• infection
  • The present invention provides methods for the production of Y. pestis protein antigens in plants, as well as methods for their use in the treatment and/or prevention of Y. pestis infection. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Infection may occur either through blood (in the case of Y. pestis) or in an alimentary fashion, occasionally via consumption of food products (especially vegetables, milk-derived products, and meat) contaminated with infected urine or feces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yersinia pestis circulates in animal reservoirs, particularly in rodents, in the natural foci of infection found on all continents except Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacillus
  • Prevention of bacterial pneumonia is by vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for adults and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for children), Haemophilus influenzae type B, meningococcus, Bordetella pertussis, Bacillus anthracis, and Yersinia pestis. (wikipedia.org)
  • strains
  • Frolov AF, Ruban NM, Vasyurenko ZP (1989) Fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides of the strains of different species of Yersinia. (springer.com)
  • virulence
  • Numerous OmpA-like membrane-spanning domains contribute to bacterial virulence by a variety of mechanisms such as binding to host cells or immune regulators such as Factor H. Notable examples include E. coli OmpA and Y. pestis Ail. (wikipedia.org)
  • fleas
  • Direct examination of infected fleas, aided by in vitro studies and experiments with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, have established that Y. pestis forms a biofilm in the insect. (nih.gov)
  • yet only Y. pestis forms biofilms in fleas. (nih.gov)
  • 2007). Early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis by unblocked Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) is as efficient as transmission by blocked fleas. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Similar to other Yersinia species, it tests negative for urease , lactose fermentation, and indole . (wikipedia.org)
  • Y. pestis, the first known species, was identified in 1894 by A.E.J. Yersin, a Swiss bacteriologist, and Kitasato Shibasabur┼Ź, a Japanese bacteriologist. (wikipedia.org)
  • compositions
  • Various studies of the fatty acid compositions of Yersinia were conducted subsequently, which demonstrated that there were great differences in both the components and proportions of the fatty acids in Yersinia pestis , mainly because of the lack of a standardized GC Microbial Identification System (MIS). (springer.com)
  • bacterial
  • TheYersinia pestis protein Ail binds to laminin and heparin, therefore allowing bacterial attachment to host cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies
  • studies and discussions of the possibility of amoeba-vectored (through the cyst form of the protozoan) Yersinia propagation and proliferation are now in progress. (wikipedia.org)