Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Muscular Atrophy: Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation.Optic Atrophy: Atrophy of the optic disk which may be congenital or acquired. This condition indicates a deficiency in the number of nerve fibers which arise in the RETINA and converge to form the OPTIC DISK; OPTIC NERVE; OPTIC CHIASM; and optic tracts. GLAUCOMA; ISCHEMIA; inflammation, a chronic elevation of intracranial pressure, toxins, optic nerve compression, and inherited conditions (see OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY) are relatively common causes of this condition.Muscular Atrophy, Spinal: A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Multiple System Atrophy: A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood: A group of recessively inherited diseases that feature progressive muscular atrophy and hypotonia. They are classified as type I (Werdnig-Hoffman disease), type II (intermediate form), and type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease). Type I is fatal in infancy, type II has a late infantile onset and is associated with survival into the second or third decade. Type III has its onset in childhood, and is slowly progressive. (J Med Genet 1996 Apr:33(4):281-3)Olivopontocerebellar Atrophies: A group of inherited and sporadic disorders which share progressive ataxia in combination with atrophy of the CEREBELLUM; PONS; and inferior olivary nuclei. Additional clinical features may include MUSCLE RIGIDITY; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; RETINAL DEGENERATION; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; DEMENTIA; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and OPHTHALMOPLEGIA. The familial form has an earlier onset (second decade) and may feature spinal cord atrophy. The sporadic form tends to present in the fifth or sixth decade, and is considered a clinical subtype of MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1085)Gyrate Atrophy: Progressive, autosomal recessive, diffuse atrophy of the choroid, pigment epithelium, and sensory retina that begins in childhood.Geographic Atrophy: A form of MACULAR DEGENERATION also known as dry macular degeneration marked by occurrence of a well-defined progressive lesion or atrophy in the central part of the RETINA called the MACULA LUTEA. It is distinguishable from WET MACULAR DEGENERATION in that the latter involves neovascular exudates.Survival of Motor Neuron 1 Protein: A SMN complex protein that is essential for the function of the SMN protein complex. In humans the protein is encoded by a single gene found near the inversion telomere of a large inverted region of CHROMOSOME 5. Mutations in the gene coding for survival of motor neuron 1 protein may result in SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD.Muscular Disorders, Atrophic: Disorders characterized by an abnormal reduction in muscle volume due to a decrease in the size or number of muscle fibers. Atrophy may result from diseases intrinsic to muscle tissue (e.g., MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY) or secondary to PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES that impair innervation to muscle tissue (e.g., MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Optic Atrophy, Autosomal Dominant: Dominant optic atrophy is a hereditary optic neuropathy causing decreased visual acuity, color vision deficits, a centrocecal scotoma, and optic nerve pallor (Hum. Genet. 1998; 102: 79-86). Mutations leading to this condition have been mapped to the OPA1 gene at chromosome 3q28-q29. OPA1 codes for a dynamin-related GTPase that localizes to mitochondria.SMN Complex Proteins: A complex of proteins that assemble the SNRNP CORE PROTEINS into a core structure that surrounds a highly conserved RNA sequence found in SMALL NUCLEAR RNA. They are found localized in the GEMINI OF COILED BODIES and in the CYTOPLASM. The SMN complex is named after the Survival of Motor Neuron Complex Protein 1, which is a critical component of the complex.Survival of Motor Neuron 2 Protein: A SMN complex protein that is closely-related to SURVIVAL OF MOTOR NEURON 1 PROTEIN. In humans, the protein is encoded by an often duplicated gene found near the inversion centromere of a large inverted region of CHROMOSOME 5.Hindlimb Suspension: Technique for limiting use, activity, or movement by immobilizing or restraining animal by suspending from hindlimbs or tails. This immobilization is used to simulate some effects of reduced gravity and study weightlessness physiology.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Bulbo-Spinal Atrophy, X-Linked: An X-linked recessive form of spinal muscular atrophy. It is due to a mutation of the gene encoding the ANDROGEN RECEPTOR.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Gastritis, Atrophic: GASTRITIS with atrophy of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, the GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS, and the mucosal glands leading to ACHLORHYDRIA. Atrophic gastritis usually progresses from chronic gastritis.SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases: A subset of ubiquitin protein ligases that are formed by the association of a SKP DOMAIN PROTEIN, a CULLIN DOMAIN PROTEIN and a F-BOX DOMAIN PROTEIN.Optic Atrophies, Hereditary: Hereditary conditions that feature progressive visual loss in association with optic atrophy. Relatively common forms include autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT) and Leber hereditary optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, HEREDITARY, LEBER).Cerebellar Ataxia: Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Uveal Diseases: Diseases of the uvea.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Supranuclear Palsy, Progressive: A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Facial Hemiatrophy: A syndrome characterized by slowly progressive unilateral atrophy of facial subcutaneous fat, muscle tissue, skin, cartilage, and bone. The condition typically progresses over a period of 2-10 years and then stabilizes.Ornithine-Oxo-Acid Transaminase: A pyridoxal phosphate enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glutamate gamma-semialdehyde and an L-amino acid from L-ornithine and a 2-keto-acid. EC 2.6.1.13.Shy-Drager Syndrome: A progressive neurodegenerative condition of the central and autonomic nervous systems characterized by atrophy of the preganglionic lateral horn neurons of the thoracic spinal cord. This disease is generally considered a clinical variant of MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY. Affected individuals present in the fifth or sixth decade with ORTHOSTASIS and bladder dysfunction; and later develop FECAL INCONTINENCE; anhidrosis; ATAXIA; IMPOTENCE; and alterations of tone suggestive of basal ganglia dysfunction. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p536)Muscle Denervation: The resection or removal of the innervation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Muscle Fibers, Skeletal: Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Spinocerebellar Degenerations: A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Neuronal Apoptosis-Inhibitory Protein: An inhibitor of apoptosis protein that was initially identified during analysis of CHROMOSOME DELETIONS associated with SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY. Naip contains a nucleotide binding oligomerization domain and a carboxy-terminal LEUCINE rich repeat.Pepsinogen A: This is one of 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans and is also known as pepsinogen. (The other is PEPSINOGEN C.) This includes isozymogens Pg1-Pg5 (pepsinogens 1-5, group I or products of PGA1-PGA5 genes). This is the main pepsinogen found in urine.Myoclonic Epilepsies, Progressive: A heterogeneous group of primarily familial disorders characterized by myoclonic seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, ataxia, progressive intellectual deterioration, and neuronal degeneration. These include LAFORA DISEASE; MERRF SYNDROME; NEURONAL CEROID-LIPOFUSCINOSIS; sialidosis (see MUCOLIPIDOSES), and UNVERRICHT-LUNDBORG SYNDROME.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Macular Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Myostatin: A growth differentiation factor that is a potent inhibitor of SKELETAL MUSCLE growth. It may play a role in the regulation of MYOGENESIS and in muscle maintenance during adulthood.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Nerve Tissue ProteinsPedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein: A protein that has been shown to function as a calcium-regulated transcription factor as well as a substrate for depolarization-activated CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES. This protein functions to integrate both calcium and cAMP signals.Anterior Horn Cells: MOTOR NEURONS in the anterior (ventral) horn of the SPINAL CORD which project to SKELETAL MUSCLES.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Pepsinogen C: This is one of the 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans. It is found in prostate and seminal fluid whereas PEPSINOGEN A is not.Nerve Degeneration: Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.Neurodegenerative Diseases: Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.Frontotemporal Dementia: The most common clinical form of FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION, this dementia presents with personality and behavioral changes often associated with disinhibition, apathy, and lack of insight.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Mild Cognitive Impairment: A prodromal phase of cognitive decline that may precede the emergence of ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other dementias. It may include impairment of cognition, such as impairments in language, visuospatial awareness, ATTENTION and MEMORY.Motor Neuron Disease: Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Cerebral Ventricles: Four CSF-filled (see CEREBROSPINAL FLUID) cavities within the cerebral hemispheres (LATERAL VENTRICLES), in the midline (THIRD VENTRICLE) and within the PONS and MEDULLA OBLONGATA (FOURTH VENTRICLE).RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Gastritis: Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.

*  Topical DHEA Against Vaginal Atrophy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Vaginal Atrophy Drug: Placebo Drug: DHEA (0.25%) Drug: DHEA (0.5%) Drug: DHEA (1.0%) Phase 3 ... Labrie F. Intravaginal DHEA, by a strictly local action, exerts beneficial effects on both vaginal atrophy symptoms and sexual ... Atrophy. Pathological Conditions, Anatomical. Dehydroepiandrosterone. Adjuvants, Immunologic. Immunologic Factors. ... Topical DHEA Against Vaginal Atrophy (3-Month Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Randomized Phase III Study). ...

*  Most recent papers with the keyword Plexus choroideus | Read by QxMD

MTA index: a simple 2D-method for assessing atrophy of the medial temporal lobe using clinically available neuroimaging. ... the measurement of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) is not being widely used in daily clinical practice as a criterion in the ... simple and objective method for measuring the rate of MTA in relation to the global atrophy using clinically available ... https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24715861/mta-index-a-simple-2d-method-for-assessing-atrophy-of-the-medial-temporal-lobe-using- ...

*  Posterior cortical atrophy - Mayo Clinic

Posterior cortical atrophy is a rare, degenerative brain and nervous system disorder (neurological condition) that results in ... Posterior cortical atrophy may be associated with Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia or other neurological conditions. ... Posterior cortical atrophy. Alzheimer's Association. http://www.alz.org/dementia/posterior-cortical-atrophy.asp. Accessed Sept ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/posterior-cortical-atrophy/basics/definition/con-20036322 ...

*  Queries about cerebellar atrophy and parkinsons disease - Neurology - MedHelp

The MRI done showed evidence of cerebellar atrophy. Diffuse cerbellar and cerebral volume loss... ... Can u tell me about cerebellar atrophy? Is this an early stage of parkinson's disease? Is there a cure for this? ... MSA-P, or multi-system atrophy-Parkinsonism type, is what is termed a parkinson's plus syndrome. Basically, there are some ... There are several causes of cerbellar atrophy, including but not limited to excessive alcohol intake, some medications, some ...

*  Posterior cortical atrophy Research - Mayo Clinic

Posterior cortical atrophy can't be cured, but doctors will help you manage your condition. Your doctor may give you ... See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on posterior cortical atrophy on PubMed, a service of the National Library of ... Posterior cortical atrophy is a rare, degenerative brain and nervous system disorder (neurological condition) that results in ... Posterior cortical atrophy may be associated with Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia or other neurological conditions. ...

*  Cerebellar Atrophy - Neurology - MedHelp

... she was diagnosed with advanced cerebellar atrophy. She recently had another office visit with her neurologist to get results ... Cerebellar Atrophy. When my daughter was 20, 2 years ago, she was diagnosed with advanced cerebellar atrophy. She recently had ... I hope you have been informed about any identified cause of the atrophy. It is very much important that she is a part of some ... I hope you have been informed about any identified cause of the atrophy. It is very much important that she is a part of some ...

*  lick atrophy | BackYard Chickens

Has anyone ever had a dog with lick atrophy? My black lab has it or does it and it is so gross. Basically she licks and lick ... Has anyone ever had a dog with lick atrophy? My black lab has it or does it and it is so gross. Basically she licks and lick ... lick atrophy Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by andbab, Feb 26, 2009. ...

*  trying-to-conceive

2. Slow-down of the aging atrophy by pregnancy.. 3. Acceleration of the aging atrophy by the Pill [and/or by other endocrine- ... there is an entry about Atrophy and what it does to a woman as years go by, how "atrophy of mucosal surfaces takes place, ... Atrophy acceleration effect of 10 years on the Pill:. S crypts are down to mere 10% at 40 years of age. Here is why it's not ... About atrophy, reproductive aging, and how it's really not nice to fool Mother Nature - or with. June 27, 2010 I have taken it ...

*  Best Procedure for Progressive Hamifacial Atrophy Correction? Doctor Answers, Tips

Your own fat is the best option for correction of hemifacial atrophy. Depending on the size of the area that needs to be ... For example, if you have enophthalmos [sunken eye] due to fat atrophy, you may be able to have implants within the eye socket ... It should be done when the disease has stabilized and no more atrophy ...

*  How long does it take for muscles to atrophy? | Reference.com

Atrophy is the wasting and deterioration of muscle... ... Muscle atrophy can take several months or years before setting ... Muscle atrophy comes in two forms: disuse and neurogenic muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy is the result of a lack of physical ... Neurogenic atrophy is associated with diseases such as Polio and Lou Gehrig's Disease. Once neurogenic atrophy takes hold, it ... Neurogenic atrophy, as defined by The Free Resource, is a more severe case of muscle wasting as the result of damage to the ...

*  How long to reverse testicular atrophy? - AnabolicMinds.com

AnabolicMinds.com , Forum , Anti-Aging Discussion , Anabolics , How long to reverse testicular atrophy? ... How long to reverse testicular atrophy? I am currently in the 2nd week of my PCT after an epistane cycle. My testes shrunk by ... Is it possible reverse testicular atrophy due to varicocele?. By Alkalemmire in forum Male Anti-Aging Medicine ... reverse testicular atrophy with r3igf-1. By WATERLOGGED in forum IGF-1/GH ...

*  Radiation Dose-Dependent Hippocampal Atrophy Detected With Longitudinal Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

... 07:00 EST 1st ... Home » Topics » Clinical Approvals » Research » Radiation Dose-Dependent Hippocampal Atrophy Detected With Longitudinal ... In this study we sought to determine whether brain RT was associated with dose-dependent hippocampal atrophy. ... To assess the clinical significance of temporal pole abnormalities (temporopolar blurring, TB, and temporopolar atrophy, TA) ...

*  Genomic Susceptibility Loci for Brain Atrophy in Hypertensive Sibships From the GENOA Study | Hypertension

Genomic Susceptibility Loci for Brain Atrophy in Hypertensive Sibships From the GENOA Study. Stephen T. Turner, Myriam Fornage ... Brain atrophy in hypertension. A volumetric magnetic resonance imaging study. Hypertension. 1992; 20: 340-348. ... The logarithm transformed measure of leukoariosis, and the measures of brain atrophy, MAP, and PP were adjusted for sex and age ... Hatazawa J, Yamaguchi T, Ito M, Yamaura H, Matsuzawa T. Association of hypertension with increased atrophy of brain matter in ...

*  Posterior cortical atrophy | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), also known as the Benson's syndrome or visual variant of Alzheimer's disease, is a rare ... Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), also known as the Benson's syndrome or visual variant of Alzheimer's disease, is a rare ... Posterior cortical atrophy was first described by Franck D Benson in 1988, and thus is also known as Benson syndrome 2. ... Posterior cortical atrophy. Dr Craig Hacking ◉ ◈ and A.Prof Frank Gaillard ◉ ◈ et al. ...

*  Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

... makes it difficult for a child to move around, walk, or breathe. Although there is no cure, ... Spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, is an inherited condition that causes nerve cells in the lower part of the brain and spinal ... Type III, also called Kugelberg-Welander disease or juvenile spinal muscular atrophy, begins to affect kids as early as 18 ... In many cases, progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, parental concerns, and repeated doctor visits because of respiratory ...

*  Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

... makes it difficult for a child to move around, walk, or breathe. Although there is no cure, ... Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be ...

*  Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Steven's Story (Video)

Steven, 14, was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) when he was 3 years old. Even though his condition makes it hard ...

*  muscular atrophy

spinal muscular atrophy*spinal muscular atrophies of childhood*muscle weakness*muscle proteins*cyclic amp response element ... DESCRIPTION (Provided by Applicant): Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by loss of motor neurons and atrophy of ... PGC-1alpha protects skeletal muscle from atrophy by suppressing FoxO3 action and atrophy-specific gene transcription. Marco ... Foxo transcription factors induce the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligase atrogin-1 and cause skeletal muscle atrophy. Marco ...

*  Vaginal atrophy - In-depth - Mayo Clinic

Vaginal atrophy - Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, treatment of condition also known as genitourinary syndrome of ... Vaginal atrophy of women in postmenopause. Results from a multicentric observational study: The AGATA study. Maturitas.2016;83: ... Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: New terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of ... Treatment of vaginal atrophy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016. ...

*  Multiple System Atrophy | Gregor K. Wenning | Springer

This textbook provides a comprehensive monography on multiple system atrophy (MSA), a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder ... "This book summarizes what is currently known about multiple system atrophy. … The indented audience is both neurology ... This textbook provides a comprehensive monography on multiple system atrophy (MSA), a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder ... Since it comprises what is currently known about multiple system atrophy, degenerative movement disorder neurologists and ...

*  Atrophy by The Antlers (Indie Rock) - Pandora

The Antlers (Indie Rock) - Pandora

Testicular atrophy: Testicular atrophy is a medical condition in which the male reproductive organs (the testes, which in humans are located in the scrotum) diminish in size and may be accompanied by loss of function. This does not refer to temporary changes, such as those brought on by cold.Berk–Tabatznik syndrome: Berk–Tabatznik syndrome is a condition with an unknown cause that shows symptoms of short stature, congenital optic atrophy and brachytelephalangy. This condition is extremely rare with only two cases being found.Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy: Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy (congenital dSMA) is a hereditary genetic condition characterized by muscle wasting (atrophy), particularly of distal muscles in legs and hands, and by early-onset contractures (permanent shortening of a muscle or joint) of the hip, knee, and ankle. Affected individuals often have shorter lower limbs relative to the trunk and upper limbs.Gregor Wenning: Gregor K. Wenning (* born 21st March1964 in Horstmar, Westfalia) is a German Neurologist best known for his clinical and scientific work in Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian disorders, particularly multiple system atrophy (MSA).Spinal muscular atrophiesParkinson plus syndrome: Parkinson-plus syndromes, also known as disorders of multiple system degeneration, is a group of neurodegenerative diseases featuring the classical features of Parkinson's disease (tremor, rigidity, akinesia/bradykinesia, postural instability) with additional features that distinguish them from simple idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Some consider Alzheimer's disease to be in this group.HyperintensityPoul Kjer: Paul Kjer, Danish ophthalmologist, studied a condition in nineteen families that was characterized by infantile optic atrophy along with a dominant inheritance mode. In 1959, the condition was named Kjer's optic neuropathy in his honor.MetirosineMyokine: A myokine is one of several hundred cytokines or other small proteins (~5–20 kDa) and proteoglycan peptides that are produced and released by muscle cells (myocytes) in response to muscular contractions.Bente Klarlund Pedersen , Thorbjörn C.Hagemoser–Weinstein–Bresnick syndrome: Hagemoser–Weinstein–Bresnick syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder first described by Hagemoser et al. in 1989.Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia: Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 (ARCA1) is a condition characterized by progressive problems with movement. Signs and symptoms of the disorder first appear in early to mid-adulthood.Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a worldwide project that provides reliable clinical data for the research of pathology principle, prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Multiple research groups contribute their findings of the biological markers to the understanding of the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in the human brain.Dudley MooreProtein turnover: Protein turnover is the balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. More synthesis than breakdown indicates an anabolic state that builds lean tissues, more breakdown than synthesis indicates a catabolic state that burns lean tissues.Otto MarburgOrnithine aminotransferase deficiency: Ornithine aminotransferase deficiency (also known as gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina) is an inborn error of ornithine metabolism, caused by decreased activity of the enzyme ornithine aminotransferase. Biochemically, it can be detected by elevated levels of ornithine in the blood.Onuf's nucleus: Onuf’s nucleus is a distinct group of neurons located in the ventral part (laminae IX) of the anterior horn of the sacral region of the human spinal cord involved in the maintenance of micturition and defecatory continence, as well as muscular contraction during orgasm. It contains motor neurons, and is the origin of the pudendal nerve.Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Gross pathology: Gross pathology refers to macroscopic manifestations of disease in organs, tissues, and body cavities. The term is commonly used by anatomical pathologists to refer to diagnostically useful findings made during the gross examination portion of surgical specimen processing or an autopsy.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.Brodmann area 38: Brodmann area 38, also BA38 or temporopolar area 38 (H), is part of the temporal cortex in the human brain. BA 38 is at the anterior end of the temporal lobe, known as the temporal pole.Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy: Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME), sometimes called Jankovic–Rivera syndrome, is a very rare neurodegenerative disease whose symptoms include slowly progressive muscle wasting (atrophy), predominantly affecting distal muscles, combined with denervation and myoclonic seizures.Familial British dementia: Familial British dementia is a form of dementia. It was first reported by Cecil Charles Worster-Drought in 1933 and is therefore also known as Worster-Drought syndrome.Age-Related Eye Disease Study: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) was a clinical trial sponsored by the National Eye Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health in the United States.A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial of High-Dose Supplementation With Vitamins C and E, Beta Carotene, and Zinc for Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Vision Loss.Renshaw cell: Renshaw cells are inhibitory interneurons found in the gray matter of the spinal cord, and are associated in two ways with an alpha motor neuron.Myostatin: Myostatin (also known as growth differentiation factor 8, abbreviated GDF-8) is a myokine, a protein produced and released by myocytes that acts on muscle cells' autocrine function to inhibit myogenesis: muscle cell growth and differentiation. In humans it is encoded by the MSTN gene.Image fusion: In computer vision, Multisensor Image fusion is the process of combining relevant information from two or more images into a single image.Haghighat, M.Cerebellar stroke syndromePlace cellPedigree chart: A pedigree chart is a diagram that shows the occurrence and appearance or phenotypes of a particular gene or organism and its ancestors from one generation to the next,pedigree chart Genealogy Glossary - About.com, a part of The New York Times Company.HT-0712Hopkins syndrome: Hopkins syndrome is a neurological disorder. Its cause has not been established, but its association with asthma exacerbations (usually with a respiratory infection as a trigger) has led to suspicion that the initial viral insult that causes the respiratory infection is also implicated in the subsequent paralysis.Oat sensitivity: Oat sensitivity represents a sensitivity to the proteins found in oats, Avena sativa. Sensitivity to oatsCentre for Research in Neurodegenerative DiseasesTBR1: T-box, brain, 1 is a transcription factor protein important in vertebrate embryo development. It is encoded by the TBR1 gene.Brain biopsyInferior cerebellar peduncle: The upper part of the posterior district of the medulla oblongata is occupied by the inferior cerebellar peduncle (restiform body), a thick rope-like strand situated between the lower part of the fourth ventricle and the roots of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves.Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis: Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis (JPLS) , also known as primary lateral sclerois (PLSJ), is a rare genetic disorder, with a small number of reported cases, characterized by progressive weakness and stiffness of muscles in the arms, legs, and face. The disorder damages motor neurons, which are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movement.RNA-binding protein database: The RNA-binding Proteins Database (RBPDB) is a biological database of RNA-binding protein specificities that includes experimental observations of RNA-binding sites. The experimental results included are both in vitro and in vivo from primary literature.CagA: Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) is a 120–145kDa protein encoded on the 40kb cag pathogenicity island (PAI). H.GastritisGastric mucosal barrier: The gastric mucosal barrier is the property of the stomach that allows it to contain acid.

(1/3164) Indirect evidence for cholinergic inhibition of intestinal bicarbonate absorption in humans.

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in the fasting state, proximal intestinal HCO3- absorption, which depends on villus Na+/H+ exchanger activity, is tonically inhibited by a cholinergic atropine sensitive mechanism. SUBJECTS: The experiments were performed in 34 healthy volunteers and in eight patients with intestinal villus atrophy. METHODS: HCO3- absorption was measured with a modified triple lumen perfusion technique in the distal duodenum, the most proximal portion of the small intestine. The study was designed to compensate for the inhibitory effects of atropine on intestinal motor activity. RESULTS: Atropine had three effects on HCO3- transport: it reduced HCO3- concentration at the proximal aspiration site, it displaced the relation between HCO3- concentration and HCO3- absorption to the left, and it induced a significant acidification of the perfusate at the distal aspiration site. The magnitude of the stimulatory effect on HCO3- absorption was similar to the difference between patients with intestinal villus atrophy and healthy controls. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that, in the fasting state, duodenal HCO3- absorption, which depends on villus Na+/H+ exchanger activity, may be tonically inhibited by an atropine sensitive cholinergic mechanism.  (+info)

(2/3164) Proteinuria induces tubular cell turnover: A potential mechanism for tubular atrophy.

BACKGROUND: Proteinuria and tubular atrophy have both been closely linked with progressive renal failure. We hypothesized that apoptosis may be induced by tubular cell exposure to heavy proteinuria, potentially leading to tubular atrophy. Apoptosis was studied in a rat model of "pure" proteinuria, which does not induce renal impairment, namely protein-overload proteinuria. METHODS: Adult female Lewis rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of 2 g of bovine serum albumin (BSA, N = 16) or sham saline injections (controls, N = 8) daily for seven days. Apoptosis was assessed at day 7 in tissue sections using in situ end labeling (ISEL) and electron microscopy. ISEL-positive nuclei (apoptotic particles) were counted in blinded fashion using image analysis with NIH Image. Cell proliferation was assessed by detection of mRNA for histone by in situ hybridization, followed by counting of positive cells using NIH Image. RESULTS: Animals injected with saline showed very low levels of apoptosis on image analysis. BSA-injected rats had heavy proteinuria and showed both cortical and medullary apoptosis on ISEL. This was predominantly seen in the tubules and, to a lesser extent, in the interstitial compartment. Overall, the animals injected with BSA showed a significant 30-fold increase in the number of cortical apoptotic particles. Electron microscopy of tubular cells in a BSA-injected animal showed a progression of ultrastructural changes consistent with tubular cell apoptosis. The BSA-injected animals also displayed a significant increase in proximal tubular cell proliferation. This increased proliferation was less marked than the degree of apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Protein-overload proteinuria in rats induces tubular cell apoptosis. This effect is only partially balanced by proliferation and potentially provides a direct mechanism whereby heavy proteinuria can induce tubular atrophy and progressive renal failure.  (+info)

(3/3164) Computerised tomography and intellectual impairment in the elderly.

Sixty-six elderly subjects (mean age 77 years) whose mental state was assessed clinically and by simple psychometric tests have been studied by computerised tomography. The mean maximum ventricular area in the 17 mentally normal subjects was above the upper limit of normal for younger subjects, and there was a broad relationship between increasing ventricular dilatation and increasing intellectual impairment. No such clear relationship was demonstrable for measures of cortical atrophy.  (+info)

(4/3164) Computerised axial tomography in patients with severe migraine: a preliminary report.

Patients suffering from severe migraine, usually for many years, have been examined by the EMI scanner between attacks. Judged by criteria validated originally by comparison with pneumoencephalography, about half of the patients showed evidence of cerebral atrophy. Perhaps of more significance than generalised atrophy was the frequency of areas of focal atrophy and of evidence of infarction.  (+info)

(5/3164) Increased neurodegeneration during ageing in mice lacking high-affinity nicotine receptors.

We have examined neuroanatomical, biochemical and endocrine parameters and spatial learning in mice lacking the beta2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) during ageing. Aged beta2(-/-) mutant mice showed region-specific alterations in cortical regions, including neocortical hypotrophy, loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, astro- and microgliosis and elevation of serum corticosterone levels. Whereas adult mutant and control animals performed well in the Morris maze, 22- to 24-month-old beta2(-/-) mice were significantly impaired in spatial learning. These data show that beta2 subunit-containing nAChRs can contribute to both neuronal survival and maintenance of cognitive performance during ageing. beta2(-/-) mice may thus serve as one possible animal model for some of the cognitive deficits and degenerative processes which take place during physiological ageing and in Alzheimer's disease, particularly those associated with dysfunction of the cholinergic system.  (+info)

(6/3164) Contributory and exacerbating roles of gaseous ammonia and organic dust in the etiology of atrophic rhinitis.

Pigs reared commercially indoors are exposed to air heavily contaminated with particulate and gaseous pollutants. Epidemiological surveys have shown an association between the levels of these pollutants and the severity of lesions associated with the upper respiratory tract disease of swine atrophic rhinitis. This study investigated the role of aerial pollutants in the etiology of atrophic rhinitis induced by Pasteurella multocida. Forty, 1-week-old Large White piglets were weaned and divided into eight groups designated A to H. The groups were housed in Rochester exposure chambers and continuously exposed to the following pollutants: ovalbumin (groups A and B), ammonia (groups C and D), ovalbumin plus ammonia (groups E and F), and unpolluted air (groups G and H). The concentrations of pollutants used were 20 mg m-3 total mass and 5 mg m-3 respirable mass for ovalbumin dust and 50 ppm for ammonia. One week after exposure commenced, the pigs in groups A, C, E, and G were infected with P. multocida type D by intranasal inoculation. After 4 weeks of exposure to pollutants, the pigs were killed and the extent of turbinate atrophy was assessed with a morphometric index (MI). Control pigs kept in clean air and not inoculated with P. multocida (group H) had normal turbinate morphology with a mean MI of 41.12% (standard deviation [SD], +/- 1. 59%). In contrast, exposure to pollutants in the absence of P. multocida (groups B, D, and F) induced mild turbinate atrophy with mean MIs of 49.65% (SD, +/-1.96%), 51.04% (SD, +/-2.06%), and 49.88% (SD, +/-3.51%), respectively. A similar level of atrophy was also evoked by inoculation with P. multocida in the absence of pollutants (group G), giving a mean MI of 50.77% (SD, +/-2.07%). However, when P. multocida inoculation was combined with pollutant exposure (groups A, C, and E) moderate to severe turbinate atrophy occurred with mean MIs of 64.93% (SD, +/-4.64%), 59.18% (SD, +/-2.79%), and 73.30% (SD, +/-3.19%), respectively. The severity of atrophy was greatest in pigs exposed simultaneously to dust and ammonia. At the end of the exposure period, higher numbers of P. multocida bacteria were isolated from the tonsils than from the nasal membrane, per gram of tissue. The severity of turbinate atrophy in inoculated pigs was proportional to the number of P. multocida bacteria isolated from tonsils (r2 = 0.909, P < 0.05) and nasal membrane (r2 = 0.628, P < 0.05). These findings indicate that aerial pollutants contribute to the severity of lesions associated with atrophic rhinitis by facilitating colonization of the pig's upper respiratory tract by P. multocida and also by directly evoking mild atrophy.  (+info)

(7/3164) Quantitative assessment of gastric atrophy using the syntactic structure analysis.

AIM: To assess the topographical relation between gastric glands, using the minimum spanning tree (MST), to derive both a model of neighbourhood and quantitative representation of the tissue's architecture, to assess the characteristic features of gastric atrophy, and to assess the grades of gastric atrophy. METHODS: Haematoxylin and eosin stained sections from corporal and antral biopsy specimens (n = 139) from normal patients and from patients with nonatrophic gastritis and atrophic gastritis of grades 1, 2, and 3 (Sydney system) were assessed by image analysis system (Prodit 5.2) and 11 syntactic structure features were derived. These included both line and connectivity features. RESULTS: Syntactic structure analysis was correlated with the semiquantitative grading system of gastric atrophy. The study showed significant reductions in the number of points and the length of MST in both body and antrum. The standard deviation of the length of MST was significantly increased in all grades of atrophy. The connectivity to two glands was the highest and most affected by the increased grade of atrophy. The reciprocal values of the Wiener, Randic, and Balaban indices showed significant changes in the volume of gland, abnormality in the shape of glands, and changes in irregularity and branching of the glands in both types of gastric mucosa. There was a complete separation in the MST, connectivity, and index values between low grade and high grade gastric atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Gastric atrophy was characterised by loss of the gland, variation in the volume, reduction in the neighbourhood, irregularity in spacing, and abnormality in the shape of the glands. (2) Syntactic structure analysis significantly differentiated minor changes in gastric gland (low grade atrophy) from high grade atrophy of clinical significance. (3) Syntactic structure analysis is a simple, fast, and highly reproducible technique and appears a promising method for quantitative assessment of atrophy.  (+info)

(8/3164) Infratentorial atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and disability in multiple sclerosis.

Loss of tissue volume in the central nervous system may provide an index of fixed neurological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Recent magnetic resonance studies have shown a modest relationship between clinical disability rating scores and transverse sectional area of the cervical spinal cord. To explore further the relationship between atrophy and disability in multiple sclerosis, we estimated the volumes of infratentorial structures from MRIs in a cross-sectional study of 41 patients, 21 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 20 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. We used the Cavalieri method of modern design stereology with point counting to estimate the volume of brainstem, cerebellum and upper cervical spinal cord from three-dimensional MRIs acquired with an MPRAGE (Magnetization-prepared Rapid Acquisition Gradient Echo) sequence. The volume of the upper (C1-C3) cervical spinal cord was significantly correlated with a composite spinal cord score derived from the appropriate Functional Scale scores of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (r = -0.50, P < 0.01). The cerebellar (r = 0.49, P < 0.01) and brainstem (r = 0.34, P < 0.05) volumes correlated with the Scripp's Neurological Disability Rating Scale scores. The upper cervical cord volumes (r = -0.39, P < 0.01), but not the brainstem or cerebellar volumes, were significantly associated with disease duration. MRI-estimated structural volumes may provide a simple index of axonal and/or myelin loss, the presumed pathological substrates of irreversible impairment and disability in multiple sclerosis.  (+info)



olivopontocerebellar atrophy

  • For a long time, overlapping pathology in individual cases with striatonigral degeneration (SND), sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) or Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS) had often been a source of confusion. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a unifying term that brings together a group of neurodegenerative syndromes (olivopontocerebellar atrophy, striatonigral degeneration, and Shy-Drager syndrome) with similar brain pathology that are characterized by various degrees of autonomic dysfunction, cerebellar abnormalities, parkinsonism, and corticospinal degeneration. (uptodate.com)
  • In 1900, Dejerine and Thomas provided the first report of sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), a disease that later would become a part of the spectrum of MSA [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) refers to a group of ataxias characterized by progressive neurological degeneration affecting the cerebellum, the pons and the inferior olives. (dmoztools.net)
  • A site devoted to Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy. (dmoztools.net)

Muscular Atrophy

  • A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. (curehunter.com)
  • To determine whether thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) can increase muscle strength in children with spinal muscular atrophy types 2 and 3. (curehunter.com)
  • Please see our page(s) on Spinal muscular atrophy . (nih.gov)
  • FDA-approved indication: Treatment of spinal muscular atrophy in pediatric and adult patients. (nih.gov)
  • SMA is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons and muscular atrophy. (clinicaltrials.gov)

optic atrophy

  • PURPOSE: To investigate retinal trunk vessel diameters in subjects with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and mutation-free healthy relatives. (forskningsdatabasen.dk)
  • METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 52 ADOA patients with the optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) exon 28 (c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA) mutation (age 8.6-83.5 years) (best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 8-94 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters) and 55 mutation-free first-degree healthy relatives (age 8.9-68.7 years, BCVA 80-99). (forskningsdatabasen.dk)
  • Basal blood flow and autoregulation changes in the optic nerve of rhesus monkeys with idiopathic bilateral optic atrophy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • PURPOSE: To characterize the hemodynamic features and the association with structural damage in the optic nerve head (ONH) of idiopathic bilateral optic atrophy (BOA) in rhesus macaque monkeys. (biomedsearch.com)

spinal cord

  • The familial form has an earlier onset (second decade) and may feature spinal cord atrophy. (curehunter.com)

syndrome

  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA) or Shy-Drager syndrome is a neurological disorder that impairs body's involuntary functions (blood pressure, heart rate, bladder function and digestion). (giiresearch.com)
  • The Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) pipeline guide also reviews of key players involved in therapeutic development for Multiple System Atrophy (MSA or Shy-Drager Syndrome or Multi-System Degeneration) and features dormant and discontinued projects. (giiresearch.com)

clinical

  • MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY RESEARCH Dr Scott Kim W NeuRA - Neuroscience Research Australia - is one of the largest independent medical and clinical research institutes in Australia and an international leader in neurological research. (exploredoc.com)
  • The sporadic form tends to present in the fifth or sixth decade, and is considered a clinical subtype of MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY. (curehunter.com)

therapeutic

  • The pipeline guide provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System). (giiresearch.com)

progressive

  • HAT WE KNOW ABOUT MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rapidly progressive brain disorder. (exploredoc.com)

onset

  • Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (curehunter.com)

decade

  • Over the last decade multiple system atrophy (MSA) has been confirmed as a distinct clinicopathological entity. (biomedsearch.com)

treatment

  • See 'Multiple system atrophy: Prognosis and treatment' . (uptodate.com)

Multiple

  • Multiple system atrophy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Multiple System Atrophy - Pipeline Review, H1 2017 , provides an overview of the Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) pipeline landscape. (giiresearch.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's Pharmaceutical and Healthcare latest pipeline guide Multiple System Atrophy - Pipeline Review, H1 2017 , provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (giiresearch.com)
  • Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) pipeline guide helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. (giiresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews pipeline therapeutics for Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources. (giiresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews key companies involved in Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects. (giiresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide evaluates Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), drug target, route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (giiresearch.com)
  • Find and recognize significant and varied types of therapeutics under development for Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System). (giiresearch.com)
  • Formulate corrective measures for pipeline projects by understanding Multiple System Atrophy (Central Nervous System) pipeline depth and focus of Indication therapeutics. (giiresearch.com)