, endangered birds, international ... tags: Magnificent Frigatebird, Man O'War, Fregata magnificens, birds, mystery bird, bird ID quiz ... Birds and Aircraft. A project to restore a wildlife habitat in The Meadowlands has raised fears of increased bird strikes at ... The "Sit" is a nationwide competition sponsored by Bird Watchers Digest. The purpose of the event is to identify all the birds ...
scienceblogs.com/grrlscientist/2009/10/12/birds-in-the-news-185/

*  Overweight Pet Bird - Birds

Prevent obesity and keep your companion bird fit and healthy with a well balanced diet and exercise. - Overweight Pet Bird - ... BellaOnline's Birds Editor. Overweight Pet Bird. Guest Author - Heather Thomas. The majority of Americans struggle to maintain ... For the flighted bird, living in an aviary, this is not an issue. However, for companion birds, who primarily live in their ... Wing exercises can also be a valuable tool and fun interaction with your bird. Simply, place your bird on your hand and drop ...
bellaonline.com/articles/art23080.asp

*  Grey Colored Birds for Sale in Wisconsin

Browse through available grey colored birds and parrots for sale in wisconsin by aviaries, breeders and bird rescues. ... Grey Birds for Sale in Wisconsin. Grey Birds in Wisconsin. Filter Bird Ads ... Adopt Bamba a African Grey Bird in Edgerton, Wi (19117167)Adopt Bamba a African Grey Bird in Edgerton, Wi. ... Grey Bird Classifieds for Wisconsin by BirdsNow, part of the EquineNow.com group of websites. ...
birdsnow.com/greywisconsin.htm

*  Black-browed albatross photo - Thalassarche melanophrys - G132428 | Arkive

Black-browed albatross chick hatching from egg underneath adult - View amazing Black-browed albatross photos - Thalassarche melanophrys - on Arkive
arkive.org/black-browed-albatross/thalassarche-melanophrys/image-G132428.html

*  A TIME'S MEMORY: #Influenza A(#H5N8) virus detected in #birds in several #countries in the #WHO #European Region (@WHO EURO,...

Avoid contact with any birds (poultry or wild birds) or other animals that are sick or found dead and report them to the ... Do not touch birds or carcasses with bare hands. If you must handle a carcass, wear gloves or use an inverted plastic bag to ... Tags: A/H5N8, AVIAN INFLUENZA, EUROPEAN REGION, HUMAN, POULTRY, UPDATES, WILD BIRDS, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION ... This is the second reported outbreak of HPAI A(H5N8) in wild birds and poultry in countries in the Region since 2014. ...
https://hygimia69.blogspot.com/2016/11/influenza-ah5n8-virus-detected-in-birds.html

*  Origin and Evolution of Birds

Clearly this bird had features of dinosaurs AND birds. So where did birds evolve? ... First it superficially resembled both a bird and a reptile. In fact, except for the feathers, the bird-like feet, and the fact ... Consider for a minute the diversity of birds. There are nearly 10,000 species! Is it possible to trace these birds back to one ... Once the idea that birds came from dinosaurs began, there was a scurry to find fossil evidence that could link birds back to ...
thewildclassroom.com/biodiversity/birds/aviantopics/originandevolution.html

*  birds : NPR

birds
npr.org/tags/160599663/birds/archive?date=7-31-2010

*  Attracting Birds

There are a number of ways to attract birds to your garden, from planting native plants to providing safe stopover areas for ... Attracting Birds. There are a number of ways to attract birds to your garden, from planting native plants to providing safe ... Some birds will hunt, roost or even nest in brush piles. * Offer food in feeders- Bird feeders are great sources of ... Do not use a box with a perch, as house sparrows are known to sit on a nesting box perch and peck at other birds using the ...
https://nwf.org/Home/Garden-for-Wildlife/Wildlife/Attracting-Birds

*  Central Valley Birds

The purpose of this list is to communicate, therefore, why make it difficult? DO NOT USE 4-letter bird banding codes (or any ... or nicknames) to name birds. Please add the county name(s) or abbreviation with the location where your sighting(s) occurred. ... Send a message central_valley_birds AT yahoogroups.com ... This forum is for discussing birds of the Central Valley. Calls ... Central Valley Birds is a Restricted Group with 1711 members.. *Central Valley Birds ...
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/central_valley_birds/info?m=0

*  Birds - Wikipedia

Birds - traccia dell'album Songs from the West Coast di Elton John del 2001 Birds - album di Bic Runga del 2005 Birds - singolo ... di Kate Nash del 2007, dall'album Made of Bricks Birds - album di Thony del 2012 Birds - canzone di Anouk rappresentante dei ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birds

*  Indian sporting birds

The BookReader requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please check that your browser supports JavaScript and that it is enabled in the browser settings. You can also try one of the other formats of the book. ...
archive.org/stream/indiansportingbi00finn

Bird trapping: Bird trapping techniques to capture wild birds include a wide range of techniques that have their origins in the hunting of birds for food. While hunting for food does not require birds to be caught alive, some trapping techniques capture birds without harming them and are of use in ornithology research.Skylark launch tower: A Skylark tower is a tower used for the launch of earlier versions of Skylark rockets. As Skylark rockets have no guidance system and accelerate slowly, they require a safe launch tower with a height of at least 24 metres with a guidance system.Silence of the Songbirds: Silence of the Songbirds (ISBN 978-0-8027-1609-5) is a book by bird lover and scientist Bridget Stutchbury about the rapid decline and loss of many species of songbirds. Some major threats covered include pesticides, sun-grown coffee, city lights, cowbirds, and global warming.Geolocation software: In computing, geolocation software is used to deduce the geolocation (geographic location) of another party. For example, on the Internet, one geolocation approach is to identify the subject party's IP address, then determine what country (including down to the city and post/ZIP code level), organization, or user the IP address has been assigned to, and finally, determine that party's location.Red Feather Development Group: Red Feather Development Group is a non-profit organization that builds straw-bale homes on American Indian reservations.Kittiwake: The kittiwakes (genus Rissa) are two closely related seabird species in the gull family Laridae, the black-legged kittiwake (R. tridactyla) and the red-legged kittiwake (R.Harmening High Flyer: The Harmening High Flyer is an American powered parachute that was designed and produced by Harmening's High Flyers of Genoa, Illinois.Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, page D-7.Parrot (disambiguation)Tambopata Macaw ProjectBokhara Trumpeter: The Bokhara Trumpeter is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. Bokhara Trumpeters, along with other varieties of domesticated pigeons, are all descendants from the rock pigeon (Columba livia).Chicken as biological research model: Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their eggs have been used extensively as research models throughout the history of biology. Today they continue to serve as an important model for normal human biology as well as pathological disease processes.Prairie Wildlife Rehabilitation CentreArchitectonica perdix: Architectonica perdix, common name the partridge sundial, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Architectonicidae, the sundials.Nest (protein structural motif): The Nest is a type of protein structural motif. Peptide nests are small anion-binding molecular features of proteins and peptides.Griffon: Griffon is a type of dog, a collection of breeds of originally hunting dogs. There are three lines of the griffon type recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI): the griffon vendéens, the wirehaired pointers, and the smousje (Belgian companion dogs or Dutch Smoushond).Song control system: A song system, also known as a song control system (SCS), is a series of discrete brain nuclei involved in the production and learning of song in songbirds. It was first observed by Fernando Nottebohm in 1976 in a paper titled "Central control of song in the canary, Serinus canarius", published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology.William Finch (merchant): William Finch (died 1613) was an English merchant.Beak (band): Beak (stylized as BEAK>) is a UK based band, consisting of Geoff Barrow (of Portishead) with Billy Fuller (Robert Plant) and Matt Williams (MXLX, Fairhorns).Plasmodium circumflexum: Plasmodium circumflexum is a parasite of the genus Plasmodium subgenus Giovannolaia.Goose egg addling: Goose egg “addling” is a wildlife management method of population control for Canada geese and other bird species. The process of addling involves temporarily removing fertilized eggs from the nest, testing for embryo development, terminating embryo development, and placing the egg back in the nest.Tadorninae: The Tadorninae is the shelduck-sheldgoose subfamily of the Anatidae, the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl such as the geese and swans.Carneau: The Carneau is a breed of pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding primarily as a utility breed. Carneau, along with other varieties of domesticated pigeons, are all descendants from the rock pigeon (Columba livia).Bird fancier's lungMartha Foote Crow: Martha Emily Foote Crow (1854 - January 1, 1924) was an educator and writer. Born in Sackets Harbor, New York,KM.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Flightless birdTuataraPolychromophilus: Polychromophilus is a genus of protozoa that infects bats. Known vectors include species of Nycteribiid flies.British Poultry Standard: [Poultry Standard.png|thumb|right|The front cover of the 6th Edition of the British Poultry Standards.Motu MatakoheFour Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.EcosystemHadrosaur diet: Hadrosaurids, also commonly referred to as duck-billed dinosaurs or hadrosaurs, were large terrestrial herbivores. The diet of hadrosaurid dinosaurs remains a subject of debate among paleontologists, especially regarding whether hadrosaurids were grazers who fed on vegetation close to the ground, or browsers who ate higher-growing leaves and twigs.Old World quail: Old World quail is a collective name for several genera of mid-sized birds in the pheasant family Phasianidae.Global spread of H5N1 in 2006: The global spread of (highly pathogenic) H5N1 in birds is considered a significant pandemic threat.Ernest StarlingSanta Fe College Teaching ZooHealth geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.Matrix population models: Population models are used in population ecology to model the dynamics of wildlife or human populations. Matrix population models are a specific type of population model that uses matrix algebra.Mountaineer Wind Energy Center: Mountaineer Wind Energy Center is a wind farm on Backbone Mountain in Preston and Tucker counties in the U.S.Large ornamented Ediacaran microfossil: Large ornamented Ediacaran microfossils (LOEMs) are microscopic acritarchs, usually over 100 μm in diameter, which are common in sediments of the Ediacaran period, . They largely disappear from the Ediacaran fossil record before , roughly coeval with the origin of the Ediacara biota.Peat swamp forest: Peat swamp forests are tropical moist forests where waterlogged soil prevents dead leaves and wood from fully decomposing. Over time, this creates a thick layer of acidic peat.Meramec Conservation AreaMount Fuji Radar System: The Mount Fuji Radar System is a historic weather radar system located on the summit of Mount Fuji, Japan. It was completed in 1964, and is now recorded on the list of IEEE Milestones in electrical engineering.Threshold host density: Threshold host density (NT), in the context of wildlife disease ecology, refers to the concentration of a population of a particular organism as it relates to disease. Specifically, the threshold host density (NT) of a species refers to the minimum concentration of individuals necessary to sustain a given disease within a population.Canary trap: A canary trap is a method for exposing an information leak by giving different versions of a sensitive document to each of several suspects and seeing which version gets leaked. Special attention is paid to the quality of the prose of the unique language, in the hopes that the suspect will repeat it verbatim in the leak, thereby identifying the version of the document.Reproductive toxicity: Reproductive toxicity is a hazard associated with some chemical substances, that they will interfere in some way with normal reproduction; such substances are called reprotoxic. It includes adverse effects on sexual function and fertility in adult males and females, as well as developmental toxicity in the offspring.Alliance for Zero Extinction: Formed in 2000 and launched globally in 2005, the Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) comprises 100 non-governmental biodiversity conservation organizations working to prevent species extinctions by identifying and safeguarding sites where species evaluated to be Endangered or Critically Endangered under International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) criteria only exist at one location on earth."Zero Extinction - Home.Delay line memory: Delay line memory is a form of computer memory, now obsolete, that was used on some of the earliest digital computers. Like many modern forms of electronic computer memory, delay line memory was a refreshable memory, but as opposed to modern random-access memory, delay line memory was sequential-access.AlligatorCookie (cockatoo)Cicero Stephens Hawks: Cicero Stephens Hawks (May 26, 1812–April 19, 1868) was the first Episcopal bishop of Missouri.Hele-Shaw clutch: The Hele-Shaw clutch was an early form of multi-plate wet clutch, in use around 1900. It was named after its inventor, Professor Henry Selby Hele-Shaw, who was noted for his work in viscosity and flows through small gaps between parallel plates.Kingston parakeets: The Kingston parakeets, also known as the Twickenham parakeets, are feral rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri) that live in the suburbs around Kingston and Twickenham, South West London, England, numbering at least 6,000, with some estimates as high as 50,000 individuals. The origins of the flocks are subject to speculation.Ecdysis: Ecdysis is the moulting of the cuticle in many invertebrates. This process of moulting is the defining feature of the clade Ecdysozoa, comprising the arthropods, nematodes, velvet worms, horsehair worms, tardigrades, and Cephalorhyncha.Wing walkingSexual motivation and hormones: Sexual motivation is influenced by hormones such as testosterone, estrogen, progesterone, oxytocin, and vasopressin. In most mammalian species, sex hormones control the ability to engage in sexual behaviours.Restricted isometry property: In linear algebra, the restricted isometry property characterizes matrices which are nearly orthonormal, at least when operating on sparse vectors. The concept was introduced by Emmanuel Candès and Terence TaoE.PsittacosisWest Nile virus in the United States: The West Nile virus quickly spread across the United States after the first reported cases in Queens, New York in 1999. The virus is believed to have entered in an infected bird or mosquito, although there is no clear evidence.List of West Nile virus outbreaks: *United States: From 1999 through 2001, the CDC confirmed 149 West Nile virus infections, including 18 deaths. In 2002, a total of 4,156 cases were reported, including 284 fatalities.Stomach oil: Stomach oil is the light oil composed of neutral dietary lipids found in the proventriculus (fore-gut) of birds in the order Procellariiformes. All albatrosses, procellarids (gadfly petrels and shearwaters) and storm petrels use the oil.Avian Bornavirus: In 2008, by pyrosequencing of cDNA from the brains of several parrots suffering from Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD), Honkavouri et al. identified the presence of a novel Borna virus.

(1/4610) A survey of serum and dietary carotenoids in captive wild animals.

Accumulation of carotenoids varies greatly among animal species and is not fully characterized. Circulating carotenoid concentration data in captive wild animals are limited and may be useful for their management. Serum carotenoid concentrations and dietary intakes were surveyed and the extent of accumulation categorized for 76 species of captive wild animals at Brookfield Zoo. Blood samples were obtained opportunistically from 275 individual animals immobilized for a variety of reasons; serum was analyzed for alpha- and beta-carotene, lutein + zeaxanthin, lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin and canthaxanthin. Total carotenoid content of diets was calculated from tables and chemical analyses of commonly consumed dietary components. Diets were categorized as low, moderate or high in carotenoid content as were total serum carotenoid concentrations. Animals were classified as unknown, high, moderate or low (non-) accumulators of dietary cartenoids. Nonaccumulators had total serum carotenoid concentrations of 0-101 nmol/L, whereas accumulators had concentrations that ranged widely, from 225 to 35,351 nmol/L. Primates were uniquely distinguished by the widest range of type and concentration of carotenoids in their sera. Most were classified as high to moderate accumulators. Felids had high accumulation of beta-carotene regardless of dietary intake, whereas a wide range of exotic birds accumulated only the xanthophylls, lutein + zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin or cryptoxanthin. The exotic ungulates, with the exception of the bovids, had negligible or nondetectable carotenoid serum concentrations despite moderate intakes. Bovids accumulated only beta-carotene despite moderately high lutein + zeaxanthin intakes. Wild captive species demonstrated a wide variety of carotenoid accumulation patterns, which could be exploited to answer remaining questions concerning carotenoid metabolism and function.  (+info)

(2/4610) Casts of hepatic blood vessels: a comparison of the microcirculation of the penguin, Pygoscelis adeliae, with some common laboratory animals.

Latex casts of the hepatic blood vessels of the penguin, Pygoscelis adeliae, and of some common laboratory animals were compared. There was general similarity between the different species, but the portal venous and hepatic arterial systems of the penguin were simpler than those of other species. Measurements were made of the volume and length of portal veins and it appears that the portal venous system is capable of being a more efficient blood reservoir in the penguin than in other species studied. The peribiliary plexus was especially well formed in the penguin and was drained by long veins which usually joined portal venous branches. Some of the long veins drained directly into the hepatic venous tree: these translobular veins were more prominent than in mammals. Anastomoses between hepatic artery and portal vein were not present in penguins, and the supply to the sinusoids appeared to be separate. The morphology of small hepatic veins of all the species appeared to be similar.  (+info)

(3/4610) First report of Thelazia sp. from a captive Oriental white stork (Ciconia boyciana) in Japan.

Nematodes of the genus Thelazia were recovered from the cornea and inferior conjunctival sac of an immature Oriental white stork (Ciconia boyciana). The bird hatched and reared at the Toyooka Oriental White Stork Breeding Center, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, but died of chlamydiosis. There were neither gross nor histopathologic ophthalmic lesions. The eye worm from a bird is believed to be first reported in Japan. As regarding reintroduction plan for the Oriental white stork, control measures for prevent further infection with the eye worm will be needed.  (+info)

(4/4610) Evidence for a correlation between the number of marginal band microtubules and the size of vertebrate erthrocytes.

In 23 species of vertebrates the dimensions of erythrocytes and the number of their marginal band microtubules were examined. A positive correlation was found between the size of erythrocytes and the number of microtubules. The absence of microtubules in diskoid erythrocytes of mammals-Camelidae-is discussed.  (+info)

(5/4610) Temperature regulation and heat dissipation during flight in birds.

Core and skin temperature were measured by radiotelemetry in starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) during 30 min flights in a wind tunnel. Core temperature was independent of ambient temperature from 0 to 28 degrees C. The temporal mean of the monitored core temperature during flight was 42-7 degrees C in one bird and 44-0 degrees C in another. These temperatures are 2-4 degrees C higher than the resting temperature in starlings, and are among the highest steady-state temperatures observed in any animal. Skin temperature on the breast was within a few degrees of core temperature. In some locations skin temperature was higher at low ambient temperatures than at intermediate ambient temperatures. An analysis of the data shows that a high core temperature does not function as an aid to head dissipation. On the contrary, insulation is adjusted to maintain a high temperature, presumably because it is necessary for flight. The increase in skin temperature at low ambient temperatures is believed to be a result of a decrease in heat flow through the breast feathers brought about by feather adjustments, to compensate for an unavoidable increase in heat flow in unfeathered or poorly feathered parts of the body.  (+info)

(6/4610) Activities of citrate synthase, NAD+-linked and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenases, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in nervous tissues from vertebrates and invertebrates.

1. The activities of citrate synthase and NAD+-linked and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenases were measured in nervous tissue from different animals in an attempt to provide more information about the citric acid cycle in this tissue. In higher animals the activities of citrate synthase are greater than the sum of activities of the isocitrate dehydrogenases, whereas they are similar in nervous tissues from the lower animals. This suggests that in higher animals the isocitrate dehydrogenase reaction is far-removed from equilibrium. If it is assumed that isocitrate dehydrogenase activities provide an indication of the maximum flux through the citric acid cycle, the maximum glycolytic capacity in nervous tissue is considerably greater than that of the cycle. This suggest that glycolysis can provide energy in excess of the aerobic capacity of the tissue. 2. The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase are high in most nervous tissues and the activities of aspartate aminotransferase are high in all nervous tissue investigated. However, the activities of alanine aminotransferase are low in all tissues except the ganglia of the waterbug and cockroach. In these insect tissues, anaerobic glycolysis may result in the formation of alanine rather than lactate.  (+info)

(7/4610) Molecular studies suggest that cartilaginous fishes have a terminal position in the piscine tree.

The Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) are commonly accepted as being sister group to the other extant Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). To clarify gnathostome relationships and to aid in resolving and dating the major piscine divergences, we have sequenced the complete mtDNA of the starry skate and have included it in phylogenetic analysis along with three squalomorph chondrichthyans-the common dogfish, the spiny dogfish, and the star spotted dogfish-and a number of bony fishes and amniotes. The direction of evolution within the gnathostome tree was established by rooting it with the most closely related non-gnathostome outgroup, the sea lamprey, as well as with some more distantly related taxa. The analyses placed the chondrichthyans in a terminal position in the piscine tree. These findings, which also suggest that the origin of the amniote lineage is older than the age of the oldest extant bony fishes (the lungfishes), challenge the evolutionary direction of several morphological characters that have been used in reconstructing gnathostome relationships. Applying as a calibration point the age of the oldest lungfish fossils, 400 million years, the molecular estimate placed the squalomorph/batomorph divergence at approximately 190 million years before present. This dating is consistent with the occurrence of the earliest batomorph (skates and rays) fossils in the paleontological record. The split between gnathostome fishes and the amniote lineage was dated at approximately 420 million years before present.  (+info)

(8/4610) Prehistoric birds from New Ireland, Papua New Guinea: extinctions on a large Melanesian island.

At least 50 species of birds are represented in 241 bird bones from five late Pleistocene and Holocene archaeological sites on New Ireland (Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea). The bones include only two of seabirds and none of migrant shorebirds or introduced species. Of the 50 species, at least 12 (petrel, hawk, megapode, quail, four rails, cockatoo, two owls, and crow) are not part of the current avifauna and have not been recorded previously from New Ireland. Larger samples of bones undoubtedly would indicate more extirpated species and refine the chronology of extinction. Humans have lived on New Ireland for ca. 35,000 years, whereas most of the identified bones are 15,000 to 6,000 years old. It is suspected that most or all of New Ireland's avian extinction was anthropogenic, but this suspicion remains undetermined. Our data show that significant prehistoric losses of birds, which are well documented on Pacific islands more remote than New Ireland, occurred also on large, high, mostly forested islands close to New Guinea.  (+info)



Species


  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Divisions of Endangered Species and Migratory Birds and State Programs, Pacific Region, Portland, OR. (fws.gov)
  • 53 v Ackno wledgm ents This monitoring plan was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in cooperation with State resource agencies, recovery team members, representatives from each FWS Region, the Divisions of Migratory Birds, Endangered Species, and other partners. (fws.gov)
  • The common murre nests in large colonies on rocky offshore islands and cliffs in association with other bird species such as puffins, guillemots, kittiwakes, gulls, and razorbills. (skullsunlimited.com)
  • Even though most bird species form social bonds with their mates, they are not always faithful partners to each other. (scienceblogs.com)