• quantum theory
  • According to Quantum Theory, the subatomic particles that make up our universe are "little knots of energy" which pop into and out of existence. (solari.com)
  • But it wasn't until 1911, with an experiment by Max Planck, one of the founding fathers of quantum theory, that physicists understood that empty space was bursting with activity. (solari.com)
  • biologist
  • Chemistry PhD candidate Richard Li, computational nano/bio physicist Rosa Di Felice, quantum computing expert and Viterbi Professor of Engineering Daniel Lidar along with computational biologist Remo Rohs sought to apply machine learning to derive models from biological data to predict whether certain sequences of DNA represented strong or weak binding sites for binding of a particular set of transcription factors. (bctechnology.com)
  • Riehl had a hard time incorporating Born, Catsch, and Zimmer into his tasking on uranium production, as Born was a radiochemist, Catsch was a physician and radiation biologist, and Zimmer was a physicist and radiation biologist. (wikipedia.org)
  • nuclear
  • In mid-May 1945, the Russian nuclear physicists Georgy Flerov and Lev Artsimovich, in NKVD colonel's uniforms, compelled Zimmer to take them to the location of Riehl and his staff, who had evacuated their Auergesellschaft facilities and were west of Berlin, hoping to be in an area occupied by the American or British military forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • writes
  • If we do indeed possess an immaterial soul," physicist Victor Stenger writes in "God: The Failed Hypothesis," "then we should expect to find some evidence for it. (sfgate.com)
  • November 1-2 - Physicist Hans Ferdinand Mayer writes the Oslo Report on German weapons systems and passes it to the British Secret Intelligence Service. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientists
  • Lynne explores the work of various physicists, biochemists and other scientists who have stumbled across or purposefully searched for evidence in their respective fields that there is a force, which she calls the Field, which connects all beings and matter at a fundamental level. (solari.com)
  • 4 January American scientists report that a parasitic species of fly which compels honey bees to abandon their hives may be responsible for a global honey bee die-off that has decimated hives around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • What scientists at Jurassic World were doing - taking in the huge suspension of disbelief needed in a fictional setting - is what is known as de-extinction science, the idea that it is possible, in principle, to mix genes of extinct animals with those of a living relative to create a hybrid creature. (nhpr.org)
  • 1941
  • In 1941, during the Second World War, the British War Office called for a machine that weighed less than 23 lb (this was not achieved - the final weight was about 32 pounds) and would withstand being dropped by parachute. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation
  • Each IC facility needs one person, typically their radiation protection officer, radiation safety officer or medical physicist, to become their registered Facility Coordinator (FC). (iaea.org)
  • For each of these two topical areas a working group was set up with experts covering the respective area in a comprehensive way with respect to professions, type of radiation usages, geographical regions and other factors. (iaea.org)
  • A testimony to his conviction on the human safety of background low-level radiation was his offering rewards of up to $10,000 if people provided evidence that the inverse association he found between radon (county averages) and lung cancer (county averages) was due to some factor other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • decade
  • To meet the information storage and transmission requirements would require current computing capabilities to continue improve by a factor of 10 to 100 times per decade for 200 to 300 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • real
  • To date, much has been stated about the promise of quantum computing for myriad of applications but there have been few examples of a quantum advantage for real-world problems of practical interest. (bctechnology.com)
  • We chose to attack the problem using machine learning implemented on a D-Wave quantum annealer, in order to test our ability to translate complicated real-life biology problems to the setting of quantum machine learning, and to look for any advantages this approach might offer over more conventional, yet state-of-the-art classical machine learning techniques," Lidar added . (bctechnology.com)
  • Morality is an empirical fact no less real than any other experience in the world. (sfgate.com)
  • great
  • As the great physicist Richard Feynman once described… the energy in a single cubic meter of space is enough to boil all of the oceans of the world. (solari.com)
  • It is a great example that documents how factors associated with consciousness and our physical material world are connected in 'some' way . (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • In the last three decades, the use of image guided interventional procedures in cardiology has increased significantly, bringing great benefit to millions of patients around the world. (iaea.org)
  • medical
  • on his viewpoint, and its support found in his exhaustive studies] it could go further and say that no confounding factors (like socio-economic, geography, ethnicity, medical care access, and beyond 500 explored in the analysis) can explain the results. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Vidal's reasoning: The universe is so old there have to be far-advanced civilizations out there, billions of years more evolved than us. (mufon.com)
  • The idea is the same: It takes place at an isolated park (the by-now famous Isla Nublar), a mix of Disney World and SeaWorld, where people can have close contact with animals that have been extinct for more than 65 million years. (nhpr.org)
  • In August 2008, physicist Michio Kaku predicted in Discovery Channel Magazine that a teleportation device similar to those in Star Trek would be invented within 100 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • He studied painting in the years after the Second World War and began publishing poetry in the early 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • believe
  • He is basically saying that the immaterial 'substance' of consciousness is directly intertwined with what we perceive to be our physical material world in some sort of way, shape or form, that consciousness is required for matter to be, that it becomes after consciousness and he's not the only physicist to believe that. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • Causal determinists believe that there is nothing in the universe that is uncaused or self-caused. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • It's hard to have missed the explosive launching of Jurassic World , the new dinosaurs vs. humans bout in Steven Spielberg's venerable series. (nhpr.org)
  • make
  • So, the particles, which make up the photons and electrons, which in turn make up us and the entire universe, are kind of like those drops in the ocean. (solari.com)
  • power
  • This would give a further increase to power available by at least a factor of 10 billion. (mufon.com)
  • ROC Speak uses Azure Machine Learning to power the entire sensing platform. (wn.com)
  • However, this only applies to certain renewable technologies, mainly wind power and solar photovoltaics, and its significance depends on a range of factors which include the market penetration of the renewables concerned, the balance of plant and the wider connectivity of the system, as well as the demand side flexibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • By the late 1970s, newer machines had reached all of the conditions needed for practical fusion, although not at the same time and in a single reactor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other debates often concern the scope of determined systems, with some maintaining that the entire universe is a single determinate system and others identifying other more limited determinate systems (or multiverse). (wikipedia.org)
  • computer
  • The course is taught from a computer science perspective but should be accessible for physicists as well. (cwi.nl)
  • He came back to Los Alamos in 1948 to lead the group in the Theoretical Division that designed and built the MANIAC I computer in 1952 that was modeled on the IAS machine, and the MANIAC II in 1957. (wikipedia.org)
  • energy
  • If you add up all the particles of all varieties in the universe constantly popping in and out of being, you come up with a vast inexhaustible energy source. (solari.com)
  • In a machine, friction reduces the mechanical advantage, or the ratio of output to input: an automobile, for instance, uses one-quarter of its energy on reducing friction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook 2006 concludes that rising petroleum demand, if left unchecked, would accentuate vulnerability to a severe supply disruption and resulting sudden price increases, in consuming countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • expert
  • As the sound expert demonstrates some useful vocal exercises and shares tips on how to speak with empathy, he offers his vision for a sonorous world of listening and understanding. (wn.com)
  • theory
  • Physicists should rethink interference experiments to reveal whether or not general relativity follows classical theory, argue Chiara Marletto and Vlatko Vedral. (nature.com)
  • The theory holds that the universe is utterly rational because complete knowledge of any given situation assures that unerring knowledge of its future is also possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • These are all made up of the same atoms and molecules as trees and stones and are assembled by a process of evolution and natural selection into this intricate machine we call Homo sapiens. (sfgate.com)
  • physical
  • What it does have, however, is some sort of effect on our physical material world, and the extent of this effect and how far it goes is the next step for science. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • From matches to machines to molecular structures, friction is one of the most significant phenomena in the physical world. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Newton's first law of motion identifies inertia, a tendency of objects in the physical universe that is sometimes mistaken for friction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • think
  • Out of curiosity, I'd heard your name passed around and I think the Tubby Hayes factor was probably the reason I picked up Blues in Trinity first. (allaboutjazz.com)
  • less
  • It took the Soviets less than a year to detonate their own - and the race was on for bigger and more destructive killing machines. (nhpr.org)
  • News
  • The big news in Jurassic World comes not from cloning, but from genetically engineering a new creature. (nhpr.org)
  • laws
  • Weight, in turn, is an all-important factor in friction, as revealed in the three laws governing the friction between an object at rest and the surface on which it sits. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the case of nomological determinism, these conditions are considered events also, implying that the future is determined completely by preceding events-a combination of prior states of the universe and the laws of nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • close
  • He was taken prisoner by the Russians at the close of World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • What happened to Born after the Russians entered Berlin, at the close of World War II, is best understood in the context of his colleague Karl Zimmer at the KWIH, who also had a professional relationship with Nikolaus Riehl at the Auergesellschaft. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the close of World War II, Russia had special search teams operating in Austria and Germany, especially in Berlin, to identify and "requisition" equipment, materiel, intellectual property, and personnel useful to the Soviet atomic bomb project. (wikipedia.org)
  • Force
  • Lynne McTaggart's book The Field: The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe will help you see the world in a radically different light. (solari.com)
  • further
  • He chose the name MANIAC in the hope of stopping the rash of such acronyms for machine names, but may have, instead, only further stimulated such use. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • understanding how consciousness functions as a separate state of matter could help us come to a more thorough understanding of why we perceive the world the way we do. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • carry
  • The existence of the Zero Point Field implied that all matter in the universe was interconnected by waves, which are spread out through time and space and can carry on to infinity, tying one part of the universe to every other part. (solari.com)
  • approach
  • The performance was such an advance that the US abandoned the stellarator approach and converted their latest machine to a tokamak. (wikipedia.org)
  • concept
  • The concept of predeterminism is often argued by invoking causal determinism, implying that there is an unbroken chain of prior occurrences stretching back to the origin of the universe. (wikipedia.org)