Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Anesthesia, Conduction: Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Adjuvants, Anesthesia: Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Anesthesia, Closed-Circuit: Inhalation anesthesia where the gases exhaled by the patient are rebreathed as some carbon dioxide is simultaneously removed and anesthetic gas and oxygen are added so that no anesthetic escapes into the room. Closed-circuit anesthesia is used especially with explosive anesthetics to prevent fires where electrical sparking from instruments is possible.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Anesthetics, General: Agents that induce various degrees of analgesia; depression of consciousness, circulation, and respiration; relaxation of skeletal muscle; reduction of reflex activity; and amnesia. There are two types of general anesthetics, inhalation and intravenous. With either type, the arterial concentration of drug required to induce anesthesia varies with the condition of the patient, the desired depth of anesthesia, and the concomitant use of other drugs. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p.173)Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Anesthesia, Caudal: Epidural anesthesia administered via the sacral canal.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Comprehensive Dental Care: Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Anesthetics, Dissociative: Intravenous anesthetics that induce a state of sedation, immobility, amnesia, and marked analgesia. Subjects may experience a strong feeling of dissociation from the environment. The condition produced is similar to NEUROLEPTANALGESIA, but is brought about by the administration of a single drug. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed)Infection Control, Dental: Efforts to prevent and control the spread of infections within dental health facilities or those involving provision of dental care.Pentobarbital: A short-acting barbiturate that is effective as a sedative and hypnotic (but not as an anti-anxiety) agent and is usually given orally. It is prescribed more frequently for sleep induction than for sedation but, like similar agents, may lose its effectiveness by the second week of continued administration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p236)Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Tooth DiseasesAnesthesia Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration of functions and activities pertaining to the delivery of anesthetics.Anesthesia, IntratrachealDental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Dental Caries Susceptibility: The predisposition to tooth decay (DENTAL CARIES).Dental Informatics: The application of computer and information sciences to improve dental practice, research, education and management.Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Prilocaine: A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.Dental Scaling: Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Anesthesia and Analgesia: Medical methods of either relieving pain caused by a particular condition or removing the sensation of pain during a surgery or other medical procedure.Preventive Dentistry: The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.American Dental Association: Professional society representing the field of dentistry.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Stomatognathic Diseases: General or unspecified diseases of the stomatognathic system, comprising the mouth, teeth, jaws, and pharynx.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Dental Polishing: Creation of a smooth and glossy surface finish on a denture or amalgam.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Midazolam: A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Mepivacaine: A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168)Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Legislation, Dental: Laws and regulations pertaining to the field of dentistry, proposed for enactment or recently enacted by a legislative body.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Surgical Procedures, Minor: Surgery restricted to the management of minor problems and injuries; surgical procedures of relatively slight extent and not in itself hazardous to life. (Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Xenon: A noble gas with the atomic symbol Xe, atomic number 54, and atomic weight 131.30. It is found in the earth's atmosphere and has been used as an anesthetic.Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.EthersDental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Libraries, DentalHemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Ether: A mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid used as an inhalation anesthetic and as a solvent for waxes, fats, oils, perfumes, alkaloids, and gums. It is mildly irritating to skin and mucous membranes.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Evidence-Based Dentistry: An approach or process of practicing oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinical relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. (from J Am Dent Assoc 134: 689, 2003)Group Practice, Dental: Any group of three or more full-time dentists, organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of dental care, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Dental Pulp Diseases: Endodontic diseases of the DENTAL PULP inside the tooth, which is distinguished from PERIAPICAL DISEASES of the tissue surrounding the root.Carticaine: A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Dental Calculus: Abnormal concretion or calcified deposit that forms around the teeth or dental prostheses.Dental Pulp CalcificationPostoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Chloralose: A derivative of CHLORAL HYDRATE that was used as a sedative but has been replaced by safer and more effective drugs. Its most common use is as a general anesthetic in animal experiments.Fluorides: Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.Manifest Anxiety Scale: True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Sufentanil: An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.Dental Plaque Index: An index which scores the degree of dental plaque accumulation.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).Consciousness Monitors: Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Prosthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Medetomidine: An agonist of RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 that is used in veterinary medicine for its analgesic and sedative properties. It is the racemate of DEXMEDETOMIDINE.Dental Impression Technique: Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.Manuals as Topic: Books designed to give factual information or instructions.

*  Dental Anesthesia | OMICS International | Open Access Articles

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*  State Board Revises Anesthesia Rule and Permit Structure - Colorado Dental Association

The Colorado State Board of Dental Examiners (SBDE) recently revised its rule on the administration of anesthesia in an attempt ... The Colorado State Board of Dental Examiners (SBDE) recently revised its rule on the administration of anesthesia in an attempt ... The new rule is based on an "anesthesia continuum" that ranges from local to general anesthesia, and focuses on the sedation ... The new rule is based on an anesthesia continuum that ranges from local to general anesthesia, and focuses on the sedation ...
cdaonline.org/news/latest-news/state-board-revises-anesthesia-rule-2/

*  Ask an Expert: Dental anesthesia

Dental Anesthesia. Dental anesthesia. 08/21/2008 Question:. i had an extraction over 36 hours ago is it normal to still not ... Go to the Dental Anesthesia health topic, where you can: *Read articles on this topic * Browse the previously asked questions ... You should contact your dentist as this can occur with either the surgery or from the local anesthesia. The "pins and needles" ...
netwellness.uc.edu/question.cfm/65394.htm

*  The consequences of anesthesia-free dental care

However, had this dog been taken in for a proper dental cleaning with safe anesthesia and dental x-rays, the areas of severe ... If your dog doesn't get x-rays taken during dental care (with or without anesthesia) you are only getting half, or less, of the ... The consequences of anesthesia-free dental care. Talk about diets, exercise, and disease. ... After full examination including dental radiographs, the problems were evident and resulted in extraction of 16 teeth that were ...
pitbullforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=2033444

*  Dental surgery - Wikipedia

Dental anesthesia[edit]. Main article: Dental anesthesia. Dentists inject anesthetic to block sensory transmission by the ... Dental instruments and restorative materials[edit]. Main articles: Dental instruments and Dental restorative materials ... select dental X-rays. See also dental plaque identification procedure and removal. ... Most dental hygienists recommend having the teeth professionally cleaned at least every six months.[citation needed] ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_Surgery

*  Dental Anesthesia

ONLINE -Renewal Program for NJ Dental Hygienist Anesthesia ...
https://dsi-nj.com/product-category/dental-anesthesia/

*  Instruments for Local Anesthesia - Dental Instrument Setups

Home > Medical Reference and Training Manuals > > Instruments for Local Anesthesia - Dental Instrument Setups ... a. Sterilized Instruments. As in the basic examination, the anesthesia also. requires a certain setup. (Look in Annex A for ... topical anesthesia is to lessen the discomfort to the patient during the actual injection. ... syringe available for local anesthesia has a thumb-ring handle at the outer end and a ...
armymedical.tpub.com/MD0503/Instruments-for-Local-Anesthesia-Dental-Instrument-Setups-28.htm

*  Outlook for Delivery and Cost of Anesthesia to Patients

As anesthesia specialists, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) safely provide approximately 40 million anesthetics ... Dental Anesthesia Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia Local Anaesthesia General Anesthesia Anaesthesia - History Anaesthesia - ... Dental Anesthesia. The advent of anesthesia may be regarded as a cornerstone in the development of modern dentistry. ... Anesthesia Not Linked to Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults. Older patients should be reassured that surgery and anesthesia ...
medindia.net/news/outlook-for-delivery-and-cost-of-anesthesia-to-patients-158956-1.htm

*  Regional Anesthesia for Pediatric Knee Surgery Reduces Pain: Study

Dental Anesthesia Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia Local Anaesthesia General Anesthesia Anaesthesia - History Anaesthesia - ... Dental Anesthesia. The advent of anesthesia may be regarded as a cornerstone in the development of modern dentistry. ... Low Hand Hygiene Compliance Rates found During Anesthesia Administration: Study. During surgical procedures, anesthesia ... Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia. Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general information about Spinal Anesthesia ...
medindia.net/news/regional-anesthesia-for-pediatric-knee-surgery-reduces-pain-study-140134-1.htm

*  General Anesthesia for Kids | Kids Dental Anesthesia Los Angeles

Read more about the general anesthesia for kids. Visit Children's Dental FunZone for more information. ... How do we put a child under general anesthesia? ... may benefit from dental anesthesia because the child can have ... General Anesthesia for Kids. Patients looking to put their children to sleep during their dental treatment often choose to go ... What are the advantages to general anesthesia?. The greatest advantage of putting a child to sleep while getting their dental ...
childrensdentalfunzone.com/services/general-anesthesia/

General anaesthesia: General anaesthesia (or general anesthesia) is a medically induced coma and loss of protective reflexes resulting from the administration of one or more general anaesthetic agents. A variety of medications may be administered, with the overall aim of ensuring unconsciousness, amnesia, analgesia, relaxation of skeletal muscles, and loss of control of reflexes of the autonomic nervous system.Anesthesia cart: Anesthesia carts are hospital devices used to store tools that are necessary for aid during procedures that require administration of anesthesia. Anesthesia refers to the use of drugs to subdue a patient's mind and prevent him or her from feeling any pain during a surgical operation.Dental Procedure Education System: The Dental Procedure Education System (DPES), is a web-based resource containing a collection of procedures from the dental disciplines. The procedures presented in DPES were developed by individual faculty members at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, in collaboration with a group of educational media and technology experts.Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia: Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia (CSE) is a regional anaesthetic technique, which combines the benefits of both spinal anaesthesia and epidural anaesthesia and analgesia. The spinal component gives a rapid onset of a predictable block.Spinal anaesthesia: Spinal anaesthesia (or spinal anesthesia), also called spinal analgesia, spinal block or subarachnoid block (SAB), is a form of regional anaesthesia involving injection of a local anaesthetic into the subarachnoid space, generally through a fine needle, usually 9 cm long (3.5 inches).DJ College of Dental Sciences and Research: Divya Jyoti (DJ) College of Dental Sciences and Research is a dental college located in Modinagar in the nagar panchayat of Niwari in Ghaziabad district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The founder and chairman is Ajit Singh Jassar.Dental Schools Council: The Dental Schools Council represents the interests of UK dental schools as it relates to national health, wealth, knowledge acquisition through teaching, research, and the profession of dentistry.Universities UK http://www.International Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies: The International Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies (IFDAS) is a professional association established in 1976. IFDAS is devoted solely to promoting the safe and effective use of sedation and anesthesia by educationally qualified dentists for their patients.Dental cariesParacervical block: A paracervical block is an anesthetic procedure used in obstetrics and gynecology, in which a local anesthetic is injected into between two to six sites at a depth of 3–7 mm alongside the vaginal portion of the cervix in the vaginal fornices.paracervical block By Robert Nadelberg.Mallow General Hospital: Mallow General Hospital is a public hospital located in Mallow, County Cork, Ireland.http://www.Pulp (tooth): The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The dental pulp is a part of the dentin–pulp complex (endodontium).Utah College of Dental HygieneInternational Association for Dental Research: The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a professional association that focuses on research in the field of dentistry. The aim of this association by constitution is to promote research in all fields of oral and related sciences, to encourage improvements in methods for the prevention and treatment of oral and dental disease, to improve the oral health of the public through research, and to facilitate cooperation among investigators and the communication of research findings and their implications throughout the world.Inhalational anaesthetic: An inhalational anaesthetic is a chemical compound possessing general anaesthetic properties that can be delivered via inhalation. They are administered by anaesthetists (a term which includes anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists, and anaesthesiologist assistants) through an anaesthesia mask, laryngeal mask airway or tracheal tube connected to an anaesthetic vaporiser and an anaesthetic delivery system.Propofol infusion syndrome: Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is a rare syndrome which affects patients undergoing long-term treatment with high doses of the anaesthetic and sedative drug propofol. It can lead to cardiac failure, rhabdomyolysis, metabolic acidosis, and kidney failure, and is often fatal.Dental plaque: Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that grows on surfaces within the mouth. It appears as a white or pale yellow "slime layer", that is commonly found between the teeth and along the cervical margins.SOAP note: The SOAP note (an acronym for subjective, objective, assessment, and plan) is a method of documentation employed by health care providers to write out notes in a patient's chart, along with other common formats, such as the admission note. Documenting patient encounters in the medical record is an integral part of practice workflow starting with patient appointment scheduling, to writing out notes, to medical billing.National Dental Board of Anesthesiology: The National Dental Board of Anesthesiology (NDBA) is an American professional association established in 2001 by the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology. Based in Chicago, NDBA is the world's largest national dental board devoted to sedation and anesthesia.MFDS: MFDS is the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, a government department in South Korea. This is former KFDA, Korean Food and Drug Administration.Glot-Up: A Glot-Up is type of dental equipment, something in between a mouth guard and an adult-sized pacifier.Local anesthetic: Local anesthetic (LA) is a medication that causes reversible absence of pain sensation, although other senses are often affected as well. Also, when it is used on specific nerve pathways (local anesthetic nerve block), paralysis (loss of muscle power) can be achieved as well.Amalgam (chemistry): An amalgam is a substance formed by the reaction of mercury with another metal. Almost all metals can form amalgams with mercury, the notable exceptions being iron, platinum, tungsten, and tantalum.Nitrous oxide and oxygen: A mix of nitrous oxide 50% and oxygen 50% is a medical analgesic gas, commonly known as Entonox (a registered trademark of BOC) or Nitronox, or colloquially as "gas and air", and is frequently used in pre-hospital care, childbirth and emergency medicine situations by medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics.Implant stability quotient: The implant stability quotient (ISQ) is the value on a scale that indicates the level of stability and osseointegration in dental implants. The scale ranges from 1 to 100 and is measured by implant stability meters instruments using resonance frequency analysis (RFA) technique.Sydney Dental HospitalDental radiographyPostgraduate training in general dentistry: ==Australia==HalothaneLidocaine: lignocaineAmerican Dental Society of Anesthesiology: The American Dental Society of Anesthesiology (ADSA) is an American professional association established in 1953 and based in Chicago.Coronation Dental Specialty GroupDental fluorosisUniversity of the East College of Dentistry: The University of the East College of Dentistry was first established as a unit of the Philippine College of Commerce and Business Administration in 1948. The college is one of the pioneers of dental education and labeled as one of the top dental schools in the Philippines.Nordic Institute of Dental Materials: NorwayDenturist: A Denturist in the United States and Canada, clinical dental technician in the UK or (in Australia) a dental prosthetist, is a member of the oral health care team who provides an oral health examination, takes impressions of the surrounding oral tissues, constructs and delivers removable oral prosthesis (dentures and partial dentures) directly to the patient.American Academy of denturitry.OhmefentanylTheories of general anaesthetic action: A general anaesthetic (or anesthetic) is a drug that brings about a reversible loss of consciousness. These drugs are generally administered by an anaesthetist/anaesthesiologist in order to induce or maintain general anaesthesia to facilitate surgery.BupivacainePinnacleHealth System: $1 billion (2013)Lanicemine: Lanicemine (AZD6765) is a low-trapping NMDA receptor antagonist developed by AstraZeneca, which was being studied for the management of severe and treatment-resistant depression. It was originally developed as a neuroprotective agent, but was redeveloped as an antidepressant following the observation that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine has potent antidepressant effects, but also has hallucinogenic side effects which make it unsuitable for use as an antidepressant in most circumstances.Nerve blockProcedural sedation and analgesia: Procedural sedation and analgesia, previously referred to as conscious sedation, is defined as "a technique of administering sedatives or dissociative agents with or without analgesics to induce a state that allows the patient to tolerate unpleasant procedures while maintaining cardiorespiratory function."Outline of dentistry and oral health: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to dentistry and oral health:Anesthesia: In the practice of medicine, especially surgery, and dentistry, anesthesia (or anaesthesia) is an induced, temporary state with one or more of the following characteristics: analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (extreme muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), and unconsciousness. An anesthetic is an agent that causes anaesthesia.Human tooth: The human teeth function in mechanically breaking down items of food by cutting and crushing them in preparation for swallowing and digestion. There are four different types of teeth, namely incisors, canines, molars and premolars.EPEHistory of tracheal intubation: Tracheal intubation (usually simply referred to as intubation), an invasive medical procedure, is the placement of a flexible plastic catheter into the trachea. For millennia, tracheotomy was considered the most reliable (and most risky) method of tracheal intubation.EnfluraneRomifidineGas cylinder: A gas cylinder or tank is a pressure vessel used to store gases at above atmospheric pressure. High-pressure gas cylinders are also called bottles.

(1/480) Balanced pre-emptive analgesia: does it work? A double-blind, controlled study in bilaterally symmetrical oral surgery.

We studied 32 patients undergoing bilateral symmetrical lower third molar surgery under general anaesthesia to determine if the combined effects of pre-emptive local anaesthetic block using 0.5% bupivacaine, together with i.v. tenoxicam and alfentanil had any benefits over postoperative administration. Patients acted as their own controls and were allocated randomly to have surgery start on one side, the second side always being the pre-emptive side. Difference in pain intensity between the two sides was determined using visual analogue scales completed by each individual at 6 h, and at 1, 3 and 6 days after operation. A long-form McGill pain questionnaire was also used to assess difference in pain intensity between the two sides on the morning after surgery. There was no significant difference in pain intensity at any time after surgery. Our findings indicate that the combined use of pre-emptive analgesia from 0.5% bupivacaine, tenoxicam and alfentanil did not reduce postoperative pain intensity in patients undergoing molar exodontia.  (+info)

(2/480) The interaction between pindolol and epinephrine contained in local anesthetic solution to the left ventricular diastolic filling velocity in normal subjects.

To evaluate the interaction between the nonselective beta-blocker, pindolol, and epinephrine contained in a local anesthetic solution, the left ventricular diastolic filling velocity was examined with pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Arterial blood pressure (BP), the R-R interval on the electrocardiogram (RR), and Doppler echo-cardiographic measurements were recorded in seven healthy volunteers after 45 micrograms of epinephrine contained in lidocaine (L-E) was injected in the maxilla after pretreatment with 5 mg of pindolol. The administration of L-E caused the elevation of BP and an increase in RR interval. Peak early (E) and peak atrial (A) filling velocities decreased, whereas isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) and diastolic filling period (DFP) were prolonged. Although the ratio of E to A (E/A) remained unchanged, E/A/DFP was reduced. In contrast, when L-E was given without pindolol pretreatment, RR interval was shortened and BP was unchanged. The increase of both E and A velocities and the shortening of both IVRT and DFP were observed. E/A remained unchanged but E/A/DFP was increased. These results suggested that L-E caused opposite effects on the left ventricular filling velocity in the presence or absence of pindolol. We conclude that epinephrine activates the left ventricular relaxation rate but impairs it in the presence of pindolol.  (+info)

(3/480) Epinephrine, magnesium, and dental local anesthetic solutions.

Plasma levels of magnesium were unaffected by the inclusion of epinephrine in lidocaine dental local anesthetic solutions in patients having third molar surgery under general anesthesia.  (+info)

(4/480) Analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy of tenoxicam and diclofenac sodium after third molar surgery.

Tenoxicam and diclofenac sodium were compared with each other for analgesic efficacy following removal of third molars under general anesthesia. Thirty-five healthy patients between the ages of 18 and 28 yr were randomly allocated to two groups to participate in this study. Patients in Group A (n = 17) received a single intravenous injection of tenoxicam 40 mg at induction of anesthesia, followed by a 20-mg tablet given in the evening of the day of the operation and thereafter, one 20-mg tablet daily from days 2 to 7. Group B (n = 18) received a single intramuscular injection of diclofenac sodium 75 mg at induction of anesthesia, followed by a 50-mg tablet 4 to 6 hr after the operation and again, between 2100 hr and 2200 hr the same day. Thereafter, a 50-mg tablet was taken 3 times daily for the next 6 days. Pain was measured hourly for the first 4 hr postoperatively, then at 21 hr, and thereafter in the morning and the evenings on days 2 to 7. The highest pain scores were obtained 1 hr postoperatively for both trial groups. At 1 and 2 hr postoperatively, no statistical significant differences in pain scores could be shown for both groups. However, at 3 and 4 hr postoperatively, patients in the tenoxicam group experienced significantly (P < or = 0.05) less pain than those in the diclofenac sodium group. On the evening of the third postoperative day, the tenoxicam group of patients experienced significantly less pain (P < or = 0.05) than those in the diclofenac sodium group. This was again the case on the morning of the fourth postoperative day. On the fifth, sixth, and seventh postoperative days, the average pain scores for patients in the tenoxicam group were statistically significantly lower, both mornings and evenings, than those in the diclofenac sodium group of patients (P = 0.05).  (+info)

(5/480) Prolonged diplopia following a mandibular block injection.

A case is presented in which a 14-yr-old girl developed diplopia after injection of the local anesthetic Xylotox E 80 A (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine). Since the complication had a relatively slow onset and lasted for 24 hr, the commonly suggested explanations based on vascular, lymphatic, and neural route theories do not adequately fit the observations. No treatment, other than reassurance, was necessary, and the patient recovered fully.  (+info)

(6/480) A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients.

Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrate. Twenty-three children in three clinics who required dentistry with local anesthetic and were determined to exhibit behavior rated as "negative" or "definitely negative" based on the Frankl scale were assessed. They were evaluated with respect to acceptance of medication; initial level of anxiety at each appointment; level of sedation prior to and acceptance of local anesthetic; movement and crying during the procedure; and overall behavior. The results showed that the group randomly assigned to receive midazolam had a significantly greater initial level of anxiety for that appointment (P < 0.02), a finding that could clearly confound further determination of the efficacy of these drugs. Patients given oral midazolam had an increased level of sedation prior to the administration of local anesthetic compared with those given chloral hydrate (P < 0.015). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other parameters. The age of the patient was found to have no correlation with the difference in overall behavior (r = -0.09). These preliminary data warrant further clinical trials.  (+info)

(7/480) Comparison of recovery of propofol and methohexital sedation using an infusion pump.

Two sedative anesthetic agents administered by an infusion pump were compared during third molar surgery. Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II volunteers were randomly allocated to two groups. All subjects received supplemental oxygen via a nasal hood, fentanyl (0.0007 mg/kg intravenous [i.v.] bolus), and midazolam (1 mg/2 min) titrated to effect. Patients then received either 0.3 mg/kg of methohexital or 0.5 mg/kg of propofol via an infusion pump. Upon completion of the bolus, a continuous infusion of 0.05 mg/kg/min methohexital or 0.066 mg/kg/min propofol was administered throughout the procedure. Hemo-dynamic and respiratory parameters and psychomotor performance were compared for the two groups and no significant differences were found. The continuous infusion method maintained a steady level of sedation. Patients receiving propofol had a smoother sedation as judged by the surgeon and anesthetist.  (+info)

(8/480) Efficacy of mandibular topical anesthesia varies with the site of administration.

This study compared the threshold of pain sensitivity in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold with the posterior. This was followed by a comparison of the reduction of needle insertion pain in the anterior mucobuccal fold and the pterygo-temporal depression by either topical anesthesia or nitrous oxide inhalation. The pain threshold was determined by an analgometer, a pain-measuring device that depends on pressure readings; additionally, pain caused by a needle inserted by a normal technique was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). The threshold of pain was significantly lower in the incisor and canine regions than in the premolar and the molar regions (P < 0.001). Compared to a placebo, topical anesthesia significantly reduced the pain from needle insertion in the mucobuccal fold adjacent to the mandibular canine (P < 0.001), but did not significantly reduce pain in the pterygotemporal depression. The addition of 30% nitrous oxide did not significantly alter pain reduction compared to a control of 100% oxygen. These results suggest that topical anesthesia application may be effective in reducing the pain of needle insertion in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold, but may not be as effective for a standard inferior alveolar nerve block. The addition of 30% nitrous oxide did not lead to a significant improvement.  (+info)



procedure


  • This procedure can be done under local or general anesthesia and is very common - many people have their wisdom teeth removed before they become problematic. (wikipedia.org)
  • See also dental plaque identification procedure and removal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Demonstrating the cause of obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea is possible with a simplified anesthesia procedure enabling more widespread use of preoperative testing. (medindia.net)
  • Although the risks are very low, particularly because we at Children's Dental Fun Zone of Montebello and West Covina employ a dental anesthesiologist to oversee the procedure, some parents are not comfortable having their little ones completely put to sleep. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • In addition, anesthesia medications can have an amnesia effect that means your child won't remember much about anything related to the procedure. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • For parents that may be uncomfortable with the idea of their child having general anesthesia at the dentist, we offer this option with a dental anesthesiologist present on site to administer and monitor the procedure. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • In most cases, dental veneers are an elective dental procedure. (portsmouthhospital.com)
  • During a dental procedure, your veterinarian evaluates your pet's teeth for fractures, caries (cavities), excessive wear, and other abnormalities. (vcahospitals.com)

pediatric


  • Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is being used more regularly in pediatric patients, and more often in younger and younger patients," said Dr. Bhalla, also director of the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia fellowship at Nationwide Children's and a faculty member at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. (medindia.net)
  • Nationwide Children's is one of 13 medical centers nationwide participating in the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network, or PRAN, a collaboration designed to support the collection of highly audited data on practice patterns and complications and to facilitate collaborative research in regional anesthetic techniques in infants and children. (medindia.net)
  • Who is a good candidate for pediatric general anesthesia? (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • However, since all of the Children's Dental Fun Zone offices, including the pediatric dentists in Fontana, Los Angeles, and Eagle Rock, have an anesthesiologist on staff, these children can be treated in the comfort of a private dental office. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

teeth


  • After full examination including dental radiographs, the problems were evident and resulted in extraction of 16 teeth that were not treatable, due to long-term infection that had gone undetected during the anesthesia-free cleaning procedures. (pitbullforum.com)
  • Most dental hygienists recommend having the teeth professionally cleaned at least every six months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Routine examination of the teeth by a dental professional is recommended at least every year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, some children need to have a lot of dental work completed on multiple teeth. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • A dental veneer is a thin covering that is placed over the front of the teeth. (portsmouthhospital.com)
  • Custom-made shells are created by dental lab technicians and permanently bonded to the teeth. (portsmouthhospital.com)
  • The dentist will take a mold of your teeth and send it to a dental lab. (portsmouthhospital.com)
  • Without proper dental care, your pet will most likely suffer from bad breath, inflamed gums, missing, loose, or broken teeth, and all of the pain and discomfort such problems can cause. (vcahospitals.com)
  • Dental x-rays, if available, aid in selection of teeth to be pulled and to aid in evaluation of periodontal and other oral diseases. (vcahospitals.com)

pet's


  • While dental cleanings may seem like an added expense, they're actually a very cost effective investment in your pet's health. (vcahospitals.com)
  • At your pet's yearly examination it may be determined that they require a dental cleaning. (vcahospitals.com)

examination


  • More frequent cleaning and examination may be necessary during the treatment of many different dental/oral disorders or due to recent surgical procedures such as dental implants . (wikipedia.org)
  • Beginning at age one, your pet should have an annual dental examination and cleaning performed by your veterinarian. (vcahospitals.com)

dentists


  • Under the new rule, licensed dentists could provide local anesthesia, analgesia and anxiolysis without a permit. (cdaonline.org)
  • Only dentists who have completed a residency program in general anesthesia or a relevant post-doctoral training program, like oral surgery, would be eligible for the Level II Permit, which allows for deep sedation or general anesthesia. (cdaonline.org)
  • The new rule has been structured to allow dentists added flexibility in administering anesthesia to patients. (cdaonline.org)

surgical procedures


  • While this study looked specifically at arthroscopic knee surgery, regional anesthesia is also becoming more widely used in orthopedic procedures in the shoulder, elbow and wrist and in other surgical procedures in the abdomen. (medindia.net)
  • During surgical procedures, anesthesia providers are missing opportunities to clean their hands. (medindia.net)

local


  • The new rule is based on an "anesthesia continuum" that ranges from local to general anesthesia, and focuses on the sedation level of the patient rather than on specific drugs or routes of administration. (cdaonline.org)
  • You should contact your dentist as this can occur with either the surgery or from the local anesthesia. (uc.edu)
  • Each page stands on its own, however for a thorough understanding of dental local anesthetics the reader is advised to read the pages in order. (doctorspiller.com)
  • It is estimated that the average dentist administers between 1500 and 2000 injections of local anesthesia each year. (doctorspiller.com)
  • By definition, therefore, every dentist is an expert in the field of local anesthesia, which is an extremely good thing, since without the ability to produce profound numbness, modern dentistry would be all but impossible. (doctorspiller.com)

Tooth


  • Dental disease can cause serious problems for your pet, ranging from gum inflammation and tooth loss to infection and even organ damage. (vcahospitals.com)

surgery


  • Older patients should be reassured that surgery and anesthesia are unlikely to be implicated in causing persistent cognitive decline or incident dementia. (medindia.net)
  • There is no association between exposure to anesthesia for surgery and the development of mild cognitive impairment in the elderly patients. (medindia.net)
  • Elderly patients can develop delirium after exposure to anesthesia for surgery. (medindia.net)

patients


  • As anesthesia specialists, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) safely provide approximately 40 million anesthetics to patients each year for surgical, obstetrical, pain management, and trauma stabilization services. (medindia.net)
  • Patients looking to put their children to sleep during their dental treatment often choose to go to Children's Dental Fun Zone of West Covina or Fontana. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

dentistry


  • The advent of anesthesia may be regarded as a cornerstone in the development of modern dentistry. (medindia.net)
  • It was, of course, meant to be funny, but it shows a patient squirming in the dental chair, and in this sense, at least, was probably not far from the truth about dentistry up until shortly after the film was made. (doctorspiller.com)

general


  • These qualifications correspond to the current requirements for deep sedation or general anesthesia. (cdaonline.org)
  • Stimulating one of two dopamine-producing regions in the brain was able to arouse animals receiving general anesthesia with either propofol or isoflurane. (medindia.net)
  • Within all five of our locations, including Los Angeles, Eagle Rock, and Montebello, we make general anesthesia, or putting your child completely to sleep while having dental treatment done, a potential option. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • Why do General Anesthesia? (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • How do we put a child under general anesthesia? (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • What are the advantages to general anesthesia? (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • What are the disadvantages of general anesthesia? (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • The biggest disadvantage of general anesthesia however is the cost. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • That's why we use general anesthesia, or putting the patient to sleep, as an option for certain children so that necessary treatment can be performed. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • An important advantage for using general anesthesia during dental work is that treatments can be performed more quickly and your child won't be struggling to endure the procedures. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • We do, however, advise our parents to make sure that their insurance plans will cover the costs of general anesthesia. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • If your toddler or younger child is experiencing dental issues but exhibits an extreme fear of the dentist, you may want to consider general anesthesia. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • General anesthesia can allow your child to undergo important dental care treatments and avoid most of the stress and fear. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • Dental prophylaxis is performed with your pet under general anesthesia. (vcahospitals.com)

Children's


dentist


  • If your child is extremely frightened of the dentist and dental procedures, you may avoid bringing him or her to the office for treatment. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

periodontal disease


  • Periodontal disease is an infection caused by the bacteria found in dental plaque. (vcahospitals.com)
  • This proactive treatment is aimed at maintaining the natural oral defenses so that periodontal disease and other dental problems have a harder time becoming established. (vcahospitals.com)
  • If your pet is found to have more advanced dental or periodontal disease, your veterinarian may recommend more specialized procedures. (vcahospitals.com)

radiographs


  • Yeah, I've seen vets do full anesthesia and still neglect to do radiographs. (pitbullforum.com)
  • Our hospital offers dental radiographs (x-rays) as part of our dental care services. (vcahospitals.com)

discomfort


  • topical anesthesia is to lessen the discomfort to the patient during the actual injection. (tpub.com)

procedures


  • Participating institutions report the number of regional anesthesia procedures they do each month. (medindia.net)
  • Today, procaine is not even available for dental procedures. (doctorspiller.com)

sensory


  • Also in 1884, Dr. William Stewart Halsted was the first to describe the injection of cocaine into a sensory nerve trunk to create surgical anesthesia. (doctorspiller.com)

medically


  • CRNAs deliver essential healthcare in thousands of communities and are able to prevent gaps in access to anesthesia services, especially in rural, inner-city, and other medically underserved areas of the country. (medindia.net)

care


  • If your dog doesn't get x-rays taken during dental care (with or without anesthesia) you are only getting half, or less, of the information needed to make proper treatment recommendations. (pitbullforum.com)
  • To improve patient access to high-quality anesthesia care and make it more affordable, the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) announced that Kavita Patel, MD, will be the keynote speaker at the association's Mid-Year Assembly April 2-6 in Washington, D.C. (medindia.net)
  • This assembly brings together anesthesia professionals keenly interested in improving the quality of anesthesia care delivery in today's healthcare system," said AANA President Juan Quintana, DNP, MHS, CRNA. (medindia.net)
  • They are highly valued in today's healthcare environment because they deliver the same safe, high-quality anesthesia care as other anesthesia professionals but at a lower cost, helping to control rising healthcare costs. (medindia.net)
  • Up to 80% of dogs and 70% of cats that don't receive proper dental care will develop signs of dental disease by the age of three. (vcahospitals.com)
  • Dental disease can be easily prevented by following your veterinarian's advice regarding dental examinations, home care, and dental cleanings. (vcahospitals.com)
  • The good news, however, is that dental disease is easily prevented by regular dental examinations, home care, and dental cleanings. (vcahospitals.com)

Make


  • The sounds they hear from the dental drill and the feeling of pressure that they feel, can make them go into hysterics, even if they do not actually feel pain. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

severe


  • However, had this dog been taken in for a proper dental cleaning with safe anesthesia and dental x-rays, the areas of severe bone loss and infection could have been treated much earlier and possibly even prevented. (pitbullforum.com)

tartar


  • Without regular dental cleanings, this plaque builds up and turns into tartar. (vcahospitals.com)

services


  • Our hospital offers a variety of anesthesia services for your pet. (vcahospitals.com)

found


  • But, researchers have found no link between surgical anesthesia and the development of MCI. (medindia.net)

Course


health


  • Dr. Patel''s critical role in policy development and evaluation of policy initiatives connected to health reform, financial regulatory reform, and economic recovery issues will be valuable information for CRNAs to take back to their everyday anesthesia practice. (medindia.net)
  • Dental disease can also lead to systemic health problems in dogs and cats. (vcahospitals.com)

drill


  • It's understandable, especially considering that the very sound of a dental drill can traumatize some children. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

plaque


  • There is no better way of removing the disease-causing dental plaque. (vcahospitals.com)
  • We can also tell you about special treats that help control dental plaque. (vcahospitals.com)

better


  • The Colorado State Board of Dental Examiners (SBDE) recently revised its rule on the administration of anesthesia in an attempt to better define and clarify the permit structure. (cdaonline.org)
  • Researchers have come one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works. (medindia.net)

cases


  • Overall, opt-out states experienced a lower growth in anesthesia cases compared with non-opt-out states, 'opt-out' alone is not the silver bullet to improving access. (medindia.net)

child


  • The greatest advantage of putting a child to sleep while getting their dental work done is that they will not be traumatized by their dental work. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)
  • Also, children that need a lot of dental work, which may normally require multiple appointments, may benefit from dental anesthesia because the child can have everything done at once. (childrensdentalfunzone.com)

field


  • Southern Anesthesia & Surgical Medical is the medical supply division of SAS, providing the same great pricing, fast shipping, and customer service with a focus on the medical field. (sasrx.com)

year


treatment


search


  • Your search - Dental Anesthesia - did not match any records in OMICS International database. (omicsonline.org)