Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.United StatesPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Rhode IslandPreventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.MontanaHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)MississippiAlaskaIndians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.MissouriMassachusettsNorth DakotaKansasLife Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Tobacco, Smokeless: Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.ArthritisLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Homosexuality, Female: Sexual attraction or relationship between females.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.WashingtonIncome: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Binge Drinking: Drinking an excessive amount of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES in a short period of time.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.TexasAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Vaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.JordanWisconsinPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.North CarolinaOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Leisure Activities: Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.South CarolinaAlcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.FloridaRural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.

*  Prostate-specific antigen testing in older men in the USA: data from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: • Data were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys completed in ... 25264239 - Observe-5: observational postmarketing safety surveillance registry of etanercept for t.... ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Prostate-specific-antigen-testing-in/22448649.html

*  Health risks among North Carolina adults : 2001 : a report from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System :: State...

Health risks among North Carolina adults : 2001 : a report from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Page 1 ... Health risks among North Carolina adults : 2001 : a report from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ... Health risks among North Carolina adults : 2001 : a report from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Page 1. ... Health risks among North Carolina adults : 2001 : a report from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. ...
digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p249901coll22/id/4777/rec/4

*  Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003 (ICPSR 34085) Principal Investigator(s): United States Department of ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003. ICPSR34085-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/RCMD/studies/34085?geography[0]=Arizona&

*  Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000

... the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III), ... Smoking vs other risk factors as the cause of smoking-attributable deaths. JAMA 2000;284:706--12. ... These findings underscore the need to expand surveillance of the disease burden caused by smoking and to establish ... Calculation of attributable risks from epidemiologic data. Int J Epidemiol 1978;7:175--82. ...
https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5235a4.htm

*  Improving Public Health Surveillance Using a Dual-Frame Survey of Landline and Cell Phone Numbers.

... the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) expanded a traditional landline-based random digit dialin ... the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) expanded a traditional landline-based random digit dialing survey to a ... 17964676 - A semi-immobilizing system associated with microspectrofluorimetric and videoimaging an.... 18548716 - Continuous ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Improving-Public-Health-Surveillance-Using/21343246.html

*  Illinois Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Illinois BRFSS Web Site
idph.state.il.us/brfss/countydata.asp?areaCounty=Shelby_

*  Appendix A: State- and Sex-Specific Prevalence of Selected Characteristics -- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1994...

Appendix A: State- and Sex-Specific Prevalence of Selected Characteristics -- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1994 ...
https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00048760.htm

*  Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Center for American...

... including the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, or BRFSS-the largest continuously conducted health survey system in ... Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. By Kellan Baker and ... Within the purview of HHS, two priority surveys are the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, or YRBSS, and the National ... BRFSS, which the CDC coordinates at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, is an extensive nationwide system ...
https://americanprogress.org/issues/lgbt/reports/2016/03/29/134182/sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity-data-collection-in-the-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/

*  Multilevel Small-Area Estimation of Multiple Cigarette Smoking Status Categories Using the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor...

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: 2012 Summary Data Quality Report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: BRFSS combined Landline and cell phone weighted response rates by state; 2012. ... Method: Using 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data (our sample size = 405,233 persons), we constructed ... A case study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease prevalence using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Am J ...
cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/25/10/1402

*  MCW: Epidemiology Data Resource Center | Data Catalog

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Topic/focus: Behavior Birth Cohort-Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set (LBID ... Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER), Cancer Incidence Public-Use Database. Topic/focus: Disease - Specific / ... Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Topic/focus: Disease - Specific / Registry, Vital Events ... Medicare Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS). Topic/focus: Healthcare Facilites and Services, Cost and ...
https://mcw.edu/Epidemiology-Data-Resource-Center-EDRC/Data-Catalog.htm

*  NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20043062 - Work-related asthma and employment status - 38 states and District of Columbia,...

Methods: We analyzed the 2006-2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-back Survey for ever-employed adults ... Surveillance-programs; Author Keywords: Asthma; behavioral risk factor surveillance system; employment; occupational health ... Methods: We analyzed the 2006-2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-back Survey for ever-employed adults ... Respiratory-system-disorders; Respiration; Pulmonary-function; Pulmonary-system; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Workers; Work- ...
https://cdc.gov/niosh/nioshtic-2/20043062.html

*  FY 2013 H 2 - Department of Public Health Budget Recommendations

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Expendable Trust. 18,800. 4518-9035. Newborn Screening Trust. 217,321. ... Systems Linkages and Access to Care for Populations at High Risk of HIV 999,744. ... Public Health Injury Surveillance and Prevention 655,139. 4518-1000. Procurement of Information for the National Death Index ... Statewide Surveillance of Health Concerns & Toxic Algae Blooms 150,201. 4510-0639. Food Protection Rapid Response Team 429,427 ...
mass.gov/bb/h1/fy13h1/brec_13/dpt_13/hdph.htm

*  Statistics and Tracking | Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion | CDC

Surveillance activities provide data and statistics relevant to each program area of the National Center for Chronic Disease ... CDC's Major Chronic Disease Surveillance Systems are. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). BRFSS is the world's ... Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Surveillance System. The CKD Surveillance System documents the burden of CKD and its risk factors ... Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). YRBSS was developed to monitor priority health risk behaviors that contribute ...
https://cdc.gov/chronicdisease/stats/

*  Sleep Duration, Restfulness, and Screens in the Sleep Environment | Articles | Pediatrics

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire. Atlanta, GA: US ... insufficient rest or sleep in the past week by using an item modified from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ... 14 TV viewing is a risk factor for weight gain,15,16 decreased academic achievement, and behavioral problems.15 Although there ... Accumulating evidence indicates that inadequate sleep is a novel risk factor for obesity in childhood and later in life.1-7 ...
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/135/2/e367

*  CDC H1N1 Flu | African Americans and H1N1

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data show self-reported influenza-like illness and having sought medical care for ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers ... New Vaccine Surveillance Network. Unpublished data. *CDC. Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System. Surveillance for ... However, non-Hispanic blacks at high-risk for complications in the 18-49 year old age group received vaccine at levels above ...
https://cdc.gov/h1n1flu/african_americans_qa.htm

*  Adult Smoking in the US| VitalSigns | CDC

SOURCE: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2010. Read text version Top of Page ... Who's At Risk?. US Adult Smoking Statistics. SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey, 2010 ...
https://cdc.gov/vitalsigns/AdultSmoking/index.html

*  Preventing Chronic Disease: July 2011: 10 0181

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey, 2009. North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics. http://www.epi. ... Sixty-six children at risk for type 2 diabetes completed a 36-session prevention program; of the 25 children who began the ... Establish clinical referral process and conduct an intensive 12-week program for children aged 10-18 years with or at risk for ... Six hospital systems implemented policies, environmental changes, and initiatives with the potential to affect 13,800 employees ...
https://cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2011/jul/10_0181.htm

*  Preventing Chronic Disease: Special Issue, November 2005: 05 0083

2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) [Internet]. Salem (OR): Oregon Department of Human Services; 2003. ... Many state Medicaid programs shifted from fee-for-service systems to predominantly managed care systems in the 1990s, which ... increases the risk for asthma-related hospital admissions, increases asthma-related health care use, and increases the risk of ... major Oregon health systems. The person in this position works with health system administrators and data personnel to develop ...
https://cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2005/nov/05_0083.htm

*  Medical outcomes following bariatric surgery

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S ... Joshi AV, Day D, Lubowski TJ, Ambegaonkar A. Relationship between obesity and cardiovascular risk factors: findings from a ... Meta-analysis: obesity and the risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications. Ann Intern Med 2005; 143:199. ... Basen-Engquist K, Chang M. Obesity and cancer risk: recent review and evidence. Curr Oncol Rep 2011; 13:71. ...
https://uptodate.com/contents/medical-outcomes-following-bariatric-surgery

*  PROSPR Shared Resource - Library | MD Anderson Cancer Center

BRAHMS - Berlin Risk Appraisal and Health Motivation Study. BRFSS - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire. ... PROMIS - -Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (multiple scales). QLACS - Quality of Life in Adult Cancer ... ESAS - Edmonton Symptom Assessment System. FACT - Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (multiple versions). FFQ - Block Food ... CARES - Cancer Rehabilitation Evaluation System. Carlson Comorbidity Index. CES-D - Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression ...
https://mdanderson.org/research/research-resources/core-facilities/prospr-shared-resource/prospr-library.html

*  ISL: Statistics by Topic

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Reports (1999 to Current) *Births/Natality Reports Indiana State Department of ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBS) System U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
in.gov/library/2409.htm

*  Difference between revisions of "Washington" - GODORT

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Data on health behaviors and preventive practices related to several ... Judicial Information System. A case management system for appellate, superior, limited jurisdiction, and juvenile courts, the ... Washington Information System for Architectural and Archaeological Records Data. A searchable database of over 1800 registered ... State Park Reservation System. Allows online reservations for cabins, yurts, or campsites in 44 state parks and 3 Tacoma Public ...
wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php?title=Washington&diff=11943&oldid=8919

*  JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols

... elegans model employs a temperature-sensitive mutation in the mRNA surveillance system to engineer temperature-inducible muscle ... Behavioral assays that are associated with the misfolding of a specific protein provide a simple and powerful readout for ... As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo ... Lower rates of reproduction constitute a negative selection factor that should reduce the number of mutant alleles in the ...
https://jove.com/visualize/abstract/23776511/evolution-higher-intracellular-oxidizing-environment-caenorhabditis

*  Study Search Results

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003 (ICPSR 34085) United States Department of Health and Human Services. ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/DSDR/studies?groupResults=false&permit[0]=AVAILABLE&dataFormat[0]=SPSS&paging.startRow=1

List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Healthy People program: Healthy People is a program of nationwide health-promotion and disease-prevention goals set by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The goals were first set in 1979 “in response to an emerging consensus among scientists and health authorities that national health priorities should emphasize disease prevention”.List of rivers of the United States Virgin Islands: List of rivers and streams in the United States Virgin Islands (U.S.Fold and thrust belt: A fold and thrust belt is a series of mountainous foothills adjacent to an orogenic belt, which forms due to contractional tectonics. Fold and thrust belts commonly form in the forelands adjacent to major orogens as deformation propagates outwards.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Miss Rhode IslandPermanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Disinhibition: In psychology, disinhibition is a lack of restraint manifested in disregard for social conventions, impulsivity, and poor risk assessment. Disinhibition affects motor, instinctual, emotional, cognitive, and perceptual aspects with signs and symptoms similar to the diagnostic criteria for mania.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Waterfalls of Montana: There are at least 120 named waterfalls in Montana.San Juan River (Vancouver Island): The San Juan River is a river on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, draining into the Pacific Ocean at Port San Juan, the harbour for Port Renfrew,BCGNIS entry "San Juan River" which is at the limit of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which lies south and southeast of the river. Its name is derived from that or Port San Juan, which is also the namesake of San Juan Ridge, which lies on the south side of the river's final W-E course.University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Dentistry: The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Dentistry is a dental graduate school that is part of the University of Mississippi. Located in Jackson, Mississippi, U.List of nature centers in Alaska: This is a list of nature centers and environmental education centers in the state of Alaska.Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California: The Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Eastern Pomo people in Lake County, California.California Indians and Their Reservations.Telephone numbers in Panama: Country Code: +507Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.University of Missouri Health Care: University of Missouri Health System is an academic health system located in Columbia, Missouri. It is owned by the University of Missouri System.Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program: The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program (MTCP) is an anti-tobacco program run by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health with the goal of decreasing tobacco prevalence in the state of Massachusetts. MTCP has four main components: preventing youth smoking, assisting current smokers with quitting, protecting against second hand smoke, and eliminating tobacco related disparities.Maple River (North Dakota): The Maple River is a tributary of the Sheyenne River, about long,U.S.John Martin (Governor of Kansas): John Alexander Martin (March 10, 1839 – October 2, 1889) was the 10th Governor of Kansas.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Herbal smokeless tobaccoArthritis Research UKThe Complete Stevie Wonder: The Complete Stevie Wonder is a digital compilation featuring the work of Stevie Wonder. Released a week before the physical release of A Time to Love, the set comprises almost all of Wonder's officially released material, including single mixes, extended versions, remixes, and Workout Stevie Workout, a 1963 album which was shelved and replaced by With A Song In My Heart.Alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Excessive alcohol intake is associated with an elevated risk of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), heart failure, some cancers, and accidental injury, and is a leading cause of preventable death in industrialized countries. However, extensive research has shown that moderate alcohol intake is associated with health benefits, including less cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and lower all-cause mortality.Cancer screeningEnvironmental issues in Puget Sound: Puget Sound is a deep inlet of the Pacific Ocean in Washington, extending south from the Strait of Juan de Fuca through Admiralty Inlet. It was explored and named by Captain George Vancouver for his aide, Peter Puget, in 1792.Circular flow of income: The circular flow of income or circular flow is a model of the economy in which the major exchanges are represented as flows of money, goods and services, etc. between economic agents.Misbehaving Mums To Be: Misbehaving Mums To Be is a BBC Three series following a team of midwives as they take pregnant women who binge drink, chain smoke and overeat and help them get back into shape before they give birth.Flu season: Flu season is an annually recurring time period characterized by the prevalence of outbreaks of influenza (flu). The season occurs during the cold half of the year in each hemisphere.High-intensity interval training: High-intensity interval training (HIIT), also called high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) or sprint interval training (SIT), is an enhanced form of interval training, an exercise strategy alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. HIIT is a form of cardiovascular exercise.Mammography Quality Standards ActCalifornia Proposition 29 (2012): Proposition 29, the California Cancer Research Act, is a California ballot measure that was defeated by California voters at the statewide election on June 5, 2012.University of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonAfrican-American family structure: The family structure of African-Americans has long been a matter of national public policy interest.Moynihan's War on Poverty report A 1965 report by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, known as The Moynihan Report, examined the link between black poverty and family structure.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Pap testList of hospitals in Jordan: This is a list of hospitals in Jordan. (sorted by hospital name)Wisconsin Senate, District 4: The 4th District of the Wisconsin Senate is located in Southern Wisconsin, and is composed of parts of Milwaukee County.District MapPublic Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Steven Zeisel: Steven H. Zeisel, M.Multiple disabilitiesClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.VaccinationFecal occult bloodPneumococcal vaccine: A pneumococcal vaccine is a vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae.Neighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Lifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Vegetable juiceTime-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Virtual colonoscopy: Virtual colonoscopy (VC, also called CT Colonography or CT Pneumocolon) is a medical imaging procedure which uses x-rays and computers to produce two- and three-dimensional images of the colon (large intestine) from the lowest part, the rectum, all the way to the lower end of the small intestine and display them on a screen. The procedure is used to diagnose colon and bowel disease, including polyps, diverticulosis and cancer.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Fruit snack: A fruit snack is a processed food eaten as a snack in the United States. Fruit snacks are very similar to gummi candies.Tobacco cessation clinicU.S.-Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project: The U.S.Annual Fitness Test: In the British Army, the Annual Fitness Test is designed to assess soldiers' lower and upper body strength and endurance. The test was formally known as the Combat Fitness Test - and is still colloquially known by soldiers as the CFT.Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Cervical screening: Cervical screening is the process of detecting abnormal changes in the cervix before they can develop into cervical cancer. If the abnormal tissue or cells can be removed, then the disease can be prevented from developing.Survivor Type: "Survivor Type" is a short story by Stephen King, first published in the 1982 horror anthology Terrors, edited by Charles L. Grant, and collected in King's 1985 collection Skeleton Crew.Hypertension

(1/527) The community-oriented primary care experience in the United kingdom.

The UK National Health Service has long delivered public health programs through primary care. However, attempts to promote Sidney Kark's model of community-oriented primary care (COPC), based on general practice populations, have made only limited headway. Recent policy developments give COPC new resonance. Currently, primary care trusts are assuming responsibility for improving the health of the populations they serve, and personal medical service pilots are tailoring primary care to local needs under local contracts. COPC has yielded training packages and frameworks that can assist these new organizations in developing public health skills and understanding among a wide range of primary care professionals.  (+info)

(2/527) A reexamination of smoking before, during, and after pregnancy.

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the patterns and correlates of maternal smoking before, during, and after pregnancy. METHODS: We examined socioeconomic, demographic, and clinical risk factors associated with maternal smoking in a nationally representative cohort of women (n = 8285) who were surveyed 17 +/- 5 months and again 35 +/- 5 months after delivery. RESULTS: Smoking rates among women with a college degree decreased 30% from before pregnancy to 35 months postpartum but did not change among the least educated women. Risk factors clustered, and a gradient linked the number of risk factors (0, 2, 4) to the percentage smoking (6%, 31%, 58%, P <.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The period of pregnancy and early parenthood is associated with worsening education-related disparities in smoking as well as substantial clustering of risk factors. These observations could influence the targeting and design of maternal smoking interventions.  (+info)

(3/527) Breast, cervical, and colorectal carcinoma screening in a demographically defined region of the southern U.S.

BACKGROUND: The "Southern Black Belt," a term used for > 100 years to describe a subregion of the southern U.S., includes counties with high concentrations of African Americans and high levels of poverty and unemployment, and relatively high rates of preventable cancers. METHODS: The authors analyzed data from a state-based telephone survey of adults age >or= 18 years to compare the cancer screening patterns of African-American and white men and women in nonmetropolitan counties of this region, and to compare those rates with those of persons in other southern counties and elsewhere in the U.S. The primary study groups were comprised of 2165-5888 women and 1198 men in this region interviewed through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The respondents lived in predominantly rural counties in 11 southern states with sizeable African-American populations (>or= 24.5% of county residents). The main outcome measures were recent use of the Papanicolau (Pap) test, mammography, test for fecal occult blood in the stool (FOBT), and flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. RESULTS: Between 1998-2000, 66.3% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] +/- 2.7%) of 1817 African-American women in the region age >or= 40 years had received a mammogram within the past 2 years, compared with 69.3% (95% CI +/- 1.8%) of 3922 white women (P = 0.066). The proportion of African-American and white women who had received a Pap test within the past 3 years was similar (85.7% [95% CI +/- 1.9%] vs. 83.4% [95% CI +/- 1.5%]; P = 0.068]. In 1997 and 1999, 29.3% of African-American women in these counties reported ever receiving an FOBT, compared with 36.9% in non-Black Belt counties and 42.5% in the remainder of the U.S. Among white women, 37.7% in Black Belt counties, 44.0% in non-Black Belt counties, and 45.3% in the remainder of the U.S. ever received an FOBT. Overall, similar patterns were noted among both men and women with regard to ever-use of FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy. Screening rates appeared to vary less by race than by region. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that adults in the nonmetropolitan South receive educational messages, outreach, and provider recommendations concerning the importance of routine cancer screening.  (+info)

(4/527) Youth risk behavior surveillance--United States, 1999.

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among youth and adults, often are established during youth, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. REPORTING PERIOD: February-May 1999. DESCRIPTION OF THE SYSTEM: The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults --behaviors that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (including human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection); unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity. The YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by CDC as well as state, territorial, and local school-based surveys conducted by education and health agencies. This report summarizes results from the national survey, 33 state surveys, and 16 local surveys conducted among high school students during February-May 1999. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: In the United States, approximately three fourths of all deaths among persons aged 10-24 years result from only four causes: motor-vehicle crashes, other unintentional injuries, homicide, and suicide. Results from the 1999 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey demonstrate that numerous high school students engage in behaviors that increase their likelihood of death from these four causes--16.4% had rarely or never worn a seat belt; during the 30 days preceding the survey, 33.1% had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol; 17.3% had carried a weapon during the 30 days preceding the survey; 50.0% had drunk alcohol during the 30 days preceding the survey; 26.7% had used marijuana during the 30 days preceding the survey; and 7.8% had attempted suicide during the 12 months preceding the survey. Substantial morbidity and social problems among young persons also result from unintended pregnancies and STDs, including HIV infection. In 1999, nationwide, 49.9% of high school students had ever had sexual intercourse; 42.0% of sexually active students had not used a condom at last sexual intercourse; and 1.8% had ever injected an illegal drug. Two thirds of all deaths among persons aged > or = 25 years result from only two causes--cardiovascular disease and cancer. The majority of risk behaviors associated with these two causes of death are initiated during adolescence. In 1999, 34.8% of high school students had smoked cigarettes during the 30 days preceding the survey; 76.1% had not eaten > or = 5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables during the 7 days preceding the survey; 16.0% were at risk for becoming overweight; and 70.9% did not attend physical education class daily. ACTIONS TAKEN: These YRBSS data are already being used by health and education officials at national, state, and local levelsto analyze and improve policies and programs to reduce priority health-risk behaviors among youth. The YRBSS data also are being used to measure progress toward achieving 16 national health objectives for 2010 and 3 of the 10 leading health indicators.  (+info)

(5/527) Smoking cessation and prevention: an urgent public health priority for American Indians in the Northern Plains.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of cigarette smoking and smoking cessation among American Indians living on or near Montana's seven reservations to those of non-Indians living in the same geographic region. METHODS: Data for Montana Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) respondents (n = 1,722) were compared to data from a BRFSS survey of American Indians living on or near Montana's seven reservations in 1999 (n = 1,000). Respondents were asked about smoking and smoking cessation as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and selected risk factors. Quit ratios were calculated for both groups. RESULTS: American Indians were more likely to report current smoking (38%) than non-Indians (19%; p < 0.001). Thirty-seven percent of Indian respondents with CVD risk factors reported current smoking, compared with 17% of non- Indians with CVD risk factors. However, there was no significant difference in reported smoking rates between Indians (21%) and non-Indians (27%) with a history of CVD. Indian smokers were more likely to report quitting for one or more days in the past year (67%), compared with non-Indians (43%). Quit ratios were significantly lower among Indians (43%) than among non-Indians (65%). CONCLUSIONS: High smoking rates in Indians, particularly among those with other CVD risk factors, demonstrate an urgent need for culturally sensitive smoking cessation interventions among Northern Plains Indians and highlight the need for the Surgeon General's focus on smoking in minority populations.  (+info)

(6/527) Preventive-care practices among persons with diabetes--United States, 1995 and 2001.

Effective interventions are available to persons with diabetes that can prevent or delay the development of serious health complications such as lower limb amputation, blindness, kidney failure, and cardiovascular disease. However, the use of preventive-care practices is lower than recommended, and the national health objectives for 2010 aim to improve care for all persons with diabetes. To assess progress toward meeting these goals, CDC analyzed data on selected diabetes-related preventive-care practices, including influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage, from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1995 and 2001. This report presents the findings of these analyses, which indicate that levels of preventive-care practices among persons with diabetes in the United States increased from 1995 to 2001. Further efforts are needed to improve care among persons with diabetes, reduce the burden of diabetes-related complications, and achieve the national health objectives, including continued surveillance of diabetes-related preventive-care practices and collaboration with community-based organizations, health-care providers, public health officials, and persons with diabetes.  (+info)

(7/527) Risk behaviors of Filipino methamphetamine users in San Francisco: implications for prevention and treatment of drug use and HIV.

OBJECTIVE: This study describes the demographics, HIV risk and drug use behaviors, and psychosocial status of Filipino American methamphetamine users in the San Francisco Bay area. METHODS: Individual interviews were conducted with 83 Filipino American methamphetamine users, recruited through snowball sampling methods. A structured survey questionnaire included measures of drug use behaviors, HIV-related sexual behaviors, psychosocial factors, and demographics. RESULTS: Filipino methamphetamine users tended to be male, to have low levels of perceived personal control in their lives, and to report low levels of shame about their drug use. Methamphetamine use was strongly associated with HIV-related risk behaviors. Frequent methamphetamine users tended to engage in drug use before or during sex and to use condoms infrequently. Commercial sex activity was associated with frequency of methamphetamine use. About one-third of the study participants had never been tested for HIV. CONCLUSION: HIV/STD and drug abuse prevention programs that target Filipino Americans are needed. These programs should be tailored to meet clients' needs on the basis of gender, employment status, acculturation, and psychosocial variables that affect drug use and sexual behaviors.  (+info)

(8/527) Prevalence of self-reported arthritis or chronic joint symptoms among adults--United States, 2001.

Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions comprise the leading cause of disability among adults in the United States, and the cost of this public health burden is expected to increase as the U.S. population ages. State-specific estimates of the prevalence of arthritis and chronic joint symptoms (CJS) are important for planning health services and programs to prevent arthritis-related disability and for tracking progress toward meeting state and national health objectives for 2010. In 2001, questions about arthritis and CJS were asked of adult respondents in every state through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes the results of that survey, which indicate that the estimated U.S. prevalence of arthritis/CJS was 33.0% among adults. Increased intervention efforts, including early diagnosis and appropriate clinical and self-management (e.g., physical activity, education, and maintaining appropriate weight), are needed to reduce the impact of arthritis and CJS.  (+info)



BRFSS


  • The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. (umich.edu)
  • The BRFSS questionnaire was developed jointly by CDC's Behavioral Surveillance Branch (BSB) and the states. (umich.edu)
  • Fortunately, some surveys are beginning to take steps to gather these data, including the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, or BRFSS-the largest continuously conducted health survey system in the world. (americanprogress.org)
  • BRFSS, which the CDC coordinates at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, is an extensive nationwide system of telephone surveys conducted by all states, the District of Columbia, and most U.S. territories. (americanprogress.org)
  • BRFSS annually surveys more than 400,000 American adults about health-related risk behaviors, health conditions, and preventive services and is the premier source of health data that inform a wide range of funding decisions and activities conducted by both public and private actors at the federal, state, and local levels. (americanprogress.org)
  • Many state health departments, for instance, use BRFSS data for purposes such as public education, epidemiology and disease surveillance, policy development, program evaluation, and the compilation of reports on residents' health. (americanprogress.org)
  • Data were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys completed in 2006, 2008 and 2010. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Using 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data (our sample size = 405,233 persons), we constructed and fitted a series of multilevel logistic regression models and applied them to the U.S. Census population to generate county-level prevalence estimates. (aacrjournals.org)
  • BRFSS is the world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system. (cdc.gov)

behaviors


  • States conduct monthly telephone surveillance using a standardized questionnaire to determine the distribution of risk behaviors and health practices among adults. (umich.edu)
  • Better understand the extent of health risk behaviors, preventive care practices, and the burden of chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • YRBSS was developed to monitor priority health risk behaviors that contribute markedly to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Improving sleep duration and quality may improve somatic and psychosocial health, school performance, and risk-taking behaviors among youth 8 and reduce hypertension, coronary heart disease, and stroke in adulthood. (aappublications.org)

Asthma


  • Methods: We analyzed the 2006-2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-back Survey for ever-employed adults (excluding those who were retired, homemakers, and students at the time of the interview) with current asthma in 38 states and District of Columbia (N=25,680). (cdc.gov)
  • A primary focus of the project is the development of partnerships among health plans, health care providers, and large health care organizations to integrate asthma management and smoking control through systems innovations and provider education. (cdc.gov)
  • Collaboration between HPCDP and OMAP has been an important factor in Oregon s successful smoking cessation efforts in general and in recent efforts to address tobacco use among Oregonians with asthma. (cdc.gov)
  • Among people with asthma, cigarette smoking decreases lung functioning, increases the risk for asthma-related hospital admissions, increases asthma-related health care use, and increases the risk of death from asthma (3,4). (cdc.gov)

data


  • Prostate-specific antigen testing in older men in the USA: data from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Surveillance activities provide data and statistics relevant to each program area of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (cdc.gov)
  • Use these open data to describe the burden of chronic disease and risk factors, identify research gaps, monitor population trends, and evaluate programs. (cdc.gov)
  • Smoking and tobacco data and other information from various sources, such as CDC surveillance systems, journal articles, and reports. (cdc.gov)
  • These statistics were prepared using US Census Bureau state population estimates and water system data reported by states to the CDC Water Fluoridation Reporting System. (cdc.gov)
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data show self-reported influenza-like illness and having sought medical care for that illness was similar among racial/ethnic groups. (cdc.gov)
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. (uptodate.com)

preventive


  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued recommendations for clinicians to ask all adults about smoking, with the aim of providing smokers with behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for smoking cessation ( 2 ). (aacrjournals.org)

obesity


  • Inadequate sleep has been identified as a risk factor for obesity and other outcomes. (aappublications.org)
  • Accumulating evidence indicates that inadequate sleep is a novel risk factor for obesity in childhood and later in life. (aappublications.org)

Prevention


  • Many state Medicaid programs shifted from fee-for-service systems to predominantly managed care systems in the 1990s, which presented unique opportunities to improve the public s health by integrating disease prevention and public health goals into the health care system (6). (cdc.gov)

performance


  • In many situations, managed care led to increased monitoring of quality of care and in some systems made reimbursement dependent on performance (7). (cdc.gov)

time


  • The CKD Surveillance System documents the burden of CKD and its risk factors in the United States population over time and provides the means for monitoring and evaluating efforts to prevent, detect, and manage CKD by both federal and nonfederal agencies. (cdc.gov)