• syndrome
  • Whiplash due to The Referred Shoulder Impingement Syndrome was successfully treated using conventional treatments for shoulder impingement including anti inflammatory steroids and non steroids, and by avoiding the overhead position of shoulder impingement during the day and night time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The association between traumatic shaking, subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages was described in 1972 and referred to as whiplash shaken infant syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • sudden
  • Typical scenarios for rear-ends are a sudden deceleration by the first car (for example, to avoid someone crossing the street) so that the car behind does not have the time to brake and collides with the first. (wikipedia.org)
  • frequently
  • The "missing link" of whiplash may be towards or inside the shoulder and this would explain why neck therapy alone frequently does not give lasting relief. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • Often, the lognus colli muscle is weakened during whiplash and the sternocleidomastoid muscles become overworked as they compensate. (encyclopedia.com)
  • impact
  • When the neck bends backward during a whiplash impact, the joints can be compressed and then swell in response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A whiplash impact can also damage the anterior longitudinal ligament, which is a tough band of tissue that runs down the front of the vertebral column and holds the vertebral bones together. (encyclopedia.com)
  • full
  • However, if one of the vehicles is significantly more rigid (e.g. the rear of a truck) then the deceleration is more typically reflected by the full closing speed for the less rigid vehicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • In the United Kingdom, 430,000 people made an insurance claim for whiplash in 2007, accounting for 14% of every driver's premium. (wikipedia.org)