Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Antimanic Agents: Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.Lithium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain lithium as an integral part of the molecule.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Lithium Carbonate: A lithium salt, classified as a mood-stabilizing agent. Lithium ion alters the metabolism of BIOGENIC MONOAMINES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, and affects multiple neurotransmission systems.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Valproic Acid: A fatty acid with anticonvulsant properties used in the treatment of epilepsy. The mechanisms of its therapeutic actions are not well understood. It may act by increasing GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID levels in the brain or by altering the properties of voltage dependent sodium channels.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Cyclothymic Disorder: An affective disorder characterized by periods of depression and hypomania. These may be separated by periods of normal mood.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Lithium: An element in the alkali metals family. It has the atomic symbol Li, atomic number 3, and atomic weight [6.938; 6.997]. Salts of lithium are used in treating BIPOLAR DISORDER.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Lithium Chloride: A salt of lithium that has been used experimentally as an immunomodulator.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Postmortem Changes: Physiological changes that occur in bodies after death.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.DibenzothiazepinesStress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Triazines: Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Endophenotypes: Measurable biological (physiological, biochemical, and anatomical features), behavioral (psychometric pattern) or cognitive markers that are found more often in individuals with a disease than in the general population. Because many endophenotypes are present before the disease onset and in individuals with heritable risk for disease such as unaffected family members, they can be used to help diagnose and search for causative genes.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Carbamazepine: An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Impulse Control Disorders: Disorders whose essential features are the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the individual or to others. Individuals experience an increased sense of tension prior to the act and pleasure, gratification or release of tension at the time of committing the act.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Risperidone: A selective blocker of DOPAMINE D2 RECEPTORS and SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS that acts as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It has been shown to improve both positive and negative symptoms in the treatment of SCHIZOPHRENIA.Electroconvulsive Therapy: Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.Affective Disorders, Psychotic: Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.Benzodiazepines: A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Checklist: Aid for consistent recording of data such as tasks completed and observations noted.Early Medical Intervention: Action taken to reduce susceptibility or exposure to health problems and to detect and treat disease in early stages.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Sensory Gating: The ability of the BRAIN to suppress neuronal responses to external sensory inputs, such as auditory and visual stimuli. Sensory filtering (or gating) allows humans to block out irrelevant, meaningless, or redundant stimuli.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.United StatesNeuropsychiatry: A subfield of psychiatry that emphasizes the somatic substructure on which mental operations and emotions are based, and the functional or organic disturbances of the central nervous system that give rise to, contribute to, or are associated with mental and emotional disorders. (From Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 8th ed.)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Psychophysiologic Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physical symptoms that are affected by emotional factors and involve a single organ system, usually under AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM control. (American Psychiatric Glossary, 1988)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Anisotropy: A physical property showing different values in relation to the direction in or along which the measurement is made. The physical property may be with regard to thermal or electric conductivity or light refraction. In crystallography, it describes crystals whose index of refraction varies with the direction of the incident light. It is also called acolotropy and colotropy. The opposite of anisotropy is isotropy wherein the same values characterize the object when measured along axes in all directions.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.

*  Bipolar Disorder Center by MedicineNet.com

Read about bipolar disorder treatment, medications, and causes of this mental illness. ... Bipolar disorder, or manic depression, causes symptoms of mania and depression. ... Who is at risk for developing bipolar disorder? Are you? Take this Bipolar Disorder Quiz to learn more about bipolar disorder, ... Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens. Bipolar disorder, or manic-depressive illness, is a disorder that causes unusual and ...

*  Bipolar Disorders Clinic | Bipolar Disorders Clinic | Stanford Medicine

The Bipolar Disorders Clinic is part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of ... Clinic Chief Shefali Miller, M.D., M.A. spearheads the Stanford Bipolar Disorders Clinic program and research. Dr. Miller is ... Stanford Medicine Bipolar Disorders Clinic - in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Site Nav ... is internationally known for his groundbreaking research on the neurobiology of mood disorders. ...

*  Functional impairment and cognition in bipolar disorder.

Bipolar disorder is a common, chronic and severe mental disorder, affecting approximately 2% of the adult population. Bipolar ... The literature on functional impairment and cognition in bipolar disorder is reviewed. ... However, modern outcome studies have found that a majority of bipolar patients evidence high rates of functional impairment. ... Whether impaired neuropsychological performance in associated with the functional impairment in bipolar patients who have ...

*  Psychiatrists under fire in mental health battle | world | Hindustan Times

There is no scientific evidence that psychiatric diagnoses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are valid or useful, ... There is no scientific evidence that psychiatric diagnoses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are valid or useful, ... There is no scientific evidence that psychiatric diagnoses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are valid or useful, ... disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and somatic symptom disorder, respectively.. Some of the manual's omissions are just as ...

*  Childhood trauma and hallucinations in bipolar affective disorder: preliminary investigation | The British Journal of Psychiatry

Relationship of childhood physical and sexual abuse to adult bipolar disorder. Bipolar Disorders, 2, 131-135. ... as were individuals displaying rapid-cycling bipolar disorder or severe comorbid borderline personality disorder. As the ... Childhood trauma and hallucinations in bipolar affective disorder: preliminary investigation. PAUL HAMMERSLEY, ANTON DIAS, ... Childhood trauma and hallucinations in bipolar affective disorder: preliminary investigation. PAUL HAMMERSLEY, ANTON DIAS, ...

*  Analyses of treatment-emergent mania with olanzapine/fluoxetine combination in the treatment of bipolar depression.

Due to the cyclical nature of bipolar disorder, patients taking olanzapine/fluoxetine combination for bipolar depression should ... Treatment-emergent mania is a potential risk when patients with bipolar disorder are treated with antidepressant agents. These ... Analyses of treatment-emergent mania with olanzapine/fluoxetine combination in the treatment of bipolar depression. Academic ... patients with bipolar I depression (DSM-IV criteria) (N = 833, baseline Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total score ...

*  Genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder in large families | The British Journal of Psychiatry

Genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder in large families Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ... Blackwood, D. H. R., He, L., Morris, S. W., et al (1996) A locus for bipolar affective disorder on chromosome 4p. Nature ... Armstrong, C., Marshall, D., Todd, R. D., et al (1997) An initial report of a genome screen for a bipolar I disorder ... Ewald, H., Degn, B., Mors, O., et al (1998a) Support for the possible locus on chromosome 4p16 for bipolar affective disorder. ...

*  Acute Treatment of Bipolar II Depression - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Bipolar Disorder. Behavioral Symptoms. Bipolar and Related Disorders. Mental Disorders. Lithium Carbonate. Lamotrigine. ... Genetics Home Reference related topics: bipolar disorder Drug Information available for: Lithium carbonate Lithium citrate ... Bipolar II disorder (BDII) is a serious condition characterized by depressive and hypomanic episodes. The disability and ... in treating depression in individuals with bipolar II disorder. ... Acute Treatment of Bipolar II Depression. This study has been ...

*  Efficacy of olanzapine in combination with valproate or lithium in the treatment of mania in patients partially nonresponsive...

Patients with bipolar disorder (n = 344), manic or mixed episode, who were inadequately responsive to more than 2 weeks of ... the addition of olanzapine provided superior efficacy in the treatment of manic and mixed bipolar episodes. ... olanzapine and either valproate or lithium compared with valproate or lithium alone in treating acute manic or mixed bipolar ...

*  Genetics

For example, bipolar I illness may be genetically related to bipolar II, major depressive disorder, schizoaffective disorder, ... disorder is the most severe form of the illness, followed by bipolar I, bipolar II and unipolar depressive disorder. ... of expression including bipolar and unipolar affective disorder. The most extensive observations on the bipolar phenotype and ... Panic Disorder The familial nature of panic disorder is supported by family history, with patients reporting secondary cases in ...

*  Dendritic Spine Loss Reported in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

... Posted on January 23, 2015. by Celeste Sunderland ... Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are very different mental illnesses, but researchers are discovering evidence that the two ... Posted in Customer News, Software and tagged bipolar disorder, Dendritic Spines, Neurolucida, Neurolucida Case Studies, ... individuals with bipolar disorder (n=9) and unaffected control participants (n=19). The pyramidal cells were located in the ...

*  Development of a bipolar disorder biobank: differential phenotyping for subsequent biomarker analyses | International Journal...

Biobank Bipolar disorder Phenotype Background. Bipolar disorder is a medical illness characterized by recurrent episodes of ... Society of Bipolar Disorder Jun 3-7, 2015 Toronto. Bipolar Disorders Volume 17 Supplement 1, 2015.Google Scholar. ... Psychiatric GWAS Consortium Bipolar Disorder Working Group. Large-scale genome-wide association analysis of bipolar disorder ... The specific diagnoses of the participants were bipolar disorder I in 69.0 %, bipolar disorder II in 29.2 %, and ...

*  MedGen for PubMed (Select 23247604) - MedGen - NCBI

Bipolar and Related Disorders. These disorders are related to both SCHIZOPHRENIA SPECTRUM AND RELATED DISORDERS and DEPRESSIVE ... Bipolar affective disorder. A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a ... Major affective disorder 1. Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme shifts in mood, energy, and ... People with bipolar disorder often have repeated thoughts of death and suicide, and they have a much greater risk of dying by ...

*  Behavioral activation, inhibition and mood symptoms in early-onset bipolar disorder. - Oxford Neuroscience

CONCLUSIONS: In bipolar adolescents, mania and depression appear to be independent of self-reported behavioral activation ... The aim of the present study was to examine whether self-reported levels of BAS functioning in bipolar adolescents corresponded ... METHODS: Twenty-five adolescents diagnosed with bipolar I, II or not otherwise specified were recruited from a treatment- ... Adolescents were interviewed using the Depression and Mania Rating Scales of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and ...

*  A 24-week open-label extension study of olanzapine-fluoxetine combination and olanzapine monotherapy in the treatment of...

... combination has shown efficacy in the acute treatment of depressive episodes in patients with bipolar I disorder. The present ... combination or olanzapine monotherapy in a 6-month open-label extension study.376 patients with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder, ... The efficacy measures were the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Version, ... 24-week open-label extension study of olanzapine-fluoxetine combination and olanzapine monotherapy in the treatment of bipolar ...

*  Examination of Tamoxifen in Acute Mania in Patients With Bipolar I Disorder - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Bipolar Disorder. Bipolar and Related Disorders. Mental Disorders. Tamoxifen. Estrogen Antagonists. Hormone Antagonists. ... Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Manic; 296.6x, Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Mixed. ... Bipolar Disorder. Antimanic. Placebo Controlled. Randomized. Cytochrome P450. Mania. PKC Inhibitor. Tamoxifen. Bipolar. Manic. ... Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a common, severe, chronic and often life-threatening illness. Suicide is the cause of death in 10-20% ...

*  Bipolar I disorder - Wikipedia

Bipolar I disorder (BD-I; pronounced "type one bipolar disorder") is a bipolar spectrum disorder characterized by the ... "Bipolar Disorder: Who's at Risk?". Retrieved 22 November 2011.. *^ "What are the types of bipolar disorder?". Retrieved 22 ... Berk M., Dodd S. (2005). "Bipolar II disorder: a review". Bipolar Disorders. 7: 11-21. doi:10.1111/j.1399-5618.2004.00152.x.. ... Seasonal affective disorder. References[edit]. *^ "The Two Types of Bipolar Disorder". Psych Central.com. Retrieved 25 November ...

*  CBT Improves Memory Functioning in Patients with Bipolar I Disorder

You are here: Home / CBT Improves Memory Functioning in Patients with Bipolar I Disorder / Blog / CONDITION / Bipolar Disorder ... CBT Improves Memory Functioning in Patients with Bipolar I Disorder April 8, 2013. /1 Comment/in Bipolar Disorder, Health and ... Tags: Bipolar, Bipolar Disorder, cbt, cbt-study, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Cognitive ... This suggests that bipolar disorder affects global memory performance and introduces a negative memory bias. The present study ...

*  Group psychoeducation for stabilised bipolar disorders: 5-year outcome of a randomised clinical trial | The British Journal of...

Psychoeducation in bipolar patients with comorbid personality disorders. Bipolar Disord 2004 ; 6: 294 -8. ... from participants with bipolar I and II disorders enrolled in the naturalistic prospective follow-up of the Bipolar Disorders ... One hundred and twenty people fulfilling DSM-IV9 criteria for bipolar disorder type I or II, aged 18-65 years, were recruited ... The long-term natural history of the weekly symptomatic status of bipolar I disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2002 ; 59: 530 -7. ...

*  Genetic refinement and physical mapping of a 2.3 Mb probable disease region associated with a bipolar affective disorder...

The small number of genes will facilitate systematic screening for variations associated with bipolar disorder. ... The small number of genes will facilitate systematic screening for variations associated with bipolar disorder. ... A susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder has been mapped to chromosome 4q35 in a large multigenerational pedigree ... A susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder has been mapped to chromosome 4q35 in a large multigenerational pedigree ...

*  Bipolar disorder: Do you keep it secret?

Who do you tell -- and when do you tell -- about your disorder? If you have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, please talk ... Receiving the news that you have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder can be devastating. ... Bipolar disorder is classified by experiencing intense highs and lows with your moods. ... More on bipolar disorder. What is the course of bipolar disorder?. Bipolar disorder: Spending sprees and gambling problems. ...

*  Bipolar Disorder Information | HealthCentral

Information on bipolar disorder: signs and symptoms, mental health, risks, treatments, medications and other information on ... How Important Is Sleep to Managing Bipolar Disorder? Is there a relationship between the symptoms of bipolar disorder and your ... article How Peer Support Can Help You Manage Bipolar Disorder article Flu in pregnancy may increase child's bipolar risk ... Bipolar Symptoms Versus Normal Emotions How can someone with bipolar disorder tell the difference between a symptom and an ...

*  Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

meet DSM-IV criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Bipolar II Disorder, Bipolar Disorder NOS, or Cyclothymic Disorder; ... Bipolar Disorder. Pathologic Processes. Bipolar and Related Disorders. Mental Disorders. Risperidone. Valproic Acid. ... Bipolar Disord. 2006 Oct;8(5 Pt 2):566-75. Miklowitz DJ, Otto MW. New psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: A review ... Lamotrigine treatment of bipolar disorder: data from the first 500 patients in STEP-BD. Bipolar Disord. 2004 Apr;6(2):139-43. ...

*  Markers of glutamate synaptic transmission and plasticity are increased in the anterior cingulate cortex in bipolar disorder. -...

... and netrin-G1d and G1f were increased in bipolar disorder but not in schizophrenia. Netrin-G1c did not differ between groups. ... and netrin-G2 in the anterior cingulate cortex from subjects with bipolar disorder (n = 34), schizophrenia (n = 35), and ... VGluT1 expression is supportive of elevated glutamate neurotransmission in the anterior cingulate cortex in bipolar disorder. ... Cortical glutamate levels are elevated in bipolar disorder, but the interpretation of this increase is unclear because ...

*  Olanzapine versus placebo in the treatment of acute mania. Olanzapine HGEH Study Group.

Bipolar Disorder * Double-Blind Method * Drug Administration Schedule * Female * Headache * Humans * Male ...

Bipolar disorderMood stabilizer: A mood stabilizer is a psychiatric medication used to treat mood disorders characterized by intense and sustained mood shifts, typically bipolar disorder.Postpartum psychosisOrocobreReligion and schizophrenia: == Background ==SchizophreniaMental disorderSocial anxiety disorderBrexpiprazoleAtypical antipsychotic: The atypical antipsychotics (AAP; also known as second generation antipsychotics (SGAs)) are a group of antipsychotic drugs (antipsychotic drugs in general are also known as major tranquilisers and neuroleptics, although the latter is usually reserved for the typical antipsychotics) used to treat psychiatric conditions. Some atypical antipsychotics have received regulatory approval (e.DSM-IV Codes (alphabetical): __FORCETOC__Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorderValpromideCyclothymiaComorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law: The Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law (麻薬及び向精神薬取締法 Mayaki oyobi kousei shin'yaku torishimari hou) is a law enacted in Japan in 1953 to control most narcotic and psychotropic drugs.Lithium (medication)Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Substance-related disorderS32212: S32212 is a drug which is under preclinical investigation as a potential antidepressant medicine. It behaves as a selective, combined 5-HT2C receptor inverse agonist and α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist (at all three subtypes—α2A, α2B, and α2C) with additional 5-HT2A and, to a lesser extent, 5-HT2B receptor antagonistic properties, and lacks any apparent affinity for the monoamine reuptake transporters or for the α1-adrenergic, H1, or mACh receptors.Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is a neuropsychological assessment initially introduced in 1998. It consists of ten subtests which give five scores, one for each of the five domains tested (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory).Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.Lithium chlorideCingulate sulcus: The cingulate sulcus is a sulcus (brain fold) on the medial wall of the cerebral cortex. The frontal and parietal lobes are separated from the cingulate gyrus by the cingulate sulcus.Agonal respiration: Agonal respiration, gasping respiration or agonal breathing is an abnormal pattern of breathing and brainstem reflex characterized by gasping, labored breathing, accompanied by strange vocalizations and myoclonus. Possible causes include cerebral ischemia, extreme hypoxia or even anoxia.Skyland Trail: Skyland Trail is a private, not-for profit organization in Atlanta, Georgia offering treatment to adults with mental illness. Skyland Trail specializes in treating adults with Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, and Dual Diagnosis.Relationship obsessive–compulsive disorder: In psychology, relationship obsessive–compulsive disorder (ROCD) is a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder focusing on intimate relationships (whether romantic or non-romantic). Such obsessions can become extremely distressing and debilitating, having negative impacts on relationships functioning.HyperintensityDibenzothiazepine: Dibenzothiazepines are chemical compounds which are derivatives of thiazepine with two benzene rings.Oneirology: Oneirology (; from Greek [oneiron, "dream"; and -λογία], ["the study of") is the scientific study of [[dream]s. Current research seeks correlations between dreaming and current knowledge about the functions of the brain, as well as understanding of how the brain works during dreaming as pertains to memory formation and mental disorders.Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the field of special education. The editors-in-chief are Alisa K.Girl, Interrupted: Girl, Interrupted is a best-sellingThe Unconfessional Confessionalist, Time Magazine, July 11, 1994 1993 memoir by American author Susanna Kaysen, relating her experiences as a young woman in a psychiatric hospital in the 1960s after being diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The memoir's title is a reference to the Vermeer painting Girl Interrupted at her Music.Emotion and memory: Emotion can have a powerful response on humans and animals. Numerous studies have shown that the most vivid autobiographical memories tend to be of emotional events, which are likely to be recalled more often and with more clarity and detail than neutral events.Barratt WaughCreativity and mental illness: Parallels can be drawn to connect creativity to Major Mental Illnesses including: Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, Anxiety Disorder, and ADHD. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated correlations between creative occupations and people living with mental illness.Relationship Development Intervention: Relationship Development Intervention (RDI) is a trademarked proprietary treatment program for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), based on the belief that the development of dynamic intelligence is the key to improving the quality of life for individuals with autism. The program's core philosophy is that individuals with autism can participate in authentic emotional relationships if they are exposed to them in a gradual, systematic way.Martin Weaver: Martin Weaver is a psychotherapist, author and media writerWGAViewer: WGAViewer is a bioinformatics software tool which is designed to visualize, annotate, and help interpret the results generated from a genome wide association study (GWAS). Alongside the P values of association, WGAViewer allows a researcher to visualize and consider other supporting evidence, such as the genomic context of the SNP, linkage disequilibrium (LD) with ungenotyped SNPs, gene expression database, and the evidence from other GWAS projects, when determining the potential importance of an individual SNP.Triazine: A triazine is class of nitrogen-containing heterocycles. The parent molecules' molecular formula is 333.Woodhull Medical and Mental Health CenterPopulation stratification: Population stratification is the presence of a systematic difference in allele frequencies between subpopulations in a population possibly due to different ancestry, especially in the context of association studies. Population stratification is also referred to as population structure, in this context.Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering pediatric psychiatry. It is published by Elsevier and is the official journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.Claustrophobia: Claustrophobia is the fear of having no escape and being in closed or small space or room It is typically classified as an anxiety disorder and often results in panic attack, and can be the result of many situations or stimuli, including elevators crowded to capacity, windowless rooms, and even tight-necked clothing. The onset of claustrophobia has been attributed to many factors, including a reduction in the size of the amygdala, classical conditioning, or a genetic predisposition to fear small spaces.Salvador Minuchin: Salvador Minuchin (born 1921) is a family therapist born and raised in San Salvador, Entre Ríos, Argentina. He developed structural family therapy, which addresses problems within a family by charting the relationships between family members, or between subsets of family (Minuchin, 1974).Teenage suicide in the United States: Teenage suicide in the United States remains comparatively high in the 15 to 24 age group with 10,000 suicides in this age range in 2004, making it the third leading cause of death for those aged 15 to 24. By comparison, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death for all those age 10 and over, with 33,289 suicides for all US citizens in 2006.Emotional responsivity: Emotional responsivity refers to the ability to acknowledge an affective stimuli by exhibiting emotion. Any response, whether it is appropriate or not, would showcase the presence of this phenomena.Rating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Protective index: The protective index is a comparison of the amount of a therapeutic agent that causes the therapeutic effect to the amount that causes toxicity. Quantitatively, it is the ratio given by the toxic dose divided by the therapeutic dose.Alejandro Rodriguez (psychiatrist): Alejandro Rodriguez (February 1918 – January 20, 2012) was a Venezuelan-American pediatrician and psychiatrist, known for his pioneering work in child psychiatry. He was the director of the division of child psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and conducted pivotal studies on autism and other developmental disorders in children.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Cognitive behavioral treatment of eating disorders: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is derived from both the cognitive and behavioral schools of psychology and focuses on the alteration of thoughts and actions with the goal of treating various disorders. The cognitive behavioral treatment of eating disorders emphasizes the minimization of negative thoughts about body image and the act of eating, and attempts to alter negative and harmful behaviors that are involved in and perpetuate eating disorders.Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.History of psychopathy: Psychopathy, from psych (soul or mind) and pathy (suffering or disease), was coined by German psychiatrists in the 19th century and originally just meant what would today be called mental disorder, the study of which is still known as psychopathology. By the turn of the century 'psychopathic inferiority' referred to the type of mental disorder that might now be termed personality disorder, along with a wide variety of other conditions now otherwise classified.Research Society on Alcoholism: The Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) is a learned society of over 1600 active members based in Austin, Texas. Its objective is to advance research on alcoholism and the physiological and cognitive effects of alcohol.Image fusion: In computer vision, Multisensor Image fusion is the process of combining relevant information from two or more images into a single image.Haghighat, M.Timothy's Law: Timothy's Law is the reference used for a New York state statute signed into law on December 22, 2006 by Governor George E. Pataki which took effect January 1, 2007.CarbamazepineDysthymiaMemory clinic: A memory clinic is a dedicated medical clinic specialising in the assessment and diagnosis of memory disorders. Memory clinics were first seen in the UK in the 1980s, mainly in academic research centres.Genetic linkage: Genetic linkage is the tendency of alleles that are located close together on a chromosome to be inherited together during the meiosis phase of sexual reproduction. Genes whose loci are nearer to each other are less likely to be separated onto different chromatids during chromosomal crossover, and are therefore said to be genetically linked.Tic disorderEthical decisionCognitive skill: Cognitive functioning is a term referring to a human’s ability to process to (thoughts) that should not deplete on a large scale in healthy individuals. Cognition mainly refers to things like memory, the ability to learn new information, speech, understanding of written material.David Budescu: David Budescu is a psychologist and academic. He is the Anne Anastasi Professor of Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology at Fordham University.Kleptomania

(1/2554) The social and economic effects of manic depressive illness and of its treatment in lithium clinics.

Advising about the employment of those who have had manic depressive episodes requires Occupational Health Physicians to obtain, with consent, an objective account of previous episodes and to appreciate the enormous range of manic and depressive manifestations. Familiarity is needed with the likely effects of treatment of episodes and the benefits and problems of prophylaxis--not just in general but in individual cases, for example, where driving is required. This article summarizes research into the effects of lithium preparations on the course of the illness, thyroid and renal function and the risk of suicide. The author found that changing from treatment of episodes to continuous prophylaxis benefited employment and personal relationships without causing body weight problems. Many patients do well in life if supported by an experienced professional team, with 61% requiring no further admissions once on lithium, and with an 86% reduction in admissions achieved in our local clinic.  (+info)

(2/2554) Sustained antidepressant effect of sleep deprivation combined with pindolol in bipolar depression. A placebo-controlled trial.

Total sleep deprivation (TSD) shows powerful but transient clinical effects in patients affected by bipolar depression. Pindolol blocks the serotonergic 5-HT1A autoreceptor, thus improving the antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. We evaluated the interaction of TSD and pindolol in the treatment of acute episodes of bipolar depression. Forty bipolar depressed inpatients were randomized to receive pindolol 7.5 mg/day or placebo for nine days in combination with three consecutive TSD cycles. Pindolol significantly improved the antidepressant effect of TSD, and prevented the short-term relapse after treatment. The response rate (HDRS scores < 8) at the end of treatment was 15/20 for pindolol, and 3/20 for placebo. Coadministration of pindolol and TSD resulted in a complete response, which could be sustained for six months with lithium salts alone, in 65% of cases. This results suggest a major role for serotonergic transmission in the mechanism of action of TSD, and makes TSD treatment more effective in the treatment of bipolar depression.  (+info)

(3/2554) A note on power approximations for the transmission/disequilibrium test.

The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) is a popular method for detection of the genetic basis of a disease. Investigators planning such studies require computation of sample size and power, allowing for a general genetic model. Here, a rigorous method is presented for obtaining the power approximations of the TDT for samples consisting of families with either a single affected child or affected sib pairs. Power calculations based on simulation show that these approximations are quite precise. By this method, it is also shown that a previously published power approximation of the TDT is erroneous.  (+info)

(4/2554) Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of ceramic glaze.

A case of deliberate overdose of barium sulphide in a psychiatric setting is presented, with resulting flaccid paralysis, malignant arrhythmia, respiratory arrest and severe hypokalaemia, but ultimately with complete recovery. The degree of paralysis appears to be related directly to serum barium levels. The value of early haemodialysis, particularly with respiratory paralysis and hypokalaemia, is emphasised.  (+info)

(5/2554) Pharmacogenetics of lithium response in bipolar disorder.

Lithium is the first-line treatment for bipolar disorder. In the past, genetic studies have attempted to identify factors associated with positive treatment response or side effects. Several research groups have shown that familial factors, family history of primary bipolar disorder, and negative family history of schizophrenia in particular, correlate well with prophylactic lithium response. Conversely, studies of lithium responsive patients and their families can assist genetic research of bipolar disorder. Lithium responders appear to suffer from a form of bipolar disorder that is more genetically based and more homogeneous. In a series of family studies, the author and his colleagues have confirmed the differences in family histories of lithium responders and nonresponders and shown that the mode of inheritance in lithium responders is compatible with a major-gene model. Subsequently, they initiated an international collaborative study to map the gene(s) predisposing to the illness or treatment response, or both, using both linkage and association strategies. To date, a sample of 32 families, 138 unrelated patients and 163 control subjects has been studied. In these studies, they found support for the role of phospholipase C in lithium responsive bipolar disorder.  (+info)

(6/2554) A high-density genome scan detects evidence for a bipolar-disorder susceptibility locus on 13q32 and other potential loci on 1q32 and 18p11.2.

Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness characterized by mood swings of elation and depression. Family, twin, and adoption studies suggest a complex genetic etiology that may involve multiple susceptibility genes and an environmental component. To identify chromosomal loci contributing to vulnerability, we have conducted a genome-wide scan on approximately 396 individuals from 22 multiplex pedigrees by using 607 microsatellite markers. Multipoint nonparametric analysis detected the strongest evidence for linkage at 13q32 with a maximal logarithm of odds (lod) score of 3.5 (P = 0. 000028) under a phenotype model that included bipolar I, bipolar II with major depression, schizoaffective disorder, and recurrent unipolar disorder. Suggestive linkage was found on 1q31-q32 (lod = 2. 67; P = 0.00022) and 18p11.2 (lod = 2.32; P = 0.00054). Recent reports have linked schizophrenia to 13q32 and 18p11.2. Our genome scan identified other interesting regions, 7q31 (lod = 2.08; P = 0. 00099) and 22q11-q13 (lod = 2.1; P = 0.00094), and also confirmed reported linkages on 4p16, 12q23-q24, and 21q22. By comprehensive screening of the entire genome, we detected unreported loci for bipolar disorder, found support for proposed linkages, and gained evidence for the overlap of susceptibility regions for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.  (+info)

(7/2554) Plasma catecholamine metabolites as markers for psychosis and antipsychotic response in schizophrenia.

The objective of this study was to determine the association between the patterns of change in the dopaminergic metabolite plasma homovanillic acid (HVA), the noradrenergic metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and psychosis following haloperidol withdrawal in schizophrenic patients. Weekly plasma measurements were obtained in 107 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Random regression was used to control for individual variance while modeling metabolite changes over time and relationships with psychosis. Changes in plasma MHPG were not significantly associated with relapse or psychosis, while increased plasma HVA was found to be associated with relapse. Psychosis was correlated negatively with plasma HVA levels. The current analysis, controlling for individual variance, indicates that there is evidence for pharmacological effects on plasma HVA, but not plasma MHPG. In addition, these metabolites do not appear to be direct markers of psychosis, but may be associated with a compensatory response by the system to return to the steady state.  (+info)

(8/2554) Assessing the feasibility of linkage disequilibrium methods for mapping complex traits: an initial screen for bipolar disorder loci on chromosome 18.

Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis has been promoted as a method of mapping disease genes, particularly in isolated populations, but has not yet been used for genome-screening studies of complex disorders. We present results of a study to investigate the feasibility of LD methods for genome screening using a sample of individuals affected with severe bipolar mood disorder (BP-I), from an isolated population of the Costa Rican central valley. Forty-eight patients with BP-I were genotyped for markers spaced at approximately 6-cM intervals across chromosome 18. Chromosome 18 was chosen because a previous genome-screening linkage study of two Costa Rican families had suggested a BP-I locus on this chromosome. Results of the current study suggest that LD methods will be useful for mapping BP-I in a larger sample. The results also support previously reported possible localizations (obtained from a separate collection of patients) of BP-I-susceptibility genes at two distinct sites on this chromosome. Current limitations of LD screening for identifying loci for complex traits are discussed, and recommendations are made for future research with these methods.  (+info)



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