Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Aortitis: Inflammation of the wall of the AORTA.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.ElastinAtherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Diet, Atherogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and acceleration of ATHEROGENESIS.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Venae Cavae: The inferior and superior venae cavae.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Rats, Inbred WKY: A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Rats, Inbred SHR: A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III: A CALCIUM-dependent, constitutively-expressed form of nitric oxide synthase found primarily in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Takayasu Arteritis: A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Constriction: The act of constricting.Potassium Chloride: A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.Cyclic GMP: Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mice, Inbred C57BLCalcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester: A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Aortic Arch Syndromes: Conditions resulting from abnormalities in the arteries branching from the ASCENDING AORTA, the curved portion of the aorta. These syndromes are results of occlusion or abnormal blood flow to the head-neck or arm region leading to neurological defects and weakness in an arm. These syndromes are associated with vascular malformations; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; TRAUMA; and blood clots.Methylene Blue: A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Aortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Ulcer: A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Ductus Arteriosus: A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced: A technique to arrest the flow of blood by lowering BODY TEMPERATURE to about 20 degrees Centigrade, usually achieved by infusing chilled perfusate. The technique provides a bloodless surgical field for complex surgeries.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Desmosine: A rare amino acid found in elastin, formed by condensation of four molecules of lysine into a pyridinium ring.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Receptors, Thromboxane: Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Prazosin: A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.Tunica Media: The middle layer of blood vessel walls, composed principally of thin, cylindrical, smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It accounts for the bulk of the wall of most arteries. The smooth muscle cells are arranged in circular layers around the vessel, and the thickness of the coat varies with the size of the vessel.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1: A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors that mediate contraction of SMOOTH MUSCLE in a variety of tissues such as ARTERIOLES; VEINS; and the UTERUS. They are usually found on postsynaptic membranes and signal through GQ-G11 G-PROTEINS.Desoxycorticosterone: A steroid metabolite that is the 11-deoxy derivative of CORTICOSTERONE and the 21-hydroxy derivative of PROGESTERONE.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Epoprostenol: A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Nitroglycerin: A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Nitroarginine: An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase which has been shown to prevent glutamate toxicity. Nitroarginine has been experimentally tested for its ability to prevent ammonia toxicity and ammonia-induced alterations in brain energy and ammonia metabolites. (Neurochem Res 1995:200(4):451-6)Czechoslovakia: Created as a republic in 1918 by Czechs and Slovaks from territories formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia 1 January 1993.

*  Left to right extracardial shunt to control hemorrhage of ascending aorta and left ventricle: a report of 3 cases.
Presented in this paper are 3 cases of hemorrhage of ascending aorta and left ventricle after open heart surgery treated by ... Aorta / surgery. Aortic Aneurysm / surgery*. Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation. Cardiopulmonary Bypass. Female. Humans. Male ... Presented in this paper are 3 cases of hemorrhage of ascending aorta and left ventricle after open heart surgery treated by ...
  http://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Left-to-right-extracardial-shunt/10806820.html
*  ATCC Products by Tissue - Aorta Page 1
ATCC offers cell lines derived from the normal aorta of human, mouse and rat, as well as primary aortic smooth muscle cells ...
  https://www.atcc.org/en/Products/Cells_and_Microorganisms/By_Tissue/Aorta.aspx?dsNav=N:4294927603
*  enlarged aorta - Posts
Treatments and Tools for enlarged aorta. Find enlarged aorta information, treatments for enlarged aorta and enlarged aorta ... MedHelp's enlarged aorta Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... Posts on enlarged aorta. enlarged aorta 3.8cm - Heart Disease Expert Forum ... I have controlled high blood pressure,and enlarged aorta. Will my aorta ever go back to its... ...
  http://www.medhelp.org/tags/show/66332/enlarged-aorta?section=subjects
*  Patent US6589206 - Methods and devices for occluding the ascending aorta and maintaining ... - Google Patents
An aortic occlusion catheter has an occluding member for occluding the ascending aorta. The aortic occlusion catheter passes ... A method and device for occluding a patient's ascending aorta, maintaining circulation of oxygenated blood in the patient and ... The opening also provides direct access to the ascending aorta for control of the ascending aorta and to place purse-string ... Catheter with an aorta-occluding balloon. US5428070. 11 Jun 1993. 27 Jun 1995. The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford ...
  http://www.google.co.uk/patents/US6589206
*  Vintage Desk Clock 2 - Aorta
Aorta The Heart of Art is a Limited Liability Company Registered in England & Wales. Company Number 08878163. VAT Registration ...
  http://theheartofart.com/aorta_product/vintage-desk-clock-2/
*  Home Aid Kit - Aorta
Aorta The Heart of Art is a Limited Liability Company Registered in England & Wales. Company Number 08878163. VAT Registration ...
  http://theheartofart.com/aorta_product/home-aid-kit/
*  Henley-In-Arden Medical Practice - Library - Health A-Z
An AAA can form if the sides of the aorta weaken and balloon outwards. It's not always clear why this happens, but there are ... An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a bulge or swelling in the aorta, the main blood vessel that runs from the heart down ... This can help spot a swelling in the aorta early on, when it can be treated. ... The test involves a quick and painless ultrasound scan to see how big your aorta is. ...
  http://www.henley-in-ardenmedcntr.co.uk/Library/Conditions/Articles/repairofabdominalaneurysm/introduction
*  Relaxation of Rat Aorta by Farrerol Correlates with Potency to Reduce Intracellular Calcium of VSMCs - pdf descargar
Relaxation of Rat Aorta by Farrerol Correlates with Potency to Reduce Intracellular Calcium of VSMCs. . Biblioteca virtual para ... Keywords: farrerol; rat aorta; VSMCs; vasorelaxation farrerol; rat aorta; VSMCs; vasorelaxation Autor: Xiaojiang Qin 1,2,†, ... In endothelium-denuded aortas, farrerol also reduced Ca2+-induced contraction on the basis of the stable contraction induced by ... Relaxation of Rat Aorta by Farrerol Correlates with Potency to Reduce Intracellular Calcium of VSMCs - Descarga este documento ...
  http://libros.duhnnae.com/2017/jun5/149742348271-Relaxation-of-Rat-Aorta-by-Farrerol-Correlates-with-Potency-to-Reduce-Intracellular-Calcium-of-VSMCs.php
*  You've been diagnosed with an enlarged aorta: Now what? - UofMHealthBlogs.org
Treatment for an enlarged aorta depends on a variety of factors, including age and body size, medical history and the position ... You've been diagnosed with an enlarged aorta: Now what?. Posted by The CVC HeartBeat Team on October 29, 2015. ... If you've been diagnosed with an enlarged aorta, you likely have many questions about your condition: How big is too big? When ... Michael Shea, enlarged aorta, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Marfan Syndrome, thoracic aortic aneurysm, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm ...
  http://uofmhealthblogs.org/cardiovascular/youve-been-diagnosed-with-an-enlarged-aorta-now-what/25522/
*  Aorta dimensions - Heart Disease - MedHelp
However, a 3 cm aorta is normal for adults. You should trust in your physicians, as aorta dimension is not something that they ... Normal aorta dimensions can vary and to be considered dilated, usually have to be big even for your size. We do this by ... indexing, meaning we take the diameter of your aorta, and divide it by your height or body surface area (depending on the ...
  https://www.medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Disease/Aorta-dimensions/show/1777024
*  北京航空航天大学生物与医学
A numerical study on the flow of blood and the transport of LDL in the human aorta: the physiological significance of the ...
  http://bme.buaa.edu.cn/teacherInfo.aspx?catID=7&subcatID=140&curID=394
*  Aorta - Wikipedia
Aorta er hovedpulsåren hos dyr, særlig pattedyr. Aorta fører blod fra venstre hjertekammer ut i kroppen. Aorta hos andre dyr er ... aorta · brachiocephalica/innominata · bronchialis · thoracic (thoracis lateralis, thoracica interna) · subclavia · vertebralis ... Hos dyr med åpent blodsystem er ofte aorta den eneste tydelige delen av bodåresystemet. ... Hentet fra «https://no.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aorta&oldid=17869363» ...
  https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorta
*  Aorta - Cardiovascular System
The descending aorta is broken down into two sections - the thoracic aorta and abdominal aorta - named after the body cavities ... Continued From Above... section of the aorta is known as the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta branches into the left and ... Aorta. At about one inch in diameter and traveling almost the entire length of the trunk, the aorta is the largest artery in ... Thus, the aorta provides oxygenated blood flow to all of the tissues of the body. The wall of the aorta is very thick and ...
  http://www.innerbody.com/image_c1/card16-new2.html
*  Coarctation of the Aorta
... is a narrowing of the aorta, the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body. ... Coarctation of the Aorta. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving ...
  http://kidshealth.org/Nemours/en/parents/coa.html?view=rr
*  Coarctation of the Aorta
... that person's aorta (the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body) is narrowed at some point. ... Coarctation of the Aorta. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving ... When someone has coarctation of the aorta, ...
  http://kidshealth.org/ChildrensHealthNetwork/en/teens/coa.html?view=rr
*  Coarctation of the Aorta
... that person's aorta (the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body) is narrowed at some point. ... What Is Coarctation of the Aorta?. The aorta (pronounced: ay-OR-tuh) is the major artery that carries blood away from the heart ... Coarctation of the aorta can be repaired in several ways. Surgery can very effectively repair a narrowing of the aorta, usually ... When someone has coarctation (pronounced: ko-ark-TAY-shun) of the aorta, that person's aorta is narrowed at some point. ...
  http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/coa.html?WT.ac=ctg
*  Coarctation of the aorta - Wikipedia
Coarctation of the aorta (CoA or CoAo), also called aortic narrowing, is a congenital condition whereby the aorta is narrow, ... The severity of coarctation of the aorta can be rated by a combination of the smallest aortic cross-sectional area of the aorta ... Since the aorta is narrowed, the left ventricle must generate a much higher pressure than normal in order to force enough blood ... The characteristic bulging of the sign is caused by dilatation of the aorta due to an indrawing of the aortic wall at the site ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coarctation_of_the_aorta
*  Aorta - Wikipedia
... the aorta then travels inferiorly as the descending aorta. The descending aorta has two parts. The aorta begins to descend in ... Ascending aortaEdit. Main article: Ascending aorta. The ascending aorta begins at the opening of the aortic valve in the left ... Abdominal aortaEdit. Main article: Abdominal aorta. The abdominal aorta begins at the aortic hiatus of the diaphragm at the ... Thoracic aortaEdit. Main article: Descending thoracic aorta. The thoracic descending aorta gives rise to the intercostal and ...
  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorta
*  Enlarged Aorta - Heart Disease - MedHelp
He has been diagnosed with an enlarged Aorta and been told that something will need to be done within the next five years. He ... Enlarged Aorta gaving I live in the UK and my best friend and I have turned 50 this year. He has been diagnosed with an ... Enlarged Aorta. I live in the UK and my best friend and I have turned 50 this year. He has been diagnosed with an enlarged ... We are both big Pittsburgh Steelers and Penguins fans and I see that there is big developments in Aorta procedures in the ...
  https://www.medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Disease/Enlarged-Aorta/show/1366784
*  aorta,ventricles - Interventional Cardiology - MedHelp
aorta,ventricles long Dr.Bogart, Is this 'LV-4.5 cm' typing error,because I thought Left Ventricle ID (dia -cm) upper normal ... The aorta can lso vary but I am not aware that athletes have a larger aortic root. The left ventricle does get bigger with ... and Mid Ascending Aorta for the below person(both athletic and sedentary types)? 3. When Lown criteria is no longer valid does ...
  https://www.medhelp.org/posts/Interventional-Cardiology/aorta-ventricles/show/374250
*  aorta valve transplant - Transplants - MedHelp
aorta valve transplant musique How long will it take to be fully recovered from this type of surgery, especially if your chest ... aorta valve transplant. How long will it take to be fully recovered from this type of surgery, especially if your chest is ...
  https://www.medhelp.org/posts/Transplants/aorta-valve-transplant/show/456539
*  Takayasu Disease: Symptoms of Aorta Inflammation
... a chronic inflammation of the aorta. Takayasu disease symptoms include dizziness, headaches, chest pain, and abdominal pain. ... The inflammation of the aorta and its branch arteries can lead to poor blood supply to tissues of the body in patients with ... Some researchers have found that the prognosis is worse when the retinas of the eyes are affected, if the aorta is damaged, or ... Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a ballooning or widening of the main artery (the aorta) as it courses down through the abdomen. ...
  https://www.medicinenet.com/takayasu_disease/article.htm
*  Coarctation of the aorta | physiology | Britannica.com
... of a short section of that portion of the aorta that arches over the heart. The aorta is the principal artery conducting blood ... Coarctation of the aorta, congenital malformation involving the constriction, or narrowing, ... cardiovascular disease: Coarctation of the aorta. Coarctation of the aorta, which is a constriction of the aorta, usually in ... aorta. Aorta. , in vertebrates and some invertebrates, the blood vessel (or vessels) carrying blood from the heart to all the ...
  https://www.britannica.com/science/coarctation-of-the-aorta

Clarence CrafoordAortographyVascular smooth muscleFamilial thoracic aortic aneurysmFamilial aortic dissection: Familial aortic dissection or FAD refers to the splitting of the wall of the aorta in either the arch, ascending or descending portions. FAD is thought to be passed down as an autosomal dominant disease and once inherited will result in dissection of the aorta, and dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, or rarely aortic or arterial dilation at a young age.Endothelial activation: Endothelial activation is a proinflammatory and procoagulant state of the endothelial cells lining the lumen of blood vessels. It is most characterized by an increase in interactions with white blood cells (leukocytes), and it is associated with the early states of atherosclerosis and sepsis, among others.New Zealand rabbitTraumatic aortic ruptureAbdominal aortic aneurysmVasodilation: Vasodilation (or vasodilatation) refers to the widening of blood vessels. It results from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, in particular in the large veins, large arteries, and smaller arterioles.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Elastin: Elastin is a highly elastic protein in connective tissue and allows many tissues in the body to resume their shape after stretching or contracting. Elastin helps skin to return to its original position when it is poked or pinched.Polyethylene naphthalate: Polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) (Poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) is a polyester with good barrier properties (even better than Polyethylene terephthalate). Because it provides a very good oxygen barrier, it is particularly well-suited for bottling beverages that are susceptible to oxidation, such as beer.Distributing artery: A distributing artery (or muscular artery) is a medium-sized artery that draw blood from an elastic artery and branch into "resistance vessels" including small arteries and arterioles. In contrast to the mechanism elastic arteries use to store energy generated by the heart's contraction, distributing arteries contain layers of smooth muscle.Muscle contraction: Muscle contraction is the activation of tension-generating sites within muscle fibers. In physiology, muscle contraction does not mean muscle shortening because muscle tension can be produced without changes in muscle length such as holding a heavy book or a dumbbell at the same position.Aortic pressure: Central aortic blood pressure (CAP or CASP) is the blood pressure at the root of aorta. Studies have shown the importance of central aortic pressure and its implications in assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment with respect to cardiovascular risk factors.Antoine MarfanLow pressure receptor zones: Low pressure receptor zones are areas with baroreceptors located in the venae cavae and the pulmonary veins, and in the atria. They are also called volume receptors.Pseudoaneurysm: A pseudoaneurysm, also known as a false aneurysm, is a hematoma that forms as the result of a leaking hole in an artery. Note that the hematoma forms outside the arterial wall, so it is contained by the surrounding tissues.Common iliac artery: The common iliac arteries are two large arteries that originate from the aortic bifurcation at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra. It ends in front of the sacroiliac joint, bifurcate the external iliac artery and internal iliac artery.HypertensionTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingAortic valve replacementConcentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.Sodium nitroprussideGross pathology: Gross pathology refers to macroscopic manifestations of disease in organs, tissues, and body cavities. The term is commonly used by anatomical pathologists to refer to diagnostically useful findings made during the gross examination portion of surgical specimen processing or an autopsy.Balloon catheter: A balloon catheter is a type of "soft" catheter with an inflatable "balloon" at its tip which is used during a catheterization procedure to enlarge a narrow opening or passage within the body. The deflated balloon catheter is positioned, then inflated to perform the necessary procedure, and deflated again in order to be removed.Transesophageal echocardiogramMulti-link suspension: __NOTOC__Takayasu's arteritisNitric-oxide synthase (NAD(P)H-dependent): Nitric-oxide synthase (NAD(P)H-dependent) (, nitric oxide synthetase, NO synthase) is an enzyme with system name L-arginine,NAD(P)H:oxygen oxidoreductase (nitric-oxide-forming). This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionPulmonary artery banding: Pulmonary Artery Banding (PAB) was introduced by Muller and Danimann in 1951 as a surgical technique to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow in infants suffering from congenital heart defects.Muller WH, Dammann JF.Moens–Korteweg equation: In biomechanics, the Moens–Korteweg equation models the relationship between wave speed or pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the incremental elastic modulus of the arterial wall or its distensibility. The equation was derived independently by Adriaan Isebree Moens and Diederik Korteweg.Right-sided aortic arch: Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anatomical variant in which the aortic arch is on the right side rather than on the left. During normal embryonic development, the aortic arch is formed by the left fourth aortic arch and the left dorsal aorta.Angiotensin receptor: The angiotensin receptors are a class of G protein-coupled receptors with angiotensin II as their ligands. They are important in the renin-angiotensin system: they are responsible for the signal transduction of the vasoconstricting stimulus of the main effector hormone, angiotensin II.Cyclic guanosine monophosphateInternal elastic laminaThyroid ima artery: The thyroidea ima artery arises from the brachiocephalic trunk and ascends in front of the trachea to the lower part of the thyroid gland, which it supplies. It is only present in approximately 3-10% of the population.Calcinosis cutisAortic insufficiencyCholesterolSinusoid (blood vessel): A sinusoid is a small blood vessel that is a type of capillary similar to a fenestrated endothelium. Sinusoids are actually classified as a type of open pore capillary (or discontinuous) as opposed to continuous and fenestrated types.Mature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.First arch syndrome: First arch syndromes are congenital defects caused by a failure of neural crest cells to migrate into the first pharyngeal arch.Ronald W.Eosin methylene blue: Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB, also known as "Levine's formulation") is a selective stain for Gram-negative bacteria. EMB contains dyes that are toxic for Gram positive bacteria and bile salt which is toxic for Gram negative bacteria other than coliforms.Carotid ultrasonography: Carotid ultrasonography is an ultrasound-based diagnostic imaging technique to reveal structural details of the carotid arteries, so as to look for blood clots, atherosclerotic plaque buildup, and other blood flow problems.MedlinePlus > Carotid duplex Update Date: 5/12/2009.Superficial velocity: Superficial velocity (or superficial flow velocity), in engineering of multiphase flows and flows in porous media, is a hypothetical (artificial) flow velocity calculated as if the given phase or fluid were the only one flowing or present in a given cross sectional area. Other phases, particles, the skeleton of the porous medium, etc.Tunica intimaCalcium signaling: Calcium ions are important for cellular signalling, as once they enter the cytosol of the cytoplasm they exert allosteric regulatory effects on many enzymes and proteins. Calcium can act in signal transduction resulting from activation of ion channels or as a second messenger caused by indirect signal transduction pathways such as G protein-coupled receptors.Afterload: Afterload is the pressure in the wall of the left ventricle during ejection. In other words, it is the end load against which the heart contracts to eject blood.Congenital heart defectMedian arcuate ligament syndrome

(1/10763) Reduction in baroreflex cardiovascular responses due to venous infusion in the rabbit.

We studied reflex bradycardia and depression of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during left aortic nerve (LAN) stimulation before and after volume infusion in the anesthetized rabbit. Step increases in mean right atrial pressure (MRAP) to 10 mm Hg did not result in a significant change in heart rate or MAP. After volume loading, responses to LAN stimulation were not as great and the degree of attenuation was propoetional to the level of increased MRAP. A change in responsiveness was observed after elevation of MRAP by only 1 mm Hg, corresponding to less than a 10% increase in average calculated blood volume. after an increase in MRAP of 10 mm Hg, peak responses were attenuated by 44% (heart rate) and 52% (MAP), and the initial slopes (rate of change) were reduced by 46% (heart rate) and 66% (MAP). Comparison of the responses after infusion with blood and dextran solutions indicated that hemodilution was an unlikely explanation for the attenuation of the reflex responses. Total arterial baroreceptor denervation (ABD) abolished the volume-related attenuation was still present following bilateral aortic nerve section or vagotomy. It thus appears that the carotid sinus responds to changes inblood volume and influences the reflex cardiovascular responses to afferent stimulation of the LAN. On the other hand, cardiopulmonary receptors subserved by vagal afferents do not appear to be involved.  (+info)

(2/10763) Quantification of baroreceptor influence on arterial pressure changes seen in primary angiotension-induced hypertension in dogs.

We studied the role of the sino-aortic baroreceptors in the gradual development of hypertension induced by prolonged administration of small amounts of angiotensin II (A II) in intact dogs and dogs with denervated sino-aortic baroreceptors. Short-term 1-hour infusions of A II(1.0-100 ng/kg per min) showed that conscious denervated dogs had twice the pressor sensitivity of intact dogs. Long-term infusions of A II at 5.0 ng/kg per min (2-3 weeks) with continuous 24-hour recordings of arterial pressure showed that intact dogs required 28 hours to reach the same level of pressure attained by denervated dogs during the 1st hour of infusion. At the 28th hour the pressure in both groups was 70% of the maximum value attained by the 7th day of infusion. Both intact and denervated dogs reached nearly the same plateau level of pressure, the magnitude being directly related both the the A II infusion rate and the daily sodium intake. Cardiac output in intact dogs initially decreased after the onset of A II infusion, but by the 5th day of infusion it was 38% above control, whereas blood volume was unchanged. Heart rate returned to normal after a reduction during the 1st day of infusion in intact dogs. Plasma renin activity could not be detected after 24 hours of A II infusion in either intact or denervated dogs. The data indicate that about 35% of the hypertensive effect of A II results from its acute pressor action, and an additional 35% of the gradual increase in arterial pressure is in large measure a result of baroreceptor resetting. We conclude that the final 30% increase in pressure seems to result from increased cardiac output, the cause of which may be decreased vascular compliance. since the blood volume remains unaltered.  (+info)

(3/10763) Blocking very late antigen-4 integrin decreases leukocyte entry and fatty streak formation in mice fed an atherogenic diet.

Atherosclerotic lesion development is characterized by the recruitment of leukocytes, principally monocytes, to the vessel wall. Considerable interest has been focused on the adhesion molecule(s) involved in leukocyte/endothelial interactions. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of the very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin/ligand interaction in fatty streak development using murine models. Because alpha4 null mice are not viable, a peptidomimetic was used to block VLA-4-mediated leukocyte binding. The ability of a synthetic peptidomimetic of connecting segment-1 (CS-1 peptide) to block the recruitment of leukocytes and the accumulation of lipid in the aortic sinus of either wild-type mice (strain C57BL/6J) or mice with a low-density lipoprotein null mutation (LDLR-/-) maintained on an atherogenic diet was assessed. The active (Ac) CS-1 peptide or scrambled (Sc) CS-1 peptide was delivered subcutaneously into mice using a mini osmotic pump. Mice were exposed to the peptide for 24 to 36 hours before the onset of the atherogenic diet. In C57BL/6J mice, leukocyte entry into the aortic sinus, as assessed by en face preparations, was inhibited by the active peptide (Ac=28+/-4, Sc=54+/-6 monocytes/valve; P=0.004). Additionally, frozen sections stained with Oil Red O were analyzed to assess lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus. C57BL/6J mice that received the (Ac) compound demonstrated significantly reduced lesion areas as compared with mice that received the (Sc) peptide (Ac=4887+/-4438 microm2, Sc=15 009 +/-5619 microm2; P<0.0001). In a separate study, LDLR-/- mice were implanted with pumps containing either the (Ac) or (Sc) peptide before initiation of the atherogenic diet. Because LDLR-/- mice fed a chow diet displayed small lesions at 14 weeks, the effects of the peptide seen in these animals represented a change in early lipid accumulation rather than initiation. By using whole-mount preparations, the (Ac) but not the (Sc) peptide significantly reduced the area of lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus, resulting in an approximate 66% decrease. Plasma analysis from all studies revealed concentrations of peptide to be present at levels previously determined by in vitro analysis to block adhesion. (Ac) CS-1 peptide, which blocks VLA-4 on the leukocyte surface, is effective in reducing leukocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus. The present study provides in vivo evidence that the VLA-4 integrin plays an important role in the initiation of the atherosclerotic lesion and lipid accumulation, and it suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.  (+info)

(4/10763) Role of nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in adrenomedullin-induced vasodilation in the rat.

We previously reported that adrenomedullin (AM), a potent vasodilator peptide discovered in pheochromocytoma cells, stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in the rat kidney. To further investigate whether the NO-cGMP pathway is involved in the mechanisms of AM-induced vasodilation, we examined the effects of E-4021, a cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on AM-induced vasorelaxation in aortic rings and perfused kidneys isolated from Wistar rats. We also measured NO release from the kidneys using a chemiluminescence assay. AM (10(-10) to 10(-7) mol/L) relaxed the aorta precontracted with phenylephrine in a dose-dependent manner. Denudation of endothelium (E) attenuated the vasodilatory action of AM (10(-7) mol/L AM: intact (E+) -25.7+/-5.2% versus denuded (E-) -7. 8+/-0.6%, P<0.05). On the other hand, pretreatment with 10(-8) mol/L E-4021 augmented AM-induced vasorelaxation in the intact aorta (-49. 0+/-7.9%, P<0.05) but not in the denuded one. E-4021 also enhanced acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasorelaxation in the rat intact aorta (10(-7) mol/L ACh -36.6+/-8.4% versus 10(-8) mol/L E-4021+10(-7) mol/L ACh -62.7+/-3.1%, P<0.05). In perfused kidneys, AM-induced vasorelaxation was also augmented by preincubation with E-4021 (10(-9) mol/L AM -15.4+/-0.6% versus 10(-8) mol/L E-4021+10(-9) mol/L AM -23.6+/-1.2%, P<0.01). AM significantly increased NO release from rat kidneys (DeltaNO: +11.3+/-0.8 fmol. min-1. g-1 kidney at 10(-9) mol/L AM), which was not affected by E-4021. E-4021 enhanced ACh-induced vasorelaxation (10(-9) mol/L ACh -9.7+/-1.7% versus 10(-8) mol/L E-4021+10(-9) mol/L ACh -18.8+/-2.9%, P<0.01) but did not affect ACh-induced NO release from the kidneys. In the aorta and the kidney, 10(-4) mol/L of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an NO synthase inhibitor, and 10(-5) mol/L of methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, reduced the vasodilatory effect of AM. These results suggest that the NO-cGMP pathway is involved in the mechanism of AM-induced vasorelaxation, at least in the rat aorta and kidney.  (+info)

(5/10763) Different contributions of endothelin-A and endothelin-B receptors in the pathogenesis of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension in rats.

We investigated the involvement of actions mediated by endothelin-A (ETA) and endothelin-B (ETB) receptors in the pathogenesis of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt-induced hypertension in rats. Two weeks after the start of DOCA-salt treatment, rats were given ABT-627 (10 [mg/kg]/d), a selective ETA receptor antagonist; A-192621 (30 [mg/kg]/d), a selective ETB receptor antagonist; or their vehicle for 2 weeks. Uninephrectomized rats without DOCA-salt treatment served as controls. Treatment with DOCA and salt for 2 weeks led to a mild but significant hypertension; in vehicle-treated DOCA-salt rats, systolic blood pressure increased markedly after 3 to 4 weeks. Daily administration of ABT-627 for 2 weeks almost abolished any further increases in blood pressure, whereas A-192621 did not affect the development of DOCA-salt-induced hypertension. When the degree of vascular hypertrophy of the aorta was histochemically evaluated at 4 weeks, there were significant increases in wall thickness, wall area, and wall-to-lumen ratio in vehicle-treated DOCA-salt rats compared with uninephrectomized control rats. The development of vascular hypertrophy was markedly suppressed by ABT-627. In contrast, treatment with A-192621 significantly exaggerated these vascular changes. In vehicle-treated DOCA-salt rats, renal blood flow and creatinine clearance decreased, and urinary excretion of protein, blood urea nitrogen, fractional excretion of sodium, and urinary N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase activity increased. Such damage was overcome by treatment with ABT-627 but not with A-192621; indeed, the latter agent led to worsening of the renal dysfunction. Histopathologic examination of the kidney in vehicle-treated DOCA-salt rats revealed tubular dilatation and atrophy as well as thickening of small arteries. Such damage was reduced in animals given ABT-627, whereas more severe histopathologic changes were observed in A-192621-treated animals. These results strongly support the view that ETA receptor-mediated action plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DOCA-salt-induced hypertension. On the other hand, it seems likely that the ETB receptor-mediated action protects against vascular and renal injuries in this model of hypertension. A selective ETA receptor antagonist is likely to be useful for treatment of subjects with mineralocorticoid-dependent hypertension, whereas ETB-selective antagonism alone is detrimental to such cases.  (+info)

(6/10763) AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase.

The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in rat skeletal and cardiac muscle is activated by vigorous exercise and ischaemic stress. Under these conditions AMPK phosphorylates and inhibits acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase causing increased oxidation of fatty acids. Here we show that AMPK co-immunoprecipitates with cardiac endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylates Ser-1177 in the presence of Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) to activate eNOS both in vitro and during ischaemia in rat hearts. In the absence of Ca2+-calmodulin, AMPK also phosphorylates eNOS at Thr-495 in the CaM-binding sequence, resulting in inhibition of eNOS activity but Thr-495 phosphorylation is unchanged during ischaemia. Phosphorylation of eNOS by the AMPK in endothelial cells and myocytes provides a further regulatory link between metabolic stress and cardiovascular function.  (+info)

(7/10763) RNA antisense abrogation of MAT1 induces G1 phase arrest and triggers apoptosis in aortic smooth muscle cells.

The human MAT1 gene (menage a trois 1) is an assembly factor and a targeting subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-activating kinase. The novel mechanisms by which MAT1 forms an active CDK-activating kinase and determines substrate specificity of CDK7-cyclin H are involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair, and transcription. Hyperplasia of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is a fundamental pathologic feature of luminal narrowing in vascular occlusive diseases, and nothing is yet known regarding the cell cycle phase specificity of the MAT1 gene in its involvement in SMC proliferation. To investigate such novel regulatory pathways, MAT1 expression was abrogated by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of antisense MAT1 RNA in cultured rat aortic SMCs. We show that abrogation of MAT1 expression retards SMC proliferation and inhibits cell activation from a nonproliferative state. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that these effects are due to G1 phase arrest and apoptotic cell death. Our studies indicate a link between cell cycle control and apoptosis and reveal a potential mechanism for coupling the regulation of MAT1 with G1 exit and prevention of apoptosis.  (+info)

(8/10763) Endogenous plasma endothelin concentrations and coronary circulation in patients with mild dilated cardiomyopathy.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increased plasma concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and big endothelin (BET) play a role in the regulation of coronary circulation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). SETTING: Tertiary referral centre for cardiac diseases. PATIENTS: Fourteen patients (eight male/six female; mean (SD) age 59 (9) years) with IDCM (ejection fraction 36 (9)%) and five normotensive subjects (two male/three female; age 52 (7) years) serving as controls were studied. METHODS: Functional status was classified according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. Endogenous ET-1 and BET plasma concentrations from the aorta and the coronary sinus were determined by radioimmunoassay. Coronary blood flow, using the inert chromatographic argon method, myocardial oxygen consumption, and coronary sinus oxygen content under basal conditions were determined. RESULTS: In the aorta, mean (SD) concentrations of ET-1 (IDCM 0.76 (0.25) v controls 0.31 (0.06) fmol/ml; p = 0.002) and BET (IDCM 3.58 (1.06) v controls 2.11 (0.58) fmol/ml; p = 0.014) were increased in patients with IDCM. Aortic ET-1 concentrations correlated positively with NYHA class (r = 0. 731; p < 0.001), myocardial oxygen consumption (r = 0.749; p < 0. 001), and coronary blood flow (r = 0.645; p = 0.003), but inversely with coronary sinus oxygen content (r = -0.633; p = 0.004), which was significantly decreased in IDCM patients (IDCM 4.68 (1.05) v controls 6.70 (1.06) vol%; p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: The coronary circulation in patients with IDCM is exposed to an increased endothelin load. ET-1 concentrations correlate with functional deterioration. A decrease of the coronary sinus content of oxygen suggests a mismatch between coronary blood flow and metabolic demand. Thus, ET-1 might be a marker of a disequilibrium between myocardial oxygen demand and coronary blood flow in IDCM.  (+info)



  • aortic
  • Pressure and flow were recorded in the ascending aorta of three dogs with aortic coarctation, induced surgically 3 months previously, and in three control litter mates. (ahajournals.org)
  • Postductal coarctation is most likely the result of the extension of a muscular artery (ductus arteriosus) into an elastic artery (aorta) during fetal life, where the contraction and fibrosis of the ductus arteriosus upon birth subsequently narrows the aortic lumen. (wikipedia.org)
  • An aortic aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of the aorta. (rochester.edu)
  • Aneurysms occur most often in the portion of the aorta that runs through the abdomen (abdominal aortic aneurysm). (rochester.edu)
  • An abdominal aortic aneurysm is also called AAA or triple A. A thoracic aortic aneurysm refers to the part of the aorta that runs through the chest. (rochester.edu)
  • blood
  • A narrowing of the aorta results in a selective elevation in blood pressure in the upper extremity blood vessels and, ultimately, in an increase in heart work. (rainbowbabies.org)
  • Since the aorta is narrowed, the left ventricle must generate a much higher pressure than normal in order to force enough blood through the aorta to deliver blood to the lower part of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preductal coarctation results when an intracardiac anomaly during fetal life decreases blood flow through the left side of the heart, leading to hypoplastic development of the aorta. (wikipedia.org)
  • In more severe cases, where severe coarctations, babies may develop serious problems soon after birth because not enough blood can get through the aorta to the rest of their body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body. (rochester.edu)