AccidentsPoisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Accidents, HomeAccidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Drug Overdose: Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Rewarming: Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Sverdlovsk Accidental Release: ANTHRAX outbreak that occurred in 1979 and was associated with a research facility in Sverdlovsk, in the Ural mountain region of central RUSSIA. Most victims worked or lived in a narrow zone extending from the facility. The zone of anthrax-caused livestock mortality paralleled the northerly wind that prevailed shortly before the outbreak. It was concluded that an escape of ANTHRAX caused outbreak.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Kerosene: A refined petroleum fraction used as a fuel as well as a solvent.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Seveso Accidental Release: 1976 accidental release of DIOXINS from a manufacturing facility in Seveso, ITALY following an equipment failure.Chemical Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of a chemical from its containment that either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a chemical hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Near Drowning: Non-fatal immersion or submersion in water. The subject is resuscitable.Electric Injuries: Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.Skull Fracture, Depressed: A skull fracture characterized by inward depression of a fragment or section of cranial bone, often compressing the underlying dura mater and brain. Depressed cranial fractures which feature open skin wounds that communicate with skull fragments are referred to as compound depressed skull fractures.Household Products: Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.Respiratory Aspiration: Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Bhopal Accidental Release: 1984 accident in Bhopal, INDIA at a PESTICIDES facility, resulting when WATER entered a storage tank containing ISOCYANATES. The following accidental chemical release and uncontrolled reaction resulted in several thousand deaths.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Shaken Baby Syndrome: Brain injuries resulted from vigorous shaking of an infant or young child held by the chest, shoulders, or extremities causing extreme cranial acceleration. It is characterized by the intracranial and intraocular hemorrhages with no evident external trauma. Serious cases may result in death.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Intraoperative Awareness: Occurence of a patient becoming conscious during a procedure performed under GENERAL ANESTHESIA and subsequently having recall of these events. (From Anesthesiology 2006, 104(4): 847-64.)Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Medical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Toxic asphyxiation due to the displacement of oxygen from oxyhemoglobin by carbon monoxide.Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Post-Dural Puncture Headache: A secondary headache disorder attributed to low CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure caused by SPINAL PUNCTURE, usually after dural or lumbar puncture.Masochism: Pleasure derived from being physically or psychologically abused, whether inflicted by oneself or by others. Masochism includes sexual masochism.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Paraphilias: Disorders that include recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors generally involving nonhuman objects, suffering of oneself or partners, or children or other nonconsenting partners. (from DSM-IV, 1994)Caustics: Strong alkaline chemicals that destroy soft body tissues resulting in a deep, penetrating type of burn, in contrast to corrosives, that result in a more superficial type of damage via chemical means or inflammation. Caustics are usually hydroxides of light metals. SODIUM HYDROXIDE and potassium hydroxide are the most widely used caustic agents in industry. Medically, they have been used externally to remove diseased or dead tissues and destroy warts and small tumors. The accidental ingestion of products (household and industrial) containing caustic ingredients results in thousands of injuries per year.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Phosgene: A highly toxic gas that has been used as a chemical warfare agent. It is an insidious poison as it is not irritating immediately, even when fatal concentrations are inhaled. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed, p7304)Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Water Pollution, Chemical: Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.Retinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Blood Patch, Epidural: The injection of autologous blood into the epidural space either as a prophylactic treatment immediately following an epidural puncture or for treatment of headache as a result of an epidural puncture.Burns, ChemicalCraniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Frostbite: Damage to tissues as the result of low environmental temperatures.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Masturbation: Sexual stimulation or gratification of the self.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Merbromin: A once-popular mercury containing topical antiseptic.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Acid-Base Imbalance: Disturbances in the ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM of the body.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Egg Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to eggs that is triggered by the immune system.Hydroxyzine: A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Rolitetracycline: A pyrrolidinylmethyl TETRACYCLINE.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Angiostrongylus cantonensis: A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Hematoma, Subdural: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE between the DURA MATER and the arachnoidal layer of the MENINGES. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, but may develop in the spinal canal (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, SPINAL). Subdural hematoma can be classified as the acute or the chronic form, with immediate or delayed symptom onset, respectively. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Post-Exposure Prophylaxis: The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Medication Errors: Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.Battered Child Syndrome: A clinical condition resulting from repeated physical and psychological injuries inflicted on a child by the parents or caregivers.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Transvestism: Disorder characterized by recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors involving cross-dressing in a heterosexual male. The fantasies, urges, or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other areas of functioning. (from APA, DSM-IV, 1994)Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mastectomy, Subcutaneous: Excision of breast tissue with preservation of overlying skin, nipple, and areola so that breast form may be reconstructed.Extracorporeal Circulation: Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Nuclear Warfare: Warfare involving the use of NUCLEAR WEAPONS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Coroners and Medical Examiners: Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Chemical Warfare Agents: Chemicals that are used to cause the disturbance, disease, or death of humans during WARFARE.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Prurigo: A name applied to several itchy skin eruptions of unknown cause. The characteristic course is the formation of a dome-shaped papule with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting over or lichenification. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Acute Radiation Syndrome: A condition caused by a brief whole body exposure to more than one sievert dose equivalent of radiation. Acute radiation syndrome is initially characterized by ANOREXIA; NAUSEA; VOMITING; but can progress to hematological, gastrointestinal, neurological, pulmonary, and other major organ dysfunction.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Tracheotomy: Surgical incision of the trachea.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Myxedema: A condition characterized by a dry, waxy type of swelling (EDEMA) with abnormal deposits of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and other tissues. It is caused by a deficiency of THYROID HORMONES. The skin becomes puffy around the eyes and on the cheeks. The face is dull and expressionless with thickened nose and lips.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Hydrofluoric Acid: Hydrofluoric acid. A solution of hydrogen fluoride in water. It is a colorless fuming liquid which can cause painful burns.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.FiresWounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Razoxane: An antimitotic agent with immunosuppressive properties.Blood-Borne Pathogens: Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Charcoal: An amorphous form of carbon prepared from the incomplete combustion of animal or vegetable matter, e.g., wood. The activated form of charcoal is used in the treatment of poisoning. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Polybrominated Biphenyls: Biphenyl compounds which are extensively brominated. Many of these compounds are toxic environmental pollutants.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.EnglandEthylene Glycol: A colorless, odorless, viscous dihydroxy alcohol. It has a sweet taste, but is poisonous if ingested. Ethylene glycol is the most important glycol commercially available and is manufactured on a large scale in the United States. It is used as an antifreeze and coolant, in hydraulic fluids, and in the manufacture of low-freezing dynamites and resins.Great BritainAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.United StatesThoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Prescription Drugs: Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Strongylida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Smallpox Vaccine: A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Radiation Injuries, Experimental: Experimentally produced harmful effects of ionizing or non-ionizing RADIATION in CHORDATA animals.Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Housing: Living facilities for humans.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.WalesHealth Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.

*  Effects of Feldenkrais exercises on balance, mobility, balance confidence, and gait performance in community-dwelling adults...

Poor balance and limited mobility are major risk factors for falls. OBJECTIVE: The p ... Falls and fall-related injuries are a major public health concern, a financial challenge for health care providers, and ... Accidental Falls / prevention & control*. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Exercise Therapy*. Fear. Female. Gait*. Humans. Locomotion* ... BACKGROUND: Falls and fall-related injuries are a major public health concern, a financial challenge for health care providers ...
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Falls, accidental falls. Fractures. Physical injuries. Women. Elderly. Physical exercise. Balance exercise. ... The effect of an individualized fall prevention program on fall risk and falls in older people: a randomized, controlled trial ... Incidence of serious fall-related injuries and of all injurious falls including those leading to more moderate injuries [ Time ... Incidence of serious fall-related injuries (i.e., falls accompanied by fractures, head injuries requiring hospitalization, ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00545350?term=

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Failure of falls risk screening tools to predict outcome: a prospective cohort study Kristie J Harper, Annette D Barton, Glenn ... Prehospital emergency services screening and referral to reduce falls in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review ... Identifying older people at high risk of future falls: development and validation of a screening tool for use in emergency ...
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*  Protect Against Accidental Falls

... Merely climbing into or out of a tree stand or other elevated platform to hunt puts you at ... Long hours spent waiting in a stand, as well as poor hunting techniques, can lead to accidental falls. To protect yourself, use ... Always use a fall-arrest system (FAS) that is manufactured to industry standards and includes a full-body harness. Attach your ... Fall-Arrest System Components. Always use a properly fitting FAS that includes a full-body harness while climbing a tree, ...
https://bowhunter-ed.com/wisconsin/studyGuide/Protect-Against-Accidental-Falls/301051_7955

*  Accidental falls most frequent injury suffered by Estonians | News | ERR

... the frequency of which falls cause injury and death compared to other non-natural causes. ... The accidental death of Hardo Aasmäe, the former mayor of Tallinn, who fell down a staircase on Monday in the building in which ... Although most accidental falls don't end fatally, as in Aasmäe's case, they are still the most frequent injury suffered by ... The accidental death of Hardo Aasmäe, the former mayor of Tallinn, who fell down a staircase on Monday in the building in which ...
news.err.ee/114704/accidental-falls-most-frequent-injury-suffered-by-estonians

*  Deeds Of Flesh Members Injured In Accidental Fall - Blabbermouth.net

"Early Saturday morning, Mike [Hamilton, drums] and Jacoby [Kingston, bass/vocals] were involved in an accidental fall from a ... DEEDS OF FLESH Members Injured In Accidental Fall March 1, 2005 0 Comments ... The injuries could have been fatal from the 20-foot fall. We barely missed the brick driveway only inches away from the spot ...
blabbermouth.net/news/deeds-of-flesh-members-injured-in-accidental-fall/

*  Man survives accidental fall off Belle Isle Bridge

A man survived an accidental fall off the Belle Isle Bridge on Thursday morning. ... A man survived an accidental fall off the Belle Isle Bridge on Thursday morning. ... The fall happened around 7 a.m. and the man was transported to the hospital just before 8 a.m. ...
koco.com/article/man-survives-accidental-fall-off-belle-isle-bridge/4305990

*  An Accidental Fall by An Le for Vogue Italia > Photo Shoots > fashion...

An Accidental Fall by An Le for Vogue Italia. Click To View ...
fashionising.com/pictures/s--An-Accidental-Fall-by-An-Le-for-Vogue-Italia-17682-1.html

*  Lubbock VFW post commander killed in accidental fall - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

... Member Center:*Create Account, ... Lubbock VFW post commander killed in accidental fall. time.prefixdate:before{content:'Posted: ';}time.prefixdate:before{content ...
kcbd.com/story/19441121/lubbock-vfw-post-commander-killed-in-accidental-fall

*  Russell County man died as result of accidental fall, state police say | Lexington Herald Leader

A Russell County man whose body was found Sunday died as a result of an accidental fall, Kentucky State Police said in a news ...
kentucky.com/news/local/crime/article44377440.html

*  Halle Berry Suffers Head Injury Due To Accidental Fall | BlackDoctor

Halle Berry was hospitalized Tuesday night for a head injury she suffered while shooting a fight sequence for her new movie
https://blackdoctor.org/11185/halle-berry-accident-head-injury__trashed/

*  Accidental Fall by Kim Pritekel

"I have this nasty habit of getting into relationship where the other person falls in love with me, but I hold them at a ... Finally, she turned back to Erin . "You and your 'accidental seductions' and I are actually quite a bit alike, Erin ." ... Accidental Fall by Kim Pritekel. Accidental Fall by Kim Pritekel. Sequel to Accidental Seduction ... Accidental Fall by Kim Pritekel. *Accidental Seduction by Kim Pritekel. *After The Curtain Falls by Beth Dragon & Kathleen Wolf ...
https://thestoreelounge.wordpress.com/authors/accidental-fall-by-kim-pritekel/

*  Sons of Anarchy Death: Johnny Lewis' Fall Ruled Accidental, No Drugs in His System | E! News

The 28-year-old Sons of Anarchy actor died of traumatic injuries sustained in what can only be ruled an accidental fall due to ... Sons of Anarchy Death: Johnny Lewis' Fall Ruled Accidental, No Drugs in His System * By ... Therefore, the manner of his death is accidental.". Lewis was cremated and buried at sea off the coast of San Diego last month. ... "Decedent died of a fall," wrote L.A. County Senior Deputy Medical Examiner James K. Ribe. "We do not have definitive evidence ...
eonline.com/news/367253/sons-of-anarchy-death-johnny-lewis-fall-ruled-accidental-no-drugs-in-his-system

*  Wife's Fall Not So Accidental: Cops - NBC 7 San Diego

On Sat., March 12, just before 1 a.m. David Ditto called police saying his wife was hurt after a fall down the stairs at the ... A Mira Mesa woman's death, first reported as a fall down the stairs, has led to her husband's arrest. ...
nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Wifes-Fall-Not-So-Accidental-Cops-118250924.html

*  Dentist in Hartford City, IN | An Accidental Fall Could Also Cause a Tongue Injury

Slipping on ice or suffering a household fall often evokes fearful images of a broken arm or leg. However, there are other ... Slipping on ice or suffering a household fall often evokes fearful images of a broken arm or leg. However, there are other ...
https://maddoxfamilydentalcenter.com/an-accidental-fall-could-also-cause-a-tongue-injury/

*  50 years later, survivor recalls accidental plunge over Niagara Falls | Deseret News

Roger Woodward earned bragging rights as one of the few people to survive a plunge over Niagara Falls. ... 50 years later, survivor recalls accidental plunge over Niagara Falls. 7-year-old went over brink in 1960 after a boating ... NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. - Fifty years ago, Roger Woodward earned bragging rights as one of the few people to survive a plunge over ... And while he kept a low profile as a Niagara Falls survivor, his three sons while growing up were quicker to exploit the story. ...
https://deseretnews.com/article/700049026/50-years-later-survivor-recalls-accidental-plunge-over-Niagara-Falls.html?pg=all

*  Cooking Classes at the Depuy Canal House in High Falls, NY - The Accidental Foodie - February 2012 - Hudson Valley, NY

Cooking Classes at the Depuy Canal House in High Falls, NY. Cooking Classes at the Depuy Canal House in High Falls, NY. Chef ... More from The Accidental Foodie blog. » Go to the Hudson Valley Restaurants Guide. » Go to the Hudson Valley Food & Drink Guide ...
hvmag.com/Blogs/The-Accidental-Foodie/February-2012/Cooking-Classes-at-the-Depuy-Canal-House-in-High-Falls-NY/

*  Ryan Uhre death ruled accidental, according to autopsy findings - tribunedigital-sunsentinel

... died from an accidental fall, according to preliminary autopsy results released Monday. The body of ... Ryan Uhre, the legislative aide from Weston found dead in an abandoned building in Tallahassee, died from an accidental fall, ...
articles.sun-sentinel.com/2014-02-24/news/fl-ryan-uhre-acciddental-death-20140224_1_accidental-fall-state-rep-tallahassee

*  BPT Home Page - Bossier Press-Tribune

An inmate under medical watch recently died following an accidental fall while incarcerated at the Bossier Parish Maximum ...
bossierpress.com/?option=com_content&

*  Accidental Death At A Playground - KAUZ-TV: Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Police were dispatched to 5500 Profession Drive on an accidental hanging Thursday afternoon. First responders arrived on scene ... Wichita Falls police say a five year old girl accidentally hung herself. ... Accidental Death At A Playground - KAUZ-TV: Newschannel 6 Now , Wichita Falls, TX. Member Center:*Create Account, ... Wichita Falls police say a five year old girl accidentally hung herself. ...
newschannel6now.com/story/16611742/deadly-accident-at-a-wichita-falls-playground

*  LifeProof FRE Power Case for Apple iPhone 6 and 6s Blue 77-52787 - Best Buy

Survives accidental falls.. Water-resistant design. Provides additional protection.. Built-in scratch protector. Keeps your ...
https://bestbuy.com/site/lifeproof-fre-power-case-for-apple-iphone-6-and-6s-blue/4627802.p?skuId=4627802

*  IJERPH | Free Full-Text | Preventive Effects of Safety Helmets on Traumatic Brain Injury after Work-Related Falls

We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of safety helmet use and height of fall for study outcomes, and adjusted for any ... The industrial or construction area was the most common place of fall injury occurrence, and 45.0% were wearing safety helmets ... All of the adult patients who experienced work-related fall injuries were eligible, excluding cases with unknown safety helmet ... Conclusions: A safety helmet is associated with prevention of intracranial injury resulting from work-related fall and the ...
mdpi.com/1660-4601/13/11/1063

*  Geriatrics | Free Full-Text | Stroke and Falls-Clash of the Two Titans in Geriatrics

In addition, individuals with stroke are also more likely to have other associated risk factors for falls including diabetes, ... While anticoagulation is associated with increased risk of intracranial bleeding after a fall, the risk of suffering a further ... Despite stroke being considered a well-established major risk factor for falls, there remains no evidence for effective ... Previous observational studies evaluating falls risk factors in stroke have mainly been uncontrolled and found similar risk ...
mdpi.com/2308-3417/1/4/31

*  1

Rack and spray unit damaged by accidental fall of guest. R & R parts....good as new. ...
https://partselect.com/PS11747769-Whirlpool-WP99003318-Lower-Spray-Tower-with-Shaft.htm

*  My Family Found Me - Reece's Rainbow Down Syndrome Adoption Grant Foundation

Accidental heart noise at birth, no longer present.. Landon enjoys interacting with the other children and is interested in ... He sleeps calm but sometimes he wakes up and wants to eat and after eating something small he falls to sleep again. ...
reecesrainbow.org/category/rescued?wpfpaction=add&postid=74010

List of film accidents: This is intended to be a list of notable accidents which occurred during the shooting of films and television, such as cast or crew fatalities or serious accidents which plagued production. It is not intended to be a list of every minor injury an actor or stuntman suffered during filming.List of poisonings: This is a list of poisonings in chronological order of victim. It also includes confirmed attempted and fictional poisonings.Opioid overdose: .0, -Occupational fatality: An occupational fatality is a death that occurs while a person is at work or performing work related tasks. Occupational fatalities are also commonly called “occupational deaths” or “work-related deaths/fatalities” and can occur in any industry or occupation.HypothermiaJohn Howie (businessman): John Howie (12 March 1833 – 20 September 1895) was a wealthy Victorian captain of industry and investor, the proprietor of the renowned J & R Howie Hurlford Fireclay Works. He would have been about 350th on a notional Rich List of Britain at the time, with a fortune equal to over £200 million today.Rectal foreign bodyPositional asphyxia: Positional asphyxia, also known as postural asphyxia, is a form of asphyxia which occurs when someone's position prevents the person from breathing adequately. Positional asphyxia may be a factor in a significant number of people who die suddenly during restraint by police, prison (corrections) officers or health care staff.Medical Reserve CorpsSverdlovskSharps containerTridecaneNational Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.List of nuclear and radiation accidents by death toll: There have been more than 20 nuclear and radiation accidents involving fatalities. These involved nuclear power plant accidents, nuclear submarine accidents, radiotherapy accidents and other mishaps.First Strike CoinsList of environmental disasters: This page is a list of environmental disasters. In this context it is an annotated list of specific events caused by human activity that results in a negative effect on the environment.Diffeomorphism: In mathematics, a diffeomorphism is an isomorphism of smooth manifolds. It is an invertible function that maps one differentiable manifold to another such that both the function and its inverse are smooth.Chicago Electrical Trauma Research Institute: The Chicago Electrical Trauma Research Institute(CETRI) |url=http://www.cetri.Skull fractureHousehold chemicals: Household chemicals are non-food chemicals that are commonly found and used in and around the average household. They are a type of consumer goods, designed particularly to assist cleaning, pest control and general hygiene purposes.Teenage suicide in the United States: Teenage suicide in the United States remains comparatively high in the 15 to 24 age group with 10,000 suicides in this age range in 2004, making it the third leading cause of death for those aged 15 to 24. By comparison, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death for all those age 10 and over, with 33,289 suicides for all US citizens in 2006.BCG disease outbreak in Finland in the 2000s: BCG disease is an adverse effect of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine. The vaccine contains living Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and in BCG disease, the bacterium causes a disease in persons vaccinated.Inlays and onlaysSudden Unexplained Death in Childhood: Sudden Unexplained Death In Childhood (SUDC) is the death of a child over the age of 12 months which remains unexplained after a thorough investigation and autopsy. There has not been enough research to identify risk factors, common characteristics, or prevention strategies for SUDC.Gray baby syndromeFive faults and eight antidotes: The five faults and eight antidotes are factors of samatha meditation identified in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. The five faults identify obstacles to meditation practice, and the eight antidotes are applied to overcome the five faults.Child-resistant packaging: Child-resistant packaging or CR packaging is special packaging used to reduce the risk of children ingesting dangerous items. This is often accomplished by the use of a special safety cap.Bispectral indexCerebral contusionEndothermic gas: Endothermic gas is a gas that inhibits or reverses oxidation on the surfaces it is in contact with. This gas is the product of incomplete combustion in a controlled environment.Fernando Montes de Oca Fencing Hall: The Fernando Montes de Oca Fencing Hall is an indoor sports venue located in the Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City area of Mexico City. It hosted the fencing competitions and the fencing part of the modern pentathlon competition of the 1968 Summer Olympics.Extravasation (intravenous): Extravasation is the accidental administration of intravenously (IV) infused medications into the extravascular space/tissue around infusion sites, either by leakage (e.g.Gross examinationBallistic traumaSydney Dental HospitalBiliary injury: Biliary injury (bile duct injury) is the traumatic damage of the bile ducts. It is most commonly an iatrogenic complication of cholecystectomy — surgical removal of gall bladder, but can also be caused by other operations or by major trauma.FioricetEdmund Bergler: Edmund Bergler (; ; 1899–1962) was an Austrian-born American psychoanalyst whose books covered such topics as childhood development, mid-life crises, loveless marriages, gambling, and self-defeating behaviors. He was the most important theorist of homosexuality in the 1950s.National Poison Prevention WeekStigmatic-eligibilic paraphilia: Stigmatic-eligibilic paraphilias are desires whose objects "become eligible" to be desired because of, rather than despite, a stigma which they bear. The manifold manifestations of these paraphilias cover the broadest range of physical, intimate and social circumstance.Spent caustic: Spent caustic is a waste industrial caustic solution that has become exhausted and is no longer useful (or spent). Spent caustics are made of sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide, water, and contaminants.Falx cerebri: The falx cerebri is also known as the cerebral falx, named from its sickle-like form. It is a large, crescent-shaped fold of meningeal layer of dura mater that descends vertically in the longitudinal fissure between the cerebral hemispheres.Peripheral venous catheterNational Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority: The National Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority (NOPSA) was the occupational health and safety (OHS) regulator for the Australian offshore petroleum industry between 2005 and 2011. The role of regulator has been transferred to NOPSEMA - the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority from the first of January 2012.TriphosgeneFatal Care: Survive in the U.S. Health System: Fatal Care: Survive in the U.S.List of poisonous plantsKilled or Seriously Injured: Killed or Seriously Injured (KSI) is a standard metric for safety policy, particularly in transportation and road safety.Retinal haemorrhageOccupational hygiene: Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.Corrosive substanceKurt DiembergerHomicide: Homicide occurs when one human being causes the death of another human being. Homicides can be divided into many overlapping types, including murder, manslaughter, justifiable homicide, killing in war, euthanasia, and execution, depending on the circumstances of the death.Penetrating head injuryMyiasisMasturbation cream: Masturbation cream or masturbation creme is a personal lubricant designed to optimize sensation during the act of male masturbation.Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia: Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia (CSE) is a regional anaesthetic technique, which combines the benefits of both spinal anaesthesia and epidural anaesthesia and analgesia. The spinal component gives a rapid onset of a predictable block.MerbrominUrine anion gap: The urine anion gap is calculated using measured ions found in the urine. It is used to aid in the differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis.Infectious Disease Research Institute: The Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) is a non-profit organization based in Seattle, in the United States, and which conducts global health research on infectious diseases.HydroxyzineHarry Spira: Harold R. "Harry" Spira, BVSc MRCVS MACVSc HDA was an Australian veterinarian, geneticist and dog fancier who was instrumental in the development of dog breeding programs which used artificial insemination and frozen semen.Incidentaloma: In medicine, an incidentaloma is a tumor ([found by coincidence (incidentally) without clinical symptom]s or suspicion. Like other types of [[incidental findings, it is found during the course of examination and imaging for other reasons.EosinophilicEndodontic files and reamers: Endodontic files and reamers are surgical instruments used by dentists when performing root canal treatment. These tools are particularly used to clean and shape the root canal, with the concept being to perform complete chemomechanical debridement of the root canal to the length of the apical foramen.Subdural hematomaISO 39001: The ISO 39001 "Road Traffic Safety Management" is an ISO standard for a management system (similar to ISO 9000) for road traffic safety. The implementation of the standard is supposed to put the organizations, that provide the system "road traffic", into the position to improve the traffic safety and to reduce by that the number of persons killed or severely injured in road traffic.Crown (dentistry)Adopted child syndrome: Adopted child syndrome is a controversial term that has been used to explain behaviors in adopted children that are claimed to be related to their adoptive status. Specifically, these include problems in bonding, attachment disorders, lying, stealing, defiance of authority, and acts of violence.Global Health Security Initiative: The Global Health Security Initiative (GHSI) is an international partnership between countries in order to supplement and strengthen their preparedness to respond to threats of biological, chemical, radio-nuclear terrorism (CBRN) and pandemic influenza.Katalonan: A Katalonan (also spelled Catalonan; Catulunan in Pampango) is a priest or priestess of the old Tagalog animistic religion. These priestesses were either female, or male transvestites.BurnDeath of Ludwig van Beethoven: The death of Ludwig van Beethoven on 26 March 1827 followed a prolonged illness. It was witnessed by his sister-in-law and by his close friend Anselm Hüttenbrenner, who provided a vivid description of the event.List of nuclear weapons tests: Nuclear weapons testing according to the standard definition used in treaty language for the space/time requirement is:Erich Lexer: Erich Lexer (22 May 1867 – 4 December 1937) was a German surgeon born in Freiburg im Breisgau.Minimized extracorporeal circulation: Minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC) is a kind of cardiopulmonary bypass (heart-lung machine), a part of heart surgery. The introduction of extracorporeal circulation has facilitated open heart surgery.

(1/2115) Rider injury rates and emergency medical services at equestrian events.

BACKGROUND: Horse riding is a hazardous pastime, with a number of studies documenting high rates of injury and death among horse riders in general. This study focuses on the injury experience of cross country event riders, a high risk subset of horse riders. METHOD: Injury data were collected at a series of 35 equestrian events in South Australia from 1990 to 1998. RESULTS: Injury rates were found to be especially high among event riders, with frequent falls, injuries, and even deaths. The highest injury rates were among the riders competing at the highest levels. CONCLUSION: There is a need for skilled emergency medical services at equestrian events.  (+info)

(2/2115) Results of the Bosworth method for unstable fractures of the distal clavicle.

Eleven consecutive Neer's type II unstable fractures of the distal third of the clavicle were treated by open reduction and internal fixation, using a temporary Bosworth-type screw. In all cases, fracture healing occurred within 10 weeks. Shoulder function was restored to the pre-injury level. A Bosworth-type screw fixation is a relatively easy and safe technique of open reduction and internal fixation of type II fractures of the distal third of the clavicle.  (+info)

(3/2115) Fractures of the posteromedial process of the talus. A report of two cases.

The authors present two cases of fractures of posteromedial process of talus. One was treated conservatively and the other by excision. The appearances of the CT scans, the therapeutic options and the mechanisms of injury are discussed.  (+info)

(4/2115) EMG responses to free fall in elderly subjects and akinetic rigid patients.

OBJECTIVES: The EMG startle response to free fall was studied in young and old normal subjects, patients with absent vestibular function, and patients with akinetic-rigid syndromes. The aim was to detect any derangement in this early phase of the "landing response" in patient groups with a tendency to fall. In normal subjects the characteristics of a voluntary muscle contraction (tibialis anterior) was also compared when evoked by a non-startling sound and by the free fall startle. METHODS: Subjects lay supine on a couch which was unexpectedly released into free fall. Latencies of multiple surface EMG recordings to the onset of free fall, detected by a head mounted linear accelerometer, were measured. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: (1) EMG responses in younger normal subjects occurred at: sternomastoid 54 ms, abdominals 69 ms, quadriceps 78 ms, deltoid 80 ms, and tibialis anterior 85 ms. This pattern of muscle activation, which is not a simple rostrocaudal progression, may be temporally/spatially organised in the startle brainstem centres. (2) Voluntary tibialis EMG activation was earlier and stronger in response to a startling stimulus (fall) than in response to a non-startling stimulus (sound). This suggests that the startle response can be regarded as a reticular mechanism enhancing motor responsiveness. (3) Elderly subjects showed similar activation sequences but delayed by about 20 ms. This delay is more than can be accounted for by slowing of central and peripheral motor conduction, therefore suggesting age dependent delay in central processing. (4) Avestibular patients had normal latencies indicating that the free fall startle can be elicited by non-vestibular inputs. (5) Latencies in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were normal whereas responses were earlier in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and delayed or absent in patients with Steele-Richardson-Olszewski (SRO) syndrome. The findings in this patient group suggest: (1) lack of dopaminergic influence on the timing of the startle response, (2) concurrent cerebellar involvement in MSA may cause startle disinhibition, and (3) extensive reticular damage in SRO severely interferes with the response to free fall.  (+info)

(5/2115) Effects of physical and sporting activities on balance control in elderly people.

OBJECTIVE: Balance disorders increase with aging and raise the risk of accidental falls in the elderly. It has been suggested that the practice of physical and sporting activities (PSA) efficiently counteracts these age related disorders, reducing the risk of falling significantly. METHODS: This study, principally based on a period during which the subjects were engaged in PSA, included 65 healthy subjects, aged over 60, who were living at home. Three series of posturographic tests (static, dynamic with a single and fast upward tilt, and dynamic with slow sinusoidal oscillations) analysing the centre of foot pressure displacements or electromyographic responses were conducted to determine the effects of PSA practice on balance control. RESULTS: The major variables of postural control were best in subjects who had always practised PSA (AA group). Those who did not take part in PSA at all (II group) had the worst postural performances, whatever the test. Subjects having lately begun PSA practice (IA group) had good postural performances, close to those of the AA group, whereas the subjects who had stopped the practice of PSA at an early age (AI group) did not perform as well. Overall, the postural control in the group studied decreased in the order AA > IA > AI > II. CONCLUSIONS: The period during which PSA are practised seems to be of major importance, having a positive bearing on postural control. It seems that recent periods of practice have greater beneficial effects on the subject's postural stability than PSA practice only at an early age. These data are compatible with the fact that PSA are extremely useful for elderly people even if it has not been a lifelong habit.  (+info)

(6/2115) Fracture epidemiology and control in a developmental center.

During 3.5 years, 182 fractures occurred among 994 residents of a developmental center. The fracture rate was 5.2 per 100 person-years (1.7 times greater than the rate in the US population). Fracture rate was significantly greater in residents with: epilepsy, older age, male gender, white race, independent ambulation, osteoporosis, and residence in intermediate care (versus skilled nursing) units; it was not affected by severity of mental retardation. Hand and foot bones were fractured in 58% of cases. Femur fracture occurred in 13 cases (7%). Fracture was caused by a fall in 41 cases (23%); its cause was indeterminable in 105 cases (58%). Fractures, occurring without significant injury, may be an important cause of preventable disability in this population. Control measures are suggested.  (+info)

(7/2115) The prognosis of falls in elderly people living at home.

BACKGROUND: there are few longitudinal studies of the prognosis of falling at home. OBJECTIVE: to determine outcomes in older people who fall once and more than once. DESIGN: longitudinal prospective cohort study. SETTING: primary care in the UK. SUBJECTS: 1815 subjects over 75 who had a standardized and validated health check. METHOD: annual interviews over 4 years. Practice records were used to establish death and admission to institutions. RESULTS: risk of death was increased at 1 year [odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-4.7] and 3 years (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0) for recurrent fallers but not single fallers (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6 at 1 year; OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.7-1.4 at 3 years). Risk of admission to long-term care over 1 year was markedly increased both for single fallers (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.3) and recurrent fallers (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.7-12). Functional decline was not related to faller status, the latter being very variable from one year to the next. CONCLUSIONS: the stronger relationship between falling and admission to long-term care rather than mortality supports the hypothesis that the perceived risks for those who fall only once are exaggerated.  (+info)

(8/2115) Carotid sinus hypersensitivity--a modifiable risk factor for fractured neck of femur.

BACKGROUND: the potential impact on morbidity, mortality and health care economics makes it important to identify patients at risk of fracture, in particular fractured neck of femur (FNOF). Older patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH) are more likely to have unexplained falls and to experience fractures, particularly FNOF. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of CSH in patients with FNOF. DESIGN: case-controlled prospective series. METHODS: consecutive cases were admissions over 65 years with FNOF. Controls were consecutive patients admitted for elective hip surgery, frail elderly people admitted to hospital medical wards and day-hospital patients. All patients had a clinical assessment of cognitive function, physical abilities and history of previous syncope, falls and dizziness, in addition to repeated carotid sinus massage with continuous heart rate and phasic blood pressure measurement. RESULTS: heart rate slowing and fall in systolic blood pressure was greater for patients with FNOF than those admitted for elective hip surgery (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). CSH was present in 36% of the FNOF group, none of the elective surgery group, 13% of the acutely ill controls and 17% of the outpatients. It was more likely to be present in FNOF patients with a previous history of unexplained falls or an unexplained fall causing the index fracture. The heart rate and systolic blood pressure responses to carotid sinus stimulation were reproducible. CONCLUSION: older patients with an acute neck of femur fracture who do not give a clear history of an accidental fall or who have had previously unexplained falls are likely to have CSH. CSH may be a modifiable risk factor for older patients at risk of hip fracture.  (+info)



stairs


  • But it also includes falls from stairs and balconies, or over railings. (err.ee)
  • A Mira Mesa woman's death, first reported as a fall down the stairs, has led to her husband's arrest. (nbcsandiego.com)
  • David Ditto called police saying his wife was hurt after a fall down the stairs at the couple's home in the 7700 block of Canyon Point Lane. (nbcsandiego.com)

injury


  • The accidental death of Hardo Aasmäe, the former mayor of Tallinn, who fell down a staircase on Monday in the building in which the encyclopedia he edited has its offices, illustrated a larger societal problem in Estonia - the frequency of which falls cause injury and death compared to other non-natural causes. (err.ee)
  • Although most accidental falls don't end fatally, as in Aasmäe's case, they are still the most frequent injury suffered by Estonians requiring medical attention, and are still the third-leading cause of premature death in the country, causing 107 fatalities in 2013. (err.ee)
  • Falls also account for the highest plurality of the burden of costs due to injury for Estonia's Health Insurance Fund, accounting for around half of the 30 million euros in expenditures the fund made in 2013. (err.ee)
  • Jesse, who is also head of Estonia's Injury Prevention Task Force, said her group will be giving a report to the government next week, and one of the highlighted items will be to address the frequency of accidents caused by falls. (err.ee)

death


  • Overall, accidental poisoning, by alcohol or other sources, was the leading cause of death in Estonia in 2013, with 219 deaths. (err.ee)
  • Therefore, the manner of his death is accidental. (eonline.com)

injuries


  • The injuries could have been fatal from the 20-foot fall. (blabbermouth.net)
  • The 28-year-old Sons of Anarchy actor died of traumatic injuries sustained in what can only be ruled an accidental fall due to lack of evidence that he jumped or was pushed, according to the official autopsy report released today and obtained by E! (eonline.com)

Years Ago


  • Roger Woodward, who survived going over Niagara Falls 50 years ago when he was 7, at a park in Huntsville, Ala. (deseretnews.com)
  • NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. - Fifty years ago, Roger Woodward earned bragging rights as one of the few people to survive a plunge over Niagara Falls. (deseretnews.com)

medical


  • Decedent died of a fall," wrote L.A. County Senior Deputy Medical Examiner James K. Ribe. (eonline.com)
  • An inmate under medical watch recently died following an accidental fall while incarcerated at the Bossier Parish Maximum Security Facility. (bossierpress.com)

story


  • Early Saturday morning, Mike [ Hamilton , drums] and Jacoby [ Kingston , bass/vocals] were involved in an accidental fall from a second story balcony. (blabbermouth.net)

News


  • Maris Jesse, the director of the National Institute of Health Development, told ERR News that falls are generally categorized by slipping on the same surface you are walking on. (err.ee)

system


  • Always use a fall-arrest system (FAS) that is manufactured to industry standards and includes a full-body harness. (bowhunter-ed.com)