• programme
  • Patients with traumatic brain injury referred to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme: social and professional outcome for 508 Finnish patients 5 or more years after injury. (springer.com)
  • From 1975 to 2006, Standing worked at the International Labour Organization, latterly as director of the ILO's Socio-Economic Security Programme. (wikipedia.org)
  • The programme was responsible for a major report on socio-economic security worldwide and for creation of the Decent Work Index. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • 2016) says stress accounts for twelve percent of absenteeism in the workplace a year, which is a matter in which the company needs to stay in communication with the employee and work towards a solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • difficulties
  • The investigators hypothesize that decision making abnormalities are associated with a lower level of functioning and quality of life which could lead to social and interpersonal difficulties. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In addition to finding that girls tended to be more relationally aggressive than boys, she found evidence that relationally aggressive children were at risk for serious adjustment difficulties. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • These background papers cover the evaluation and adjustment processes, program interdependence, innovative approaches, target group selection, staffing and funding, and followup activities. (ed.gov)
  • Caudill reported his conclusions from this fieldwork in "Social Structure and Interaction Processes on a Psychiatric Ward," published in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry in 1952. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • The 69 participants were carefully selected for their ability to effect change in planning, developing and delivering vocational evaluation and work adjustment services, and included representatives of federal agencies, university educators and researchers, administrators and project directors, and leaders of national organizations. (ed.gov)
  • He wrote: Social anthropologists and other social scientists have been doing unusual things of late: participating with physicians in conferences in social medicine, teaching in medical schools, working with public health services in Peru, studying the social structure of hospitals, interviewing patients about to undergo plastic surgery, and doing psychotherapy with Plains Indians. (wikipedia.org)
  • In social work, a caseworker is a type of social worker who is employed by a government agency, non-profit organization, or other group to take on the cases of individuals and provide them with advocacy, information or other services. (wikipedia.org)
  • This post-2008 allocation of caseload management showed 90% efficiency in services and quality of practice by Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP), 2009. (wikipedia.org)
  • To increase handling caseloads over-hiring and expanding employee benefits is a practice used by social services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. F. Stuart Chapin, Smith College professor of Sociology was appointed the first Director, with Mary C. Jarrett, Chief of Social Services at Boston Psychopathic Hospital, and one of the founders of the emergency trainings held in 1918, appointed as the Associate Director. (wikipedia.org)
  • She was made Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Work at the University of Alaska, and worked for the Ontario Administration of Settlement & Integration Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • workers
  • As a result, employees can feel obliged to come to work while ill, and transmit communicable diseases to their co-workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • A great example of finding progress is forming an employee assistantship program (EAP), which is "a strategy to help workers deal with issues outside of work that employees bring to the workplace" (Quinley, 2003). (wikipedia.org)
  • It was then that the National Association of Black Social Workers condemned interracial adoption citing that adoptees were at risk for developing a poor racial identity due to lack of contact with role models of the same race. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social case work is the method employed by social workers to help individuals find solution to problems of social adjustment which they are unable to handle in a satisfactory way by their own efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • In its nearly century-long history, the school has educated approximately 7000 clinical social workers, including many leading social work intellectuals and trailblazers such as Bertha Capen Reynolds, Florence Hollis, and Lydia Rapoport, all of whom have been enshrined as eminent pioneers of the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smith College School for Social Work originated from an emergency course given in the Summer of 1918-1919 to prepare social workers for service in military hospitals treating soldiers with "shell shock" returning from the First World War. (wikipedia.org)
  • Civilian psychiatric hospitals were already using social workers to assist physicians in obtaining patients' social histories, considered a necessary ingredient for sound diagnosis, and to aid the patients in their "social adjustment" back to their communities after release from care. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the term "psychiatric social work" has long since been replaced in the social work lexicon with "clinical social work," the SCSSW continues its long tradition of providing intensive education for developing social workers specializing in the provision of mental health-focused practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • True to the interdisciplinary integration intended by its founders, the School's pedagogical mission remains focused on developing clinical social workers firmly grounded in a holistic model of practice, that synthesizes not only psychological and social theories but the incorporation of knowledge in biology and other life sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • sciences
  • LERA holds an annual membership and professional development meeting in January each year, as part of the Allied Social Sciences Association, and its National Policy Forum in alternate years in June in Washington, D.C. In 2011, LERA held its 63rd annual meeting in Denver, Colo. The 2011 National Policy Forum (June 6-7, 2011) is titled Competition, Jobs, and Equity in the Economic Recovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caudill noted that increased communication between specialists in medicine and the social sciences would help develop this field: a field which he cited as integral to the understanding and management of society's ills. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (FAcSS). (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • The 12 papers and three discussion group reports in this document are the result of a 3-day conference held in 1970 to study the role of vocational evaluation and work adjustment in manpower development programs. (ed.gov)
  • Caudill was able to conduct his first major fieldwork in medical anthropology after he was invited by Yale Medical School to study the social hierarchies within the Yale Psychiatric Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wright has received awards for her work including the "Distinguished Alumna Award" from the University of Iowa as well as the "Irvin Youngberg Award for Achievement in Applied Science" in 1984, and the "Kurt Lewin Award" from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social income and insecurity: a study in Gujarat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Service
  • Social and Rehabilitation Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. (ed.gov)
  • Wright left her teaching position to be with him and began working in the United States Employment Service. (wikipedia.org)
  • She worked at the United States Employment Service until 1946 when she left the workplace in order to raise her three children. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • Work-family balance in the U.S. differs significantly for families of different social class. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the economy was still assumed to run on an outdated breadwinner-homemaker model as evidence by the following things: women made significantly less income than men, they were still expected to do the majority of domestic work, and the nine-to-three o'clock school schedule of children still existed. (wikipedia.org)
  • rehabilitation
  • Beatrice Wright (born December 16, 1917) born Beatrice Ann Posner is an American psychologist known for her work in rehabilitation counseling. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • The test items revolve around typical work experiences, and for people to respond to them correctly they need to be able to relate to the situations presented in each item. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this reason, the WPI is appropriate for people in the working population. (wikipedia.org)
  • These different preferences and motivations influence the type of work people are successful at and what they enjoy doing. (wikipedia.org)
  • She reported that her review of the literature was what would fuel her passion for developing appropriate and culturally responsive ways of working with people with disabilities as the methodology at the time was biased against people with disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • This work with Barker would also lead to her husband Erik gaining a teaching position at the University of Kansas, and while he worked at the university she began to work with children who were deaf and their families which again would further her personal and academic interest in people with disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most residents of the area were poor and working-class people of British and Irish descent, along with smaller numbers of continental European Jewish and Balkan immigrants. (wikipedia.org)
  • In it, he blames globalisation for having plunged more and more people into the precariat, which he analyses as a new emerging social class. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standing describes the precariat as an agglomerate of several different social groups, notably immigrants, young educated people, and those who have fallen out of the old-style industrial working class. (wikipedia.org)
  • innovative
  • Crick's innovative research on relational aggression examined behaviors involving social exclusion or spreading malicious rumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • Practical Intelligence - Practical Intelligence involves characteristics such as insight, imagination, originality, being open to new ideas and maintaining a thoughtful approach to work. (wikipedia.org)
  • employee
  • Work forces often excuse absenteeism caused by medical reasons if the employee provides supporting documentation from their medical practitioner. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Factors attributed to absence from work can include stress, family related concerns, work culture, the employees ability to do the job, and supervisor-subordinate relationship. (wikipedia.org)
  • Work-family balance in the United States refers to the specific issues that arise when men and women in the United States attempt to balance their occupational lives with their family lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • This differs from work-life balance: while work-life balance may refer to the health and living issues that arise from work, work-family balance refers specifically to how work and families intersect and influence each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Work-family balance issues also differ by class, since middle class occupations provide more benefits and family support while low-wage jobs are less flexible with benefits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solutions for helping individuals manage work-family balance in the U.S. include legislation, workplace policies, and the marketization of care work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family structure (how the family is organized) historically has been influenced by social-level forces, many of them economic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to the Industrial Revolution, the two-parent farm family was the dominant family model, in which both parents working side by side on family farms The two-parent farm family ceased to be the dominant family model after the Industrial Revolution occurred. (wikipedia.org)
  • The economy relied upon the male breadwinner to earn the income to support his family financially, while women were relied upon to do the care work and other forms of domestic work to support her husband's earnings. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. (bmj.com)
  • As a result, low scores on the scales are not indicative of pathology, but rather, different preferences and motivations for working. (wikipedia.org)
  • indicative
  • This convention had its origins in the taxonomic work of researchers like Hirschfeld, Benjamin, and Freund and the fact that grouping trans women by sexual orientation reveals important qualitative and statistical differences between them, and that said differences have been maintained by various researchers as indicative or suggestive of multiple, distinct etiologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flexibility
  • Flexibility is a key factor when working a balanced business, and it's important for communication to flow effectively in the workplace. (wikipedia.org)
  • university
  • Caudill then went on to accept a faculty position with the Department of Social Relations at Harvard University from 1952-1960. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the success of Smith's initial emergency training course, several schools, including University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work, The New York School of Social Work (now Columbia), University of Chicago, and Johns Hopkins University instituted psychiatric social work training programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2006 he became professor of economic security at the University of Bath, leaving in 2013 to become professor of development studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.Since October 2015 he has worked in Professorial Research Associate, SOAS, University of London, UK. (wikipedia.org)
  • was made Head of the Department of Social Work, and later served as Chairman of the Department of Sociology at the University of Karachi. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • EAP can help those employees bring a more positive attitude to work, which can allude to the creation of a positive workplace environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • support
  • This finds empirical support in a negative association between absence and job satisfaction, in particular, the satisfaction with the work itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • upon
  • Forbes achieved his greatest success in 1919 with The Famous Mrs Fair a social comedy dealing with the adjustments a woman faces upon returning home from her work in the war effort in France during World War I. He scored other successes commercially and critically, but his interest and abilities in other aspects of theatre kept him from devoting all his time to writing. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • Founded in 1960, the Federation has since providing activities and facilities for the physical, social, educational, cultural development of the Hong Kong's youth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnostic category, "transsexualism", was for gender dysphoric individuals who demonstrated at least two years of continuous interest in transforming their physical and social gender status. (wikipedia.org)
  • workplace
  • The EPRN principal investigator is Thomas A. Kochan, George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management at MIT's Sloan School of Management and co-director of both the MIT Workplace Center and the Institute for Work and Employment Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • He continued to write plays, including several social comedies, and during the next twenty years he carved himself a niche as a highly acclaimed and popular playwright. (wikipedia.org)
  • towards
  • His recent work has concerned the emerging precariat class and the need to move towards unconditional basic income and deliberative democracy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standing calls on politicians to make ambitious social reforms towards ensuring financial security as a right. (wikipedia.org)