Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Lentiviruses, Bovine: A subgenus of LENTIVIRUS comprising viruses that produce multi-organ disease with long incubation periods in cattle.Q Fever: An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).Coxiella burnetii: A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.Infectious Anemia Virus, Equine: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for central nervous system demyelinating disease. Inoculation with a white matter emulsion combined with FREUND'S ADJUVANT, myelin basic protein, or purified central myelin triggers a T cell-mediated immune response directed towards central myelin. The pathologic features are similar to MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, including perivascular and periventricular foci of inflammation and demyelination. Subpial demyelination underlying meningeal infiltrations also occurs, which is also a feature of ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED. Passive immunization with T-cells from an afflicted animal to a normal animal also induces this condition. (From Immunol Res 1998;17(1-2):217-27; Raine CS, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p604-5)Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Mice, Inbred BALB CMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Mice, Inbred C57BLBase Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.

*  "Acute brachial diplegia due to lyme disease" by George Baquis,...

CONCLUSION: acute brachial diplegia is a rare manifestation of acute Lyme infection and responds promptly to antibiotic therapy ... Two patients had acute denervation in the cervical or proximal arm muscles. There was full recovery after antibiotic therapy in ... Proximal arm weakness and acute pain developed within 3 weeks from onset; pain was bilateral in 3 patients and unilateral in 2 ... has not been reported as a complication of acute Lyme infection. METHODS: retrospective series of 5 patients from 2 tertiary ...
https://works.bepress.com/george_baquis/3/

*  The acute phase host reaction during bacterial infection and... : The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

The acute phase host reaction during bacterial infection and its clinical impact in children.. SÁEZ-LLORENS, XAVIER MD; ... Home , January 1993 - Volume 12 - Issue 1 , The acute phase host reaction during bacterial infection and... ... The acute phase host reaction during bacterial infection and its clinical impact in children. ... Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: January 1993 - Volume 12 - Issue 1 - ppg 83-87 ...
journals.lww.com/pidj/Citation/1993/01000/The_acute_phase_host_reaction_during_bacterial.17.aspx

*  Predictive Factors of Early Seizures After Acute Cerebrovascular Disease | Stroke

Predictive Factors of Early Seizures After Acute Cerebrovascular Disease. Adrià Arboix, Luis García-Eroles, Juan B. Massons, ... Predictive Factors of Early Seizures After Acute Cerebrovascular Disease. Adrià Arboix, Luis García-Eroles, Juan B. Massons, ... Predictive Factors of Early Seizures After Acute Cerebrovascular Disease. Adrià Arboix, Luis García-Eroles, Juan B. Massons, ... The prognosis of patients with acute cerebrovascular disease and early epileptic seizures is controversial. In a previous study ...
stroke.ahajournals.org/content/28/8/1590

*  CORONARY HEART DISEASE: ANGINA PECTORIS, ACUTE CORONARY INSUFFICIENCY AND CORONARY OCCLUSION* | Annals of Internal Medicine |...

CORONARY HEART DISEASE: ANGINA PECTORIS, ACUTE CORONARY INSUFFICIENCY AND CORONARY OCCLUSION(CORONARY HEART DISEASE: ANGINA ... CORONARY HEART DISEASE: ANGINA PECTORIS, ACUTE CORONARY INSUFFICIENCY AND CORONARY OCCLUSION(CORONARY HEART DISEASE: ANGINA ... Heart disease, especially coronary heart disease, is the chief cause of death and morbidity in this country. Its importance has ... Coronary Heart Disease: Angina Pectoris; Myocardial Infarction. Annals of Internal Medicine; 49 (4): 968 ...
annals.org/aim/article/672948/coronary-heart-disease-angina-pectoris-acute-coronary-insufficiency-coronary-occlusion

*  Acute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis with Special Reference to Osteitis of the Neck of the Femur | Archives of Disease in Childhood

Acute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis with Special Reference to Osteitis of the Neck of the Femur ... Acute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis with Special Reference to Osteitis of the Neck of the Femur ...
adc.bmj.com/content/36/186/117

*  Survey of non-invasive ventilation (NIPPV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)...

A survey was undertaken to assess the availability of NIPPV for the treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD and to determine ... Background-Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation NIPPV has been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ... exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD complicated by respiratory failure. ... Respiratory disease, Lung disease, Bronchus disease, Instrumentation therapy, Mechanical ventilation ...
bdsp.ehesp.fr/Base/174943/

*  KAKEN - Research Projects | Prognostic significance of molecular detection of minimal residual disease in childhood acute...

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia / Minimal residual disease / Polymerase chain reaction / Immunoglobulin heavy chain / TEL-AML1 / ... Detection and clinical assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed for 50 ... Prognostic significance of molecular detection of minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Research ...
https://kaken.nii.ac.jp/grant/KAKENHI-PROJECT-08670875/

*  Managing the acute painful episode in sickle cell disease | Kaya | Thalassemia Reports

Managing the acute painful episode in sickle cell disease ... Managing the acute painful episode in sickle cell disease. B. ... sickle cell disease sickle cell disease. thalassaemia thalassemia thalassemia intermedia transfusion ... Acute painful events in children can be managed effectively in the community with appropriate support and education. If ... therapy or transfusion therapy can have a significant impact on reducing the severity and frequency of the acute pain event. ...
pagepressjournals.org/index.php/thal/article/view/316

*  Acute hepatitis associated with HHV-6 infection in liver transplant patients | HHV-6 Foundation | HHV-6 Disease Information for...

Acute hepatitis associated with HHV-6 infection in liver transplant patients. In All, Liver Disease, News by hhv6foundation. ... HHV-6 Foundation , HHV-6 Disease Information for Patients, Clinicians, and Researchers , Apply for a Grant. Navigation *Home ... Acute hepatitis associated with HHV-6 infection in liver transplant patients. A French study suggests HHV-6 is a cause of ... HHV-6 reactivation and poor CD4+ cell reconstitution predict pediatric acute GVHD. Over a dozen studies have now found HHV-6 to ...
https://hhv-6foundation.org/news/acute-hepatitis-associated-with-hhv-6-infection-in-liver-transplant-patients

*  Dr. Kaili Fan, MD - Dayton, OH - Infectious Disease Medicine & Internal Medicine | Healthgrades.com

South Dayton Acute Care Cnsltnt. 33 W Rahn Rd Dayton, OH 45429 ... Infectious Disease. Accredited by: American Board of Internal ... Kaili Fan, MD is an infectious disease medicine doctor who practices in Dayton, OH. She is 55 years old and has been practicing ...
https://healthgrades.com/physician/dr-kaili-fan-xtqcq

*  X-ray diagnostics in acute diseases of the chest

Chest X-ray and principle of carrying out a radiographic research. Feature of illness and pathologies of interiors. The purulent-destructive diseases of lungs: acute pneumonia and chronic abscess. Degree of an interstitial turbidity in bronchitis.
revolution.allbest.ru/medicine/00742762_0.html

Coxiella burnetii: Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, and is the causative agent of Q fever. The genus Coxiella is morphologically similar to Rickettsia, but with a variety of genetic and physiological differences.Uniform methods and rules: The Uniform methods and rules are documents by the Veterinary Services office of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) that specify the minimum standards for preventing, detecting, controlling, and/or eradicating a particular animal disease. APHIS in late 2004 had UM&Rs posted on bovine tuberculosis eradication, brucellosis, brucellosis in cervidae, equine infectious anemia, pseudorabies eradication, swine brucellosis control/eradication, and voluntary scrapie flock certification programNon-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Virulence: Virulence is, by MeSH definition, the degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of parasites as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenicity of an organism - its ability to cause disease - is determined by its virulence factors.Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society: The Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society (CTHS) is an organization headquartered in Toronto, Canada that was founded in 1906 to assist Thoroughbred horse breeders. Since 1982, there have been provincial divisions in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan.CCL20: Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) or liver activation regulated chemokine (LARC) or Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-3 (MIP3A) is a small cytokine belonging to the CC chemokine family. It is strongly chemotactic for lymphocytes and weakly attracts neutrophils.Gross pathology: Gross pathology refers to macroscopic manifestations of disease in organs, tissues, and body cavities. The term is commonly used by anatomical pathologists to refer to diagnostically useful findings made during the gross examination portion of surgical specimen processing or an autopsy.Coles PhillipsPMHC cellular microarray: PMHC cellular microarrays are a type of cellular microarray that has been spotted with pMHC complexes peptide-MHC class I or peptide-MHC class II.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingEva Engvall: Eva Engvall, born 1940, is one of the scientists who invented ELISA in 1971.Eva Engvall, The Scientist 1995, 9(18):8Proinflammatory cytokine: A proinflammatory cytokine is a cytokine which promotes systemic inflammation.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.

(1/20367) Rational sequence of tests for pancreatic function.

Of 144 patients with suspected pancreatic disease in whom a 75Se-selenomethionine scan was performed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) was successful in 108 (75%). The final diagnosis is known in 100 patients and has been compared with scan and ERP findings. A normal scan reliably indicated a normal pancreas, but the scan was falsely abnormal in 30%. ERP distinguished between carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis in 84% of cases but was falsely normal in five patients with pancreatic disease. In extrahepatic biliary disease both tests tended to give falsely abnormal results. A sequence of tests to provide a rapid and reliable assessment of pancreatic function should be a radio-isotope scan, followed by ERP if the results of the scan are abnormal, and a Lundh test if the scan is abnormal but the findings on ERP are normal.  (+info)

(2/20367) Activation of alveolar macrophages in lung injury associated with experimental acute pancreatitis is mediated by the liver.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate (1) whether alveolar macrophages are activated as a consequence of acute pancreatitis (AP), (2) the implication of inflammatory factors released by these macrophages in the process of neutrophil migration into the lungs observed in lung injury induced by AP, and (3) the role of the liver in the activation of alveolar macrophages. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Acute lung injury is the extrapancreatic complication most frequently associated with death and complications in severe AP. Neutrophil infiltration into the lungs seems to be related to the release of systemic and local mediators. The liver and alveolar macrophages are sources of mediators that have been suggested to participate in the lung damage associated with AP. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in rats by intraductal administration of 5% sodium taurocholate. The inflammatory process in the lung and the activation of alveolar macrophages were investigated in animals with and without portocaval shunting 3 hours after AP induction. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The generation of nitric oxide, leukotriene B4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and MIP-2 by alveolar macrophages and the chemotactic activity of supernatants of cultured macrophages were evaluated. RESULTS: Pancreatitis was associated with increased infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs 3 hours after induction. This effect was prevented by the portocaval shunt. Alveolar macrophages obtained after induction of pancreatitis generated increased levels of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and MIP-2, but not leukotriene B4. In addition, supernatants of these macrophages exhibited a chemotactic activity for neutrophils when instilled into the lungs of unmanipulated animals. All these effects were abolished when portocaval shunting was carried out before induction of pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Lung damage induced by experimental AP is associated with alveolar macrophage activation. The liver mediates the alveolar macrophage activation in this experimental model.  (+info)

(3/20367) Enhanced Th1 and dampened Th2 responses synergize to inhibit acute granulomatous and fibrotic responses in murine schistosomiasis mansoni.

In murine schistosomiasis mansoni, CD4(+) Th1 and Th2 cells participate in the ovum-induced granulomatous inflammation. Previous studies showed that the interleukin-12 (IL-12)-induced Th1 response strongly suppressed the Th2-cell-mediated pulmonary granuloma development in naive or primed mice. However, liver granulomas were only moderately suppressed in egg-vaccinated, recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12)-treated infected mice. The present study shows that repeated rIL-12 injections given during early granuloma development at 5 to 7 weeks after infection prolonged the Th1 phase and resulted in gamma interferon-mediated suppression of liver granulomas. The timing is crucial: if given at 6 to 8 weeks, during the Th2-dominated phase of florid granuloma growth, the treatment is ineffective. Daily injections of rIL-12 given between 5 and 7.5 weeks during the period of granuloma growth achieved a somewhat-stronger diminution in granuloma growth with less deposition of collagen but caused 60% mortality and liver pathology. In contrast, combined treatment with rIL-12 and anti-IL-4-anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody (MAb) injections given during the Th2 phase strongly inhibited liver granuloma growth without mortality. The diminished inflammatory response was accompanied by less deposition of collagen in the liver. Moreover, neutralization of endogenous IL-12 by anti-IL-12 MAbs effectively decreased the early Th1 phase (between 5 and 6 weeks after infection) but not the developing Th2 phase (5 to 7 weeks) of granuloma development. These studies indicate that the granulomatous response in infected mice can be manipulated by utilizing the Th1-Th2-subset antagonism with potential salutary results in the amelioration of fibrous pathology.  (+info)

(4/20367) Delay in presentation of patients with acute stroke to hospital in Oxford.

We identified prospectively all patients (181 patients, 183 episodes) admitted to hospital in Oxford with acute stroke from 1 January to 30 June 1997. Data were inadequate in 30, leaving 153 episodes in 151 patients (63 men, 90 women). Structured interviews were used to investigate the timing of events preceding admission. Most strokes (91%) occurred at home, and 36% of patients were alone. After a median delay of 15 min, 56% called a GP (median 30 min response), 41% an ambulance (median 48 min to admission), and 3% went directly to A&E. Median time from hospital admission to doctor assessment was 69 min. Factors reducing delay were: initially calling an ambulance rather than a GP (p < 0.0001); onset not at home (p < 0.001); symptoms improving between onset and admission (p < 0.002); and altered consciousness (p < 0.002). The stroke was not recognized by 44% of patients, but no significant delay resulted. Overall, 31% were admitted within 3 h of onset, 46% within 6 h. Initial contact with the GP is a major determinant of delay. If acute therapies for stroke become available, GPs should be the primary targets for an educational initiative.  (+info)

(5/20367) Assessment of swallowing and referral to speech and language therapists in acute stroke.

The best clinical assessment of swallowing following acute stroke, in order to decide whether to refer a patient to a speech and language therapist (SLT), is uncertain. Independently of the managing clinical team, we prospectively investigated 115 patients (51 male) with acute stroke, mean age 75 years (range 24-94) within 72 h of admission, using a questionnaire, structured examination and timed water swallowing test. Outcome variables included referral to and intervention by a speech and language therapist (SLT), dietary modification, respiratory complications and death. Of those patients in whom an SLT recommended intervention, 97% were detected by an abnormal quantitative water swallowing test; specificity was 69%. An SLT was very unlikely to recommend any intervention if the test was normal. Inability to perform a water test and/or abnormality of the test was associated with significantly increased relative risks of death, chest infection and dietary modification. A timed water swallowing test can be a useful test of swallowing and may be used to screen patients for referral to a speech and language therapist after acute stroke.  (+info)

(6/20367) Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis.

OBJECTIVE: To review the literature for evidence that chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae is associated with atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and Institute of Science and Information bibliographic databases were searched at the end of September 1998. Indexing terms used were chlamydi*, heart, coronary, and atherosclerosis. Serological and pathological studies published as papers in any language since 1988 or abstracts since 1997 were selected. DATA EXTRACTION: It was assumed that chronic C pneumoniae infection is characterised by the presence of both specific IgG and IgA, and serological studies were examined for associations that fulfilled these criteria. Pathological studies were also reviewed for evidence that the presence of C pneumoniae in diseased vessels is associated with the severity and extent of atherosclerosis. DATA SYNTHESIS: The majority of serological studies have shown an association between C pneumoniae and atherosclerosis. However, the number of cases in studies that have reported a positive association when using strict criteria for chronic infection is similar to the number of cases in studies which found no association. Nevertheless, the organism is widely found in atherosclerotic vessels, although it may not be at all diseased sites and is not confined to the most severe lesions. Rabbit models and preliminary antibiotic trials suggest that the organism might exacerbate atherosclerosis. CONCLUSION: More evidence is required before C pneumoniae can be accepted as playing a role in atherosclerosis. Although use of antibiotics in routine practice is not justified, large scale trials in progress will help to elucidate the role of C pneumoniae.  (+info)

(7/20367) Painful incarcerated hernia following a rugby union lineout.

Discussion related to hernias in sport usually involves the diagnosis and treatment of chronic musculotendinous groin disruption. A case of acute trauma in an incarcerated inguinal hernia, occurring in a rugby union player during a lineout, is presented. The injury arose as a result of a change in the laws of the game.  (+info)

(8/20367) T lymphocyte adhesion mechanisms within inflamed human kidney: studies with a Stamper-Woodruff assay.

Renal inflammatory conditions are characterized by mononuclear cell recruitment to sites of inflammation. We have developed a modified Stamper-Woodruff assay system to analyze mechanisms of functional T cell adhesion to cryostat sections of renal biopsy material from patients with vasculitic glomerulonephritis (GN) and acute allograft rejection. Peripheral blood T cells adhered to intraglomerular, periglomerular, and tubulointerstitial regions of the cortex. Blocking monoclonal antibodies against tissue expressed ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and the CS-1 domain of fibronectin (CS-1Fn) differentially attenuated T cell adhesion. Glomerular adhesion in vasculitic GN and tubulointerstitial adhesion in acute rejection were particularly sensitive to both anti-ICAM-1 and anti-VCAM-1 antibodies, indicating a prominent role for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 at glomerular sites in vasculitis and at tubulointerstitial sites in rejection. Furthermore, using KL/4 cells (LFA-1 expressing) and Jurkat cells (VLA-4 expressing), we demonstrated specific LFA-1/ICAM-1- and VLA-4/VCAM-1-mediated interactions within glomerular and tubulointerstitial compartments. Jurkat cells also adhered to VCAM-1-free sites, and binding was inhibitable by anti-CS-1Fn antibody, thereby demonstrating a role for VLA-4/fibronectin interactions especially at intraglomerular sites in acute rejection where VCAM-1 is notably absent. We therefore propose a prominent functional role for ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and CS-1 domain fibronectin in T cell recruitment to the inflamed kidney.  (+info)



chronic


  • Survey of non-invasive ventilation (NIPPV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the UK. (ehesp.fr)
  • Background-Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complicated by respiratory failure. (ehesp.fr)
  • The nurse identifies a nursing a nursing diagnosis of risk for injury: fracture related to alteration in calcium and phosphorus metabolism for a patient with chronic renal disease. (cram.com)
  • Approximately two million Canadians have kidney disease and more than 20,000 of these individuals receive ongoing chronic dialysis, according to the Kidney Foundation of Canada. (healthcanal.com)
  • The research team identified hospitalized patients in Ontario with an episode of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis between 1996 and 2006 and evaluated their long-term risk of both chronic dialysis and death. (healthcanal.com)

complication


  • BACKGROUND: bilateral, predominantly motor, cervical radiculoplexus neuropathy, the "dangling arm syndrome," has not been reported as a complication of acute Lyme infection. (bepress.com)

Liver Disease


  • Therapy with barbiturates should be administered cautiously and initiated at reduced dosages in patients with liver disease. (drugs.com)

infection


  • CONCLUSION: acute brachial diplegia is a rare manifestation of acute Lyme infection and responds promptly to antibiotic therapy. (bepress.com)
  • The acute phase host reaction during bacterial infection and. (lww.com)

patients


  • Two patients had acute denervation in the cervical or proximal arm muscles. (bepress.com)
  • Methods Data of 1220 first-ever stroke patients admitted consecutively to an acute stroke unit of a 450-bed teaching hospital between January 1986 and December 1993 were collected from a stroke registry. (ahajournals.org)
  • Patients with seizures were significantly younger and significantly more likely to have acute confusional state, cortical involvement, large stroke, and involvement of the parietal, frontal, occipital, and temporal lobes than patients without seizures. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusions Cortical involvement in the neuroimaging studies and agitated acute confusional state at the onset of stroke were independent predictive factors of early seizures in first-ever stroke patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • Little is known about predictive factors of early epileptic seizures, ie, within the first 48 hours of onset of a first stroke or TIA, in acute stroke patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • Data for all patients with first-ever stroke or TIA admitted consecutively to the Department of Neurology of L'Aliança Hospital (an acute-care, 450-bed hospital in the city of Barcelona, Spain) between January 1986 and December 1993 were collected from an unselected, population-based stroke registry, the details of which have been reported previously. (ahajournals.org)
  • The use of tramadol is contraindicated in patients with acute alcohol intoxication exhibiting depressed vital signs. (drugs.com)
  • Therapy with tramadol should be administered cautiously in patients who might be prone to acute alcohol intake. (drugs.com)
  • The study, published in the September 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) , is the largest study to date to look at the long-term health implications for patients who have experienced acute kidney injury. (healthcanal.com)
  • Now that we understand that having acute kidney injury multiplies the risk of future kidney complications, we as physicians can increase the monitoring of these patients and address complications as they occur. (healthcanal.com)
  • These 3,769 individuals survived free of dialysis for at least 30 days after discharge and were matched with 13,598 patients who were equally as ill but without acute kidney injury or dialysis during their hospitalization. (healthcanal.com)

kidney


  • An editorial that appears in the same issue of JAMA noted "the report by Wald and colleagues…provides valuable insights into the complex complications faced by survivors of an episode of severe acute kidney injury. (healthcanal.com)

hospital


  • Detection and clinical assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed for 50 children with ALL diagnosed and treated between 1987 to 1997 in Nagoya University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals. (nii.ac.jp)

trauma


  • Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care and care of the homeless and vulnerable populations in the inner city are among the Hospital's recognized areas of expertise. (healthcanal.com)

children


  • Acute painful events in children can be managed effectively in the community with appropriate support and education. (pagepressjournals.org)

pain


  • Use of oral opiates in addition to short acting easily administrable forms of analgesia and strict adherence to protocoled monitoring will enable the acute event to be well managed and the negative pain experience minimised. (pagepressjournals.org)
  • Use of sickle modifying interventions such as hydroxycarbamide therapy or transfusion therapy can have a significant impact on reducing the severity and frequency of the acute pain event. (pagepressjournals.org)
  • sickle disease, pain. (pagepressjournals.org)

increase


  • Since 1900, there has been a tremendous increase in heart disease after the age of 35. (annals.org)

heart disease


  • Heart disease, especially coronary heart disease, is the chief cause of death and morbidity in this country. (annals.org)
  • According to the U. S. Census report, 1 there were 385,191 deaths from heart disease in 1940, giving a mortality rate of 292.5 per hundred thousand, the largest number of deaths ever recorded for heart disease. (annals.org)
  • Palliative Therapies for Congenital Heart Disease with Ductus Dependent Pulmonary Circulation. (annals.org)

study


  • Subtypes of stroke were classified according to the Cerebrovascular Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology 4 and included ischemic stroke (lacunar stroke, cardioembolic infarction, atherothrombotic infarction, infarction of unusual cause, infarction of undetermined origin, and TIA) and hemorrhagic stroke (parenchymal hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and acute spontaneous subdural and epidural hematomas). (ahajournals.org)

significant


  • Other investigators have reported similar findings regarding the absence of HHV-6 DNA in the plasma despite significant organ disease. (hhv-6foundation.org)

Journal


  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. (lww.com)