Agrobacterium tumefaciens: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Agrobacterium: A genus of gram negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, plants, and marine mud.Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)Plant Tumor-Inducing Plasmids: Plasmids coding for proteins which induce PLANT TUMORS. The most notable example of a plant tumor inducing plasmid is the Ti plasmid found associated with AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS.Transformation, Genetic: Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Kalanchoe: A plant genus of the family CRASSULACEAE. Members contain bryophyllins (also called bryotoxins) which are bufadienolides (BUFANOLIDES) that have insecticidal activity.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Rhizobiaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria which are saprophytes, symbionts, or plant pathogens.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Zeatin: An aminopurine factor in plant extracts that induces cell division. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dict, 5th ed)Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Conjugation, Genetic: A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.4-Butyrolactone: One of the FURANS with a carbonyl thereby forming a cyclic lactone. It is an endogenous compound made from gamma-aminobutyrate and is the precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. It is also used as a pharmacological agent and solvent.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.AcetophenonesAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)beta-Glucosidase: An exocellulase with specificity for a variety of beta-D-glycoside substrates. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing residues in beta-D-glucosides with release of GLUCOSE.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Sinorhizobium meliloti: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of sweet clover, MEDICAGO SATIVA, and fenugreek.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Arginine: An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Datura stramonium: A plant species of the genus DATURA, family SOLANACEAE, that contains TROPANES and other SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS.Hygromycin B: Aminoglycoside produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. It is used as an anthelmintic against swine infections by large roundworms, nodular worms, and whipworms.GlucuronidasePlant Somatic Embryogenesis Techniques: The process of embryo initiation in culture from vegetative, non-gametic, sporophytic, or somatic plant cells.Cytokinins: Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.beta-Glucans: Glucose polymers consisting of a backbone of beta(1->3)-linked beta-D-glucopyranosyl units with beta(1->6) linked side chains of various lengths. They are a major component of the CELL WALL of organisms and of soluble DIETARY FIBER.Brucella suis: A species of gram-negative bacteria, primarily infecting SWINE, but it can also infect humans, DOGS, and HARES.DNA, Single-Stranded: A single chain of deoxyribonucleotides that occurs in some bacteria and viruses. It usually exists as a covalently closed circle.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of one of the three ester bonds in a phosphotriester-containing compound.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Mannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Quorum Sensing: A phenomenon where microorganisms communicate and coordinate their behavior by the accumulation of signaling molecules. A reaction occurs when a substance accumulates to a sufficient concentration. This is most commonly seen in bacteria.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Protocatechuate-3,4-Dioxygenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of protocatechuate to 3-carboxy-cis-cis-muconate in the presence of molecular oxygen. It contains ferric ion. EC 1.13.11.3.Glucans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Transformation, Bacterial: The heritable modification of the properties of a competent bacterium by naked DNA from another source. The uptake of naked DNA is a naturally occuring phenomenon in some bacteria. It is often used as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Periplasmic Binding Proteins: Periplasmic proteins that scavenge or sense diverse nutrients. In the bacterial environment they usually couple to transporters or chemotaxis receptors on the inner bacterial membrane.Acyl-Butyrolactones: Cyclic esters of acylated BUTYRIC ACID containing four carbons in the ring.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Gene Transfer Techniques: The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.Linaria: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain linarin (also called acaciin).Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Genetic Engineering: Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.Laccaria: A genus of white-spored mushrooms in the family Tricholomataceae. They form symbiotic partnerships (MYCORRHIZAE) with trees.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Chromobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring in soil and water. Its organisms are generally nonpathogenic, but some species do cause infections of mammals, including humans.Oxazines: Six-membered heterocycles containing an oxygen and a nitrogen.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Replicon: Any DNA sequence capable of independent replication or a molecule that possesses a REPLICATION ORIGIN and which is therefore potentially capable of being replicated in a suitable cell. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Ammonia-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon double bond by the elimination of AMMONIA. EC 4.3.1.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Rhizobium leguminosarum: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is found in soil and which causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of field pea, lentil, kidney bean, and clover.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.Daucus carota: A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is widely cultivated for the edible yellow-orange root. The plant has finely divided leaves and flat clusters of small white flowers.Gossypium: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Hydroxybenzoates: Benzoate derivatives substituted by one or more hydroxy groups in any position on the benzene ring.Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.beta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Adipates: Derivatives of adipic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,6-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.CinnamatesPili, Sex: Filamentous or elongated proteinaceous structures which extend from the cell surface in gram-negative bacteria that contain certain types of conjugative plasmid. These pili are the organs associated with genetic transfer and have essential roles in conjugation. Normally, only one or a few pili occur on a given donor cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed, p675) This preferred use of "pili" refers to the sexual appendage, to be distinguished from bacterial fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL), also known as common pili, which are usually concerned with adhesion.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.GlutaratesPolygalacturonase: A cell wall-degrading enzyme found in microorganisms and higher plants. It catalyzes the random hydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. EC 3.2.1.15.

*  Genome and proteome analysis of 7-7-1, a flagellotropic phage infecting Agrobacterium sp H13-3 | ViroBlogy
Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca'The flagellotropic phage 7-7-1 infects motile cells of Agrobacterium sp H13-3 by ... Genome and proteome analysis of 7-7-1, a flagellotropic phage infecting Agrobacterium sp H13-3. See on Scoop.it - Virology and ... "The flagellotropic phage 7-7-1 infects motile cells of Agrobacterium sp H13-3 by attaching to and traveling along the rotating ... This is an interesting paper, because it describes a phage infecting Agrobacterium - and touches on a subject that has ...
  https://rybicki.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/genome-and-proteome-analysis-of-7-7-1-a-flagellotropic-phage-infecting-agrobacterium-sp-h13-3/
*  Genetic Transformation of Tomato Using Bt Cry2A Gene and Characterization in Indian Cultivar Arka Vikas
... through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study was conducted to improve the regeneration and transformation protocol ... Transgenic tomato plants of south Indian cultivar Arka Vikas were developed using Agrobacterium strain EHA 105, harbouring Bt ... Agrobacterium Mediated Transformation of Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. Pusa Ruby) with Coat Protein Gene of Physalis ... Transgenic tomato plants of south Indian cultivar Arka Vikas were developed using Agrobacterium strain EHA 105, harbouring Bt ...
  http://jast.modares.ac.ir/article_13848.html
*  Profiles of Sina (upper line) and Sinb (lower line) gen | Open-i
... lines transformed with two hpRNA silencing cassettes directed to silence Sina or Sinb were obtained by the Agrobacterium- ... lines transformed with two hpRNA silencing cassettes directed to silence Sina or Sinb were obtained by the Agrobacterium- ...
  https://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC4222565_1471-2229-13-190-1&req=4
*  EfficientAgrobacterium-mediated transformation ofArabidopsis thalianausing thebargene as selectable marker | SpringerLink
We have established an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure for Arabidopsis thaliana genotype C24 using ... Efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana using the bar gene as selectable marker. ... We have established an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure for Arabidopsis thaliana genotype C24 using ...
  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00234053
*  Genome Scrambling - Myth or Reality? | EcoNexus
Agrobacterium-mediated transformation: Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has been used to create commercial cultivars for ... 3. The T-DNA is the segment of DNA bounded by the T-DNA borders which is transferred to a plant via Agrobacterium-mediated ... 4. The EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene from Agrobacterium sp. Strain CP4 confers tolerance to the ... We have searched and analysed the relevant scientific literature for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and particle ...
  http://www.econexus.info/publication/genome-scrambling-%E2%80%93-myth-or-reality
*  Systems for Bioproduction - OpenPlant
... through Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The technology is powerful and was used under ...
  https://www.openplant.org/systems-for-bioproduction/
*  "AGROBEST: an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression met" by Hang-Yi Wu, Kun-Hsiang Liu et al.
Using β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation assay, we show that the use of a specific ... Optimization with AB salts in plant culture medium buffered with acidic pH 5.5 during Agrobacterium infection greatly enhanced ... In addition, AGROBEST offers a new way to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer. ... Results We developed a highly efficient and robust Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system, named AGROBEST ( ...
  https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/csbc_pubs/6/
*  Agrobacterium problems
... Steve Wylie wylie at CENTRAL.MURDOCH.EDU.AU Tue Oct 10 21:20:46 EST 1995 *Previous message: Geneclean ... Does anyone else working with Agrobacterium tumefaciens have the problems that I do? Firstly, it is very inconsistant in growth ...
  http://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/1995-October/034686.html
*  Plant-biology] Agrobacterium
... Sheshagiri R grs_giri at hotmail.com Mon Jun 5 02:00:19 EST 2006 *Previous message: [Plant- ... Dear Friends, I have few questions about Agrobacterium. I would be grateful to you if you can quickly answer them. 1. Can EHA- ... Agrobacterium ? Are there any other confirmatory tests available? Regards, Sheshagiri, India ...
  http://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/plantbio/2006-June/027393.html
*  Plant-biology] agrobacterium strains
... kamalaker nasani via plantbio%40net.bio.net (by agbiok4 from gmail.com). Thu Jan 24 22:26 ... Hi, Any one can help me to get the list of agrobacterium strains used for plant transformation and their host range. -- URS ...
  http://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/plantbio/2008-January/027606.html
*  KEGG GENOME: Agrobacterium fabrum
Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Agrobacterium; ... Genome sequence of the plant pathogen and biotechnology agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. ...
  http://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?gn:T00070
*  Agrobacterium: From Biology to Biotechnology | SpringerLink
Agrobacterium is the only cellular organism on Earth that is naturally capable of transferring genetic material between the ... The Oncogenes of Agrobacterium Tumefaciens and Agrobacterium Rhizogenes Monica T. Britton, Matthew A. Escobar, Abhaya M. ... Agrobacterium' is a comprehensive book on Agrobacterium research, including its history, application, basic biology discoveries ... Agrobacterium DNA Expression Pathogen Pathogene Transport biotechnology crown gall disease currentjks gene transfer genetic ...
  https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-0-387-72290-0
*  Agrobacterium radiobacter (strain K84 / ATCC BAA-868)
This proteome is part of the Agrobacterium radiobacter pan proteome (fasta) Agrobacterium are Gram-negative, motile, soil- ... More recently Agrobacterium have been classified into 3 biovars based on physiological and biochemical phenotypes without ... "Genome sequences of three Agrobacterium biovars help elucidate the evolution of multichromosome genomes in bacteria.". Slater S ...
  http://www.uniprot.org/proteomes/UP000001600
*  Cytokinin production by Agrobacterium tumefaciens
Certain plant-associated prokaryotes such as Corynebacteriurn fascians and Agrobacterium tumefaciens are known to produce ... Cytokinin production by Agrobacterium tumefaciens Public Deposited Citeable URL:. http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/ ...
  https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6t053k05z
*  Agrobacterium tumafaciens | Ward's Science
Agrobacterium tumefaciens Nutrient Agar. 30°C. Refrigerator. Tube. Each. Retrieving. This Item is temperature sensitive and has ... A. tumefaciens is also known as Rhizobium radiobacter, and Agrobacterium radiobacter.. All microbial cultures undergo an ...
  https://www.wardsci.com/store/product/8865860/agrobacterium-tumafaciens
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Nucleotide excision repair - Agrobacterium fabrum
Nucleotide excision repair - Agrobacterium fabrum [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show ...
  http://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?atu03420
*  KEGG PATHWAY: 2-Oxocarboxylic acid metabolism - Agrobacterium fabrum
2-Oxocarboxylic acids, also called 2-oxo acids and alpha-keto acids, are the most elementary set of metabolites that includes pyruvate (2-oxopropanoate), 2-oxobutanoate, oxaloacetate (2-oxosuccinate) and 2-oxoglutarate. This diagram illustrates the architecture of chain extension and modification reaction modules for 2-oxocarboxylic acids. The chain extension module RM001 is a tricarboxylic pathway where acetyl-CoA derived carbon is used to extend the chain length by one. The chain modification modules RM002 (including RM032) and RM033, together with a reductive amination step (RC00006 or RC00036), generate basic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. The modification module RM030 is used in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, a class of plant secondary metabolites, for conversion to oxime followed by addition of thio-glucose moiety. Furthermore, the chain extension from 2-oxoadipate to 2-oxosuberate is followed by coenzyme B biosynthesis in methonogenic archaea ...
  http://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?atu01210+Atu1870
*  Plasmid isolation from agrobacterium - -Genetics and Epigenetics
Plasmid isolation from agrobacterium - (Feb/04/2013 ). Hi, anyone here knows the protocol to isolate the binary vector from ... resources/articles/pubhub/promega-notes-1999/wizard-plus-minipreps-for-the-isolation-of-binary-plasmids-from-agrobacterium- ...
  http://www.protocol-online.org/biology-forums-2/posts/28376.html
*  Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated Transformation of Plant Cells - eLS - Binns - Wiley Online Library
Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that causes plant tumours by transferring a portion of DNA from a ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/npg.els.0001492/abstract
*  Agrobacterium radiobacter | Taber's Medical Dictionary
Agrobacterium radiobacter answers are found in the Taber's Medical Dictionary powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone ... Agrobacterium radiobacter is a sample topic from the Taber's Medical Dictionary. To view other topics, please sign in or ... Taber's Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Agrobacterium radiobacter; Taber's Online. [cited 2018 August 14]; Available from: https ... www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/741040/all/Agrobacterium_radiobacter. Accessed 14 August 2018. ...
  https://www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/741040/all/Agrobacterium_radiobacter
*  Frontiers | Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules | Plant Science
The complexity of Agrobacterium-plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely ... The complexity of Agrobacterium-plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely ... Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium-plant interactions. ... Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS) to further ...
  https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2014.00322/full
*  Quint Lab:agrobacterium plasmid miniprep - OpenWetWare
agrobacterium plasmid miniprep (from hiro). *pick single colony and grow cells o/n in 3 ml lb medium containing the appropriate ... Retrieved from "https://openwetware.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Quint_Lab:agrobacterium_plasmid_miniprep&oldid=192966" ...
  https://openwetware.org/wiki/Quint_Lab:agrobacterium_plasmid_miniprep
*  An efficient protocol for genetic transformation of watercress ( Nasturtium officinale) using Agrobacterium rhizogenes |...
Gelvin SB (2009) Agrobacterium in the Genomics Age. Plant Physiol 150:1665-1676PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... To extract these compounds from N. officinale for study, a method was developed in which Agrobacterium rhizogenes was used to ... Watercress Nasturtium officinale Indolic glucosinolates Agrobacterium rhizogenes Hairy root culture Electronic supplementary ... Tepfer D (1984) Transformation of several species of higher plants by agrobacterium rhizogenes: sexual transmission of the ...
  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11033-010-0638-5
*  SEM of Agrobacterium tumifaciens - Stock Image B242/0002 - Science Photo Library
... of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumifaciens (small bacilli) growing on the surface of cells from the tobacco plant Nicotiana ... Keywords: agrobacterium tumifaciens, bacteria, bacterial, bacteriology, bacterium, micro-organisms, microbe, microbes, ... Caption: Scanning electron micrograph (SEM), tinted green, of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumifaciens (small bacilli) growing on ...
  http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/13174/view
*  Comparison between agrobacterium-mediated and direct gene transfer using the gene gun.
The Agrobacterium method has been successfully practiced in dicots for ... Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and direct gene transfer using the gene gun (microparticle -bombardment) are the two most ... The Agrobacterium method has been successfully practiced in dicots for many years, but only recently have efficient protocols ... Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and direct gene transfer using the gene gun (microparticle -bombardment) are the two most ...
  http://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Comparison-between-agrobacterium-mediated-direct/23104329.html

Mannosylfructose-phosphate synthase: Mannosylfructose-phosphate synthase (, mannosylfructose-6-phosphate synthase, MFPS) is an enzyme with system name GDP-mannose:D-fructose-6-phosphate 2-alpha-D-mannosyltransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionRhizobiaOpine: Opine biosynthesis is catalyzed by specific enzymes encoded by genes contained in a small segment of DNA (known as the T-DNA, for 'transfer DNA'), which is part of the Ti plasmid, inserted by the bacterium into the plant genome. The opines are used by the bacterium as an important source of nitrogen and energy.Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Triparental mating: Triparental mating is a form of Bacterial conjugation where a conjugative plasmid present in one bacterial strain assists the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid present in a second bacterial strain into a third bacterial strain. Plasmids are introduced into bacteria for such purposes as transformation, cloning, or transposon mutagenesis.Plant perception (physiology): Plant perception is the ability of plants to sense and respond to the environment to adjust their morphology, physiology and phenotype accordingly. Other disciplines such as plant physiology, ecology and molecular biology are used to assess this ability.Candidatus Liberibacter: Candidatus Liberibacter is a genus of gram-negative bacteria in the Rhizobiaceae family. The term Candidatus is used to indicate that it has not proved possible to maintain this bacterium in culture.Nicotiana glauca: Nicotiana glauca is a species of wild tobacco known by the common name tree tobacco. Its leaves are attached to the stalk by petioles (many other Nicotiana species have sessile leaves), and its leaves and stems are neither [nor sticky like Nicotiana tabacum].Coles PhillipsPhytosulfokine: Phytosulfokines are plant hormones that belong to the growing class of plant peptide hormones. Phytosulfokines are sulfated growth factors strongly promoting proliferation of plant cells in cultures.Virulence: Virulence is, by MeSH definition, the degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of parasites as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenicity of an organism - its ability to cause disease - is determined by its virulence factors.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Fungicide use in the United States: A more accurate title for this page would be "Common plant pathogens to food crops in the United States".Acyl-homoserine-lactone synthase: Acyl-homoserine-lactone synthase (, acyl-homoserine lactone synthase, acyl homoserine lactone synthase, acyl-homoserinelactone synthase, acylhomoserine lactone synthase, AHL synthase, AHS, AHSL synthase, AhyI, AinS, AinS protein, autoinducer synthase, autoinducer synthesis protein rhlI, EsaI, ExpISCC1, ExpISCC3065, LasI, LasR, LuxI, LuxI protein, LuxM, N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase, RhlI, YspI, acyl-[acyl carrier protein]:S-adenosyl-L-methionine acyltranserase (lactone-forming, methylthioadenosine-releasing)) is an enzyme with system name acyl-(acyl-carrier protein):S-adenosyl-L-methionine acyltranserase (lactone-forming, methylthioadenosine-releasing). This ePhenacylProtein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Endodermis: The endodermis is the central, innermost layer of cortex in some land plants. It is made of compact living cells surrounded by an outer ring of endodermal cells that are impregnated with hydrophobic substances (Casparian Strip) to restrict apoplastic flow of water to the inside.GBA3: Cytosolic beta-glucosidase, also known as cytosolic beta-glucosidase-like protein 1, is a beta-glucosidase () enzyme that in humans is encoded by the GBA3 gene.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Ligation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Circular bacterial chromosome: A circular bacterial chromosome is a bacterial chromosome in the form of a molecule of circular DNA. Unlike the linear DNA of most eukaryotes, typical bacterial chromosomes are circular.Nod factorSignature-tagged mutagenesis: Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is a genetic technique used to study gene function. Recent advances in genome sequencing have allowed us to catalogue a large variety of organisms' genomes, but the function of the genes they contain is still largely unknown.Protein detoxification: Protein detoxification is the process by which proteins containing methylated arginine are broken down and removed from the body.Operon: In genetics, an operon is a functioning unit of genomic DNA containing a cluster of genes under the control of a single promoter. The genes are transcribed together into an mRNA strand and either translated together in the cytoplasm, or undergo trans-splicing to create monocistronic mRNAs that are translated separately, i.List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.Composite transposon: A composite transposon is similar in function to simple transposons and Insertion Sequence (IS) elements in that it has protein coding DNA segments flanked by inverted, repeated sequences that can be recognized by transposase enzymes. A composite transposon, however, is flanked by two separate IS elements which may or may not be exact replicas.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Jimson Weed (painting): Jimson Weed is an oil on linen painting by American artist Georgia O'Keeffe from 1936, located in the Indianapolis Museum of Art, which is in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It depicts four large blossoms of jimson weed, or datura.Beta-glucuronidaseCytokininCanna Leaf Roller: Cannas are largely free of pests, but in the USA plants sometimes fall victim the Canna Leaf Roller, which can actually be two different insects. Larva of the Brazilian skipper butterfly (Calpodes ethlius), also known as the Larger Canna Leaf Roller, cut the leaves and roll them over to live inside while pupating and eating the leaf.Sticky and blunt ends: DNA end or sticky end refers to the properties of the end of a molecule of DNA or a recombinant DNA molecule. The concept is important in molecular biology, especially in cloning or when subcloning inserts DNA into vector DNA.Lonchocarpus: Lonchocarpus is a plant genus in the legume family (Fabaceae). The species are called lancepods due to their fruit resembling an ornate lance tip or a few beads on a string.GAI (Arabidopsis thaliana gene)DiisopropylphosphateMannitol motility medium: Mannitol motility medium is a bacterial growth medium used to detect the ability of bacteria to ferment mannite and produce nitrogen gas; and to indicate the motility of the organism.Multiple cloning site: A multiple cloning site (MCS), also called a polylinker, is a short segment of DNA which contains many (up to ~20) restriction sites - a standard feature of engineered plasmids. Restriction sites within an MCS are typically unique, occurring only once within a given plasmid.Decyl polyglucose: Decyl polyglucose is a mild non-ionic synthetic surfactant. It is a type of alkylpolyglycoside derived from glucose or starch and the fatty alcohol decanol.Pelagibacter ubique: Pelagibacter, with the single species P. ubique, was isolated in 2002 and given a specific name, although it has not yet been validly published according to the bacteriological code.Avery–MacLeod–McCarty experimentSquamosa promoter binding protein: The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like (SBP or SPL) family of transcription factors are defined by a plant-specific DNA-binding domain. The founding member of the family was identified based on its specific in vitro binding to the promoter of the snapdragon SQUAMOSA gene.DNA-binding proteinQuorum-quenching N-acyl-homoserine lactonase: Quorum-quenching N-acyl-homoserine lactonase (, acyl homoserine degrading enzyme, acyl-homoserine lactone acylase, AHL lactonase, AHL-degrading enzyme, AHL-inactivating enzyme, AHLase, AhlD, AhlK, AiiA, AiiA lactonase, AiiA-like protein, AiiB, AiiC, AttM, delactonase, lactonase-like enzyme, N-acyl homoserine lactonase, N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolase, N-acyl-homoserine lactone lactonase, N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone hydrolase, quorum-quenching lactonase, quorum-quenching N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolase) is an enzyme with system name N-acyl-L-homoserine-lactone lactonohydrolase.{{cite journal | title = The molecular structure and catalytic mechanism of a quorum-quenching N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone hydrolase |author = Kim, M.Sun-dried tomato: Sun-dried tomatoes are ripe tomatoes that lose most of their water content after spending a majority of their drying time in the sun. These tomatoes are usually pre-treated with sulfur dioxide or salt before being placed in the sun in order to improve quality.Asclepias linaria: Asclepias linaria is a species of milkweed known by the common name pineneedle milkweed.CS-BLASTDiazotroph: Diazotrophs are bacteria and archaea that fix atmospheric nitrogen gas into a more usable form such as ammonia.Chromosome engineering: Chromosome engineering is "the controlled generation of chromosomal deletions, inversions, or translocations with defined endpoints." For: By combining chromosomal translocation, chromosomal inversion,and chromosomal deletion, chromosome engineering has been shown to identify the underlying genes that cause certain diseases in mice.Odostomia proxima: Odostomia proxima is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pyramidellidae, the pyrams and their allies.WoRMS (2011).Medicinal plants of the American West: Many plants that grow in the American West have use in traditional and herbal medicine.Chromobacterium violaceum: Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, non-sporing coccobacillus.It is motile with the help of a single flagellum which is located at the pole of the coccobacillus.Nile redTransfer-messenger RNA: Transfer-messenger RNA (abbreviated tmRNA, also known as 10Sa RNA and by its genetic name SsrA) is a bacterial RNA molecule with dual tRNA-like and messenger RNA-like properties. The tmRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein complex (tmRNP) together with Small Protein B (SmpB), Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), and ribosomal protein S1.Stretch-activated ion channel: Stretch-activated or stretch-gated ion channels are ion channels which open their pores in response to mechanical deformation of a neuron's plasma membrane. Also see mechanosensitive ion channels and mechanosensitive channels, with which they may be synonymous.Tyrosine ammonia-lyase: Tyrosine ammonia lyase (L-tyrosine ammonia-lyase, TAL or Tyrase) is an enzyme in the natural phenols biosynthesis pathway. It transforms L-tyrosine into p-coumaric acid.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.GC box: In molecular biology, a GC box is a distinct pattern of nucleotides found in the promoter region of some eukaryotic genes upstream of the TATA box and approximately 110 bases upstream from the transcription initiation site. It has a consensus sequence GGGCGG which is position dependent and orientation independent.Gemmatimonadetes: The Gemmatimonadetes are a family of bacteria, given their own phylum (Gemmatimonadetes). This bacterium makes up about 2% of soil bacterial communities and has been identified as one of the top nine phyla found in soils; yet, there are currently only six cultured isolates.Rhizobium leguminosarum exopolysaccharide glucosyl ketal-pyruvate-transferase: Rhizobium leguminosarum exopolysaccharide glucosyl ketal-pyruvate-transferase (, PssM) is an enzyme with system name phosphoenolpyruvate:(D-GlcA-beta-(1->4)-2-O-Ac-D-GlcA-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-(3-O-CH3-CH2CH(OH)C(O)-D-Gal-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->6))-2(or3)-O-Ac-D-Glc-alpha-(1->6))n 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethan-1,1-diyl)transferase . This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionGlobal microbial identifier: The genomic epidemiological database for global identification of microorganisms or global microbial identifier (GMI) is a platform for storing whole genome sequencing (WGS) data of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect and track-and-trace infectious disease outbreaks and emerging pathogens. The database holds two types of information: 1) genomic information of microorganisms, linked to, 2) metadata of those microorganism such as epidemiological details.Symbiosis Center of Health Care: Symbiosis Center of Health Care (SCHC) is an organization under Symbiosis Society which takes care of health of symbiosis family be it student or staff.http://www.Restriction fragment: A restriction fragment is a DNA fragment resulting from the cutting of a DNA strand by a restriction enzyme (restriction endonucleases), a process called restriction. Each restriction enzyme is highly specific, recognising a particular short DNA sequence, or restriction site, and cutting both DNA strands at specific points within this site.Daucus: Daucus is a worldwide genus of herbaceous plants of the family Apiaceae of which the best-known species is the cultivated carrot. Daucus genus of Umbelliferae Apiaceae, has about 25 species.Gossypium herbaceum: Gossypium herbaceum, commonly known as Levant cotton, is a species of cotton native to the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa and Arabia where it still grows in the wild as a perennial shrub. It is a sister-species of Gossypium arboreum.Phenolic acid: Phenolic acids or phenolcarboxylic acids are types of aromatic acid compound. Included in that class are substances containing a phenolic ring and an organic carboxylic acid function (C6-C1 skeleton).Auxin binding protein: In molecular biology, the auxin binding protein family is a family of proteins which bind auxin. They are located in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase: Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal or SABG) is a hypothetical hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-galactosides into monosaccharides only in senescent cells.

(1/102) Performance and long-term stability of the barley hordothionin gene in multiple transgenic apple lines.

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(2/102) Gene knockdown by ihpRNA-triggering in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete fungus Laccaria bicolor.

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(3/102) Efficient Agrobacterium-based transient expression system for the production of biopharmaceuticals in plants.

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(4/102) Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of kabocha squash (Cucurbita moschata Duch) induced by wounding with aluminum borate whiskers.

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(5/102) Transformed hairy roots of Discaria trinervis: a valuable tool for studying actinorhizal symbiosis in the context of intercellular infection.

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(6/102) Characterization and crop production efficiency of diazotrophic bacterial isolates from coastal saline soils.

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(7/102) A mobile signal transported over a long distance induces systemic transcriptional gene silencing in a grafted partner.

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(8/102) FVE, an Arabidopsis homologue of the retinoblastoma-associated protein that regulates flowering time and cold response, binds to chromatin as a large multiprotein complex.

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  • Using β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter for Agrobacterium- mediated transformation assay, we show that the use of a specific disarmed Agrobacterium strain with vir gene pre-induction resulted in homogenous GUS staining in cotyledons of young Arabidopsis seedlings. (vcu.edu)