• magnetic fields
  • However, it provides the best evidence yet that magnetic fields could be to blame for the disease. (stopumts.nl)
  • This study has much better information on exposure to magnetic fields than previous studies," says Pearce. (stopumts.nl)
  • An expert panel constructed a job exposure matrix of parental occupational exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion: The present study gives an indication of an association between selected disorders of the central nervous system and parental exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields. (bmj.com)
  • Sources of exposure to magnetic fields are numerous. (bmj.com)
  • An expert panel established a job exposure matrix by categorising job types into three levels of exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields. (bmj.com)
  • Is Newborn Melatonin Production Influenced by Magnetic Fields Produced by Incubators? (scirp.org)
  • Our approach started with applying electrical, magnetic and combined electrical and magnetic fields to cells using capacitors created by gluing plates on both surfaces of standard petri dishes, by constructing a large coil which would accommodate several petri dishes at a time and using a stepped down power source which was monitored by a sophisticated potentiometer. (rife.org)
  • So, we were using electrical and magnetic fields and both combined as sources of the energy exposures and living cells in cell culture all conducted in a big incubator. (rife.org)
  • According to a 1997 NCI press release, "A comprehensive study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute and the Children's Cancer Group found no evidence that magnetic fields in the house increase the risk for the most common form of childhood cancer. (emfnews.org)
  • Yet, the researchers acknowledge in no less than four places in the report that a statistically significant increase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia exists in children exposed to power line magnetic fields in excess of 3 milligauss (mG). (emfnews.org)
  • The induction of currents by oscillating magnetic fields is also the way in which solar storms disrupt the operation of electrical and electronic systems, causing damage to and even the explosion of power distribution transformers, blackouts (as occurred in 1989), and interference with electromagnetic signals (e.g. radio, TV, and telephone signals). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are publications which support the existence of complex biological and neurological effects of weaker non-thermal electromagnetic fields (see Bioelectromagnetics), including weak ELF magnetic fields and modulated RF and microwave fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effects
  • My initial interest was directed to the possible etiologic effects of emf fields. (rife.org)
  • Reproductive toxicity has been defined as the occurrence of adverse effects on the reproductive system that may result from exposure to environmental agents. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Developmental toxicity has been defined as the occurrence of adverse effects on the developing organism that may result from exposure prior to conception (either parent), during pprenatal development or postnatally to the time of sexual maturation. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Our discussion will not include the effects of postnatal exposures on development. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Although most of the effects of erethism are neurological, some physical problems arise as well, including a decrease in physical strength, "headaches, general pain, and tremors after exposure to metallic mercury" as well as irregular heartbeat. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Electromagnetic hypersensitivity symptoms occur only in sensitive individuals. (medindia.net)
  • Long-term, low-level exposure has been found to be associated with less pronounced symptoms of erethism, characterized by fatigue, irritability, loss of memory, vivid dreams, and depression (WHO, 1976). (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Workplace exposure to electromagnetic fields is linked to a higher risk of developing the most common form of motor neurone disease. (stopumts.nl)
  • Results: The total risk of birth defects was not associated with parental exposure. (bmj.com)
  • The other occupational factors assessed were only weakly associated with ALS risk in both men and women, and there was no clear evidence of a linear increase in risk according to the amount of cumulative exposure. (bmj.com)
  • News : Could Electromagnetic Fields Raise a Worker's ALS Risk? (hon.ch)
  • Other occupational factors were only weakly associated with ALS risk, and the researchers found no clear evidence that risk increased with higher levels of exposure. (hon.ch)
  • This study showed that electromagnetic fields could contribute to the 39 percent of risk attributable to as-yet-unknown environmental factors, he said. (hon.ch)
  • Occupational Hazards increase Breast Cancer risk ( A recent study revealed that women at d. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Applications of the PIMEX methods are various, focusing on work task analysis, training and risk communication, encouraging worker participation in and motivation for improvements in the workplace environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a widely used in the Netherlands for risk communication in the field of chemical exposure and it has been proven to be a very strong communication tool. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk was highest among subjects who were first employed in jobs with exposure before the age of 30 years and who were initially exposed at least 30 years prior to diagnosis. (myombody.com)
  • The myth of low risk ratios Critics who scoff at the idea that EMFs pose any health risk often point to studies in which exposure to EMFs could not be shown to cause a significant increase in cancer or other diseases in other words, EMFs seemed to have relatively low "risk ratios. (emfnews.org)
  • In his 1998 study of carcinogenic risk, "Carcinogenicity of Electromagnetic Fields," Milham illustrates this point by presenting the basic data of a 1956 study of smoking and lung cancer conducted by British physicians Richard Doll and Austin Bradford Hill. (emfnews.org)
  • Most cancer deaths caused by occupational risk factors occur in the developed world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Millions of workers run the risk of developing cancers such as lung cancer and mesothelioma from inhaling asbestos fibers and tobacco smoke, or leukemia from exposure to benzene at their workplaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary risk factor for erethism is long-term exposure to mercury vapors and gasses at high levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1985, an important association between risk of pathological emphysema and dust exposure was demonstrated, leading ultimately to recognition of this disease as a quantifiable risk of coal mining. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent analysis of the mortality of a subset of the miners originally studied has found an association between the risk of lung cancer and quartz exposure, and raised mortality from chronic lung disease and pneumoconiosis associated with increasing dust exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • currents
  • Exposure to electromagnetic fields , contact currents and induced currents through the limbs are treated separately. (emf-portal.org)
  • For this reason, in addition to the field strengths shown in the " Reference levels " table, a limit for currents through the limbs is defined in the BGV B11. (emf-portal.org)
  • É In 1976-77, we did a field study in the greater Denver area which suggested that, in fact, the homes of children who developed cancer were found unduly often near electric lines carrying high currents. (emfnews.org)
  • Energy from RF currents in conductors can radiate into space as electromagnetic waves (radio waves). (wikipedia.org)
  • waves
  • Also, the study authors acknowledged that since the research was not an experiment or a controlled trial, it does not establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship between electromagnetic waves and ALS, only a potential association. (hon.ch)
  • sources of exposure
  • Therefore, most studies focus on particular sources of exposure. (bmj.com)
  • Studies concerning specific sources of exposure relative to fetal development and pregnancy outcome have included the use of electric blankets, heated waterbeds, power lines, video display terminals, and other occupational sources. (bmj.com)
  • Detailed information on the use of occupational sources of exposure to EMF was collected as part of the INTERPHONE-INTEROCC study. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Conclusion: We have constructed a database with measurements and complementary information for the most common sources of exposure to EMF in the workplace, based on the responses to the INTERPHONE-INTEROCC study questionnaire. (oregonstate.edu)
  • occur
  • It is commonly characterized through behavioral changes such as irritability, low self-confidence, depression, apathy, shyness and timidity, and in some extreme cases with prolonged exposure to mercury vapors, delirium, personality changes and memory loss occur as a result. (wikipedia.org)
  • cumulative exposure
  • Furthermore, those in the top 30% of cumulative exposure (duration x intensity) were nearly twice as likely to develop the disease. (bmj.com)
  • People with the most cumulative exposure -- long periods combined with high intensity -- were nearly twice as likely to develop ALS. (hon.ch)
  • Vermeulen
  • This doesn't mean that folks should worry about exposure from using household appliances, Vermeulen said. (hon.ch)
  • electric
  • Strong electric fields (from high voltages applied to small or pointed conductors) often produce violet-colored corona discharges in air, as well as visible sparks. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • The team have stressed that this study is observational - it has not proven that the fields themselves cause ALS, just that this factor is linked to a person's likelihood of developing the disease. (stopumts.nl)
  • Methods: First, a comprehensive literature search was performed for published and unpublished documents containing exposure measurements for the EMF sources identified, a priori as well as from answers of study subjects. (oregonstate.edu)
  • It seems like every time we turn around there is another study citing the dangers of EMF exposure. (myombody.com)
  • In July 1982, research epidemiologist Sam Milham of the Washington State Department of Health published the results of a study indicating that workers with high EMF exposure such as electricians and power station operators had a greater-than-expected rate of leukemia. (emfnews.org)
  • sunlight
  • In this sense, the environment is not limited to the biophysical environment (e.g. exposure to factors such as air pollution or sunlight, encountered outdoors or indoors, at home or in the workplace), but also includes lifestyle, economic and behavioral factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • weak
  • Field modulation of cell surface chemical events indicates a major amplification of initial weak triggers associated with binding of hormones, antibodies and neurotransmitters to their specific binding sites. (myombody.com)
  • This response is enhanced by weak microwave fields, also acting at cell membranes. (myombody.com)
  • analysis
  • Lomen-Hoerth said it's too early to discount those other possible workplace exposures, since the analysis included so few people who died from ALS. (hon.ch)
  • Visualization of a good practice method In the Netherlands, the method is available to small and medium enterprises by the use of a half day workplace analysis or simple videos can be made. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • recognition of toxic agents, occupational diseases, and epidemiology. (una.edu)
  • The problem with mercury is that if humans are exposed to any of the forms of mercury, depending on the amount (dose), route (ingestion, skin contact, inhalation), duration (time) of exposure, it can be toxic. (wikipedia.org)