Community and school-based health education for dengue control in rural Cambodia: a process evaluation. (1/15)

Dengue fever continues to be a major public health problem in Cambodia, with significant impact on children. Health education is a major means for prevention and control of the National Dengue Control Program (NDCP), and is delivered to communities and in schools. Drawing on data collected in 2003-2004 as part of an ethnographic study conducted in eastern Cambodia, we explore the approaches used in health education and their effectiveness to control dengue. Community health education is provided through health centre outreach activities and campaigns of the NDCP, but is not systematically evaluated, is under-funded and delivered irregularly; school-based education is restricted in terms of time and lacks follow-up in terms of practical activities for prevention and control. As a result, adherence is partial. We suggest the need for sustained routine education for dengue prevention and control, and the need for approaches to ensure the translation of knowledge into practice.  (+info)

The impact of the extended parallel process model on stroke awareness: pilot results from a novel study. (2/15)

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What impact do posters have on academic knowledge transfer? A pilot survey on author attitudes and experiences. (3/15)

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Inter-institutional development of a poster-based cancer biology learning tool. (4/15)

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Anti-alcohol posters in Poland, 1945-1989: diverse meanings, uncertain effects. (5/15)

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Tips for better visual elements in posters and podium presentations. (6/15)

CONTEXT: The ability to effectively communicate through posters and podium presentations using appropriate visual content and style is essential for health care educators. OBJECTIVES: To offer suggestions for more effective visual elements of posters and podium presentations. METHODS: We present the experiences of our multidisciplinary publishing group, whose combined experiences and collaboration have provided us with an understanding of what works and how to achieve success when working on presentations and posters. Many others would offer similar advice, as these guidelines are consistent with effective presentation. FINDINGS/SUGGESTIONS: Certain visual elements should be attended to in any visual presentation: consistency, alignment, contrast and repetition. Presentations should be consistent in font size and type, line spacing, alignment of graphics and text, and size of graphics. All elements should be aligned with at least one other element. Contrasting light background with dark text (and vice versa) helps an audience read the text more easily. Standardized formatting lets viewers know when they are looking at similar things (tables, headings, etc.). Using a minimal number of colors (four at most) helps the audience more easily read text. For podium presentations, have one slide for each minute allotted for speaking. The speaker is also a visual element; one should not allow the audience's view of either the presentation or presenter to be blocked. Making eye contact with the audience also keeps them visually engaged. CONCLUSIONS: Health care educators often share information through posters and podium presentations. These tips should help the visual elements of presentations be more effective.  (+info)

Writing abstracts and developing posters for national meetings. (7/15)

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Differences between ADEA Annual Session poster abstracts and their corresponding full published articles. (8/15)

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between abstracts of posters presented at the 79(th) (2002) and 80(th) (2003) Annual Session & Exhibition of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and the published full-length articles resulting from the same studies. The abstracts for poster presentation sessions were downloaded, and basic characteristics of the abstracts and their authors were determined. A PubMed search was then performed to identify the publication of full-length articles based on those abstracts in a peer-reviewed journal. The differences between the abstract and the article were examined and categorized as major and minor differences. Differences identified included authorship, title, materials and methods, results, conclusions, and funding. Data were analyzed with both descriptive and analytic statistics. Overall, 89 percent of the abstracts had at least one variation from its corresponding article, and 65 percent and 76 percent of the abstracts had at least one major and minor variation, respectively, from its corresponding article. The most prevalent major variation was in study results, and the most prevalent minor variation was change in the number of authors. The discussion speculates on some possible reasons for these differences.  (+info)