Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Independent Living: A housing and community arrangement that maximizes independence and self-determination.Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Occupational Therapy: Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Mental Status Schedule: Standardized clinical interview used to assess current psychopathology by scaling patient responses to the questions.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Institutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Architectural Accessibility: Designs for approaching areas inside or outside facilities.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Dependency (Psychology): The tendency of an individual or individuals to rely on others for advice, guidance, or support.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.United StatesChronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Housing for the Elderly: Housing arrangements for the elderly or aged, intended to foster independent living. The housing may take the form of group homes or small apartments. It is available to the economically self-supporting but the concept includes housing for the elderly with some physical limitations. The concept should be differentiated from HOMES FOR THE AGED which is restricted to long-term geriatric facilities providing supervised medical and nursing services.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Homemaker Services: Non-medical support services, such as food preparation and bathing, given by trained personnel to disabled, sick or convalescent individuals in their home.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.JapanMotor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Phenylcarbamates: Phenyl esters of carbamic acid or of N-substituted carbamic acids. Structures are similar to PHENYLUREA COMPOUNDS with a carbamate in place of the urea.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Antiparkinson Agents: Agents used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The most commonly used drugs act on the dopaminergic system in the striatum and basal ganglia or are centrally acting muscarinic antagonists.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Electric Stimulation Therapy: Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Upper Extremity: The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Mild Cognitive Impairment: A prodromal phase of cognitive decline that may precede the emergence of ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other dementias. It may include impairment of cognition, such as impairments in language, visuospatial awareness, ATTENTION and MEMORY.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Home Nursing: Nursing care given to an individual in the home. The care may be provided by a family member or a friend. Home nursing as care by a non-professional is differentiated from HOME CARE SERVICES provided by professionals: visiting nurse, home health agencies, hospital, or other organized community group.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Homebound Persons: Those unable to leave home without exceptional effort and support; patients (in this condition) who are provided with or are eligible for home health services, including medical treatment and personal care. Persons are considered homebound even if they may be infrequently and briefly absent from home if these absences do not indicate an ability to receive health care in a professional's office or health care facility. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p309)Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Home Health Aides: Persons who assist ill, elderly, or disabled persons in the home, carrying out personal care and housekeeping tasks. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms. 2d ed, p202)Cholinesterase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Indans: Aryl CYCLOPENTANES that are a reduced (protonated) form of INDENES.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: A scale comprising 18 symptom constructs chosen to represent relatively independent dimensions of manifest psychopathology. The initial intended use was to provide more efficient assessment of treatment response in clinical psychopharmacology research; however, the scale was readily adapted to other uses. (From Hersen, M. and Bellack, A.S., Dictionary of Behavioral Assessment Techniques, p. 87)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.ConnecticutPatient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.BrazilResistance Training: A type of strength-building exercise program that requires the body muscle to exert a force against some form of resistance, such as weight, stretch bands, water, or immovable objects. Resistance exercise is a combination of static and dynamic contractions involving shortening and lengthening of skeletal muscles.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Wheelchairs: Chairs mounted on wheels and designed to be propelled by the occupant.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Health Impact Assessment: Combination of procedures, methods, and tools by which a policy, program, or project may be judged as to its potential effects on the health of a population, and the distribution of those effects within the population.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Memantine: AMANTADINE derivative that has some dopaminergic effects. It has been proposed as an antiparkinson agent.Urinary Incontinence: Involuntary loss of URINE, such as leaking of urine. It is a symptom of various underlying pathological processes. Major types of incontinence include URINARY URGE INCONTINENCE and URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Vision, Low: Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Physical Therapy Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and medical rehabilitation services to restore or improve the functional capacity of the patient.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Subthalamic Nucleus: Lens-shaped structure on the inner aspect of the INTERNAL CAPSULE. The SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS and pathways traversing this region are concerned with the integration of somatic motor function.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Muscle Spasticity: A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Nootropic Agents: Drugs used to specifically facilitate learning or memory, particularly to prevent the cognitive deficits associated with dementias. These drugs act by a variety of mechanisms. While no potent nootropic drugs have yet been accepted for general use, several are being actively investigated.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.GermanyExercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.EnglandSocial Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Motor Skills Disorders: Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)Southwestern United States: The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Leisure Activities: Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Galantamine: A benzazepine derived from norbelladine. It is found in GALANTHUS and other AMARYLLIDACEAE. It is a cholinesterase inhibitor that has been used to reverse the muscular effects of GALLAMINE TRIETHIODIDE and TUBOCURARINE and has been studied as a treatment for ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other central nervous system disorders.Nursing Assessment: Evaluation of the nature and extent of nursing problems presented by a patient for the purpose of patient care planning.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).HandwritingLevodopa: The naturally occurring form of DIHYDROXYPHENYLALANINE and the immediate precursor of DOPAMINE. Unlike dopamine itself, it can be taken orally and crosses the blood-brain barrier. It is rapidly taken up by dopaminergic neurons and converted to DOPAMINE. It is used for the treatment of PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS and is usually given with agents that inhibit its conversion to dopamine outside of the central nervous system.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Tenodesis: Fixation of the end of a tendon to a bone, often by suturing.OhioMoving and Lifting Patients: Moving or repositioning patients within their beds, from bed to bed, bed to chair, or otherwise from one posture or surface to another.Geriatric Nursing: Nursing care of the aged patient given in the home, the hospital, or special institutions such as nursing homes, psychiatric institutions, etc.Lower Extremity: The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.SwedenStatistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.

*  White matter lesions are related to impaired instrumental activities of daily living poststroke.

... and have been associated with impaired activities of daily living (ADL) and cognitive decline. We sought to examine the role of ... Activities of Daily Living*. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brain / pathology*. Brain Ischemia / complications*, pathology, ... and have been associated with impaired activities of daily living (ADL) and cognitive decline. We sought to examine the role of ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/White-matter-lesions-are-related/18035242.html

*  Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Impairment Is Associated with Increased Amyloid Burden - FullText - Dementia and...

Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) impairment in Alzheimer's disease has been associated with global amyloid ... Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) consist of many everyday activities, such as handling the finances, using public ... Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Impairment Is Associated with Increased Amyloid Burden. Marshall G.A.a, b · Olson L.E.a ... Keywords: Alzheimerߣs diseaseAmyloidInstrumental activities of daily livingMild cognitive impairmentPittsburgh compound B ...
https://content.karger.com/Article/FullText/329543

*  Activities of Daily Living - March 16

... refers to daily self care activities within an individual's place of residence, outdoor environments or both ... Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) is a real term used in healthcare that refers to daily basic self-care activities in an ... Activities of Daily Living' in order to take better care of ourselves and start living Life rightly. Below you will see 7 ... Ask yourself if you are a creature of habit when it comes to your daily food intake. I am a creature of habit when it comes to ...
drstandley.com/activities_of_daily_living_march_16.shtml

*  Activities of Daily Living - August 26

... refers to daily self care activities within an individual's place of residence, outdoor environments or both ... Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) is a real term used in healthcare that refers to daily basic self-care activities in an ... Activities of Daily Living' in order to take better care of ourselves and start living Life rightly. Below you will see 7 ... simple activities to accomplish at some point during the day all under the motivation of the the daily mentation question below ...
drstandley.com/activities_of_daily_living_august_26.shtml

*  Activities of Daily Living - March 12

... refers to daily self care activities within an individual's place of residence, outdoor environments or both ... Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) is a real term used in healthcare that refers to daily basic self-care activities in an ... Activities of Daily Living' in order to take better care of ourselves and start living Life rightly. Below you will see 7 ... Even if you live in an apartment, you can grow a small herb garden. Some communities in cities now have garden space (for free ...
drstandley.com/activities_of_daily_living_march_12.shtml

*  NHSGGC : Activities of Daily Living

All of the Activities of Daily Living available on the template suggest that help is required or that the person is dependent ... Activities of Daily Living. Is the patient's life affected by their symptoms ? (Cough, breathlessness, chest pain, oedema). ...
nhsggc.org.uk/about-us/professional-support-sites/cdm-local-enhanced-services/lvsd/activities-of-daily-living/

*  Blogs about Activities Of Daily Living

... Feelin' the Love at the PJCC (Blink and 10 years go by). "Blink!... Blink!" ordered my ... Turns out I needed a daily dose of eye drops, especially working in windy Foster City. Otherwise I could see perfectly fine. ...
ideafit.com/blogs/topic/activities-of-daily-living

*  Activities of Daily Living | Interactive Autism Network

Learning to perform activities of daily living, like dressing, self-feeding, and toileting, is crucial to a person's ... In other words, all the other issues individuals with ASD face make the acquisition of daily living skills that much harder. ...
https://iancommunity.org/cs/challenging_behavior/activities_of_daily_living

*  Recovery of Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults After Hospitalization for Acute Medical Illness - RWJF

Recovery of Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults After Hospitalization for Acute Medical Illness. * *December 2008 ... Recovery of Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults After Hospitalization for Acute Medical Illness (Web) ... in-home health care and palliative care to older adults living in a variety of situations. ...
rwjf.org/en/library/research/2008/12/recovery-of-activities-of-daily-living-in-older-adults-after-hos.html

*  Coordinated Control of Assistive Robotic Devices for Activities of Daily Living Tasks - IEEE Journals & Magazine

Recent research in rehabilitation indicates that tasks that focus on activities of daily living (ADL) are likely to show ...
ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/4483652/keywords?reload=true

*  Activities of Daily Living - Virtual Tour - Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

The activities of daily living kitchen and lounge is a specially designed accessible space that allows children and youth to ... learn self-supporting activities that will help them develop independence and the confidence to perform daily tasks on their ... The lounge area is provided as a place to relax, enjoy recreation and leisure activities, practice social skills, and just have ... Skills for living life are lessons that everyone should have the opportunity to learn. ...
https://hollandbloorview.ca/aboutus/virtualtour/level0/activitiesofdailyliving

*  Could Questions on Activities of Daily Living Estimate Grip Strength of Older Adults Living Independently in the Community?

... ... Many older adults have to deal with disabilities in mobility, activities of daily living (ADL), or instrumental ADL [1]. Among ... The objective of the study was to identify questions about tasks or daily activities done with the hands that could be good ... The aim of this study was to identify questions about tasks or daily activities done with the hands that could estimate ...
https://hindawi.com/journals/jar/2012/427109/

*  Lirias: Automatic monitoring of activities of daily living using contactless sensors (AMACS)

Automatic monitoring of activities of daily living using contactless sensors (AMACS). Authors: Devriendt, Els. Mertens, Marc. ... Automatic monitoring of activities of daily living using contactless sensors (AMACS)'', European geriatric medicine, vol. 3 ...
https://lirias.kuleuven.be/handle/123456789/359065

*  Fall-Associated Difficulty with Activities of Daily Living in Functionally Independent Individuals Aged 65 to 69 in the United...

Patients and/or caregivers may access this content for use in relation to their own personal healthcare or that of a family member only. Terms and conditions will apply. ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.12071/pdf

*  Healthcare | Free Full-Text | Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related...

Basic activities of daily living (ADL) are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum ... Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing ... Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing ... "Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing ...
mdpi.com/2227-9032/3/3/503

*  Daily living activities of Medicare beneficiaries, 2007

... of community-resident Medicare beneficiaries over age 65 had difficulty in performing one or more activities of daily living. ... Daily living activities of Medicare beneficiaries, 2007. In 2007, more than 25% of community-resident Medicare beneficiaries ... An additional 4.6% reported difficulties with instrumental activities of daily living.. Of institutionalized Medicare ... over age 65 had difficulty in performing one or more activities of daily living. ...
silverbook.org/fact/in-2007-more-than-25-of-community-resident-medicare-beneficiaries-over-age-65-had-difficulty-in-performing-one-or-more/

*  Effects of a predefined minitrampoline training programme on balance, mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a...

Effects of a predefined minitrampoline training programme on balance, mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a ... mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study. ...
strokecenter.org/effects-of-a-predefined-minitrampoline-training-programme-on-balance-mobility-and-activities-of-daily-living-after-stroke-a-randomized-controlled-pilot-study/

*  Memory care is a specialized form of assisted living requiring assistance with the activities of daily living.

... programs and activities designed especially for those with Alzheimr disease and othe dementias ... Memory care is a specialized form of assisted living with special environments, ... social activation and housekeeping and assistance with the activities of daily living - things like medication reminders, help ... Social activities are key in helping those with memory care issues by providing an activity and outlet for them and minimize ...
https://thecareguide.com/residence-options/memory-care/services/memory-care-services

*  Tips for Daily Living Library - Daily Activities Continued

Tips For Daily Living Daily Activities. Kitchen Tips By Stroke Survivor, George Fassett, Sr. I had an old whiteboard hanging ... Tips for Daily Living Library - Daily Activities Continued. .subhead { color: #3B9BDD; font-size:20px } .section { font-size: ...
strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/General/Tips-for-Daily-Living-Library---Daily-Activities-Continued_UCM_459844_SubHomePage.jsp

*  Activities of daily living: changes in functional ability in three samples of elderly and very elderly people - ePrints Soton

Activities of daily living: changes in functional ability in three samples of elderly and very elderly people ... Bowling, Ann and Grundy, Emily (1997) Activities of daily living: changes in functional ability in three samples of elderly and ... Keywords: Activities of Daily Living, Aged, 80 and over, disability evaluation, england, female, follow-up studies, frail ... Design: a structured interview survey of three samples of elderly people living at home at two points in time. The three ...
https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/334770/

*  Star Trek (2009) / Headscratchers - TV Tropes

Even if humans can live over 120 years by TNG (and look every minute of it) can a beagle live that long by TOS? These things ... By way of comparison consider the daily life of the captain of a Nimitz class aircraft carrier. It's not all about launching ... The message from Vulcan reported only heavy seismic activity and the need for humanitarian (Vulcanitarian?) aid. It wasn't ... Plenty of individuals fail to live up to their cultural ideals. * ^ Though in T'Pol's case it had more to do with her long-term ...
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Headscratchers/StarTrek2009

*  The Awareness Center, Inc. (International Jewish Coaltion Against Sexual Assault): The Cruelest Crime - Sexual Abuse Of...

"I couldn't live without the sex. I couldn't imagine my life without it," Bob says. "A kid could walk past me right now and my ... "I also encouraged her to distract them with other activities rather than try to control the behavior," she says. "It's better ... At the time the three were living in a shelter for battered women in St. Paul, Minn. Chris had left her husband and their home ... We tell these men that they will need to work on their problem every day for the rest of their lives." ...
theawarenesscenter.blogspot.com/1984/12/the-cruelest-crime-sexual-abuse-of.html

*  Amazon.com: Mr. Heater F232000 MH9BX Buddy 4,000-9,000-BTU Indoor-Safe Portable Radiant Heater: Home & Kitchen

Math Activities. for Kids & Schools. Warehouse Deals. Open-Box. Discounts. Whispercast. Discover & Distribute. Digital Content ... Easy to use and warms up the living area of our 32 foot RV quickly which saves us from using the furnace and RV battery when we ...
https://amazon.com/Mr-Heater-F232000-Indoor-Safe-Portable/dp/B002G51BZU

*  Lopinavir/r or Fosamprenavir/r Switch to Atazanavir/r or Darunavir/r - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Randomized, Open-label Study of Switch From Lopinavir/Ritonavir (LPV/r) or Fosamprenavir/Ritonavir (FPV/r) to Either Once Daily ... Clinical or laboratory evidence of clinically significant liver impairment/dysfunction disease or cirrhosis ... methods or not willing to continue practicing these birth control methods from screening until the last trial related activity ... Participants will be randomized to receive either boosted atazanavir or boosted darunavir given once daily, along with ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00756730?order=381

*  Residents protest proposed cell phone tower - Newfoundland & Labrador - CBC News

Live Blog Fancy a Friday read? Here's the CBC N.L. live blog ... Daily Digests. *Breaking Alerts. Log Out. Log out of your CBC ... Curling cash: Brier generates $10M in economic activity * Yes! Yes! Yes!: Hey Rosetta! moves one St. John's show to Mile One ...
cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/residents-protest-proposed-cell-phone-tower-1.1395673

Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.Multiple disabilitiesInternational Disability and Development Consortium: The International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) is a global consortium of disability and development related organisations. The aim of IDDC is to promote inclusive development internationally, with a special focus on promoting human rights for all disabled people living in economically poor communities in lower and middle-income countries.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Independent Living Program: The Independent Living Program is a United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program aimed at making sure that each eligible veteran is able to live independently to their maximum capacity. The program is commonly referred to as VA ILP.Frailty syndrome: Frailty is a common geriatric syndrome that embodies an elevated risk of catastrophic declines in health and function among older adults. Frailty is a condition associated with ageing, and it has been recognized for centuries.Home of the future: The home of the future, similar to the office of the future, is a concept that has been popular to explore since the early 20th century, or perhaps earlier. There have been many exhibits, such as at World's Fairs and theme parks, purporting to show how future homes will look and work, as well as standalone model "homes of the future" sponsored by builders, developers, or technology companies.Occupational therapy in SeychellesCurotek: Curotek is an American company based in Portland, Oregon that provides technology for community-based care settings such as assisted living communities and group home settings serving those with Dementia, Alzheimer's, Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities and other disabilities that cause safety risks associated with freedom of movement and personal autonomy. Curotek provides various hardware devices providing real-time tracking of residents and care staff, an alert system tied to various sensor devices such as bed pads and thresholds and an electronic door control system that locks and unlocks doors based on the proximity of tracking badges.Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Familial British dementia: Familial British dementia is a form of dementia. It was first reported by Cecil Charles Worster-Drought in 1933 and is therefore also known as Worster-Drought syndrome.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Psychiatric assessment: A psychiatric assessment, or psychological screening, is a process of gathering information about a person within a psychiatric (or mental health) service, with the purpose of making a diagnosis. The assessment is usually the first stage of a treatment process, but psychiatric assessments may also be used for various legal purposes.Assistive technology service provider: Assistive technology service providers help individuals with disabilities acquire and use appropriate Assistive Technology (AT) to help them participate in activities of daily living, employment and education.Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is a neuropsychological assessment initially introduced in 1998. It consists of ten subtests which give five scores, one for each of the five domains tested (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory).Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingWalking on a Dream (song)Cognitive skill: Cognitive functioning is a term referring to a human’s ability to process to (thoughts) that should not deplete on a large scale in healthy individuals. Cognition mainly refers to things like memory, the ability to learn new information, speech, understanding of written material.List of kanji by stroke count: This Kanji index method groups together the kanji that are written with the same number of strokes. Currently, there are 2,186 individual kanji listed.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Rating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Neighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Craig HospitalBerg Balance Scale: The Berg Balance Scale (or BBS) is a widely used clinical test of a person's static and dynamic balance abilities, named after Katherine Berg, one of the developers. For functional balance tests, the BBS is generally considered to be the gold standard.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Cable grip: thumbnail|right|[[Detachable chairlift grip. (Chair is on a sidetrack).Select MedicalThe Movement Disorder SocietyRegression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Gait (human): Human gait refers to locomotion achieved through the movement of human limbs. Human gait is defined as bipedal, biphasic forward propulsion of center of gravity of the human body, in which there are alternate sinuous movements of different segments of the body with least expenditure of energy.Placebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.Causes of Parkinson's disease: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Most people with PD have idiopathic Parkinson's disease (having no specific known cause).COPE FoundationDemographic dividend: Demographic dividend refers to a period – usually 20 to 30 years – when fertility rates fall due to significant reductions in child and infant mortality rates. As women and families realize that fewer children will die during infancy or childhood, they will begin to have fewer children to reach their desired number of offspring, further reducing the proportion of non-productive dependents.Bio Base EuropeSilent strokeNiigata UniversityAdult interaction with infants: When adults come into contact with infants, it is unlikely that they would be able to have a proper conversation, as the infant would not know enough about pop culture or general knowledge to create a stimulating conversation for the adult. Also, the adult may not understand baby-language and cannot relate to their situation properly.Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a worldwide project that provides reliable clinical data for the research of pathology principle, prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Multiple research groups contribute their findings of the biological markers to the understanding of the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in the human brain.Pain scale: A pain scale measures a patient's pain intensity or other features. Pain scales are based on self-report, observational (behavioral), or physiological data.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.David Budescu: David Budescu is a psychologist and academic. He is the Anne Anastasi Professor of Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology at Fordham University.Cancer pain: Pain in cancer may arise from a tumor compressing or infiltrating nearby body parts; from treatments and diagnostic procedures; or from skin, nerve and other changes caused by a hormone imbalance or immune response. Most chronic (long-lasting) pain is caused by the illness and most acute (short-term) pain is caused by treatment or diagnostic procedures.Sensory stimulation therapy: Sensory stimulation therapy (SST) is an experimental therapy that aims to utilize neural plasticity mechanisms to aid in the recovery of somatosensory function after stroke or cognitive ageing. Stroke and cognitive ageing are well known sources of cognitive loss, the former by neuronal death, the later by weakening of neural connections.St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church (Calgary, Alberta): St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church is an historic Carpenter Gothic style Roman Catholic church building located at 14608 Macleod Trail in the Midnapore neighbourhood in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Exercise prescription software: Exercise prescription software is a branch of computer software designed to aid in the construction of exercise programmes or regimes for patients who require some kind of ongoing rehabilitation.Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Upper-limb surgery in tetraplegia: Upper-limb surgery in tetraplegia includes a number of surgical interventions that can help improve the quality of life of a patient with tetraplegia.Effect of oxygen on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: In some individuals, the effect of oxygen on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is to cause increased carbon dioxide retention, which may cause drowsiness, headaches, and in severe cases lack of respiration, which may lead to death. People with lung ailments or with central respiratory depression, who receive supplemental oxygen, require careful monitoring.Wills Sainte Claire: Wills Sainte Claire was an automobile brand manufactured by the C. H.

(1/6812) Legalized physician-assisted suicide in Oregon--the first year's experience.

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: On October 27, 1997, Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide. We collected data on all terminally ill Oregon residents who received prescriptions for lethal medications under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act and who died in 1998. The data were obtained from physicians' reports, death certificates, and interviews with physicians. We compared persons who took lethal medications prescribed under the act with those who died from similar illnesses but did not receive prescriptions for lethal medications. RESULTS: Information on 23 persons who received prescriptions for lethal medications was reported to the Oregon Health Division; 15 died after taking the lethal medications, 6 died from underlying illnesses, and 2 were alive as of January 1, 1999. The median age of the 15 patients who died after taking lethal medications was 69 years; 8 were male, and all 15 were white. Thirteen of the 15 patients had cancer. The case patients and controls were similar with regard to sex, race, urban or rural residence, level of education, health insurance coverage, and hospice enrollment. No case patients or controls expressed concern about the financial impact of their illness. One case patient and 15 controls expressed concern about inadequate control of pain (P=0.10). The case patients were more likely than the controls to have never married (P=0.04) and were more likely to be concerned about loss of autonomy due to illness (P=0.01) and loss of control of bodily functions (P=0.02). At death, 21 percent of the case patients and 84 percent of the controls were completely disabled (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: During the first year of legalized physician-assisted suicide in Oregon, the decision to request and use a prescription for lethal medication was associated with concern about loss of autonomy or control of bodily functions, not with fear of intractable pain or concern about financial loss. In addition, we found that the choice of physician-assisted suicide was not associated with level of education or health insurance coverage.  (+info)

(2/6812) Diabetic peripheral neuropathy and quality of life.

The quality of life (QOL) of 79 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and 37 non-diabetic controls was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). The NHP consists of six domains assessing energy, sleep, pain, physical mobility, emotional reactions and social isolation. Symptomatic diabetic neuropathy was present in 41 of the patients. The neuropathy patients had significantly higher scores (impaired QOL) in 5/6 NHP domains than either the other diabetic patients (p < 0.01) or the non-diabetic (p < 0.001) controls. These were: emotional reaction, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep. The diabetic patients without neuropathy also had significantly impaired QOL for 4/6 NHP domains compared with the non-diabetic control group (p < 0.05) (energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep). This quantification of the detrimental effect on QOL of diabetes, and in particular of chronic symptomatic peripheral diabetic neuropathy, emphasizes the need for further research into effective management of these patients.  (+info)

(3/6812) Teaching pedestrian skills to retarded persons: generalization from the classroom to the natural environment.

Little attention has been given to teaching adaptive community skills to retarded persons. In this study, five retarded male students were taught basic pedestrian skills in a classroom- Training was conducted on a model built to simulate city traffic conditions. Each subject was taught five specific skills involved in street crossing in sequence, viz. intersection recognition, pedestrian-light skills, traffic-light skills, and skills for two different stop-sign conditions. Before, during, and after training, subjects were tested on generalization probes on model and under actual city traffic conditions. Results of a multiple-baseline design acorss both subjects and behaviors indicated that after receiving classroom training on the skills, each subject exhibited appropriate pedestrian skills under city traffic conditions. In addition, training in some skills appeared to facilitate performance in skills not yet trained.  (+info)

(4/6812) The Sock Test for evaluating activity limitation in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Assessment within rehabilitation often must reflect patients' perceived functional problems and provide information on whether these problems are caused by impairments of the musculoskeletal system. Such capabilities were examined in a new functional test, the Sock Test, simulating the activity of putting on a sock. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Intertester reliability was examined in 21 patients. Concurrent validity, responsiveness, and predictive validity were examined in a sample of 337 patients and in subgroups of this sample. RESULTS: Intertester reliability was acceptable. Sock Test scores were related to concurrent reports of activity limitation in dressing activities. Scores also reflected questionnaire-derived reports of problems in a broad range of activities of daily living and pain and were responsive to change over time. Increases in age and body mass index increased the likelihood of Sock Test scores indicating activity limitation. Pretest scores were predictive of perceived difficulties in dressing activities after 1 year. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: Sock Test scores reflect perceived activity limitations and restrictions of the musculoskeletal system.  (+info)

(5/6812) The psychometric properties of clinical rating scales used in multiple sclerosis.

OullII;l y Many clinical rating scales have been proposed to assess the impact of multiple sclerosis on patients, but only few have been evaluated formally for reliability, validity and responsiveness. We assessed the psychometric properties of five commonly used scales in multiple sclerosis, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Scripps Neurological Rating Scale (SNRS), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Ambulation Index (AI) and the Cambridge Multiple Sclerosis Basic Score (CAMBS). The score frequency distributions of all five scales were either bimodal (EDSS and AI) or severely skewed (SNRS, FIM and CAMBS). The reliability of each scale depended on the definition of 'agreement'. Inter-and intra-rater reliabilities were high when 'agreement' was considered to exist despite a difference of up to 1.0 EDSS point (two 0.5 steps), 13 SNRS points, 9 FIM points, 1 AI point and 1 point on the various CAMBS domains. The FIM, AI, and the relapse and progression domains of the CAMBS were sensitive to clinical change, but the EDSS and the SNRS were unresponsive. The validity of these scales as impairment (SNRS and EDSS) and disability (EDSS, FIM, AI and the disability domain of the CAMBS) measures was established. All scales correlated closely with other measures of handicap and quality of life. None of these scales satisfied the psychometric requirements of outcome measures completely, but each had some desirable properties. The SNRS and the EDSS were reliable and valid measures of impairment and disability, but they were unresponsive. The FIM was a reliable, valid and responsive measure of disability, but it is cumbersome to administer and has a limited content validity. The AI was a reliable and valid ambulation-related disability scale, but it was weakly responsive. The CAMBS was a reliable (all four domains) and responsive (relapse and progression domains) outcome measure, but had a limited validity (handicap domain). These psychometric properties should be considered when designing further clinical trials in multiple sclerosis.  (+info)

(6/6812) Efficacy and safety of rivastigmine in patients with Alzheimer's disease: international randomised controlled trial.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of rivastigmine on the core domains of Alzheimer's disease. DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, multicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group trial. Patients received either placebo, 1-4 mg/day (lower dose) rivastigmine, or 6-12 mg/day (higher dose) rivastigmine. Doses were increased in one of two fixed dose ranges (1-4 mg/day or 6-12 mg/day) over the first 12 weeks with a subsequent assessment period of 14 weeks. SETTING: 45 centres in Europe and North America. PARTICIPANTS: 725 patients with mild to moderately severe probable Alzheimer's disease diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, and the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association. OUTCOME MEASURES: Cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale, rating on the clinician interview based impression of change incorporating caregiver information scale, and the progressive deterioration scale. RESULTS: At the end of the study cognitive function had deteriorated among those in the placebo group. Scores on the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale improved in patients in the higher dose group when compared with patients taking placebo (P<0.05). Significantly more patients in the higher dose group had improved by 4 points or more than had improved in the placebo group (24% (57/242) v 16% (39/238)). Global function as rated by the clinician interview scale had significantly improved among those in the higher dose group compared with those taking placebo (P<0.001), and significantly more patients in the higher dose group showed improvement than did in the placebo group (37% (80/219) v 20% (46/230)). Mean scores on the progressive deterioration scale improved from baseline in patients in the higher dose group but fell in the placebo group. Adverse events were predominantly gastrointestinal, of mild to moderate severity, transient, and occurred mainly during escalation of the dose. 23% (55/242) of those in the higher dose group, 7% (18/242) of those in the lower dose group, and 7% (16/239) of those in the placebo group discontinued treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Rivastigmine is well tolerated and effective. It improves cognition, participation in activities of daily living, and global evaluation ratings in patients with mild to moderately severe Alzheimer's disease. This is the first treatment to show compelling evidence of efficacy in a predominantly European population.  (+info)

(7/6812) Long-term functional status and quality of life after lower extremity revascularization.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the longer term (up to 7 years) functional status and quality of life outcomes from lower extremity revascularization. METHODS: This study was designed as a cross-sectional telephone survey and chart review at the University of Minnesota Hospital. The subjects were patients who underwent their first lower extremity revascularization procedure or a primary amputation for vascular disease between January 1, 1989, and January 31, 1995, who had granted consent or had died. The main outcome measures were ability to walk, SF-36 physical function, SF-12, subsequent amputation, and death. RESULTS: The medical records for all 329 subjects were reviewed after the qualifying procedures for details of the primary procedure (62.6% arterial bypass graft, 36.8% angioplasty, 0.6% atherectomy), comorbidities (64% diabetics), severity of disease, and other vascular risk factors. All 166 patients who were living were surveyed by telephone between June and August 1996. At 7 years after the qualifying procedure, 73% of the patients who were alive still had the qualifying limb, although 63% of the patients had died. Overall, at the time of the follow-up examination (1 to 7.5 years after the qualifying procedure), 65% of the patients who were living were able to walk independently and 43% had little or no limitation in walking several blocks. In a multiple regression model, patients with diabetes and patients who were older were less likely to be able to walk at follow-up examination and had a worse functional status on the SF-36 and a lower physical health on the SF-12. Number of years since the procedure was not a predictor in any of the analyses. CONCLUSION: Although the long-term mortality rate is high in the population that undergoes lower limb revascularization, the survivors are likely to retain their limb over time and have good functional status.  (+info)

(8/6812) Infratentorial atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and disability in multiple sclerosis.

Loss of tissue volume in the central nervous system may provide an index of fixed neurological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Recent magnetic resonance studies have shown a modest relationship between clinical disability rating scores and transverse sectional area of the cervical spinal cord. To explore further the relationship between atrophy and disability in multiple sclerosis, we estimated the volumes of infratentorial structures from MRIs in a cross-sectional study of 41 patients, 21 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 20 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. We used the Cavalieri method of modern design stereology with point counting to estimate the volume of brainstem, cerebellum and upper cervical spinal cord from three-dimensional MRIs acquired with an MPRAGE (Magnetization-prepared Rapid Acquisition Gradient Echo) sequence. The volume of the upper (C1-C3) cervical spinal cord was significantly correlated with a composite spinal cord score derived from the appropriate Functional Scale scores of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (r = -0.50, P < 0.01). The cerebellar (r = 0.49, P < 0.01) and brainstem (r = 0.34, P < 0.05) volumes correlated with the Scripp's Neurological Disability Rating Scale scores. The upper cervical cord volumes (r = -0.39, P < 0.01), but not the brainstem or cerebellar volumes, were significantly associated with disease duration. MRI-estimated structural volumes may provide a simple index of axonal and/or myelin loss, the presumed pathological substrates of irreversible impairment and disability in multiple sclerosis.  (+info)



ADLs


  • Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) is a real term used in healthcare that refers to daily basic self-care activities in an individual's residence, outdoor environment or both. (drstandley.com)
  • The most common shorthand of "Activities of Daily Living Survey" is ADLS. (acronymsandslang.com)
  • OASIS requires the assessment of eight ADLs, or basic self-care activities. (shieldhealthcare.com)

instrumental activities


  • White matter lesions are related to impaired instrumental activities of daily living poststroke. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) impairment in Alzheimer's disease has been associated with global amyloid deposition in postmortem studies. (karger.com)
  • Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) consist of many everyday activities, such as handling the finances, using public transportation or driving, shopping for clothes and food, preparing meals, cleaning, and doing the laundry. (karger.com)

Alzheimer's


  • The Alzheimer Society is Canada's leading nationwide health charity for people living with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. (thecareguide.com)
  • The aim of this field experiment was to compare the effects of a special care unit (SCU) on residents with Alzheimer's disease (AD) who lived on the SCU and on traditional (integrated) nursing home units. (bepress.com)

Difficulty with Activities


  • African American stroke survivors were more likely to become disabled and have difficulty with activities of daily living than their non-Hispanic white counterparts. (grabstats.com)

independence


  • Learning to perform activities of daily living, like dressing, self-feeding, and toileting, is crucial to a person's independence and their ability to take part in the larger world. (iancommunity.org)
  • The activities of daily living kitchen and lounge is a specially designed accessible space that allows children and youth to learn self-supporting activities that will help them develop independence and the confidence to perform daily tasks on their own. (hollandbloorview.ca)
  • Basic activities of daily living (ADL) are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument. (mdpi.com)

Tasks


  • The objective of the study was to identify questions about tasks or daily activities done with the hands that could be good estimators of objectively determined grip strength. (hindawi.com)
  • do not know/not applicable) in performing different tasks of daily living involving grip strength, such as opening a jar, carrying a bag of groceries, and holding a dictionary. (hindawi.com)
  • The choice of these tasks was first based on an analysis of tasks or activities that require different amounts of grip strength. (hindawi.com)

dementia


  • Another study found that the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale [ 16 ], which is highly dependent on activities of daily living, was correlated with PiB retention across subjects with different dementias [ 7 ]. (karger.com)
  • This study examines how prestroke dementia and cognitive dysfunction after stroke influence the personal activities of daily living (P-ADL) in elderly patients in the acute phase after stroke. (lu.se)

functional


  • These results suggest that daily functional impairment is related to greater amyloid burden in MCI. (karger.com)
  • Are Functional and Activity Limitations Becoming More Prevalent Among 55 to 69-Year-Olds in the United States? (rand.org)

mobility


  • Many older adults have to deal with disabilities in mobility, activities of daily living (ADL), or instrumental ADL [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Effects of a predefined minitrampoline training programme on balance, mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study. (strokecenter.org)

stroke


  • Influence of cognition on personal activities of daily living (P-ADL) in the acute phase: The Gothenburg Cognitive Stroke Study in Elderly. (lu.se)
  • Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of stroke rehabilitation and examine the effect of stroke rehabilitation on stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living strategies. (duhnnae.com)
  • socio-demographic and medical data sheet, pre/post knowledge questionnaire interview schedule, Barthel index scale, Ashworth scale and Construction patient teaching booklet about stroke and activities of daily living performance. (duhnnae.com)

cognitive


  • BACKGROUND: White matter lesions (WMLs) are frequent in elderly people, and have been associated with impaired activities of daily living (ADL) and cognitive decline. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In addition to the basic services of meal preparation, social activation and housekeeping and assistance with the activities of daily living - things like medication reminders, help with bathing and grooming that assisted living residents may receive, those with cognitive issues receive additional help in the form of gentle reminders and assistance to find the dining room for example. (thecareguide.com)

elderly people


  • Design: a structured interview survey of three samples of elderly people living at home at two points in time. (soton.ac.uk)

practices


  • The project focused only on those living in the communities who were capable of accurately self-reporting their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. (umich.edu)

older adults


  • The authors call for additional research to help practitioners and policy-makers determine how to better target and deliver acute and long-term rehabilitation services, in-home health care and palliative care to older adults living in a variety of situations. (rwjf.org)
  • Could Questions on Activities of Daily Living Estimate Grip Strength of Older Adults Living Independently in the Community? (hindawi.com)

Brain


  • When dopamine levels decrease, it causes abnormal brain activity, leading to signs of Parkinson's disease. (mayoclinic.org)

patients


  • Fortunately, innovative treatments are saving lives and aortic stenosis can be successfully treated with valve replacement in patients of all ages. (silverbook.org)

toilet


  • This work examines the use of a low-power Wireless AcousticSensor Network (WASN) for the observation of clinicallyrelevant activities of daily living (ADL) (e.g. eating, personalhygiene, toilet usage, etc.) from elderly. (kuleuven.be)

skills


  • In other words, all the other issues individuals with ASD face make the acquisition of daily living skills that much harder. (iancommunity.org)
  • The lounge area is provided as a place to relax, enjoy recreation and leisure activities, practice social skills, and just have fun. (hollandbloorview.ca)
  • Skills for living life are lessons that everyone should have the opportunity to learn. (hollandbloorview.ca)

everyday activities


  • A feasibility study involving N = 10 participants was carried out to evaluate the devices' ability to differentiate between nine everyday activities. (mdpi.com)

help


  • All of the Activities of Daily Living available on the template suggest that help is required or that the person is dependent on someone. (nhsggc.org.uk)

include


  • The choices available in seniors' housing include everything from living in your home, with home care, to progressively higher levels of support as we age. (thecareguide.com)

care


  • And sometimes we just need to go back to the basics of the 'Activities of Daily Living' in order to take better care of ourselves and start living Life rightly. (drstandley.com)
  • Memory care is a specialized form of assisted living requiring assistance with the activities of daily living. (thecareguide.com)
  • Memory care is a specialized form of assisted living. (thecareguide.com)
  • Social activities are key in helping those with memory care issues by providing an activity and outlet for them and minimize the frustration that results from the disease. (thecareguide.com)
  • She lived at home, but she required full-time assistance with her care. (flemingandcurti.com)
  • In 2007 she paid two caretakers a total of $49,580 for live-in care (one lived with her for five weeks while the primary caretaker took a vacation). (flemingandcurti.com)
  • By the end of 2006, in an effort to save money, he had discharged the nursing service and hired one of their caretakers directly to live with his sister and oversee her care. (flemingandcurti.com)
  • Because of the evaluation by her primary care physician in 2006, the cost of her live-in caretakers would be a legitimate deduction on her income taxes - or at least it would be deductible to the extent that it exceeded 7% of her adjusted gross income. (flemingandcurti.com)
  • Documents (such as a Living Will) completed and signed by a person who is legally competent to explain wishes for medical care should he or she become unable to make those decisions at a later time. (als-ny.org)

study


  • Vuegen L., Van Den Broeck B., Karsmakers P., Van hamme H., Vanrumste B., ''Automatic monitoring of activities of daily living based on real-life acoustic sensor data: a preliminary study'', 4th workshop on speech and language processing for assistive technologies - SLPAT-2013, 6 pp. (kuleuven.be)

survey


Tips


  • Our Activities of Daily Living: Tips & Tricks for the Caregiver - Presented by Barbara E. West, RN, MSN, CWOCN of Capital Nursing Education webinar has already taken place. (shieldhealthcare.com)

Devices


  • In this paper, the authors investigate the role that smart devices, including smartphones and smartwatches, can play in identifying activities of daily living. (mdpi.com)

directly


  • A drug that increases neurotransmitter activity by directly stimulating the nerve cell receptors. (als-ny.org)

services


  • For everyday healthy living advice and services information. (nhsggc.org.uk)

residents


  • Sunrise Assisted Living, for example, advertises that it has one staff to look after five to six residents. (thecareguide.com)

Among


  • in Japanese, ikigai ) with mortality and a decline in the activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) among the community-dwelling elderly. (go.jp)

better


  • Both single and multi-sensor approaches were examined to better understand the role each sensor in the device can play in unobtrusive activity recognition. (mdpi.com)

kitchen


require


  • Because of her memory deficits she would require assistance with the activities of daily living, he wrote. (flemingandcurti.com)