• strobus
  • Our study investigated how elevated temperature, and the combination of elevated temperature with elevated CO 2 , affected photosynthetic rates, leaf carbohydrates, freezing tolerance, and proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold hardening in Eastern white pine ( Pinus strobus ). (plantphysiol.org)
  • citation needed] The species is native to Europe and was introduced to North America in 1925, where it has become widespread in northern parts of the United States and Canada, where it is a major pest of white pine (Pinus strobus). (wikipedia.org)
  • coniferous
  • Pinus sylvestris is an evergreen coniferous tree growing up to 35 m in height and 1 m trunk diameter when mature, exceptionally over 45 metres (148 ft) tall and 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in) trunk diameter[citation needed] on very productive sites, the tallest on record being a more than 210-year-old tree growing in Estonia which stands at 46.6 m (152 ft 11 in). (wikipedia.org)
  • Betula
  • A 30-year series (1978-2007) of photographic records were analysed to determine changes in lake ice cover, local (low elevation) and montane (high elevation) snow cover and phenological stages of mountain birch ( Betula pubescens ssp. (springer.com)
  • needles
  • It was shown that FA composition of needle lipids changed during the entire growth period (from March to October) under the influence of environmental factors (temperature, solar radiation) affecting the biosynthesis of chloroplast membrane lipids in pine needles. (deepdyve.com)
  • The effects of low-level ozone exposure and suppression of natural mycorrhizas on the above-ground chemical quality of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and insect herbivore performance were studied in a two-year field experiment. (lu.se)
  • article{885ce74a-3160-4321-8f2b-10258aa5d21b, abstract = {The effects of low-level ozone exposure and suppression of natural mycorrhizas on the above-ground chemical quality of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and insect herbivore performance were studied in a two-year field experiment. (lu.se)
  • with two or three needles such as ponderosa pine, jack pine, and scots pine. (wikipedia.org)
  • pines
  • Pine-pine gall rust has characteristically brown to yellow-orange sori visible on large globular galls on pines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The life cycle of E. Harknessii is different from other pine stem rust in that it is autoecious, making large stands of pines ideal hosts for survival and reproduction of the fungus. (wikipedia.org)
  • scots pine
  • Low cloud glides over a forest of Scots pine and on up the Ryvoan Pass (November 22nd, 2011). (treeblog.co.uk)
  • Scots pine - probably my favourite photo of the trip. (treeblog.co.uk)
  • Orangey Scots pine bark caught in the late afternoon sun must be one of the nicest colours a tree can possibly be, don't you think? (treeblog.co.uk)
  • The strength loss of scots pine timber in an accelerated soil contact test. (metla.fi)
  • Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). In: Pagues, L.E. (ed. (metla.fi)
  • Variation in telomeric repeats of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Tree Genetics & Genomes 8: 267-275. (metla.fi)
  • Genetic differentiation in phenotypic traits among populations from heterogeneous environments is often observed in common-garden studies on forest trees, but data on adaptive variation in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Scotland are limited. (nerc.ac.uk)
  • An analysis of spatial variation in climate showed substantial differences in temperature and precipitation among the native Scots pine sites in Scotland. (nerc.ac.uk)
  • Nucleotide polymorphism at 12 nuclear loci was studied in Scots pine populations across an environmental gradient in Scotland, to evaluate the impacts of demographic history and selection on genetic diversity. (nerc.ac.uk)
  • The clonal variation in expected seed set has been compiled for 12 adult clonal seed orchards of Scots pine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seed set ability is not that drastic among clones as has been shown in other investigations which are probably less relevant for actual seed production of Scots pine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The correlations of cone set for Scots pine in a clonal archive was not well correlated with that of the same clones in seed orchards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Considerations for Swedish Scots pine suggested an economic lifetime of 30 years, which is less than the current lifetime. (wikipedia.org)
  • These results suggest that low-level ozone exposure and moderately declined mycorrhizal infection do not drastically affect either the above-ground chemical quality of Scots pine seedlings or performance of studied insect herbivores. (lu.se)
  • Native Scots Pine at Glenmuick, Scotland. (thefullwiki.org)
  • dwarf
  • Nevertheless, the daily average values of photosynthesis in the summer were similar for pine stands with bilberry, heather, and dwarf shrub-polytric as understory dominants. (deepdyve.com)
  • moth
  • Retinia resinella, the pine resin-gall moth, is a moth of the Tortricidae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exoteleia nepheos, the pine candle moth, is a moth of the Gelechiidae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eucosma gloriola, the eastern pine shoot borer, is a moth of the Tortricidae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • gall
  • Symptoms of pine-pine gall rust can be quite conspicuous and are useful for diagnostic identification. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signs of pine-pine gall rust include the pale yellow aecia (1-8mm in diameter) formed on galls in spring as well as the yellow-orange aeciospores contained within. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gall formation on trunks occurs over 2-4 years and is stimulated by the pathogen, which causes cells to grow and divide quickly at the site of initial infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Early identification of the disease is important for treatment, but is often hard to diagnose due to the inconspicuous initial symptoms and a lack of galls until the second year. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon
  • Recalculation of three-year data per entire crown yielded an annual average carbon assimilation of 1.54 g C/(g dry wt year). (deepdyve.com)
  • second year
  • The seed cones are red at pollination, then pale brown, globose and 4-8 mm (5⁄32-5⁄16 in) diameter in their first year, expanding to full size in their second year, pointed ovoid-conic, green, then grey-green to yellow-brown at maturity, 3-7.5 cm (1 1⁄8-3 in) long. (wikipedia.org)