• Maize
  • Reinert J., Yeoman M.M. (1982) Embryos of Maize (Zea mays) . (springer.com)
  • Like the Linnaeus variant of maize, any kernel may contain the yellow pigment zeaxanthin but at more varying concentrations. (wikipedia.org)
  • disputed - discuss] The traditional method of scientific naming is under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, and many of the most important cultigens, like maize (Zea mays) and banana (Musa acuminata), are so named. (wikipedia.org)
  • Young leaves, may experience chlorotic spotting which may eventually turn into a mosaic or mottle pattern ("Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus," n.d. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants affected later in their reproductive cycle may experience a slowing in ear development ("Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus," n.d.), while some plants may even become barren (Lipps & Mills, n.d. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants
  • This plant is introduced to some part of the PLANTS Floristic Area, though it may be native in other parts. (redorbit.com)
  • Plants which do not receive sufficient light may become pale in color, have fewer leaves and a "leggy" stretched-out appearance. (backyardgardener.com)
  • Apart from ancient cultigens like those mentioned above there may be occasional anthropogenic plants such as those that are the result of breeding, selection, and tissue grafting that are of no commercial value and have therefore not been given names according to the ICNCP. (wikipedia.org)
  • During infection after periods of cool night temperatures, about 60 °F, the plants may exhibit signs of the disease such as blotches or streaks of red. (wikipedia.org)
  • plant
  • The advantages of growing an embryo isolated from the rest of the seed, apart from the intrinsic interest in doing so, are to remove the immature plant from the endosperm and/or cotyledon (s) which may in particular cases prevent or modify the development of the plant. (springer.com)
  • If a shade loving plant is exposed to direct sun, it may wilt and/or cause leaves to be sunburned or otherwise damaged. (backyardgardener.com)
  • More commonly grown to a height of 2-3 meters (6-9 feet), Zea mays typically grows with a single, hollow main stem often called a stalk (or culm) which exhibits internodes that are cylindrical in the upper part, and alternately grooved on the lower part with a bud in the groove, and with one or occasionally two lateral branches in the leaf axils in the upper part of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • The flowers of Zea mays are monoecious, and are born in separate parts of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • barren
  • Should the weather during the latter part of the flowering period be unfavourable, the pollen will not be freely transported and deposited on the silk and the upper part of the ear may be partly or wholly barren, as the seeds are unable to-develop properly without fertilization. (chestofbooks.com)
  • leaf
  • The leaves of Zea mays alternate with broad, sword-shaped leaf blades, parallel veins with a prominent mid-rib, and small ligules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later in the growing season, the mosaic pattern may bleed into a general yellowing of the leaf and eventually areas of red streaks or blotches may appear if night time temperatures are consistently around 60 degrees Fahrenheit (Lipps & Mills, n.d. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • a domesticated group of which the origin may be unknown or indefinite, which has such characters as to separate it from known indigens, and which is probably not represented by any type specimen or exact description, having therefore no clear taxonomic beginning. (wikipedia.org)